Category Archives: Environmental Health Causes

this pressed for your right to know: Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One – NYTimes.com


Photo In 1986, Ronald Reagan signed the so-called “amnesty” law passed by Congress that granted legal status to three million undocumented immigrants, and then acted on his own the following year to expand it to about 100,000 more. Credit Ron Edmunds/Associated Press

Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One

Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVISNOV. 20, 2014

President Obama’s action to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation and grant them work permits opens a new front in the decades-long debate over the scope of presidential authority.

Although Mr. Obama is not breaking new ground by using executive powers to carve out a quasi-legal status for certain categories of unauthorized immigrants — the Republican Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush all did so — his decision will affect as many as five million immigrants, far more than the actions of those presidents.

Mr. Obama’s action is also a far more extensive reshaping of the nation’s immigration system.

“The magnitude and the formality of it is arguably unprecedented,” said Peter J. Spiro, a Temple University law professor. “It’s fair to say that we have never seen anything quite like this before in terms of the scale.”

via Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One – NYTimes.com.

this pressed…So that you know: Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents | OpenSecrets Blog


Home / News & Analysis / OpenSecrets Blog

Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents

by Sarah Bryner on November 19, 2014

Senate Democrats successfully blocked a bill Tuesday that would have approved construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The controversial measure fell one vote shy of overcoming a filibuster, with 59 senators supporting it and 41 opposing. The vote followed the bill’s approval in the House by a much wider margin, with 252 lawmakers voting to advance the pipeline.

The vote largely fell along party lines. All Senate Republicans supported construction of the pipeline but they were joined by 14 Democrats, including three of the four Democrat incumbents who lost their re-election bids earlier this month. For Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.), the bill’s main sponsor, the vote was considered an important test of her effectiveness in advance of a Dec. 6 runoff that will determine whether she keeps her seat. In the House, 31 Democrats crossed the aisle to side with the Republican majority.

via Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents | OpenSecrets Blog.

The Monarch Butterfly


 

 

 

 

The Monarch Butterfly

 

 

 

English:

English: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The monarch, with its distinctive orange and black pattern, is considered one the world’s most beautiful butterflies. In North America, thousands of monarchs gather in autumn and migrate southward, sometimes more than 1,800 miles (2,900 km), and return north in spring. Their ability to return to the same spots over several generations has led scientists to research how circadian rhythm and the position of the sun are involved. What is aposematism, and how do monarch butterflies exemplify it? More…

 

 

 

Discuss

 

 

 

climate change: More Lightning to Come with Warmer Climate


 

More Lightning to Come with Warmer Climate

As global temperatures rise, so too will lightning strikes, says one team of climate researchers. According to the team’s projections, every 1°C rise in global temperatures will lead to a 12 percent increase in lightning strikes, so that by 2100 there will be three lightning strikes for every two in 2000. Increased lightning strikes have both positive and negative implications for the environment. Lightning strikes currently ignite half of all wildfires in the US, so it stands to reason that wildfires may increase along with lightning. However, on a more positive note, lightning also produces nitrogen oxides, which indirectly regulate greenhouse gases like ozone and methane. More… Discuss

 


UN Panel: Fossil Fuels Must Be Phased Out by 2100

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a UN-backed panel of experts, has concluded that the unrestricted use of fossil fuels without carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology should be phased out by 2100 if we are to avoid dangerous climate change. While the costs of phasing out fossil fuel use and transitioning to renewable energy sources will undoubtedly be steep, failing to make the necessary changes will be more costly in the long run. More… Discuss

Jasmine


Jasmine

Jasmine—also known as jessamine—is a genus of shrubs and vines in the family Oleaceae. It has about 300 species native to all continents except North America. Jasmine is prized for its very fragrant white or yellow blossoms, which, when dried, can be used to flavor tea. Jasmine oil is popular for perfumes and aromatherapy, even though jasmine flowers are too delicate to be distilled in the same way as true essential oils. Jasmine is thus called an “absolute” oil. What is Sampaguita? More… Discuss

For your Health: Children Mistake Laundry Pods for Toys or Candy


Children Mistake Laundry Pods for Toys or Candy

Brightly colored detergent pods containing concentrated laundry soap have sent more than 700 children in the US to the hospital in the two years since the pods became widely available there, and poison control centers have fielded thousands of calls from worried parents and caregivers whose charges have been exposed to or ingested the contents of these packets. Some manufacturers have already altered their packaging to make the pods safer for children, and this seems to have had some positive effect, but it is still advisable to store such products out of the sight and reach of youngsters. More… Discuss

The Northern Lights


 

Northern lights over Kulusuk, Greenland

Northern lights over Kulusuk, Greenland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Northern Lights

 

The northern lights, or aurora borealis, are a luminous display of various forms and colors in the night sky of the Northern Hemisphere. They are caused by

Plasmasphere

Plasmasphere (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

high-speed electrons and protons from the Sun, which are trapped in the radiation belt above Earth and channeled toward the polar regions by Earth’s magnetic field. These electrically charged particles enter the atmosphere and collide with air molecules, exciting them to luminosity. Who coined the name “aurora borealis” for this phenomenon? More… Discuss

 

Health and Civilization: Happiness and Aging (


Happiness and Aging

Polls of populations around the globe show that life satisfaction often waxes and wanes with age and differs depending on where people live. In Western nations, happiness bottoms out between the ages of 45 and 54 before rising again into old age, while in the former Soviet Union and Latin America, it declines throughout life. The reasons for these trends are complex and multifaceted, but one factor that seems to have a strong influence is a region’s economic prosperity, suggesting that money does in fact buy some measure of happiness. More… Discuss

From Nourished Kitchen: Access from sidebar widget: Milk Kefir: What It Is and How to Brew It


Ethics, Environmental, Health: IS YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW ENOUGH? Effects of Feeding GMO Potatoes To Rats (Pt. 1)


Effects of Feeding GMO Potatoes To Rats (Pt. 1)

this pressed for your spider photo collection: 5 Spooky Spider Myths Busted : Discovery News


Spiders: they creep, they leap, they haunt the nightmares of arachnophobic humans. But a lot of the fear surrounding spiders is based on myths, not facts, according to the experts who study these eight-legged creatures.

Did you know, for example, that the venom of most tarantulas would hardly make adult humans flinch, let alone kill them? And all those stories you’ve heard about spiders laying eggs inside an open wound are the stuff of urban legend, not reality.

via 5 Spooky Spider Myths Busted : Discovery News.

this presssed for your bat week experience: National Bat Week Pictures: Just in Time for Halloween!


Mexican free-tailed bats fleeing a bat-cave preserve.

Bats on the Wing Photograph by Joel Sartore with Cole Sartore, National Geographic Creative

Bats on the Wing

Photograph by Joel Sartore with Cole Sartore, National Geographic Creative

Bats have long been associated with vampires, witches, and Halloween. But their bad reputation looks more like a trick than a treat.

Bats matter in a big way in countless ecosystems around the world. In truth, the only thing scary about bats is the rate at which they’re disappearing.

Bats are a wildly diverse order of mammals, with more than 1,300 species worldwide. About one out of every five mammal species is a bat.

Despite the way they’re often depicted in movies and television, only three species of bats feed exclusively on blood. Most species—around 70 percent—dine on insects, making them invaluable partners in human agriculture by removing crop pests. The rest eat nectar and fruit and serve as some of the best pollinators and seed dispersers on the planet.

via National Bat Week Pictures: Just in Time for Halloween!.

Biologist Illuminates Glowing Underwater World | National Geographic Magazine


Biologist Illuminates Glowing Underwater World

Stores receipts, foot long with BPA’s: at ForEffectiveGov


this pressed for your right to know: Ebola Contact Monitoring Graph from CDC: number of people at risk “decreasing each day”— CBSDFW (@CBSDFW)


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“Suddenly he goes into the last phase—the human virus bomb explodes. Military biohazard specialists have ways of describing this occurrence. They say that the victim has “crashed and bled out.” Or more politely they say that the victim has “gone down.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone

THIS PRESSED for your right to know: Homeland Security braces for flood of immigrants seeking work permits|The Truth23.com


WASHINGTON — The Homeland Security Department appears to be preparing for an increase in the number of immigrants applying for work permits after President Barack Obama announces his long-promised plans for executive actions on immigration reform later this year.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services confirmed to The Associated Press that it has published a draft contract proposal to buy the card stock needed to make work permits and Permanent Resident Cards, more commonly known as green cards. The proposal calls for providing material for at least 5 million cards a year, with as many as 9 million “during the initial period … to support possible future immigration reform initiative requirements.” The contract calls for as many 34 million cards over five years.

USCIS, the Homeland Security agency that oversees immigration benefits, produces about 3 million work permits and Green Cards annually, so the new contract would at least provide the Obama administration with the flexibility to issue far more work permits or green cards even if it chose not to exercise that option.

USCIS spokesman Christopher Bentley described the proposal posted earlier this month a routine contract solicitation.

“Solicitations of this nature are frequent practice,” Bentley said. He said the number of immigration applications can rise “for any number of any reasons.”

The contract proposal was first reported by the online news site Breitbart.com.

Obama said earlier this year that he would act on his own if Congress failed to pass immigration legislation. He has twice delayed making any changes, saying as recently as last month that he would hold off on executive actions until after November’s midterm elections.

via| Homeland Security braces for flood of immigrants seeking work permits.

this pressesd: Monomoy Refuge, MA testing latest in birding tracking electronics, called nano-tag— USFWS Refuge System


Bryce Canyon: Watch this amayzing documentary clear your mind and enjoy


Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon National Park in 3D

Bryce Canyon National Park in 3D is a 37 minute documentary that covers the Park today in 3D stereography and some history about the Park. It completes the tour of the various vistas from the rim of the Paunsaugunt Plateau in south central Utah.
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Utah‘s Bryce Canyon is known for its spectacularly colorful landscape and its geological structures that resemble miniature cities, cathedrals, and spires. These structures, known as “hoodoos,” were formed when water, frost, and wind acted on alternate strata of soft and hard limestone, creating colorful and unique forms. The canyon region was settled by Mormon pioneers in the 1850s and was named for Ebenezer Bryce, who homesteaded in the area. How is Bryce said to have described the canyon? More… Discuss

 

 

Former Obama spokesman floats flight ban to fight Ebola: The Truth 24.com (by: CBSNews)


Excepts: ” Carney said on CNN. “I think that would demonstrate a level of seriousness in response to this that is merited at this point.”

Administration officials insist that a travel ban could actually hurt efforts to fight the virus. The move would “slow down the ability of the United States and other international partners to actually get expertise and capabilities and equipment into the affected areas,” White House Homeland Security Adviser Lisa Monaco said earlier this month.

Obama acknowledges Ebola missteps

Amid Ebola fears, should the U.S. ban air travel from West Africa?

Full coverage: Ebola virus outbreak

The idea of a travel ban is certain to come up at a congressional hearing on the U.S. response to Ebola Thursday afternoon. Seven of the panel’s 14 Republicans say it’s time for the administration to at least consider restricting the flow of people from West Africa to the U.S., and House Speaker John Boehner said Wednesday afternoon that a temporary travel ban, “is something that the president should absolutely consider” in response to the crisis. (16/10/2014 19:20     by: CBSNews)

via Former Obama spokesman floats flight ban to fight Ebola.

quotation: At the touch of love everyone becomes a poet. Plato


At the touch of love everyone becomes a poet.

Plato (427 BC-347 BC) Discuss

this pressed: Bats, white-nose syndrome and you | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region



via   Bats, white-nose syndrome and you | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region.

healthwise and such: Stop and Smell the Roses


Stop and Smell the Roses

One’s sense of smell, more specifically the loss of one’s sense of smell, could be an indicator of impending death. A study finds that older adults whose sense of smell has declined have a greater risk of dying within five years. Of participants with the most severe olfactory dysfunction, 39 percent passed away within five years. By comparison, just 19 percent of those with moderate dysfunction and 10 percent of those with a normal sense of smell died during that same period. This is not to say that the loss of sense of smell is directly causing deaths. Rather, researchers believe, it is a warning sign of declining health. More… Discuss

this pressed: Liberians describe likely Ebola infection of Dallas man


Liberians describe likely Ebola infection of Dallas man.


Wildlife Declined By More than Half in 40 Years

Human activities have dramatically altered the balance of life on Earth, according to a report by the Zoological Society of London. Wildlife populations around the globe have plummeted by more than half over just the past four decades, and the decline shows no signs of letting up any time soon. When broken down by habitat type, the data show that terrestrial and marine species both declined by 39 percent between 1970 and 2010, while freshwater species suffered a staggering 76 percent drop. The report calls “unsustainable human consumption” leading to habitat loss and degradation the greatest threat to biodiversity on our planet. More… Discuss

Norway to Pay Liberia to Leave Trees Be


Norway to Pay Liberia to Leave Trees Be

Liberia is to become the first African nation to completely halt logging in exchange for development aid. Norway has agreed to pay Liberia $150 million to stop deforestation in the country by 2020. Though Liberia’s forestland is not as extensive as that of other countries, it contains a significant portion of West Africa’s remaining rainforest. The deal is a major turnaround from just two years ago, when Liberia handed out licenses permitting companies to cut down more than half of the country’s remaining primary rainforest. More… Discuss

Green Lakes State Park


Green Lakes State Park

Green Lakes State Park near Syracuse, New York, is home to two unusual lakes. Green Lake and Round Lake are meromictic, meaning that unlike most lakes, their deep and shallow waters do not mix. The absence of mixing produces relatively undisturbed layers of sediment—a scientific boon—and creates gorgeous blue-green waters. Along with its eponymous lakes, the park is known for its 18-hole public golf course, which opened at the height of the Great Depression. How was the course’s designer paid? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Devils Tower Named First US National Monument (1906)


Devils Tower Named First US National Monument (1906)

Rising 1,267 feet (386 m) above the meandering Belle Fourche River, Devils Tower is a cluster of rock columns in the Black Hills of Wyoming formed by the cooling and crystallization of molten matter. The site, which many Native American Plains tribes consider sacred, was declared the first US National Monument by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1906. A popular rock-climbing site, the monument attracts some 400,000 visitors each year. Why do most climbers abstain from scaling the tower in June? More… Discuss

Banana Peels and Pork Strips Earn Ig Nobel Honors


Banana Peels and Pork Strips Earn Ig Nobel Honors

The winners of this year’s Ig Nobel Prizes have been announced, and included among them are a team studying the slipperiness of banana peels, another investigating the ability of pork strips to stop nosebleeds, and yet another gauging how reindeer react to humans in polar bear suits. The aforementioned honorees took home the physics, medicine, and arctic science prizes, respectively. The award in public health went to a team investigating whether it is mentally hazardous to own a cat, while the psychology award went to a team that found that night owls tend to be more psychopathic than early risers. Prizes were also awarded in several other categories. More…

this pressed: Photos: More wildlife in the Quad Cities | WQAD.com


Photos: More wildlife in the Quad Cities | WQAD.com.

article: The Aswan High Dam


The Aswan High Dam

Located near Aswan, Egypt, the Aswan High Dam regulates the Nile River‘s annual flooding and produces a great deal of hydroelectric power. Constructed from 1960 to 1970, it was financed largely by the Soviet Union after the US and Britain withdrew their financial support in 1956 due to differences with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser. The dam’s creation of Lake Nasser required the relocation of some 90,000 people. What else had to be relocated? More… Discuss

Trick? Treat? Male Halloween pennant dragonfy on pond’s edge await female. — USFWS Refuge System – September 16, 2014


endangered species: Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction


Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction

The Chinese sturgeon, considered a “living fossil” due to its 140-million-year history, may not be around for much longer. It is teetering on the brink of extinction, thanks in large part to rising pollution levels and the construction of numerous dams along the Yangtze River it calls home. Only 100 specimens are thought to remain in the wild, and for the first year on record, none reproduced naturally in the river in 2013. Without additional conservation efforts, there is little hope for the future of this ancient creature. More… Discuss

‘s birthday: todayAlexander von Humboldt (1769)


Alexander von Humboldt (1769)

A German naturalist and explorer, Humboldt traveled extensively and made observations and discoveries too numerous to count. Among other things, he discovered the connection between the Amazon and Orinoco river systems, surmised that lack of oxygen causes altitude sickness, studied the ocean current off the western coast of South America that was known for a time as the Humboldt Current, and added to an understanding of the development of the Earth’s crust. To what did he devote his final years? More… Discuss

Hawaii is a paradise…of bird extinction http://t.co/jkTaUx6mqq #SOTB14 pic.twitter.com/lYufd32CxM — Smithsonian


Hawaii is a paradise…of bird extinction http://t.co/jkTaUx6mqq #SOTB14 pic.twitter.com/lYufd32CxM

— Smithsonian (@smithsonian) September 10, 2014

environment/endangered species: California Blue Whale Makes a Comeback


California Blue Whale Makes a Comeback

Once teetering on the brink of extinction, the California blue whale has recovered in an unprecedented way—reaching about 97 percent of historic population levels. Researchers estimate that there are now 2,200 of these whales in existence. It is the only population of blue whale known to have rebounded from the ravages of whaling. The blue whale is the largest known animal on Earth, growing to nearly 100 feet (30 meters) in length and weighing in at 190 tons (172 tonnes), twice as much as the largest known dinosaur. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Last Passenger Pigeon Dies in Captivity (1914)


Last Passenger Pigeon Dies in Captivity (1914)

Billions of passenger pigeons inhabited eastern North America in the early 19th century, migrating in enormous flocks that darkened the skies for days at a time. They soon fell victim to habitat loss caused by mass deforestation, along with excessive hunting on an industrial scale. The bird‘s rapid extinction was largely responsible for ending the marketing of game birds and gave major impetus to the conservation movement. Where did the last known passenger pigeon die in 1914? More… Discuss

Flower Power: Dandelion Tires


Flower Power: Dandelion Tires

Dandelions are widely considered pesky weeds, but they have numerous uses, some of which we are just beginning to capitalize on. Until now, the tire industry has relied entirely on rubber-tree plantations in Southeast Asia for its natural rubber. However, researchers have been working to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan that yields tire-grade rubber and have achieved per-hectare yields on par with rubber-tree plantations, suggesting the flower is a viable alternative source of natural rubber. It may not be long before dandelion fields begin cropping up across the US and Europe to keep the wheels of the tire industry turning. More… Discuss

Image

IS THIS THE NEWEST PLANET THE SOLAR SYTEM?


Casa Jaya's photo.

Seals, Not Europeans, Brought Tuberculosis to New World


Seals, Not Europeans, Brought Tuberculosis to New World

Genetic tests have cast doubt on the long-held belief that Europeans arriving in the Americas in the 15th century introduced tuberculosis to the New World. The new evidence, collected from ancient Peruvian skeletons that predate the Europeans’ arrival by about 500 years, suggests it was not humans at all but seals that first brought TB to the Americas. Researchers hypothesize that seals picked up the disease from infected humans in Africa, where TB originated, and then carried it across the ocean to the Americas, where they were hunted and eaten, thereby transmitting the disease to humans there. More… Discuss

Gulf Dead Zone Roughly the Size of Connecticut


Gulf Dead Zone Roughly the Size of Connecticut

Human activities have created a “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico that is roughly the size of the state of Connecticut—about 5,000 square miles (13,000 sq km). Though this is several thousand square miles smaller than it was at its peak, it remains the second-largest dead zone in the world. Dead zones develop when there is insufficient oxygen near the ocean floor to support marine life. In most cases, this results from an overgrowth of algae fed by excessive nutrient runoff from farming and other human activities. More… Discuss

The Hot Zone Quotes


The Hot Zone Quotes

The Hot Zone The Hot Zone by Richard Preston

46,786 ratings, 4.06 average rating, 2,291 reviews

buy a copy

The Hot Zone Quotes (showing 1-16 of 16)

“In biology, nothing is clear, everything is too complicated, everything is a mess, and just when you think you understand something, you peel off a layer and find deeper complications beneath. Nature is anything but simple.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone

Read all quotations HERE

Ebola Crisis Deepens


Ebola Crisis Deepens

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed 729 lives in four countries thus far, making it the deadliest and widest ranging such outbreak the world has ever seen. Dozens of healthcare workers have fallen victim, complicating efforts to combat it. Though the disease is outpacing current efforts to contain its spread, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) still believes that the “unprecedented” outbreak could be stopped if proper steps are taken at both the national and international levels. To this end, a new, $100 million (75 million euro) Ebola response plan is being launched to combat the disease. More… Discuss

Preventing Alzheimer’s


Preventing Alzheimer’s

Researchers say a third of the world’s Alzheimer’s cases are preventable. They found that diabetes, mid-life hypertension, mid-life obesity, physical inactivity, depression, smoking, and poor education are all risk factors in the development of Alzheimer’s that can potentially be addressed to reduce risk. According to their calculations, reducing each risk factor by 10 percent could prevent nearly nine million cases of Alzheimer’s by 2050. More… Discuss

Desmond Tutu backs assisted dying


Desmond Tutu backs assisted dying http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-28282323

we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


we’re blessed, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The snow is melting on Kilimanjaro,
The snow is melting everywhere else
The water levels are rising, and they will continue to
Water cannot escape the earth, the air is captive:
We are lucky that way…
we’re blessed.

Facts on Pesticides – earthjustice.org‎ Adwww.earthjustice.org/pesticides‎ Top 12 Fruits and Vegetables You Should Buy Organic


About 5,290,000 results (0.33 seconds)       Facts on Pesticides - earthjustice.org‎     Adwww.earthjustice.org/pesticides‎     Learn about the impacts of pesticides on your health.     Earthjustice has 468 followers on Google+  Search Results      Safe Fruits and Veggies     www.safefruitsandveggies.com/     Should I be worried about pesticide residues on my fruits and vegetables? .... Warehouse store, traditional grocery store, small local market, specialty food ...     Top 12 Fruits and Vegetables You Should Buy Organic     gourmetfood.about.com/od/slowfoodorganiclocal/a/organicproduce.htm     by Brett Moore - The long term effects of consuming these pesticides has not been sufficiently ... Here is a list of the fruits and vegetables most contaminated and which you should buy ... Find a Local Farmers Market · How to Make Your Kitchen Eco-Friendly ..

About 5,290,000 results (0.33 seconds)
Facts on Pesticides – earthjustice.org‎
Adwww.earthjustice.org/pesticides‎
Learn about the impacts of pesticides on your health.
Earthjustice has 468 followers on Google+
Search Results
Safe Fruits and Veggies
http://www.safefruitsandveggies.com/
Should I be worried about pesticide residues on my fruits and vegetables? …. Warehouse store, traditional grocery store, small local market, specialty food …
Top 12 Fruits and Vegetables You Should Buy Organic
gourmetfood.about.com/od/slowfoodorganiclocal/a/organicproduce.htm
by Brett Moore – The long term effects of consuming these pesticides has not been sufficiently … Here is a list of the fruits and vegetables most contaminated and which you should buy … Find a Local Farmers Market · How to Make Your Kitchen Eco-Friendly ..

 

this pressed: Google I/O – What We Now Know – Forbes (google should use the profits in a socially responsible manner e.g. why not invest in nanothechnology to help the autoimune system fight, conquer and eradicate Multiple Myeloma ? instead of stupid robots?)


Google I/O: What We Now Know – Forbes.

Quicksilver


Quicksilver

Quicksilver, commonly known as mercury and represented in the periodic table with the symbol Hg, is a chemical element with an atomic number of 80. A heavy, silvery, transition metal, mercury is the only elemental metal that is liquid at room temperature. It is used in thermometers, barometers, and other scientific apparatuses. Due to the toxicity of the element, however, the use of mercury in thermometers has been largely phased out in the interests of health and safety. What has replaced it? More… Discuss

UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring



UC Davis MIND Institute Study Finds Association Between Maternal Exposure to Agricultural Pesticides, Autism in Offspring
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mindinstitute.ucdavis.edu

Source: http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
The work was supported by grants from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences R01-ES015359, P01-ES011269 and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results (STAR) grants R833292 and 829338. The study is available free of charge at:  http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1307044/