Category Archives: Environmental Health Causes

this pressesd: Monomoy Refuge, MA testing latest in birding tracking electronics, called nano-tag— USFWS Refuge System


Bryce Canyon: Watch this amayzing documentary clear your mind and enjoy


Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon National Park in 3D

Bryce Canyon National Park in 3D is a 37 minute documentary that covers the Park today in 3D stereography and some history about the Park. It completes the tour of the various vistas from the rim of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah.
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Utah‘s Bryce Canyon is known for its spectacularly colorful landscape and its geological structures that resemble miniature cities, cathedrals, and spires. These structures, known as “hoodoos,” were formed when water, frost, and wind acted on alternate strata of soft and hard limestone, creating colorful and unique forms. The canyon region was settled by Mormon pioneers in the 1850s and was named for Ebenezer Bryce, who homesteaded in the area. How is Bryce said to have described the canyon? More… Discuss

 

 

Former Obama spokesman floats flight ban to fight Ebola: The Truth 24.com (by: CBSNews)


Excepts: ” Carney said on CNN. “I think that would demonstrate a level of seriousness in response to this that is merited at this point.”

Administration officials insist that a travel ban could actually hurt efforts to fight the virus. The move would “slow down the ability of the United States and other international partners to actually get expertise and capabilities and equipment into the affected areas,” White House Homeland Security Adviser Lisa Monaco said earlier this month.

Obama acknowledges Ebola missteps

Amid Ebola fears, should the U.S. ban air travel from West Africa?

Full coverage: Ebola virus outbreak

The idea of a travel ban is certain to come up at a congressional hearing on the U.S. response to Ebola Thursday afternoon. Seven of the panel’s 14 Republicans say it’s time for the administration to at least consider restricting the flow of people from West Africa to the U.S., and House Speaker John Boehner said Wednesday afternoon that a temporary travel ban, “is something that the president should absolutely consider” in response to the crisis. (16/10/2014 19:20     by: CBSNews)

via Former Obama spokesman floats flight ban to fight Ebola.

quotation: At the touch of love everyone becomes a poet. Plato


At the touch of love everyone becomes a poet.

Plato (427 BC-347 BC) Discuss

this pressed: Bats, white-nose syndrome and you | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region



via   Bats, white-nose syndrome and you | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region.

healthwise and such: Stop and Smell the Roses


Stop and Smell the Roses

One’s sense of smell, more specifically the loss of one’s sense of smell, could be an indicator of impending death. A study finds that older adults whose sense of smell has declined have a greater risk of dying within five years. Of participants with the most severe olfactory dysfunction, 39 percent passed away within five years. By comparison, just 19 percent of those with moderate dysfunction and 10 percent of those with a normal sense of smell died during that same period. This is not to say that the loss of sense of smell is directly causing deaths. Rather, researchers believe, it is a warning sign of declining health. More… Discuss

this pressed: Liberians describe likely Ebola infection of Dallas man


Liberians describe likely Ebola infection of Dallas man.


Wildlife Declined By More than Half in 40 Years

Human activities have dramatically altered the balance of life on Earth, according to a report by the Zoological Society of London. Wildlife populations around the globe have plummeted by more than half over just the past four decades, and the decline shows no signs of letting up any time soon. When broken down by habitat type, the data show that terrestrial and marine species both declined by 39 percent between 1970 and 2010, while freshwater species suffered a staggering 76 percent drop. The report calls “unsustainable human consumption” leading to habitat loss and degradation the greatest threat to biodiversity on our planet. More… Discuss

Norway to Pay Liberia to Leave Trees Be


Norway to Pay Liberia to Leave Trees Be

Liberia is to become the first African nation to completely halt logging in exchange for development aid. Norway has agreed to pay Liberia $150 million to stop deforestation in the country by 2020. Though Liberia’s forestland is not as extensive as that of other countries, it contains a significant portion of West Africa’s remaining rainforest. The deal is a major turnaround from just two years ago, when Liberia handed out licenses permitting companies to cut down more than half of the country’s remaining primary rainforest. More… Discuss

Green Lakes State Park


Green Lakes State Park

Green Lakes State Park near Syracuse, New York, is home to two unusual lakes. Green Lake and Round Lake are meromictic, meaning that unlike most lakes, their deep and shallow waters do not mix. The absence of mixing produces relatively undisturbed layers of sediment—a scientific boon—and creates gorgeous blue-green waters. Along with its eponymous lakes, the park is known for its 18-hole public golf course, which opened at the height of the Great Depression. How was the course’s designer paid? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Devils Tower Named First US National Monument (1906)


Devils Tower Named First US National Monument (1906)

Rising 1,267 feet (386 m) above the meandering Belle Fourche River, Devils Tower is a cluster of rock columns in the Black Hills of Wyoming formed by the cooling and crystallization of molten matter. The site, which many Native American Plains tribes consider sacred, was declared the first US National Monument by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906. A popular rock-climbing site, the monument attracts some 400,000 visitors each year. Why do most climbers abstain from scaling the tower in June? More… Discuss

Banana Peels and Pork Strips Earn Ig Nobel Honors


Banana Peels and Pork Strips Earn Ig Nobel Honors

The winners of this year’s Ig Nobel Prizes have been announced, and included among them are a team studying the slipperiness of banana peels, another investigating the ability of pork strips to stop nosebleeds, and yet another gauging how reindeer react to humans in polar bear suits. The aforementioned honorees took home the physics, medicine, and arctic science prizes, respectively. The award in public health went to a team investigating whether it is mentally hazardous to own a cat, while the psychology award went to a team that found that night owls tend to be more psychopathic than early risers. Prizes were also awarded in several other categories. More…

this pressed: Photos: More wildlife in the Quad Cities | WQAD.com


Photos: More wildlife in the Quad Cities | WQAD.com.

article: The Aswan High Dam


The Aswan High Dam

Located near Aswan, Egypt, the Aswan High Dam regulates the Nile River‘s annual flooding and produces a great deal of hydroelectric power. Constructed from 1960 to 1970, it was financed largely by the Soviet Union after the US and Britain withdrew their financial support in 1956 due to differences with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser. The dam’s creation of Lake Nasser required the relocation of some 90,000 people. What else had to be relocated? More… Discuss

Trick? Treat? Male Halloween pennant dragonfy on pond’s edge await female. — USFWS Refuge System – September 16, 2014


endangered species: Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction


Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction

The Chinese sturgeon, considered a “living fossil” due to its 140-million-year history, may not be around for much longer. It is teetering on the brink of extinction, thanks in large part to rising pollution levels and the construction of numerous dams along the Yangtze River it calls home. Only 100 specimens are thought to remain in the wild, and for the first year on record, none reproduced naturally in the river in 2013. Without additional conservation efforts, there is little hope for the future of this ancient creature. More… Discuss

‘s birthday: todayAlexander von Humboldt (1769)


Alexander von Humboldt (1769)

A German naturalist and explorer, Humboldt traveled extensively and made observations and discoveries too numerous to count. Among other things, he discovered the connection between the Amazon and Orinoco river systems, surmised that lack of oxygen causes altitude sickness, studied the ocean current off the western coast of South America that was known for a time as the Humboldt Current, and added to an understanding of the development of the Earth’s crust. To what did he devote his final years? More… Discuss

Hawaii is a paradise…of bird extinction http://t.co/jkTaUx6mqq #SOTB14 pic.twitter.com/lYufd32CxM — Smithsonian


Hawaii is a paradise…of bird extinction http://t.co/jkTaUx6mqq #SOTB14 pic.twitter.com/lYufd32CxM

— Smithsonian (@smithsonian) September 10, 2014

environment/endangered species: California Blue Whale Makes a Comeback


California Blue Whale Makes a Comeback

Once teetering on the brink of extinction, the California blue whale has recovered in an unprecedented way—reaching about 97 percent of historic population levels. Researchers estimate that there are now 2,200 of these whales in existence. It is the only population of blue whale known to have rebounded from the ravages of whaling. The blue whale is the largest known animal on Earth, growing to nearly 100 feet (30 meters) in length and weighing in at 190 tons (172 tonnes), twice as much as the largest known dinosaur. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Last Passenger Pigeon Dies in Captivity (1914)


Last Passenger Pigeon Dies in Captivity (1914)

Billions of passenger pigeons inhabited eastern North America in the early 19th century, migrating in enormous flocks that darkened the skies for days at a time. They soon fell victim to habitat loss caused by mass deforestation, along with excessive hunting on an industrial scale. The bird‘s rapid extinction was largely responsible for ending the marketing of game birds and gave major impetus to the conservation movement. Where did the last known passenger pigeon die in 1914? More… Discuss

Flower Power: Dandelion Tires


Flower Power: Dandelion Tires

Dandelions are widely considered pesky weeds, but they have numerous uses, some of which we are just beginning to capitalize on. Until now, the tire industry has relied entirely on rubber-tree plantations in Southeast Asia for its natural rubber. However, researchers have been working to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan that yields tire-grade rubber and have achieved per-hectare yields on par with rubber-tree plantations, suggesting the flower is a viable alternative source of natural rubber. It may not be long before dandelion fields begin cropping up across the US and Europe to keep the wheels of the tire industry turning. More… Discuss

Image

IS THIS THE NEWEST PLANET THE SOLAR SYTEM?


Casa Jaya's photo.

Seals, Not Europeans, Brought Tuberculosis to New World


Seals, Not Europeans, Brought Tuberculosis to New World

Genetic tests have cast doubt on the long-held belief that Europeans arriving in the Americas in the 15th century introduced tuberculosis to the New World. The new evidence, collected from ancient Peruvian skeletons that predate the Europeans’ arrival by about 500 years, suggests it was not humans at all but seals that first brought TB to the Americas. Researchers hypothesize that seals picked up the disease from infected humans in Africa, where TB originated, and then carried it across the ocean to the Americas, where they were hunted and eaten, thereby transmitting the disease to humans there. More… Discuss

Gulf Dead Zone Roughly the Size of Connecticut


Gulf Dead Zone Roughly the Size of Connecticut

Human activities have created a “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico that is roughly the size of the state of Connecticut—about 5,000 square miles (13,000 sq km). Though this is several thousand square miles smaller than it was at its peak, it remains the second-largest dead zone in the world. Dead zones develop when there is insufficient oxygen near the ocean floor to support marine life. In most cases, this results from an overgrowth of algae fed by excessive nutrient runoff from farming and other human activities. More… Discuss

The Hot Zone Quotes


The Hot Zone Quotes

The Hot Zone The Hot Zone by Richard Preston

46,786 ratings, 4.06 average rating, 2,291 reviews

buy a copy

The Hot Zone Quotes (showing 1-16 of 16)

“In biology, nothing is clear, everything is too complicated, everything is a mess, and just when you think you understand something, you peel off a layer and find deeper complications beneath. Nature is anything but simple.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone

Read all quotations HERE

Ebola Crisis Deepens


Ebola Crisis Deepens

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed 729 lives in four countries thus far, making it the deadliest and widest ranging such outbreak the world has ever seen. Dozens of healthcare workers have fallen victim, complicating efforts to combat it. Though the disease is outpacing current efforts to contain its spread, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) still believes that the “unprecedented” outbreak could be stopped if proper steps are taken at both the national and international levels. To this end, a new, $100 million (75 million euro) Ebola response plan is being launched to combat the disease. More… Discuss

Preventing Alzheimer’s


Preventing Alzheimer’s

Researchers say a third of the world’s Alzheimer’s cases are preventable. They found that diabetes, mid-life hypertension, mid-life obesity, physical inactivity, depression, smoking, and poor education are all risk factors in the development of Alzheimer’s that can potentially be addressed to reduce risk. According to their calculations, reducing each risk factor by 10 percent could prevent nearly nine million cases of Alzheimer’s by 2050. More… Discuss

Desmond Tutu backs assisted dying


Desmond Tutu backs assisted dying http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-28282323

we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The snow is melting on Kilimanjaro,
The snow is melting everywhere else
The water levels are rising, and they will continue to
Water cannot escape the earth, the air is captive:
We are lucky that way…
we’re blessed.

Facts on Pesticides – earthjustice.org‎ Adwww.earthjustice.org/pesticides‎ Top 12 Fruits and Vegetables You Should Buy Organic


About 5,290,000 results (0.33 seconds)       Facts on Pesticides - earthjustice.org‎     Adwww.earthjustice.org/pesticides‎     Learn about the impacts of pesticides on your health.     Earthjustice has 468 followers on Google+  Search Results      Safe Fruits and Veggies     www.safefruitsandveggies.com/     Should I be worried about pesticide residues on my fruits and vegetables? .... Warehouse store, traditional grocery store, small local market, specialty food ...     Top 12 Fruits and Vegetables You Should Buy Organic     gourmetfood.about.com/od/slowfoodorganiclocal/a/organicproduce.htm     by Brett Moore - The long term effects of consuming these pesticides has not been sufficiently ... Here is a list of the fruits and vegetables most contaminated and which you should buy ... Find a Local Farmers Market · How to Make Your Kitchen Eco-Friendly ..

About 5,290,000 results (0.33 seconds)
Facts on Pesticides – earthjustice.org‎
Adwww.earthjustice.org/pesticides‎
Learn about the impacts of pesticides on your health.
Earthjustice has 468 followers on Google+
Search Results
Safe Fruits and Veggies
http://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/
Should I be worried about pesticide residues on my fruits and vegetables? …. Warehouse store, traditional grocery store, small local market, specialty food …
Top 12 Fruits and Vegetables You Should Buy Organic
gourmetfood.about.com/od/slowfoodorganiclocal/a/organicproduce.htm
by Brett Moore – The long term effects of consuming these pesticides has not been sufficiently … Here is a list of the fruits and vegetables most contaminated and which you should buy … Find a Local Farmers Market · How to Make Your Kitchen Eco-Friendly ..

 

this pressed: Google I/O – What We Now Know – Forbes (google should use the profits in a socially responsible manner e.g. why not invest in nanothechnology to help the autoimune system fight, conquer and eradicate Multiple Myeloma ? instead of stupid robots?)


Google I/O: What We Now Know – Forbes.

Quicksilver


Quicksilver

Quicksilver, commonly known as mercury and represented in the periodic table with the symbol Hg, is a chemical element with an atomic number of 80. A heavy, silvery, transition metal, mercury is the only elemental metal that is liquid at room temperature. It is used in thermometers, barometers, and other scientific apparatuses. Due to the toxicity of the element, however, the use of mercury in thermometers has been largely phased out in the interests of health and safety. What has replaced it? More… Discuss

UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring



UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring
.

mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Source: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
The work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences R01-ES015359, P01-ES011269 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants R833292 and 829338. The study is available free of charge at:  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1307044/

Tanning Appears Addictive (CRIMINALIZING EVERYTHING LATELY? lIKE TANNING= ADDICTIVE?)


Tanning Appears Addictive

That “healthy glow” many love has proved to be less than healthy—the link between excessive ultraviolet (UV) exposure and skin cancer is well established—so why do they continue to tan? One possibility is that they are addicts. Researchers found that chronic exposure to UV radiation triggers the release of endorphins, so-called feel-good hormones, in mice. The regular exposure leads to physical dependence so strong that the animals exhibit withdrawal symptoms like shaking, tremors, and teeth chattering when those endorphins are blocked. Mice and humans have a similar biological response to UV exposure, meaning that tanning may be similarly addictive in people. More… Discuss

WARNING:  BEWARE OF SUNSHINE: IS ADDICTIVE!!!  :)

this day in the yeasteryear: The International Olympic Committee Is Founded (1894) (THIS POST IS NOT EXPLOITED BY coca-cola)


The International Olympic Committee Is Founded (1894)

Based in Lausanne, Switzerland, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) was founded following efforts by Pierre de Coubertin to reinstate the ancient Olympic Games that were first held in Greece in 776 BCE. Today, the IOC constitutes a single legal entity that organizes the Summer and Winter Olympic Games and owns copyrights, trademarks, and other intangible properties associated with the Games, such as the Olympic logos. What is the maximum number of members the IOC can have? More… Discuss

Study finds link between pesticides and autism – Yahoo News


A California study finds that pregnant women who live near farms where pesticides are applied have a two-thirds higher risk of having children with autism (AFP Photo/Philippe Huguen)

A California study finds that pregnant women who live near farms where pesticides are applied have a two-thirds higher risk of having children with autism (AFP Photo/Philippe Huguen)

Study finds link between pesticides and autism – Yahoo News.

this day in the yesteryear: Cuyahoga River Catches Fire (1969)


Cuyahoga River Catches Fire (1969)

Famously described in a Time magazine article as a river that “oozes rather than flows” and a waterway in which a person “does not drown but decays,” Ohio’s Cuyahoga River used to be so heavily polluted that it actually caught fire—on more than one occasion. The river fire of 1969, which received national media attention, helped spur the environmental movement of the late 1960s and prompted the creation of the US Environmental Protection Agency. When else has the river caught fire? More… Discuss

Possible Mass Anthrax Exposure at CDC Labs (loosing the grip on reality?)


Possible Mass Anthrax Exposure at CDC Labs

As many as 75 scientists working in US federal government laboratories in Atlanta, Georgia, may have been accidentally exposed to live anthrax bacteria after staff members at a high-level facility failed to follow proper procedures to inactivate the deadly bacteria before sending the samples to lower-level labs for experimentation. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, under whose watch the breach occurred, is now investigating the incident and is offering antibiotic treatment and vaccines to those who might have been exposed. More… Discuss

Corn syrup: an almost omnipresent additive in all processed foods: why? There is no need for it in more than 85% of the present use!


Food indusry is responsible for obesity, and therefore for the global resession! its time to make industrial dinosour change their recipes, or leave the scene!

Corn syrup

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Corn syrup on a black surface

Karo advertisement, 1917.

Corn syrup is a food syrup which is made from the starch of maize (called corn in some countries) and contains varying amounts of maltose and higher oligosaccharides, depending on the grade. Corn syrup is used in foods to soften texture, add volume, prevent crystallization of sugar, and enhance flavor. Corn syrup is distinct from high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which is manufactured from corn syrup by converting a large proportion of its glucose into fructose using the enzyme xylose isomerase, thus producing a sweeter compound due to higher levels of fructose.

The more general term glucose syrup is often used synonymously with corn syrup, since glucose syrup is in the United States most commonly made from corn starch.[1][2] Technically, glucose syrup is any liquid starch hydrolysate of mono-, di-, and higher-saccharides and can be made from any source of starch; wheat, tapioca and potatoes are the most common other sources.[3][4][5]

Commercial preparation

Historically, corn syrup was produced by combining corn starch with dilute hydrochloric acid, and then heating the mixture under pressure. Currently, corn syrup is obtained through a multi-step bioprocess. First, the enzyme α-amylase is added to a mixture of corn starch and water. α-amylase is secreted by various species of the bacterium Bacillus; the enzyme is isolated from the liquid in which the bacteria are grown. The enzyme breaks down the starch into oligosaccharides, which are then broken into glucose molecules by adding the enzyme glucoamylase, known also as “γ-amylase”. Glucoamylase is secreted by various species of the fungus Aspergillus; the enzyme is isolated from the liquid in which the fungus is grown. The glucose can then be transformed into fructose by passing the glucose through a column that is loaded with the enzyme D-xylose isomerase, an enzyme that is isolated from the growth medium of any of several bacteria.[6]

Corn syrup is produced from number 2 yellow dent corn.[7] When wet milled, about 2.3 litres of corn are required to yield an average of 947g of starch, to produce 1 kg of glucose or dextrose syrup. A bushel (25 kg) of corn will yield an average of 31.5 pounds (14.3 kg) of starch, which in turn will yield about 33.3 pounds (15.1 kg) of syrup. Thus, it takes about 2,300 litres of corn to produce a tonne of glucose syrup, or 60 bushels (1524 kg) of corn to produce one short ton.[8][9]

The viscosity and sweetness of the syrup depends on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been carried out. To distinguish different grades of syrup, they are rated according to their dextrose equivalent (DE).

Some commercial corn syrup products are actually a composition of syrups.

  • Composition Light corn syrup is a combination of corn syrup and high fructose corn syrup, seasoned with vanilla flavor and salt. Light corn syrup is clear and tastes moderately sweet.
  • Composition Dark corn syrup is a combination of corn syrup and molasses, caramel color and flavor, salt, and the preservative sodium benzoate. Dark corn syrup is a warm brown color and tastes much stronger than light corn syrup. Molasses in dark corn syrup enhances its flavor and color.

Uses

Corn syrup’s major uses in commercially prepared foods are as a thickener, a sweetener and as a humectant – an ingredient that retains moisture and thus maintains a food’s freshness.[10]

In the United States, cane sugar quotas raise the price of sugar;[11] hence, domestically produced corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup are less expensive alternatives that are often used in American-made processed and mass-produced foods, candies, soft drinks and fruit drinks to help control cost.[10]

Glucose syrup was the primary corn sweetener in the United States prior to the expanded use of high fructose corn syrup production. HFCS is a variant in which other enzymes are used to convert some of the glucose into fructose. The resulting syrup is sweeter and more soluble. Corn syrup is also available as a retail product. The best-known brand in the U.S. is “Karo”.

If mixed with sugar, water and cream of tartar corn syrup can be used to make sugar glass.

See also

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press this: U.S. Chamber, You Are Wrong | Regs Talk


 

U.S. Chamber, You Are Wrong | Regs Talk.

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news: Poison Toad Invades Madagascar


Poison Toad Invades Madagascar

The Asian common toad, a relative of the cane toad that has devastated wildlife in Australia, has been spotted in Madagascar, raising concerns of an impending ecological disaster similar to that seen in Australia. The cane toad was intentionally introduced to Australia in the 1930s in an effort to control the population of an agricultural pest, but it produces a toxin that is deadly to the birds, mammals, and reptiles that prey on it too. It is thought that the poisonous Asian common toad may have reached Madagascar by stowing away on a cargo ship, as the first sightings took place in Toamasina, the island nation‘s main port. More… Discuss


As a commemoration of The 60th. anniversary of The Queen’s Coronation of Tuesday 2nd. June 1953 at Westminster Abbey I thought it appropriate to post the full version in one video of the much celebrated colour film chronicle of this most sacred & ancient event. (I’d hoped to have had this uploaded pre 2nd. June. Technical issues needed to be overcome before it could be posted. Although The Queen’s Birthday Long Weekend In NSW is still a fitting day for this posting.) Continue reading

this day in the yesteryear: The Ancash Earthquake (1970)


The Ancash Earthquake (1970)

The 1970 Ancash earthquake was a severe undersea earthquake that affected the Peruvian region of Ancash,

Yungay cemetery in Ancash, Peru.

Yungay cemetery in Ancash, Peru. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

killing at least 50,000 people. Combined with a subsequent landslide, it was the most catastrophic natural disaster ever recorded in the history of Peru. The quake destabilized part of Mount Huascarán, an extinct volcano and Peru’s highest mountain, triggering a rock and snow avalanche that buried the towns of Yungay and Ranrahirca. What was the magnitude of the earthquake? More… Discuss

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7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România


7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România.

Plantain. In childhood, we treat abrasions, scratches and bruises plantain leaves freshly picked. This plant can be used in the kitchen but in salads, stews and soups. However, in addition to leaves, inflorescence and seeds are edible. Seeds, dried and ground are a rich source of fiber and are effective in the treatment of constipation. “

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article: Hybrid Vehicles


Hybrid Vehicles

A hybrid vehicle uses multiple energy sources—or propulsion systems—to provide its motive power. Typically, these sources are gasoline and electric batteries. Hybrids have become especially popular in recent years, as they provide greater fuel economy with lower emissions and are thus more environmentally friendly than traditional internal-combustion engine vehicles. What makes hybrid vehicles a greater safety risk to pedestrians and cyclists than conventional vehicles? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Rachel Carson (1907)


Rachel Carson (1907)

Carson was an American writer and marine biologist. Her book Silent Spring, a provocative study of the dangers of certain insecticides, is generally acknowledged as the impetus for the modern environmental movement. In other well-known books on sea life, such as Under the Sea Wind, she combines keen scientific observation with rich poetic description. What did Carson’s marital status lead former Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Benson to conclude about her political leanings? More… Discuss

Related articles

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Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Make Crops Less Nutritious


Rising Carbon Dioxide Levels Could Make Crops Less Nutritious

Nutrient levels in staple food crops may fall as carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere continue to rise. Researchers grew wheat, rice, soybeans, corn, sorghum, and field peas in fields subjected to carbon dioxide concentrations anticipated on Earth by the middle of this century. In four out of the six crops, zinc and iron levels were found to be reduced. The wheat and rice also had a reduced protein content. Sorghum and corn alone were able to resist the effects of the elevated carbon dioxide levels. More… Discuss

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NEWS: UNESCO Worries Great Barrier Reef “in Danger”


UNESCO Worries Great Barrier Reef “in Danger”

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage Site—and a dumping ground for dredged sediment if reef authorities have anything to say about it. A plan has been approved to dispose sediment there in January as part of a project to expand the Abbot Point port and make it one of the world’s biggest coal ports, and this has UNESCO worried. The reef is already facing decline as a result of climate change, pollution, and other human activities, and the dumping could do further damage. UNESCO is now considering listing the natural wonder as a World Heritage in Danger site. More… Discuss

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Air Pollution Is Killing Millions


 

Air Pollution Is Killing Millions.

Scientists narrow in on Sea Star Wasting Syndrome devastating Pacific coast | CTV News


Sea stars dying off in PacificScientists narrow in on Sea Star Wasting Syndrome devastating Pacific coast | CTV News.

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: MINAMATA DISEASE OFFICIALLY DISCOVERED IN JAPAN (1956)


Minamata Disease Officially Discovered in Japan (1956)

Minamata disease is a degenerative neurological disorder characterized by a loss of coordination and peripheral vision, poor articulation of speech, and numbness of the extremities. It was first encountered in 1956, when numerous cases of the then-unknown disease were observed in Minamata, Japan. Investigations showed that the consumption of seafood contaminated by a local chemical factory‘s mercury-laden wastewater caused the disorder. What brought more attention to the disease in 1965? More…

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