Category Archives: Arts, Virtual Museums tour.

1917_-_Regina_Maria_pe_timpul_vizitei_într-un_spital_în_anul_1917_historic Photos at Euzicasa


1917_-_Regina_Maria_pe_timpul_vizitei_într-un_spital_în_anul_1917

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1917_-_Regina_Maria_pe_timpul_vizitei_într-un_spital_în_anul_1917-Sepia

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October 29, 1875 in History Born:
Marie, queen consort of Ferdinand I of Romania, 1914-27

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Princess Marie of Edinburgh, more commonly known as Marie of Romania (Marie Alexandra Victoria; 29 October 1875 – 18 July 1938),[note 1] was the last Queen consort of Romania as the wife of King Ferdinand I.

Born into the British royal family, she was titled Princess Marie of Edinburgh at birth. Her parents were Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. Marie’s early years were spent in Kent, Malta and Coburg. After refusing a proposal from her cousin, the future King George V, she was chosen as the future wife of Crown Prince Ferdinand of Romania, the heir apparent of King Carol I, in 1892. Marie was Crown Princess between 1893 and 1914, and became immediately popular with the Romanian people.

Marie visiting a military hospital, 1917

 

Marie had controlled her weak-willed husband even before his ascension in 1914, prompting a Canadian newspaper to state that “few royal consorts have wielded greater influence than did Queen Marie during the reign of her husband”.[2]

After the outbreak of World War I, Marie urged Ferdinand to ally himself with the Triple Entente and declare war on Germany, which he eventually did in 1916. During the early stages of fighting, Bucharest was occupied by the Central Powers and Marie, Ferdinand and their five children took refuge in Moldavia. There, she and her three daughters acted as nurses in military hospitals, caring for soldiers who were wounded or afflicted by cholera. On 1 December 1918, the province of Transylvania, following Bessarabia and Bukovina, united with the Old Kingdom. Marie, now Queen consort of Greater Romania, attended the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, where she campaigned for international recognition of the enlarged Romania. In 1922, she and Ferdinand were crowned in a specially-built cathedral in the ancient city of Alba Iulia, in an elaborate ceremony which mirrored their status as queen and king of a united state.

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

<<< 1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

As queen, she was very popular, both in Romania and abroad. In 1926, Marie and two of her children undertook a diplomatic tour of the United States. They were received enthusiastically by the people and visited several cities before returning to Romania. There, Marie found that Ferdinand was gravely ill and he died a few months later. Now queen dowager, Marie refused to be part of the regency council which reigned over the country under the minority of her grandson, King Michael. In 1930, Marie’s eldest son Carol, who had waived his rights to succession, deposed his son and usurped the throne, becoming King Carol II. He removed Marie from the political scene and strived to crush her popularity. As a result, Marie moved away from Bucharest and spent the rest of her life either in the countryside, or at her home by the Black Sea. In 1937, she became ill with cirrhosis and died the following year.

Following Romania’s transition to a Socialist Republic, the monarchy was excoriated by communist officials. Several biographies of the royal family described Marie either as a drunkard or as a promiscuous woman, referring to her many alleged affairs and to orgies she had supposedly organised before and during the war. In the years preceding the Romanian Revolution of 1989, Marie’s popularity recovered and she was offered as a model of patriotism to the population. Marie is primarily remembered for her work as a nurse, but is also known for her extensive writing, including her critically acclaimed autobiography.

Queen Mary of Romania 2.jpg

Marie wearing her regalia. Photograph by George Grantham Bain.
Queen consort of Romania
Reign 10 October 1914 – 20 July 1927
Coronation 15 October 1922
Spouse Ferdinand I, King of Romania
Issue
Full name
Marie Alexandra Victoria
House House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (by birth)
House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (by marriage)
Father Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh
Mother Maria Alexandrovna of Russia
Born 29 October 1875
Eastwell Park, Kent, England
Died 18 July 1938 (aged 62)
Pelișor Castle, Sinaia, Romania
Burial 24 July 1938[1]
Curtea de Argeș Cathedral
Signature

Read more >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>HERE

this pressed For your “Ou sont les neiges d’antan…” Salvador Dali kisses the hand of Raquel Welch after finishing his famous portrait of her, 1965 — Classic Pics (@classicepics)


Saint of the Day for Saturday, October 25th, 2014: St. Daria


Ancient Theater of Epidaurus, 1956 photo by Dimitirs Harissiadis.The Benaki Museum Photografic Archive— volkan (@arzawa)


Howard Carter opening the sarcophagus of King Tutankhamun in 1924— Classic Pics (@classicepics)


Cave Paintings Redraw History of Human Art


Cave Paintings Redraw History of Human Art

Experts are rethinking the theory of the origins of human artistic activity after cave paintings on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi were dated to 40,000 years ago. Until now, it had been thought that cave art emerged in Western Europe about 40,000 years ago, but it would seem that it in fact emerged simultaneously in various regions of the globe. The paintings in question contain stencils of human hands and naturalistic depictions of animals. More… Discuss

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum


The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim is a modern art museum located in New York City. It is named for its benefactor, art collector Solomon Guggenheim. Founded in the 1930s, it is known for its remarkable circular building designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The structure resembles a white ribbon spiraling upward and outward in a smooth coil of white concrete. It has no separate floors but instead uses a spiral ramp, realizing Wright’s ideal of a continuous space. Why has Wright’s design been criticized? More… Discuss

Frank Lloyd Wright, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York City, 1942-1959

Art Talk: Artist Archives at the Amon Carter: A large archive of digitized photography!


Art Talk: Artist Archives at the Amon Carter

Persian Rugs


Persian Rugs

Carpet weaving is an integral part of Persian culture, dating back thousands of years. In the 6th century BCE, the court of Persian king Cyrus the Great was decked with magnificent carpets. Today, hand-woven rugs remain one of Iran‘s chief exports, and the rug industry employs some two million workers. Persian carpets typically have a tight, velvety pile, rich colors, and flowing or geometric designs. What is the difference between Anatolian rugs and Persian rugs? More… Discuss

Washington DC. National Academy of Sciences: Einstein Memorial, was financed by 5,000 contributors Photo — ✍ Bibliophilia


“He seems to be saying: well, it’s official: ALL IS RELATIVE!”

Story: Brandenburg Gate


Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate is the last surviving town gate of Berlin, Germany. When completed in 1791, the lavish gate greeted visitors to the boulevard that led directly to the Prussian palace. Architect Carl G. Langhans modeled the gate after the Propylea, the gateway to the Acropolis in Athens. On top was the “Quadriga of Victory,” a statue of a chariot drawn by four horses. Heavily damaged in World War II, the gate was restored in 1957. Why was it closed in 1961, and when did it reopen? More… Discuss

story: Windsor Castle


English: Photograph of Windsor castle showing ...

English: Photograph of Windsor castle showing visitors. Taken Summer 1989 by contributor. All rights waived. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Windsor Castle

Located in the county of Berkshire, west of London, Windsor Castle has been a principal official residence of British monarchs since the 11th century. The Queen herself is quite fond of Windsor and frequently weekends there. Windsor has the distinction of being the oldest and largest occupied castle in the world. The modern castle, which contains about 1,000 rooms and occupies 13 acres (5 hectares), consists of three “wards”—the upper, middle, and lower. What damaged more than 100 rooms in 1992? More… Discuss

official trailer of the film “I Build the Tower” the Watts Towers by Simon Rodia: A MUST SEE!


Sam (Simon Rodia) of the watts Towers

Simon Rodia, Architect and sole builder of the Rodia Towers (Watts Towers)

the Watts Towers Arts Center and tours
call (213) 847-4646 fax (323) 564 7030
add +1 when dialing from abroad

e-mail cadwattsctr@earthlink.net

Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre (National Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor:Leopold Stokowski): great compositions/performances


Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” arr: Stokowski: great compositions/performances


Mussorgsky “Pictures at an Exhibition” arr: Stokowski

What is: Ciociara? Is to Ciocharia what Malagueña is for Malaga


Ciociaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fresco representing the Campagne and Maritime Province, in Vatican Museums

Ciociara (woman from Ciociaria) by Enrique Simonet.

Ciociaria (Italian pronunciation: [tʃotʃaˈɾiːa]) is the name of a traditional region of Central Italy without a defined border nor historical identity.[1] The name was adopted by a fascist movement of Frosinone as an ethnical denomination for the province of Frosinone, when it was created in 1927.[2] In the Middle Ages, this region was referred to as Campagna. The local dialect, now known as ciociaro, was earlier referred to as campanino. In more recent times, the term Campagna Romana, or Roman Campagna, a favorite subject of countless painters from all over Europe, has referred to the adjoining region to the north of Ciociaria, but part of the Province of Rome.

The name appears to be derived from the ciocia (plural cioce), the traditional footwear still worn by a few sheep and cattle herders in the Central Apennines.

Filigree


Filigree

Filigree is an ornamental work of fine gold or silver wire, often wrought into an openwork design and joined with matching solder under the flame of a blowpipe. It was made in ancient Egypt, China, and India. Saxons, Britons, and especially the Celts in Ireland were skilled at devising intricate and ingenious designs in the Middle Ages. Today, it is employed in Mediterranean areas, as well as in Mexico, India, and Scandinavian countries. What is the origin of the word “filigree“? More… Discuss

GoogleArtProject: Access here and from the new euzicasa WIDGET – take a virtual museum tour today


Google Cultural Institute_ Virtual Art Museums tours
Click here to access and select a virtual museum tour

The Prado Museum Access Google Art Project from this post, or from the new widjet at euzicasa


The Prado Museum

The Museo del Prado is Spain’s national art museum. Founded in Madrid in 1818 by Ferdinand VII, it features one of the world’s finest collections of European art, much of which came from the royal holdings of the Habsburg and Bourbon monarchs in Spain. In 1872, the Prado acquired

The Prado Museum

many notable works formerly owned by Spanish convents and monasteries. It owns outstanding pieces by El Greco, Diego Velázquez, and Francisco de Goya. What is considered its most famous work on display? More… Discuss

Google Cultural Institute_ Virtual Art Museums tours

Click here to access and select a virtual museum tour

 

this day in the yesteryear: Edvard Munch’s The Scream is Stolen at Gunpoint (2004)


Edvard Munch’s The Scream is Stolen at Gunpoint (2004)

Edvard Munch completed four versions of his most famous work, The Scream, an expressionist depiction of modern humanity’s spiritual anguish. In 1994, the version belonging to Norway’s National Gallery was stolen, but it was soon recovered in a sting operation. A decade later, thieves stole the version belonging to the Munch Museum. Despite rumors that the painting had been burned, the Oslo government offered a hefty reward for information leading to its recovery. What was its fate? More… Discuss

Triumph of Death (El triunfo de la muerte) Psalter. Germany (S., Augsburg?), 1st half of the 16th century: Bibliophilia (@Libroantiguo) August 22, 2014


this day in the yesteryear: Jimi Hendrix Headlines Woodstock (1969) (with rare video)


Jimi Hendrix Headlines Woodstock (1969)

The Sistine Chapel (with virtual video tour)


The Sistine Chapel

The Sistine Chapel is located in the Palace of the Vatican, the official residence of the Pope in Vatican City. It was built between 1473 and 1481 and is known for its artwork—especially the ceiling paintings by Michelangelo. Attracted to ambitious sculptural projects—which he did not always complete—Michelangelo agreed to the project reluctantly. His confidence grew in time, and he devoted his last 30 years to The Last Judgment fresco in the chapel. For whom is the Sistine Chapel named? More… Discuss
FROM: 

vatican virtual The Sistine Chaple, vatican secrets, virtual tour,1st day


Get our android app

http://www.androidzoom.com/android_ap…
or visit romavita.com for a free mp3 and for iphone see our tour at
http://www.mytourguide.com
to use while in the chapel and learn how the Vatican City’s Sistine Chapel, contains a veiled meaning; theology.

Egyptian Mummification Dates Back 6,000 Years


Egyptian Mummification Dates Back 6,000 Years

Mummification is an indisputably ancient practice, but new evidence suggests it emerged even earlier than experts previously thought. Funerary textiles from Egypt’s oldest-known cemeteries contain remnants of embalming substances, proof that mummification was being practiced as early as 4300 BCE, more than 1,500 years earlier than previously believed. Furthermore, the composition of the embalming agents on these textiles differed little from the agents used thousands of years later at the height of ancient Egyptian civilization. More… Discuss

The Fabergé Eggs


The Fabergé Eggs

The Fabergé eggs were 50 jeweled “Easter eggs” created for the Russian tsars by famed jeweler Peter Carl Fabergé between 1885 and 1917. Tsar Alexander III commissioned the first egg as an Easter surprise for his wife, Maria Fedorovna. The tsarina was so delighted with the gift that Alexander established Fabergé as the Imperial Goldsmith and requested an egg each year thereafter, stipulating only that it contain a surprise. Nicholas II continued the tradition. Where are the eggs today? More… Discuss

Ottorino Respighi – Three Botticelli Pictures: grest compositions/performances


Ottorino Respighi – Three Botticelli Pictures

FROM: 

quotation: The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls. Pablo Picasso


this day in the yesteryear: The Statue of Liberty’s Cornerstone Is Laid (1884)


The Statue of Liberty’s Cornerstone Is Laid (1884)

The Statue of Liberty—officially “Liberty Enlightening the World”—is located on Liberty Island in New York Harbor. It was a gift to the US from France to commemorate France’s alliance with the colonies during the American Revolution. Though it is now an iconic landmark, many forget that “Lady Liberty” also served as a functioning lighthouse from 1886 to 1902. Designed by French sculptor F.A. Bartholdi, the statue depicts Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom. Who served as Bartholdi’s model? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: New London Bridge Opens (1831)


New London Bridge Opens (1831)

The London Bridge of nursery-rhyme fame was built around 1200. Damaged by many fires over the years, it was replaced with a new, five-arched, granite bridge in 1831. The New London Bridge spanned the city’s River Thames for over a century. In 1968, American entrepreneur Robert P. McCulloch purchased and reconstructed the bridge in Lake Havasu City, Arizona, where it has since become Arizona’s second biggest tourist attraction after the Grand Canyon. How much did McCulloch pay for the bridge? More… Discuss

Giotto


Giotto

Giotto di Bondone (1266/7 – January 8, 1337), known as Giotto (Italian: [ˈdʒɔtto]), was an Italian painter and

Uffizi Giotto.jpg

Statue representing Giotto, outside the Uffizi
Born Giotto di Bondone
1266/7
near Florence, Republic of Florence, in present-day Italian Republic
Died January 8, 1337 (aged about 70)
Florence, Republic of Florence, in present-day Italian Republic
Nationality Italian
Known for Painting, Fresco, Architecture
Notable work(s) Scrovegni Chapel frescoes, Campanile
Movement Late Gothic
Proto-Renaissance

architect from Florence in the late Middle Ages. He is generally considered the first in a line of great artists who contributed to the Italian Renaissance.Considered the father of European art, he turned from the formulaic, impersonal Byzantine style to a more natural representation of human expression and movement. Compared with the gracefulness of Byzantine forms, Giotto’s figures are monumental, even bulky, but imbued with a new compassion for the human being. His innovative style likely influenced Renaissance artists. His main works are cycles of frescoes inside churches in what Italian cities? More… Discuss

Isadora Duncan


Isadora Duncan

Duncan was a pioneer of modern dance. Though born in the US, she was never very popular there. It was in Europe where she achieved great acclaim. An innovator and liberator of expressive movement, Duncan rejected the conventions of classical ballet and gave lecture-demonstrations of what she called “the dance of the future.” Inspired by the drama of ancient Greece, she danced barefoot while wearing revealing Greek tunics and flowing scarves. How did her fondness for scarves lead to her death? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Marcel Duchamp (1887)


Marcel Duchamp (1887)

Duchamp was an innovative French-American artist who influenced the Dada, Surrealist, and Pop art movements. His irreverence for conventional aesthetic standards led him to exhibit commonplace objects as works of art that he called “ready-mades,” intended as a derisive gesture against the excessive importance attached to works of art. His most famous works include the controversial Cubist-Futurist painting Nude Descending a Staircase and Fountain, which features what object? More… Discuss

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2-framed) my art collection_FotoSketcher


along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2) my art collection

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2) my art collection

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2-framed) my art collection_FotoSketcher

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2-framed) my art collection_FotoSketcher

Ernst von Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 1 (1895) – iii.: make music part of your life series


Ernst von Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 1 (1895) – iii.

Adagio quasi andante
Danielle de Swert Hahn (pno), Vilmos Szabadi, Luke Wedge (vls), Szilvia Kovács (vla), Charlie Powers (vlc)
National Gallery of Art Washington D.C.
2009
http://www.szabadi.com
http://www.achordpictures.hu

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The native form of this personal name is Dohnányi Ernő. This article uses the Western name order.

Ernő Dohnányi

Ernő Dohnányi (Hungarian: [ˈɛrnøː ˈdohnaːɲi]; July 27, 1877 – February 9, 1960) was a Hungarian conductor, composer and pianist. He used a German form of his name, Ernst von Dohnányi, on most of his published compositions. The “von” implies nobility, and, according to the biography by his third wife, his family was ennobled in 1697 and given a “seal,” which she describes in some detail.[1]

“along the trail” by George-B (oil-emergence-2)_FotoSketcher (my art collection)


along the trail by George-B (oil-emergence-2)_FotoSketcher

along the trail by George-B (oil-emergence-2)_FotoSketcher

today’s birthday: Rembrandt van Rijn (1606)


 

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606)

Rembrandt is considered one of the greatest European painters. Early on, he displayed an interest in the “spotlight effects” of light and shadow that dominate his later paintings and began the studies of his own face and the more formal self-portraits that make up much of his painted and etched work. After moving to Amsterdam around 1631, he quickly became the city’s most fashionable portrait painter and a popular teacher. However, he went bankrupt in 1656. What had happened to his money? More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Aram Khachaturian: Spartacus – Ballet Suite No. 2


The monument of the composer Aram Khachaturian...

The monument of the composer Aram Khachaturian (1903 – 1978). http://www.armeniapedia.org/index.php?title=Aram_Khachaturian (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Aram Khachaturian: Spartacus – Ballet Suite No. 2

1. Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia
2. Entrance of Merchants, Dance of a Roman Courtesan, General Dance 8:52
3. Entrance of Spartacus, Quarrel, Harmodius’ Treachery 13:15
4. Dance of the Pirates 19:21

Scottish National Orchestra
Neeme Järvi – conductor

Gustave Dore: Engraving of Don Quixote and several other works (19th Century)


Gustave Dore engraving of Don Quixote19th Century

Gustave Dore engraving of Don Quixote19th Century

Gustave dore crusades miracles

Gustave dore crusades miracles (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gustave Dore Enigma

Gustave Dore Enigma (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Français : Gustave Doré licence : source : htt...

Français : Gustave Doré licence : source : http://www.antiquemapsandprints.com/gustave-dore.htm (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gustave Doré (French, 1832-1883), "Little...

Gustave Doré (French, 1832-1883), “Little Red Riding Hood” (Photo credit: sofi01)

Gustave Dore (1832-1883), "Les Fées (Scèn...

Gustave Dore (1832-1883), “Les Fées (Scène Tirée de Shakespeare)” (Photo credit: sofi01)

Gustave Dore Contes drolatiques cover

Gustave Dore Contes drolatiques cover (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The first ascent of the Matterhorn by Gustave Doré

The first ascent of the Matterhorn by Gustave Doré (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Gustave Dore Inferno23

Gustave Dore Inferno23 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Andromeda exposed to the sea-monster (1869) Gu...

Andromeda exposed to the sea-monster (1869) Gustave Doré. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jonah Cast Forth By The Whale, by Gustave Doré.

Jonah Cast Forth By The Whale, by Gustave Doré. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Over London–by Rail from London: A Pilgrimage ...

Over London–by Rail from London: A Pilgrimage (1872) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

today’s birthday: Marc Chagall (1887)


Marc Chagall (1887)

Chagall was a Belarusian artist often considered a forerunner of the surrealist movement. He began studying painting in 1907 and soon blended elements of cubism into his expressionistic style. His Jewish heritage served as a source of great inspiration to him, and images of Jewish life and folklore and biblical themes frequently feature in his art. He explored a variety of mediums, including painting, printmaking, etching, tapestry, mosaic, and stained glass. Where can his work be seen? More… Discuss

The MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas (watch youtube video)


The MGM Grand Hotel

One of the largest hotels on Earth, the MGM Grand opened in Las Vegas, Nevada, in 1993. It had a very different look then than it does today, originally boasting an extensive Wizard of Oz theme that has since been scrapped in favor of an Art Deco motif. The complex also included a theme park, which was meant to make the Vegas Strip more family friendly, but it performed poorly and was closed in 2000. Why did many Chinese patrons avoid the MGM Grand’s main entrance prior to its redesign? More… Discuss

MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas

130520_185756 foto_FotoSketcher “Bamboo Heart – Pencil Sketch” (my art collection)


 

130520_185756 foto_FotoSketcher "Bamboo Heart" (my art collection)
130520_185756 foto_FotoSketcher “Bamboo Heart” (my art collection) (Click  to full size)

Mario Kart in Real Life (3D Chalk Art)


Mario Kart in Real Life (3D Chalk Art)

Published on Sep 3, 2013

This week Chris takes his chalk art into the streets with a live action rendering of Yoshi from Mario Kart.

http://www.ChrisCarlsonArt.com

Photographer: Mike Larremore (http://www.mikelarremore.com)

Get your Awe Me or Man At Arms Swag: http://aweme.spreadshirt.com

Check out the other chalk art episodes here:

Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robots 3D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S5WLAX…

Donkey Kong 3D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71A6Rk…

Star Trek Bridge x Space Invaders 3D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuQHYZ…

Iron Man 3D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFxqva…

Minecraft Diamond Sword:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CQ8TJ…

Jurassic Park 3D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnFj6U…

Tetris 3D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0_lw5…

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130519_215256_FotoSketcher_DREAMOID OF NO ROTATION(©ALWAYS – MY ART COLLECTION)


130519_215256_FotoSketcher_DREAMOID OF NO ROTATION (MY ART COLLECTION)

130519_215256_FotoSketcher_DREAMOID OF NO ROTATION (MY ART COLLECTION)

 

Băile Herculane: a town in Romanian Banat, in Caraş-Severin County (the Romans bilt the several therapeutic bathes around the healing mineral water springs!


Băile Herculane

Băile Herculane
en.wikipedia.org
  • Băile Herculane is a town in Romanian Banat, in Caraş-Severin County, situated in the valley of the Cerna River, between the Mehedinţi Mountains to the east and the Cerna Mountains to the west, elevation 168 meters. Its current population is approximately 6,000. The town administers one village, Pecinișca.
  • en.wikipedia.org
  • Local time: 2:56 PM 6/18/2014
  • Population: 6,051 (2002)
  • Area: 2.32 sq miles (6 km²)

Images of baile herculane

bing.com/images

article: The Baths of Bath


The Baths of Bath

Bath is a city in southwest England famous for its baths, which are fed by the only natural hot springs in the country and which some believe have curative properties. The Romans established the city as Aquae Sulis in the first century, building elaborate, lead-lined baths with heating and cooling systems. These were rediscovered in 1755, by which time Bath, as it had since become known, had revived as a spa and become a resort city for the wealthy. What was Jane Austen‘s connection to Bath? More… Discuss

The Forbidden City


The Forbidden City

At the heart of the ancient city of Beijing lies the Forbidden City, the vast palace complex that was occupied by Chinese emperors from 1421 to 1911, during the mid-Ming and Qing dynasties. Once closed to outsiders—hence its name—the Forbidden City now serves as a museum and is one of the world’s most popular tourist attractions. In 1987, it was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site. The opulent complex consists of nearly 1,000 buildings with some 9,000 rooms. How long did it take to build? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Frank Lloyd Wright (1867): Widely considered the greatest American architect


Frank Lloyd Wright (1867)

Widely considered the greatest American architect, Wright championed the use of open planning as well http://img.weburbanist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/movie-houses-north-by-northwest-vandamm.jpgas “organic architecture,” a design philosophy that promotes harmony between building and environment. His masterpieces include New York City’s iconic Guggenheim Museum and “Fallingwater,” a breathtaking Pennsylvania house that is cantilevered over a waterfall, with its balconies and terraces seemingly suspended in midair. How many people were murdered at Wright’s home, Taliesin, in 1914? More… Discuss

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The Mona Lisa


The Mona Lisa

One of the most famous paintings in history, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa can be seen at the Louvre museum in Paris, where it is on permanent display. The work’s name was not chosen by the artist; rather, it was derived from a posthumously published biography of da Vinci, which identifies the subject as Lisa, wife of a wealthy Florentine businessman. Still, her identity remains the subject of debate, and theories regarding the owner of the enigmatic smile abound. What are some of them? More… Discuss

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