Daily Archives: December 11, 2013

The Doors – Roadhouse Blues, BEST version (live in N.Y. 1970)



I´ve made a fantasy cut for the ultimate roadhouse blues version :)) – lyrics:

Hi, how you doin’ there? Y-e-ah. Looking good. Everything is fucked up as usual… you know…

WHOOOOOAAAAAAOOOO – C´MON!
A-keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel
A-keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel
Come to the Roadhouse, gonna have a real, a good time.

Yeah, at the back of the Roadhouse they got some bungalows.
Ah, at the back of the Roadhouse they got some bungalows.
That’s for the people… like to go down slow.

Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll — all night long.

Ashen lady, Ashen lady,
Give up your vows,
Give up your vows.
Save our city, save our city
Right now!

Yeah, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer.
Well, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer.
Future’s uncertain and the end is always near.

Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll — all night long.

Today in Music History


Today in Music History.
Today in Music History

quotation: Francis Bacon


Nuptial love maketh mankind; friendly love perfecteth it; but wanton love corrupteth, and embaseth it.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

HELEN FRANKENTHALER (1928)


Helen Frankenthaler (1928)

A member of abstract expressionism‘s second generation, Frankenthaler was greatly influenced by Jackson Pollock. Inspired by his way of working on a canvas laid on the floor rather than mounted upright, Frankenthaler developed a technique for staining unprimed canvases with thinned pigments that she poured. Her work gave rise to the color-field movement of the late 50s. An appointee to the National Endowment for the Arts, she controversially opposed government grants to artists on what grounds? More… Discuss

 

CLAPHAM JUNCTION RAIL CRASH (1988)


 

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p>Near London on the morning of December 12, 1988, the driver of the 7:18 train from Basingstoke to Waterloo saw a signal in front of him abruptly change from green to red. He stopped his train and called the signalman, who told him to proceed. Before he could, however, the 6:14 from Poole rammed into his train’s rear at about 40 mph (64 km/h). Then, an empty train traveling in the opposite direction hit the wreckage. The crashes killed 35 and injured hundreds more. What caused the signal failure? More… Discuss

Near London on the morning of December 12, 1988, the driver of the 7:18 train from Basingstoke to Waterloo saw a signal in front of him abruptly change from green to red. He stopped his train and called the signalman, who told him to proceed. Before he could, however, the 6:14 from Poole rammed into his train’s rear at about 40 mph (64 km/h). Then, an empty train traveling in the opposite direction hit the wreckage. The crashes killed 35 and injured hundreds more. What caused the signal failure? More… Discuss

Mozart – Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201



The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774. It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.” The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.
There are four movements:
1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto: Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8
The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main theme. 
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Kempff – Brahms Rhapsody op.119 no.4 in E flat



Johannes Brahms, Rhapsody op.119 no.4 in E flat.

Wilhelm Kempff, piano.
Recorded in 1953.