Category Archives: BOOKS

quotation: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, “One can know a man from his laugh…”


One can know a man from his laugh, and if you like a man’s laugh before you know anything of him, you may confidently say that he is a good man.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss

quotation: I see heaven’s glories shine and faith shines equal… Emily Bronte


I see heaven’s glories shine and faith shines equal…

Emily Bronte (1818-1848) Discuss

today’s birthday: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770)


Hegel

Hegel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770)

Hegel was an influential German philosopher who developed the Hegelian dialectic, according to which a thesis, such as “being,” inevitably generates its antithesis, “not-being.” The interaction of the two forms a synthesis, “becoming,” which, in turn, becomes a new thesis that generates an antithesis, and so on. He used the dialectic to explain everything from nature to history, interpreting the French Revolution as a thesis that generated its antithesis, known as what period in French history? More… Discuss

quotation: George Eliot (on the uplifting role of music)


I think I should have no other mortal wants, if I could always have plenty of music. It seems to infuse strength into my limbs and ideas into my brain. Life seems to go on without effort, when I am filled with music.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

today’s birthday: Julio Cortázar (1914) “French: a culture of inclusion”


 

Français : Plaque commémorative, 4 rue Martel,...

Français : Plaque commémorative, 4 rue Martel, Paris 10 e . « Ici vécut Julio Cortázar, 1914-1984, écrivain argentin naturalisé français, auteur de Marelle. » (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Julio Cortázar (1914)

Cortázar was an Argentinean novelist who gained recognition as one of the century’s major experimental writers. A permanent resident of France after 1951, his works reflect his interest in French Surrealism, psychoanalysis, photography, jazz, and revolutionary Latin American politics. His masterpiece, Rayuela—translated as Hopscotch—creates a world in which eroticism, humor, and play offer solace for life’s cruelty and despair. What is unique about the novel’s structure? More… Discuss

Democracy passes into despotism. Plato (427 BC-347 BC) Discuss


Democracy passes into despotism.
Plato (427 BC-347 BC) Discuss

quotation: It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage. Jane Austen


It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

quotation: O! beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on. William Shakespeare (1564-1616)


O! beware, my lord, of jealousy; It is the green-eyed monster which doth mock The meat it feeds on.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Triumph of Death (El triunfo de la muerte) Psalter. Germany (S., Augsburg?), 1st half of the 16th century: Bibliophilia (@Libroantiguo) August 22, 2014


quotation: I have found out that there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them. Mark Twain


I have found out that there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

quotation: O Henry “She plucked from my lapel the invisible strand of lint (the universal act of woman to proclaim ownership).”


She plucked from my lapel the invisible strand of lint (the universal act of woman to proclaim ownership).

O Henry (1862-1910) Discuss

today’s birthday: Alain Robbe-Grillet (1922) (with “Blow-up” movie scene video)



From:  ARTE ARTE

Alain Robbe-Grillet (1922)

Robbe-Grillet, a French novelist and filmmaker, is considered the originator of the nouveau roman, or “new novel.” This genre, also called the antinovel, dispenses with conventional notions of plot, character, style, theme, psychology, chronology, and message. In Robbe-Grillet’s The Erasers, for example, a detective searches for the killer in a murder that has not yet occurred, only to discover that he will be the murderer. The novel is based on what legend from ancient Greece? More… Discuss

this pressed at EUZICASA: from Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne – préhistoire


 

Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne – préhistoire.

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)


A la découverte de l'encyclopédie Larousse

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)

this Pressed: What the Democratic Party Does Well: Doing Itself In | Ralph Nader


Ralph Nader at Emory

Ralph Nader at Emory (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

(Consumer advocate, lawyer and author)

“My message to Democrats is: Dump your corporate consultants. Just campaign for the necessities of the people. And publicize those Republican votes crisply, widely and repeatedly.”

via What the Democratic Party Does Well: Doing Itself In | Ralph Nader.

Calendarul Ortodox (click to access)


Calendarul Ortodox: http://calendar-ortodox.eu/ (click to access)

Calendarul Ortodox: http://calendar-ortodox.eu/ (click to access)

quotation: James Fenimore Cooper


America owes most of its social prejudices to the exaggerated religious opinions of the different sects which were so instrumental in establishing the colonies.

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) Discuss

quotation: The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven. John Milton


The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.

John Milton (1608-1674) Discuss

today’s birthday: Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792)


Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792)

Shelley is considered one of the great English Romantic poets. He is known for his masterpiece lyrical drama Prometheus Unbound and his poems “To a Skylark” and “Ozymandias.” A rebellious youth, Shelley was expelled from Oxford for his part in authoring an atheist tract. He married Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, now famed as Mary Shelley, after his first wife drowned herself in 1816. Shelley himself drowned just six years later at age 29. Why do some think his death was not accidental? More… Discuss

quotation: Wisdom is a sacred communion. Victor Hugo (1802-1885)


Wisdom is a sacred communion.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

today’s birthday: James Baldwin (1924)


James Baldwin (1924)

Baldwin was a groundbreaking African-American author best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. He wrote about social taboos such as racism and homosexuality at a time when mainstream literature largely ignored them. He grew up in poverty in the New York City district of Harlem and became a preacher while in his teens. In 1947, he left the US to live in Europe, and upon his return in 1957, he joined the civil rights movement. What famous author taught Baldwin in his youth? More… Discuss

“The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story is a best-selling” (from Wikipedia)


The Hot Zone (cover).jpg
Author Richard Preston
Country South Africa, United States
Language English
Genre Non-fiction
Publisher Anchor
Publication date
1995
Media type Print (paperback and hardback) eBook and audiobook
Pages 420
ISBN 0-385-47956-5
OCLC 32052009
614.5/7 20
LC Class RC140.5 .P74 1995b


The Hot Zone: A Terrifying True Story is a best-selling[1] 1994 non-fiction thriller by Richard Preston about the origins and incidents involving viral hemorrhagic fevers, particularly ebolaviruses and marburgviruses. The basis of the book was Preston’s 1992 New Yorker article “Crisis in the Hot Zone“.[2]

The filoviruses Ebola virus (EBOV), Sudan virus (SUDV), Marburg virus (MARV), and Ravn virus (RAVV) are Biosafety Level 4 agents. Biosafety Level 4 agents are extremely dangerous to humans because they are very infectious, have a high case-fatality rate, and there are no known prophylactics, treatments, or cures. Along with describing the history of the diseases caused by these two Central African diseases, Ebola virus disease (EVD) and Marburg virus disease (MVD), Preston describes a 1989 incident in which a relative of Ebola virus named Reston virus (RESTV), was discovered at a primate quarantine facility in Reston, Virginia, less than fifteen miles (24 km) away from Washington, DC. The virus found at the facility was a mutated form of the original Ebola virus, and was initially mistaken for Simian Hemorrhagic Fever (SHV). The original Reston facility involved in the incident, located at 1946 Isaac Newton Square, was subsequently torn down sometime between 1995 and 1998.[3]

Synopsis

The book is in four sections:

  • “The Shadow of Mount Elgon” delves into the history of filoviruses, as well as speculation about the origins of AIDS. Preston accounts the story of “Charles Monet” (a pseudonym), who might have caught MARV from visiting Kitum Cave on Mount Elgon in Kenya. The author describes in great detail the progression of the disease, from the initial headache and backache, to the final stage in which Monet’s internal organs fail and he “bleeds out” (i.e., hemorrhages extensively) in a waiting room in a Nairobi hospital. This part also introduces a young promising physician who becomes infected with MARV while treating Monet. Nancy Jaax’s story is told. Viruses, and biosafety levels and procedures are described. The EVD outbreaks caused by EBOV and its cousin, Sudan virus (SUDV) are mentioned. Preston talks to the man who named Ebola virus.
  • “The Monkey House” chronicles the discovery of Reston virus among imported monkeys in Reston, Virginia, and the following actions taken by the U.S. Army and Centers for Disease Control.
  • “Smashdown” is more on the Reston epizootic, which involved a strain of the virus that does not affect humans but which easily spreads by air, and is very similar to its cousin the Ebola virus.
  • “Kitum Cave” tells of the author’s visiting the cave that is the suspected home of the natural host animal that Ebola lives inside of.

The book starts with “Charles Monet” visiting Kitum Cave during a camping trip to Mount Elgon in Central Africa. Not long after, he begins to suffer from a number of symptoms, including vomiting, diarrhea and red eye. He is soon taken to Nairobi Hospital for treatment, but his condition deteriorates further and he goes into a coma while in the waiting room. This particular filovirus is called Marburg virus.

Dr. Nancy Jaax had been promoted to work in the Level 4 Biosafety containment area at USAMRIID, and is assigned to research Ebola virus. While preparing food for her family at home, she cuts her right hand. Later, while working on a dead, EBOV-infected monkey, one of the gloves on the hand with the open wound tears, and she is almost exposed to contaminated blood, but does not get infected. Nurse Mayinga is also infected by a nun and elects to visit Nairobi Hospital for treatment, where she succumbs to the disease.

In Reston, Virginia, less than fifteen miles (24 km) away from Washington, DC, a company called Hazelton Research once operated a quarantine center for monkeys that were destined for laboratories. In October 1989, when an unusually high number of their monkeys began to die, their veterinarian decided to send some samples to Fort Detrick (USAMRIID) for study. Early during the testing process in biosafety level 3, when one of the flasks appeared to be contaminated with harmless pseudomonas bacterium, two USAMRIID scientists exposed themselves to the virus by wafting the flask. They later determine that, while the virus is terrifyingly lethal to monkeys, humans can be infected with it without any health effects at all. This virus is now known as Reston virus (RESTV).

Finally, the author himself goes into Africa to explore Kitum Cave. On the way, he discusses the role of AIDS in the present, as the highway they were on, sometimes called the “AIDS Highway,” or the “Kinshasa Highway” was where it first appeared. Equipped with a Hazmat suit, he enters the cave and finds a large number of animals, one of which might be the virus carrier. At the conclusion of the book, he travels to the quarantine facility in Reston. The building there was abandoned and deteriorating. He concludes the book by saying EBOV will be back.

Reception

In his blurb, horror writer Stephen King called the first chapter, “one of the most horrifying things I’ve read in my whole life.”[4] When asked whether any book “scared the pants off you” television writer Suzanne Collins answered, “The Hot Zone, by Richard Preston. I just read it a few weeks ago. Still recovering.”[5]

See also

CANNERY ROW (1982) – FORGOTTEN TREASURE


CANNERY ROW (1982) – FORGOTTEN TREASURE

Uploaded on May 5, 2010

CANNERY ROW (1982) DIRECTED BY DAVID S WARD, STARRING NICK NOLTE , DEBRA WINGER, AUDRA LINDLEY, FRANK MCRAE, M. EMMETT WALSH, AND JOHN HOUSTON AS THE NARRATOR. RAQUEL WELCH WAS FAMOUSLY FIRED AND WAS REPLACED BY WINGER PRIOR TO THE PRODUCTION OF THIS FILM. AUDRA LINDLEY (MRS. ROPER FROM “THREE’S COMPANY”) GIVES A STAND OUT PERFORMANCE IN THIS FORGOTTEN TREASURE!

People and places: Cannery Row



Edward Flanders Robb Ricketts (May 14, 1897 — May 11, 1948) commonly known as Ed Ricketts, was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher. He is best known for Between Pacific Tides (1939), a pioneering study of intertidal ecology, and for his influence on writer John Steinbeck, which resulted in their collaboration on the Sea of Cortez, later republished as The Log from the Sea of Cortez (1951).

Read more : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_Ricketts

Bust at Monterey site of Ricketts’ fatal 1948 car-train collision. People continually place flowers in his hand which holds a starfish. RIP “Doc”. I love You.

quotation: Plato


He who is of calm and happy nature will hardly feel the pressure of age, but to him who is of an opposite disposition youth and age are equally a burden.

Plato (427 BC-347 BC) Discuss

quotation : It is easier to get into the enemy’s toils than out again. Aesop


It is easier to get into the enemy’s toils than out again.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

today’s birthday: J.K. Rowling (1965)


J.K. Rowling (1965)

Joanne Kathleen Rowling is the author of the Harry Potter book series, which has been credited with sparking an interest in reading at a time when children were thought to be abandoning books. She parlayed the series into a global brand, including the popular movie adaptations, worth an estimated $15 billion. All seven volumes of the series have broken sales records, and the last four have been the fastest-selling books in history. Where was Rowling when she first conceived the story? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Daniel Defoe Placed in a Pillory (1703)


Daniel Defoe Placed in a Pillory (1703)

Although Defoe achieved literary immortality with the novel Robinson Crusoe and is called the father of modern journalism, he also produced eloquent, witty, often audacious tracts on public affairs during his prolific writing career. After Defoe’s publication of a pamphlet that ruthlessly satirized the High Church Tories, he was arrested and placed in a pillory. According to legend, what did Defoe’s pillory audience throw at him instead of the customary harmful and noxious objects? More… Discuss

Quotations 101: Henry Miller (tropic of capricorn, tropic of cancer)


“To walk in money through the night crowd, protected by money, lulled by money, dulled by money, the crowd itself a money, the breath money, no least single object anywhere that is not money, money, money everywhere and still not enough, and then no money or a little money or less money or more money, but money, always money, and if you have money or you don’t have money it is the money that counts and money makes money, but what makes money make money?”

“No man is great enough or wise enough for any of us to surrender our destiny to. The only way in which anyone can lead us is to restore to us the belief in our own guidance.”

“Take a good look at me. Now tell me, do you think I’m the sort of fellow who gives a fuck what happens once he’s dead? “

Read more about Henry Miller, here

quotation: Jane Austen


It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind; but when a beginning is made–when the felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt–it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

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quotation: Maya Angelou (1928-2014)


Embedded image permalink

quotation: A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud. Ralph Waldo Emerson


A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

Serge Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf. Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. (make music part of your life series)


http://www.cbcmusic.ca
The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra‘s music director Bramwell Tovey does double duty as conductor and narrator in this delightfully entertaining performance. It’s the final work on a program that introduces listeners young and old to the various instruments and sections of the orchestra. Also featured are popular favourites from Star Wars, the Nutcracker Suite and Pictures at an Exhibition.

quotation: Gilbert Chesterton


I owe my success to having listened respectfully to the very best advice, and then going away and doing the exact opposite.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936)

The Walnut Street Theatre


The Walnut Street Theatre

The Walnut Street Theatre, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is the oldest continuously-operating theater in America. Its first play was The Rivals in 1812, and it went on to host many pre-Broadway tryouts of soon-to-be classics—including Gigi with Audrey Hepburn and A Streetcar Named Desire with Marlon Brando. Technologically innovative, it was the first theater to install gas footlights and air conditioning. In 1976, what major non-theatrical event happened there? More…

today’s birthday: William Makepeace Thackeray (1811)


William Makepeace Thackeray (1811)

Thackeray was an English novelist and satirist. In his lifetime, he was seen as the only possible rival of Charles Dickens for his pictures of contemporary life. Thackeray achieved widespread popularity in 1848 with Book of Snobs, but he is best known for another of his novels published that year, Vanity Fair, a satirical panorama of upper-middle-class London life in the early 19th century. Who were Charles James Yellowplush, Michael Angelo Titmarsh, and George Savage Fitz-Boodle? More… Discuss

Survivors, poetic thought by George-B ©Always (The smudge and other poems)


Survivors, poetic thought by George-B ©Always (The smudge and other poems)

I’ve witnessed moments like this
Made of lights and shadows,
with aroma of licorice and tarragon
tasting like roasted bell peppers and eggplants

I’ve witnessed moments like this
In sepia, and black and white, faintly smelling of retouching indigo

Papillon:

In the depth of the jungle, the smell of mushrooms is stronger
that any other smell except that of decaying matter

I’ve witnessed moments like this
of serenity: when being takes over the fear of dying,
of falling, through the holes in the old dragnet:
tilapia is a smart fish: it turns on one side,
at the bottom,
just above the mud,
avoiding the net…
other fishes are learning the technique: They are survivors.

The Tomb of Nakht, 1500 BC, contains a tilapia hieroglyph just above the head of the central figure.

Great AudioBooks: LES MISERABLES – Victor Hugo Part 1 Livre Audio Francais Audio Book


LES MISERABLES – Victor Hugo Part 1 Livre Audio Francais Audio Book [GreatAudioBooks]

Jean Valjean.JPG

Author Victor Hugo
Illustrator Emile Bayard
Country France
Language French
Genre Epic novel, historical fiction
Publisher A. Lacroix, Verboeckhoven & Cie.
Publication date
1862

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quotation: We often despise what is most useful to us. Aesop


We often despise what is most useful to us.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

The weather is like the government, always in the wrong. Jerome K. Jerome (three men in a boat)


The weather is like the government, always in the wrong.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927) Discuss

quotation: Edith Wharton – “…habit is necessary;…”


quotation: 

Habit is necessary; it is the habit of having habits, of turning a trail into a rut, that must be incessantly fought against if one is to remain alive.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

today’s birthday: Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804)


Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804)

Hawthorne was one of the great masters of American fiction. His novels and tales are penetrating explorations of moral and spiritual conflicts, and his masterpiece, The Scarlet Letter, is often considered the first American psychological novel. Hawthorne also helped to establish the American short story as a significant art form with his haunting tales of human loneliness, frustration, hypocrisy, eccentricity, and frailty. What future US president did Hawthorne befriend in college? More… Discuss

quotation: The value of a dollar is social, as it is created by society. Ralph Waldo Emerson


quotation:  The value of a dollar is social, as it is created by society.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

todady’s birthday: Franz Kafka (1883)


Franz Kafka (1883)

Despite the fact that he published only a few short works during his lifetime, Kafka is regarded as one of the most influential 20th-century writers. In prose remarkable for its clarity and precision, Kafka presents a world that is at once real and dreamlike and in which individuals burdened with guilt, isolation, and anxiety make a futile search for personal salvation. What virtually insurmountable difficulties do translators face when converting Kafka’s works from German into English? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Revolt Aboard the Amistad (1839)


Revolt Aboard the Amistad (1839)

In 1839, 53 African slaves being transported on the Spanish merchant ship La Amistad revolted against their captors. Having gained control of the ship, they demanded that the navigator set a course for Africa. However, he deceived them and sailed the ship northward until it was intercepted by the US Navy off the coast of New York. After a widely publicized court battle, the Supreme Court ruled that the Africans were not legally slaves and ordered them freed. What does amistad mean? More… Discuss

quotation: There is nothing like a dream to create the future. Victor Hugo


QUOTATION

There is nothing like a dream to create the future.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss