Daily Archives: December 28, 2013

Article: HORSEPOWER INDEED


Horsepower Indeed

Early streetcars had horsepower, literally; they were drawn by horses or mules and called “horsecars.” By the late 1880s, there were 415 street railway companies in the US. However, horses could only work for about four hours a day and needed to be groomed, fed, and housed—and they left behind tremendous amounts of waste. These issues, coupled with the introduction of the overhead trolley system in 1887, spelled the end of the horsecar era. Where was the last functional horsecar in the US? More…Discuss

 

Dream A Little Dream Of Me – The Mamas & The Papas


Dream A Little Dream Of Me – The Mamas & The Papas

 

Sting – Shape of My Heart


 

Leonard Cohen The Partisan Austin City Limits


Recorded from PBS televised at Austin City Limits. Cohen’s 1988 performance was his first major appearance on American television.

 

 

Janis Joplin Live – Summertime


 

The Doors – Light My Fire



Light My Fire” is a song originally performed by The Doors which was recorded in August 1966 and released the first week of January 1967. It spent three weeks at #1 on the Billboard’s Hot 100, and one week on the Cashbox Top 100. It was re-released in 1968, peaking at #87. The song was largely written by Robby Krieger, and credited to the entire band. A live version was released in 1983 on their album Alive, She Cried, the first of several live or compilation albums released in subsequent decades to include the song.

“Light My Fire” also achieved modest success in Australia, where it peaked at #22 on the ARIA chart. The single originally reached #49 in the UK in 1967, but experienced belated success in that country in 1991 when a re-issue peaked at #7. The re-issue occurred on the back of revived interest in the band following Oliver Stone‘s film biopic “The Doors”. The single has been certified in 1967 a gold by the Recording Industry Association of America.

The song is #35 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.It was also included in the Songs of the Century list and was ranked number 7 in VH1′s 100 Greatest Songs of All Time list.

 

The Doors – Roadhouse Blues, BEST version (live in N.Y. 1970)



Hi, how you doin’ there? Y-e-ah. Looking good. Everything is fucked up as usual… you know…

WHOOOOOAAAAAAOOOO – C´MON!
A-keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel
A-keep your eyes on the road, your hands upon the wheel
Come to the Roadhouse, gonna have a real, a good time.

Yeah, at the back of the Roadhouse they got some bungalows.
Ah, at the back of the Roadhouse they got some bungalows.
That’s for the people… like to go down slow.

Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll — all night long.

Ashen lady, Ashen lady,
Give up your vows,
Give up your vows.
Save our city, save our city
Right now!

Yeah, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer.
Well, I woke up this morning, I got myself a beer.
Future’s uncertain and the end is always near.

Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll, baby, roll,
Let it roll — all night long.

 

The Beatles – A Hard Day’s Night (FULL ALBUM Stereo



A Hard Day’s Night is the third studio album by British rock group the Beatles, released on 10 July 1964, with side one containing songs from the soundtrack to their film A Hard Day’s Night. The American version of the album was released two weeks earlier, on 26 June 1964 by United Artists Records, with a different track listing. This is the first Beatles album to be recorded entirely on four-track tape, allowing for good stereo mixes.
While showcasing the development of the band’s songwriting talents, the album sticks to the basic rock and roll instrumentation and song format.[citation needed] The album contains some of their most famous songs, including the title track, with its distinct, instantly recognisable opening chord, and the previously released “Can’t Buy Me Love”; both were transatlantic number-one singles for the band.
The title of the album was the accidental creation of drummer Ringo Starr. According to Lennon in a 1980 interview with Playboy magazine: “I was going home in the car and Dick Lester [director of the movie] suggested the title, ‘Hard Day’s Night‘ from something Ringo had said. I had used it in ‘In His Own Write’, but it was an off-the-cuff remark by Ringo. You know, one of those malapropisms. A Ringo-ism, where he said it not to be funny … just said it. So Dick Lester said, ‘We are going to use that title.’”
In 2000, Q placed A Hard Day’s Night at number five in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever. In 2012, A Hard Day’s Night was voted 307th on Rolling Stone magazine‘s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time“.

1. A Hard Day’s Night
2. I Should Have Known Better
3. If I Fell
4. I’m Happy Just to Dance with You
5. And I Love Her
6. Tell Me Why
7. Can’t Buy Me Love
8. Any Time at All
9. I’ll Cry Instead
10. Things We Said Today
11. When I Get Home
12. You Can’t Do That
13. I’ll Be Back

 

LISZT La Campanella (S.141/3) – F.R.Duchable, 1974



Franz LISZT: Grandes études de Paganini, S.141, LW.A173 (1851)0:10 / No.3 – La Campanella. Allegretto in G-sharp minor (based on Paganini‘s 2nd Violin Concerto Op.7) [4'36'']
François-René DUCHABLE, piano
(rec: Paris, Salle Wagram, 1974)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 

The Grandes études de Paganini are a series of six études for the piano by Franz Liszt, revised in 1851 from an earlier version (published asÉtudes d’exécution transcendante d’après Paganini, S.140, in 1838). It is almost exclusively in the final version that these pieces are played today.

The pieces are all based on the compositions of Niccolò Paganini for violin, and are among the most technically demanding pieces in the piano literature (especially the original versions, before Liszt revised them, thinning the textures and removing some of the more outrageous technical difficulties). The pieces run the gamut of technical hurdles, and frequently require very large stretches by the performer of an eleventh (although all stretches greater than a tenth were removed from the revised versions).

 

Antonin Dvorak – Slavonic Dance No. 10 in E minor, Op. 72, No. 2


 

Claude Debussy Printemps, symphonic suite, conductor Francesco Mander



Francesco Mander conducts the symphonic suitePrintemps” by Claude Debussy. There are two movements: Très modéré – Modéré. This is a very early work by the composer. The orchestra is the National Symphony Orchestra

 

Gabriel Fauré, ballade for piano and orchestra, op. 19, Vasso Devetzi, Serge Baudo



No, this is not about Paris. I was floating in memories letting them carry me away. Doing some resetting too.

The first symphonic work by G. Fauré (1845-1924), the great master of french song, had its première in 1881. It was composed earlier when the composer broke his affair with Marianne Viardot (yes, Pauline´s daughter). When Liszt played the work in a friendly meeting with Fauré, arranged by Saint Saens in Weimar in 1877, he said ´´this is too difficult“, leaving the scholars ever since aghast. Some of them claim that Liszt had troubles of vision at that time.

Vasso Devetzi, greek pianist, Thessaloniki, September the 9th, 1927- Paris, November the 1st, 1987. An ambitious artist who defined herself in her cv through her friendships. So, friend of the composer Mikis Theodorakis and late friend of Maria Callas. In the 50´s she moved to Paris. She became friend with Marguerite Long, Henri Sauguet, René Dumesnil, Bernard Gavoty, Claude Rostand, Jacques Fevrier, Jean Roire. . . It is said that M. Long gave the score of this ballade to Devetzi. In the 1960′s and 1970′s she lived long periods in Soviet Union. Soprano Galina Vishnevskaja and cellist Mstislav Rostropovich were her good friends, and she often accompanied them. During her last years she was the president of the Maria Callas Foundation, which provided international scholarships for young singers. She organized the ceremony of spreading Callas´s ashes in the Aegean sea. Greek people, regretfully, rarely talk about Devetzi.

The ballade was recorded in 1963 in Salle Wagram in Paris. An excellent result in my opinion. Serge Baudo conducts Devetzi and the Orchestre de la Socièté des Concerts du Conservatoire de Paris, long and dull name for the ancestor of the Orchestre de Paris. Chant du Monde, France. 

 

FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.

 

B. Smetana: Prodaná nevěsta (předehra) / The Bartered Bride (Overture)



Záznam z Novoročního koncertu České filharmonie 1. 1. 2013 v pražském Rudolfinu. / Czech Philharmonic performing at the 2013 New Year Eve’s concert in Rudolfinum, Prague.

Česká filharmonie
Jiří Bělohlávek — dirigent / conductor

Zvuk: Český rozhlas / Audio: Czech Radio

 

Money Morning


Money Morning.

The Best Streaming Services


 

The Best Streaming Services.

Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America’s Eyeballs: Gina Keating: 9781591844785: Amazon.com: Books


And yet there is nothing new to watch on stream as they want you to pay both for dvd and stream: That’s th eNetflix way!Netflixed: The Epic Battle for America’s Eyeballs: Gina Keating: 9781591844785: Amazon.com: Books.

Fukushima radiation hits San Francisco


“Fukushima Mon Amour!”
Fukushima radiation hits San Francisco.

The Best Map Ever Made of America’s Racial Segregation | Wired Design | Wired.com


The Best Map Ever Made of America’s Racial Segregation | Wired Design | Wired.com.

Presidential Panel to NSA: Stop Undermining Encryption – ProPublica


 

Presidential Panel to NSA: Stop Undermining Encryption – ProPublica.

Judge on NSA Case Cites 9/11 Report, But It Doesn’t Actually Support His Ruling – ProPublica


 

Judge on NSA Case Cites 9/11 Report, But It Doesn’t Actually Support His Ruling – ProPublica.

Warehouse 13|Syfy


Warehouse 13|Syfy

Leonard Cohen London 2009 live – If it be your will



Leonard Cohen London 2009 live – If it be your will

Lyrics: 

If it be your will 
That I speak no more 
And my voice be still 
As it was before 
I will speak no more 
I shall abide until 
I am spoken for 
If it be your will 
If it be your will 
That a voice be true 
From this broken hill 
I will sing to you 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 

If it be your will 
If there is a choice 
Let the rivers fill 
Let the hills rejoice 
Let your mercy spill 
On all these burning hearts in hell 
If it be your will 
To make us well 

And draw us near 
And bind us tight 
All your children here 
In their rags of light 
In our rags of light 
All dressed to kill 
And end this night 
If it be your will 

If it be your will

 

Leonard Cohen – Anthem (with lyrics): “…The Holy Dove She will be caught again bought and sold and bought again the dove is never free…”


There is a crack in everything....that's how the light gets in! (Leonard Cohen_ANthem))

LEONARD COHEN LYRICS

“Anthem”

The birds they sang 
at the break of day 
Start again 
I heard them say 
Don’t dwell on what 
has passed away 
or what is yet to be. 
Ah the wars they will 
be fought again 
The holy dove 
She will be caught again 
bought and sold 
and bought again 
the dove is never free. Ring the bells that still can ring 
Forget your perfect offering 
There is a crack in everything 
That’s how the light gets in. We asked for signs 
the signs were sent: 
the birth betrayed 
the marriage spent 
Yeah the widowhood 
of every government – 
signs for all to see. I can’t run no more 
with that lawless crowd 
while the killers in high places 
say their prayers out loud. 
But they’ve summoned, they’ve summoned up 
a thundercloud 
and they’re going to hear from me. 

Ring the bells that still can ring … 

You can add up the parts 
but you won’t have the sum 
You can strike up the march, 
there is no drum 
Every heart, every heart 
to love will come 
but like a refugee. 

Ring the bells that still can ring 
Forget your perfect offering 
There is a crack, a crack in everything 
That’s how the light gets in. 

Ring the bells that still can ring 
Forget your perfect offering 
There is a crack, a crack in everything 
That’s how the light gets in. 
That’s how the light gets in. 
That’s how the light gets in.

 

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Don McLean- American Pie



A long, long time ago…
I can still remember
How that music used to make me smile.
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And, maybe, they’d be happy for a while.

But february made me shiver
With every paper I’d deliver.
Bad news on the doorstep;
I couldn’t take one more step.

I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride,
But something touched me deep inside
The day the music died.

So bye-bye, miss american pie.
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Did you write the book of love,
And do you have faith in God above,
If the Bible tells you so? 
Do you believe in rock ‘n roll,
Can music save your mortal soul,
And can you teach me how to dance real slow? 

Well, I know that you’re in love with him
`cause I saw you dancin’ in the gym.
You both kicked off your shoes.
Man, I dig those rhythm and blues.

I was a lonely teenage broncin’ buck
With a pink carnation and a pickup truck,
But I knew I was out of luck
The day the music died.

I started singin’,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Now for ten years we’ve been on our own
And moss grows fat on a rollin’ stone,
But that’s not how it used to be.
When the jester sang for the king and queen,
In a coat he borrowed from james dean
And a voice that came from you and me,

Oh, and while the king was looking down,
The jester stole his thorny crown.
The courtroom was adjourned;
No verdict was returned.
And while lennon read a book of marx,
The quartet practiced in the park,
And we sang dirges in the dark
The day the music died.

We were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Helter skelter in a summer swelter.
The birds flew off with a fallout shelter,
Eight miles high and falling fast.
It landed foul on the grass.
The players tried for a forward pass,
With the jester on the sidelines in a cast.

Now the half-time air was sweet perfume
While the sergeants played a marching tune.
We all got up to dance,
Oh, but we never got the chance!
`cause the players tried to take the field;
The marching band refused to yield.
Do you recall what was revealed
The day the music died? 

We started singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

Oh, and there we were all in one place,
A generation lost in space
With no time left to start again.
So come on: jack be nimble, jack be quick!
Jack flash sat on a candlestick
Cause fire is the devil’s only friend.

Oh, and as I watched him on the stage
My hands were clenched in fists of rage.
No angel born in hell
Could break that satan’s spell.
And as the flames climbed high into the night
To light the sacrificial rite,
I saw satan laughing with delight
The day the music died

He was singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
And singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

I met a girl who sang the blues
And I asked her for some happy news,
But she just smiled and turned away.
I went down to the sacred store
Where I’d heard the music years before,
But the man there said the music wouldn’t play.

And in the streets: the children screamed,
The lovers cried, and the poets dreamed.
But not a word was spoken;
The church bells all were broken.
And the three men I admire most:
The father, son, and the holy ghost,
They caught the last train for the coast
The day the music died.

And they were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.
“this’ll be the day that I die.”

They were singing,
“bye-bye, miss american pie.”
Drove my chevy to the levee,
But the levee was dry.
Them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye
Singin’, “this’ll be the day that I die.”

 

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM NEVER GOING BACK AGAIN


Written by Lindsey Buckingham

She broke down and let me in
Made me see where I’ve been

Been down one time
Been down two times
I’m never going back again

You don’t know what it means to win
Come down and see me again

Been down one time
Been down two times
I’m never going back again

 

The Eagles Hotel California [Remastered] 01 Hotel California


“Hotel California

On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair
Warm smell of colitas, rising up through the air
Up ahead in the distance, I saw a shimmering light
My head grew heavy and my sight grew dim
I had to stop for the night
There she stood in the doorway;
I heard the mission bell
And I was thinking to myself,
“This could be Heaven or this could be Hell
Then she lit up a candle and she showed me the way
There were voices down the corridor,
I thought I heard them sayWelcome to the Hotel California
Such a lovely place (Such a lovely place)
Such a lovely face
Plenty of room at the Hotel California
Any time of year (Any time of year)
You can find it here

Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends
She got a lot of pretty, pretty boys she calls friends
How they dance in the courtyard, sweet summer sweat.
Some dance to remember, some dance to forget

So I called up the Captain,
“Please bring me my wine”
He said, “We haven’t had that spirit here since nineteen sixty nine”
And still those voices are calling from far away,
Wake you up in the middle of the night
Just to hear them say…

Welcome to the Hotel California
Such a lovely place (Such a lovely place)
Such a lovely face
They livin’ it up at the Hotel California
What a nice surprise (what a nice surprise)
Bring your alibis

Mirrors on the ceiling,
The pink champagne on ice
And she said “We are all just prisoners here, of our own device”
And in the master’s chambers,
They gathered for the feast
They stab it with their steely knives,
But they just can’t kill the beast

Last thing I remember, I was
Running for the door
I had to find the passage back
To the place I was before
Relax, ” said the night man,
“We are programmed to receive.
You can check-out any time you like,
But you can never leave! “

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:  

“Hotel California” topped the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart for one week in May 1977 and peaked at number ten on the Adult Contemporary charts. Three months after its release, the single was certified Gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), representing one million copies shipped. The Eagles also won the 1977 Grammy Award for Record of the Year for “Hotel California” at the 20th Grammy Awards in 1978.[3]

 

In 2009, the song “Hotel California” was certified Platinum (Digital Sales Award) by the RIAA for sales of one million digital downloads.[4]

 

The lyrics weave a surrealistic tale in which a weary traveler checks into a luxury hotel. The hotel at first appears inviting and tempting, but it turns out to be a nightmarish place where “you can check out anytime you like, but you can never leave”. The song is an allegory about hedonism, self-destruction, and greed in the music industry of the late 1970s.[9] Don Henley called it “our interpretation of the high life in Los Angeles[10] and later reiterated: “It’s basically a song about the dark underbelly of the American dream and about excess in America, which is something we knew a lot about.”[11] In 2008,Don Felder described the origins of the lyrics:

 

Don Henley and Glenn wrote most of the words. All of us kind of drove into L.A. at night. Nobody was from California, and if you drive into L.A. at night… you can just see this glow on the horizon of lights, and the images that start running through your head of Hollywood and all the dreams that you have, and so it was kind of about that… what we started writing the song about. Coming into L.A…. and from that ‘Life in the Fast Lane’ came out of it, and ‘Wasted Time’ and a bunch of other songs.[12]

 

The term “colitas” in the first stanza means “little tails” in Spanish; in Mexican slang it refers to buds of the cannabis (marijuana) plant.[13]

 

In a 2009 interview, The Plain Dealer music critic John Soeder asked Don Henley this about the lyrics:

 

On “Hotel California,” you sing: “So I called up the captain / ‘Please bring me my wine’ / He said, ‘We haven’t had that spirit here since 1969.’” I realize I’m probably not the first to bring this to your attention, but wine isn’t a spirit. Wine is fermented; spirits are distilled. Do you regret that lyric?

 

Henley responded:

 

Thanks for the tutorial and, no, you’re not the first to bring this to my attention—and you’re not the first to completely misinterpret the lyric and miss the metaphor. Believe me, I’ve consumed enough alcoholic beverages in my time to know how they are made and what the proper nomenclature is. But that line in the song has little or nothing to do with alcoholic beverages. It’s a sociopolitical statement. My only regret would be having to explain it in detail to you, which would defeat the purpose of using literary devices in songwriting and lower the discussion to some silly and irrelevant argument about chemical processes.[14]

 

According to Glenn Frey‘s liner notes for The Very Best Of, the use of the word “steely” in the lyric, “They stab it with their steely knives, but they just can’t kill the beast,” was a playful nod to band Steely Dan, who had included the lyric “Turn up the Eagles, the neighbors are listening” in their song “Everything You Did“.[15]

 

 

Elvis Presley Last Song Performed On Stage 1977-06-26



Elvis Presley Last Song Performed On Stage 1977-06-26

 

Stairway to Heaven Led Zeppelin Lyrics



Stairway to Heaven Led Zeppelin Lyrics

“Stairway To Heaven”

There’s a lady who’s sure all that glitters is gold
And she’s buying a stairway to heaven.
When she gets there she knows, if the stores are all closed
With a word she can get what she came for.
Ooh, ooh, and she’s buying a stairway to heaven.

There’s a sign on the wall but she wants to be sure
‘Cause you know sometimes words have two meanings.
In a tree by the brook, there’s a songbird who sings,
Sometimes all of our thoughts are misgiven.

Ooh, it makes me wonder,
Ooh, it makes me wonder.

There’s a feeling I get when I look to the west,
And my spirit is crying for leaving.
In my thoughts I have seen rings of smoke through the trees,
And the voices of those who stand looking.

Ooh, it makes me wonder,
Ooh, it really makes me wonder.

And it’s whispered that soon, if we all call the tune,
Then the piper will lead us to reason.
And a new day will dawn for those who stand long,
And the forests will echo with laughter.

If there’s a bustle in your hedgerow, don’t be alarmed now,
It’s just a spring clean for the May queen.
Yes, there are two paths you can go by, but in the long run
There’s still time to change the road you’re on.
And it makes me wonder.

Your head is humming and it won’t go, in case you don’t know,
The piper’s calling you to join him,
Dear lady, can you hear the wind blow, and did you know
Your stairway lies on the whispering wind?

And as we wind on down the road
Our shadows taller than our soul.
There walks a lady we all know
Who shines white light and wants to show
How everything still turns to gold.
And if you listen very hard
The tune will come to you at last.
When all are one and one is all
To be a rock and not to roll.

And she’s buying a stairway to heaven.
===================================================

“Stairway to Heaven” is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin. It was composed by guitarist Jimmy Page and vocalist Robert Plant for the band’s fourth unnamed studio album, (see Led Zeppelin IV (1971)). The song was voted #3 in 2000 by VH1 on their list of the 100 Greatest Rock Songs.[1] It was the most requested song on FM radio stations in the United States in the 1970s, despite never having been released as a single there.[2] In November 2007, through download sales promoting Led Zeppelin’s Mothership release, “Stairway to Heaven” hit #37 on the UK Singles Chart.[3]

 

JOAN BAEZ ~ I Pity The Poor Immigrant ~


I Pity The Poor Immigrant Lyrics

“I Pity The Poor Immigrant” is track #7 on the album John Wesley Harding. It was written by Bob Dylan

I Pity The Poor Immigrant Submit Correct LyricS

I pity the poor immigrant
Who wishes he would’ve stayed home
Who uses all his power to do evil
But in the end is always left so alone

That man whom with his fingers cheats
And who lies with every breath
Who passionately hates his life
And likewise, fears his death

I pity the poor immigrant
Whose strength is spent in vain
Whose heaven is like Ironsides
Whose tears are like rain

Who eats but is not satisfied
Who hears but does not see
Who falls in love with wealth itself
And turns his back on me

I pity the poor immigrant
Who tramples through the mud
Who fills his mouth with laughing
And who builds his town with blood

Whose visions in the final end
Must shatter like the glass
I pity the poor immigrant
When his gladness comes to pass

Songwriters
Bob Dylan

Read more: Bob Dylan – I Pity The Poor Immigrant Lyrics | MetroLyrics