Category Archives: BOOKS

QUOTATION: Daniel Defoe


And of all plagues with which mankind are curst, Ecclesiastic tyranny’s the worst.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) Discuss

QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LEONARDO DA VINCI (1452)


Leonardo da Vinci (1452)

Da Vinci was an Italian painter, sculptor, architect, musician, engineer, and scientist. His drawings depict subjects ranging from flying machines to caricatures

The Mona Lisa.

The Mona Lisa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

and are rendered with scientific precision and consummate artistry. Included among his works are intricate anatomical studies of humans, animals, and plants. The richness and originality of intellect expressed in his notebooks reveal one of the greatest minds of all time. Why are most of his journals written in mirror-image cursive? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Borrow trouble for yourself, if that’s your nature, but don’t lend it to your neighbors.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

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Apr 13 – Homily: St. Martin I, Suffering in Faith



Apr 13 – Homily: St. Martin I, Suffering in Faith
Fr. Elias on the life of St. Martin I the last Pope to be martyred in 655. He suffered greatly and even complained but in a fruitful way.
Ave Maria! 
Mass: St. Martin I – Opt Mem – Form: OF
Readings: Saturday 2nd Week of Easter
1st: act 6:1-7
Resp: psa 33:1-2, 4-5, 18-19
Gsp: joh 6:16-21
To Download Audio go to http://airmaria.com?p=34919

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  • The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, or church of Santa Maria Maggiore, is the largest Catholic Marian church in Rome, Italy. Wikipedia

 

 

 

  • AddressPiazza di S. Maria Maggiore, 42, 00100 Roma, Italy

 

 

 

 

 

  • Phone+39 06 6988 6800

 

 

 

 

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  • Archbasilica of St. John Lateran
    Basilica in Rome, Italy

 

  • The Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, commonly known as St. John Lateran’s Archbasilica, St. John Lateran’s Basilica, and just The Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Rome … Wikipedia

 

 

 

  • AddressPiazza di San Giovanni in Laterano, 4, Roma, Italy

 

 

 

 

  • Phone+39 06 6988 6433

 

 

 

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QUOTATION: Gustave Flaubert


Nothing is more humiliating than to see idiots succeed in enterprises we have failed in.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SAMUEL BARCLAY BECKETT (1906)




Samuel Barclay Beckett (1906)

Irish-born playwright and novelist Samuel Beckett settled permanently in Paris in 1937 and thereafter adopted French as his primary literary language, though he went on to translate many of his works into English. Marked by minimal plot and action, existentialist ideas, and humor, the Nobel laureate‘s works typify the Theatre of the Absurd. His Waiting for Godot is a classic of the genre and brought him global acclaim. Why did his wife call his receipt of the Nobel Prize a “catastrophe”? More…Discuss

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


The silliest woman can manage a clever man; but it needs a very clever woman to manage a fool.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LEO CALVIN ROSTEN (1908)


Leo Calvin Rosten (1908)

Rosten was an American teacher, screenwriter, and humorist. He is best remembered for his stories about a night-school “prodigy” named Hyman Kaplan, which debuted in The New Yorker in the 1930s and were later published in book form under a pseudonym. His The Joys of Yiddish is a humorous guide to the Yiddish language and Jewish culture. Rosten is quoted as having once said that “any man who hates dogs and babies can’t be all bad!” To whom was he referring when he made this remark? More… Discuss

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Trust in Me (English)- Jungle Book ( Is this close to the global political reality….Or what!)


Uploaded on Jul 20, 2008 / views: 1,067,737

Kaa singing “Trust in Me” from the Disney movie: THE JUNGLE BOOK

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Le Malade Imaginaire – Le Roi Danse


QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

 

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The Big Sleep – Chapter 1 by Raymond Chandler (read by Tom O’Bedlam): Not a word out of place!



See that little magnifying glass above? Click on it. A Search Box opens. Put in anything about the poem you’re looking for. Part of the title. The poet’s name. A brief quotation will probably find it. Try it and see…

If you remember Hancock’s Half Hour, you might also remember that Tony Hancock wore socks with gold clocks on them. If you didn’t know why then, now you do. 

Raymond Chandler virtually single-handedly invented this genre of Private Eye Fiction, which gave birth to the Film Noir and influenced a generation of readers and movie goers. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_…
Related articles

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QUOTATION: Aesop


Distrust interested advice.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BCDiscuss

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QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


 

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel ...

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel de Cervantes (Photo credit: Lumiago)

Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

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ARTICLE: JOHN DONNE


John Donne

The greatest of the metaphysical poets, Donne wrote original, witty, erudite, and often obscure verse characterized by a brilliant use of paradox, hyperbole, and imagery and distinguished by a remarkable blend of passion and reason. Neglected for some 200 years, he was rediscovered by 20th-century critics. Author of the famous phrase “for whom the bell tolls,” a reference to the tolling of church bells upon someone’s death, Donne commissioned what macabre painting shortly before his own passing? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Bret Harte


Now, I hold it is not decent for a scientific gent
To say another is an ass—at least, to all intent;
Nor should the individual who happens to be meant
Reply by heaving rocks at him to any great extent.

Bret Harte (1836-1902) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Aesop


Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: MAYA ANGELOU (1928)


Maya Angelou (1928)

Angelou is an African-American writer and performer and the author of several volumes of poetry. Her seven autobiographical volumes, including I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, recount her traumatic youth and explore themes of economic, racial, and sexual oppression. In 1993, she was given the honor of reciting her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at Bill Clinton’s presidential inauguration. Angelou was not always so vocal; she endured several years of mutism in childhood. What triggered it? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: INTERNATIONAL CHILDREN’S BOOK DAY


International Children’s Book Day

This day, which is observed by countries all over the world, is held on Hans Christian Andersen‘s birthday, April 2, because the Danish author’s stories have been favorites among children of all nationalities. Celebrations include contests in which children illustrate their favorite books. Every two years the International Board on Books for Young People sponsors the Hans Christian Andersen medals, which are awarded to a children’s book author and a children’s book illustrator for their contributions tochildren’s literatureMore… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Men often bear little grievances with less courage than they do large misfortunes. Aesop


Men often bear little grievances with less courage than they do large misfortunes.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: WILLIAM MANCHESTER (1922)


William Manchester (1922)

Manchester, an American historian, biographer, and bestselling author, published 18 books during his lifetime, including three popular volumes on US president John F. Kennedy. His writings have been translated into multiple languages. He served as a Marine during World War II, and his wartime experiences formed the basis for Goodbye, Darkness: A Memoir of the Pacific War. Why did Jacqueline Kennedy file a lawsuit to prevent the publication of Manchester’s The Death of a PresidentMore… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Ralph Waldo Emerson


It is one of the blessings of old friends that you can afford to be stupid with them.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Herman Melville


Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored…

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Willa Cather


Some memories are realities, and are better than anything that can ever happen to one again.

Willa Cather (1873-1947) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Jack London


I would rather be a superb meteor, every atom of me in magnificent glow, than a sleepy and permanent planet.

Jack London (1876-1916) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Richard le Gallienne


War I abhor, and yet how sweet The sound along the marching street Of drum and fife, and I forget Wet eyes of widows, and forget Broken old mothers, and the whole Dark butchery without a soul.

Richard le Gallienne (1866-1947) Discuss

 

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ARTICLES: THE TAMING OF THE SHREW


The Taming of the Shrew

The Taming of the Shrew is one of William Shakespeare’s earlier comedies. Its main plot involves the marriage of the violently tempered Katherina to Petruchio, who claims he can tame her wild ways and make her an obedient bride. Though modern scholars bristle at the play’s misogynistic tones, it has inspired films, a Broadway musical, and a Brazilian soap opera. The Taming of the Shrew even sparked a pseudo-sequel by John Fletcher in Shakespeare’s lifetime. What was it called? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ST. GREGORY’S DAY


St. Gregory’s Day

St. Gregory, a sixth-century monk who became pope, is also the patron saint of schoolchildren and scholars. In Belgium, schoolchildren rise early on March 12 and parade through the streets dressed as “little soldiers of St. Gregory.” They carry a big basket for gifts and are accompanied by a noisy drummer. The young girls in the procession wear big shoulder bows that resemble the wings of a butterfly. They march from house to house, pausing at each door to sing a song and to ask for treats, and the procession always includes a group of angelsMore… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Niccolo Machiavelli


There are three classes of intellects: one which comprehends by itself; another which appreciates what others comprehend; and a third which neither comprehends by itself nor by the showing of others; the first is the most excellent, the second is good, and the third is useless.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Victor Hugo


When grace is joined with wrinkles, it is adorable. There is an unspeakable dawn in happy old age.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Jane Austen


There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Oscar Wilde


One’s past is what one is. It is the only way by which people should be judged.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Arthur Conan Doyle


It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Arthur Conan Doyle


It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)

 

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QUOTATION: Mark Twain


Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Jack London


The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.

Jack London (1876-1916) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Oscar Wilde


Children have a natural antipathy to books–handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to use their hands to make something, and they would be less apt to destroy and be mischievous.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: RALPH WALDO ELLISON (1914)


Ralph Waldo Ellison (1914)

Ellison moved to New York City in 1936 to study art but took up writing after meeting authors Langston Hughes and Richard Wright. Ellison spent seven years writing what would be his only completed novel, Invisible Man, about a nameless black man struggling to live in a hostile society. The work brought Ellison eminence as a writer and remains one of the central texts of the African-American experience. What is the title of his second, uncompleted novel, published posthumously in 1999? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


Everyone is as God has made him, and oftentimes a great deal worse.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SVETLANA ALLILUYEVA (1926)


Svetlana Alliluyeva (1926)

The youngest child of Joseph Stalin, and his only daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva caused a furor when she defected to the West in the 1960s, leaving behind her two grown children in the process. After becoming a naturalized US citizen, she published two successful memoirs, married, took the name Lana Peters, had a daughter, and divorced. In 1984, she returned to the USSR and renounced her defection, but her resolve soon wavered. How long was it before she left again for the West? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Aristotle


All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) Discuss

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Wagner -Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prelude and Liebestod from ‘Tristan Und Isolde’ (Karajan-BPO-Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra)



From  the Author-DjangoMan1963:  “This is my personal vote for the greatest piece of music ever.
The version here is by the Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by the late, great Herbert Von Karajan.

The jewish coductor Daniel Barenboim aptly said: “The music is bigger than the man”. Anyone who dismisses Wagner’s music on the basis of his views as a man, is missing something truly wonderful.

I’ve chosen Karajan’s version because he gets the tempo and the feel just right. Not too much vibratro here, which other conductors sometimes bring to the piece, making it sound too overwrought. He gets it spot on. A touch of vibrato, but he let’s the notes speak for themselves, whilst the languid tempo evokes a mystical atmosphere to the piece.

I hope you enjoy this wonderful music.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Richard Wagner
Photo of Wagner

Tristan und Isolde (Tristan and Isolde, or Tristan and Isolda, or Tristran and Ysolt) is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer, based largely on the romance by Gottfried von Straßburg. It was composed between 1857 and 1859 and premiered in Munich on 10 June 1865 with Hans von Bülow conducting. Wagner referred to the work not as an opera, but called it “eine Handlung” (literally a drama. a plot or an action), which was the equivalent of the term used by the Spanish playwright Calderón for his dramas.
Wagner’s composition of Tristan und Isolde was inspired by the philosophy of Arthur Schopenhauer (particularly The World as Will and Representation) and his affair with Mathilde Wesendonck. Widely acknowledged as one of the peaks of the operatic repertory, Tristan was notable for Wagner’s unprecedented use of chromaticismtonality, orchestral colour and harmonic suspension.
The opera was inexorably influential among Western classical composers and provided direct inspiration to composers such as Gustav MahlerRichard StraussKarol SzymanowskiAlban BergArnold Schönberg and Benjamin Britten. Other composers like Claude DebussyMaurice Ravel and Igor Stravinsky formulated their styles in contrast to Wagner’s musical legacy. Many see Tristan as the beginning of the move away from common practice harmony and tonality and consider that it lays the groundwork for the direction of classical music in the 20th century.[1] Both Wagner’s libretto style and music were also profoundly influential on the Symbolist poets of the late 19th Century and early 20th Century.[2]

Composition history

Wagner was forced to abandon his position as conductor of the Dresden Opera in 1849, as there was a warrant posted for his arrest for his participation in the unsuccessfulMay Revolution. He left his wife, Minna, in Dresden, and fled to Zürich. There, in 1852, he met the wealthy silk trader Otto Wesendonck. Wesendonck became a supporter of Wagner and bankrolled the composer for several years. Wesendonck’s wife, Mathilde, became enamoured of the composer. Though Wagner was working on his epic Der Ring des Nibelungen, he found himself intrigued by the legend of Tristan and Iseult.

The re-discovery of mediæval Germanic poetry, including Gottfried von Strassburg‘s version of Tristan, the Nibelungenlied and Wolfram von Eschenbach‘s Parzival, left a large impact on the German Romantic movements during the mid-19th century. The story of Tristan and Isolde is a quintessential romance of the Middle Ages and theRenaissance. Several versions of the story exist, the earliest dating to the middle of the 12th century. Gottfried’s version, part of the “courtly” branch of the legend, had a huge influence on later German literature.[3]

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QUOTATION: Gilbert Chesterton


“My country, right or wrong,” is a thing that no patriot would think of saying except in a desperate case. It is like saying, “My mother, drunk or sober.”

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936) Discuss

QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington


One man cannot hold another man down in the ditch without remaining down in the ditch with him.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: PIERRE BOULLE (1912)


Pierre Boulle (1912)

At the start of WWII, engineer Pierre Boulle enlisted in the French Army. Later, while a secret agent for the Free French, he was captured and imprisoned in a labor camp, an experience that inspired him to write his acclaimed work of historical fiction The Bridge over the River Kwai. Its 1957 film adaptation won seven Oscars, including one for screenplay that was awarded to Boulle since the actual writers had been blacklisted as communist sympathizers. What other famous novel did he pen? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Oscar Wilde


The basis of optimism is sheer terror.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss