Category Archives: Health and Environment

Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051: make music part of your life series


Bach / I Musici, 1965: Brandenburg Concerto No. 6 in B flat major, BWV 1051- Complete

just a thought: “the reality of a conspiracy is that it stays a theory!”


just a thought:  “the reality of a conspiracy is that it stays a theory!” –George-B

Evangelical <b>Conspiracy</b> <b>Theories</b> by Gary Ellis

Nestle Scientists seem to have been cracking the mechanism throough which human body switches into producing more energy


Nestle: Could food have similar effect to exercise? (click to enlarge )

Nestle: Could food have similar effect to exercise? (click to enlarge )


ampk-metabolic-master-switch-infographic
(chart in PDF format can be accessed here)

 

An important step forward for better metabolic health


 

Lausanne, Switzerland, July 17, 2014 – New research led by scientists at the Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) could provide a clue to combat the growing epidemic of metabolic disorders. This work makes an important contribution to the knowledge and expertise that NIHS can apply in the future to develop nutritional solutions for improving metabolic health.

AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an enzyme that acts as a central molecular switch whose activation has many beneficial effects on metabolism. AMPK can be naturally activated by exercise in muscle, but if we also knew how to activate AMPK, for example, by diet, we could better control energy balance and maintain metabolic health. Regulation of AMPK is complex: it is controlled by the interplay between 3 subunits (a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits) and each subunit has multiple isoforms. A handful of synthetic small molecules have been reported to directly stimulate AMPK but, apart from thienopyridones (which stimulates AMPK through binding to one of the β subunit isoforms), precisely how they work has not yet been described.

Through a highly successful collaborative effort by an international team of scientists led by Prof. Kei Sakamoto and his group at NIHS, a research project was undertaken to characterise a recently identified AMPK activator. They identified a unique mechanism of action that displays a preference for a particular AMPK α-complex isoform.

via  An  important step forward for better metabolic health.

****Access Nestle Metabolic chart (PDF) here

 

 

 

this pressed for your right to know: Republicans quickly criticized Obama’s move on immigration, calling it presidential overreach.— Capital Journal (@WSJPolitics) November 21, 2014


this presssed for your right to know: House Files Litigation Over President’s Unilateral Actions on Health Care Law | Speaker.gov


WASHINGTON, DCHouse Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) today announced that the House of Representatives – consistent with the House-passed resolution H.Res. 676 – has filed litigation over President Obama’s unilateral actions on his health care law:

“Time after time, the president has chosen to ignore the will of the American people and re-write federal law on his own without a vote of Congress. That’s not the way our system of government was designed to work. If this president can get away with making his own laws, future presidents will have the ability to as well. The House has an obligation to stand up for the Constitution, and that is exactly why we are pursuing this course of action.”

NOTE: On July 30, 2014, the House of Representatives passed a resolution authorizing the House of Representatives to initiate litigation to challenge President Obama’s decision to unilaterally change various provisions of the health care law. The suit filed today against the Health & Human Services (HHS) and Treasury Secretaries – a copy of which can be downloaded here – will address two Executive Branch actions:

via House Files Litigation Over President’s Unilateral Actions on Health Care Law | Speaker.gov.

this pressed for your right to know: House Republicans sue Obama administration over health care law— The Truth 24 US (@TheTruth24US) November 21, 2014


this pressed for your right to know: Judicial Watch Email Proves White House And DOJ Colluded With @CBS— Judicial Watch


Other presidents exercised exec. power on immigration policy, but Obama may set precedent.— ProPublica (@ProPublica)


this pressed for your right to know: Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One – NYTimes.com


Photo In 1986, Ronald Reagan signed the so-called “amnesty” law passed by Congress that granted legal status to three million undocumented immigrants, and then acted on his own the following year to expand it to about 100,000 more. Credit Ron Edmunds/Associated Press

Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One

Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVISNOV. 20, 2014

President Obama’s action to shield millions of undocumented immigrants from deportation and grant them work permits opens a new front in the decades-long debate over the scope of presidential authority.

Although Mr. Obama is not breaking new ground by using executive powers to carve out a quasi-legal status for certain categories of unauthorized immigrants — the Republican Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush all did so — his decision will affect as many as five million immigrants, far more than the actions of those presidents.

Mr. Obama’s action is also a far more extensive reshaping of the nation’s immigration system.

“The magnitude and the formality of it is arguably unprecedented,” said Peter J. Spiro, a Temple University law professor. “It’s fair to say that we have never seen anything quite like this before in terms of the scale.”

via Obama’s Immigration Action Has Precedents, but May Set a New One – NYTimes.com.

this pressed…So that you know: Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents | OpenSecrets Blog


Home / News & Analysis / OpenSecrets Blog

Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents

by Sarah Bryner on November 19, 2014

Senate Democrats successfully blocked a bill Tuesday that would have approved construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The controversial measure fell one vote shy of overcoming a filibuster, with 59 senators supporting it and 41 opposing. The vote followed the bill’s approval in the House by a much wider margin, with 252 lawmakers voting to advance the pipeline.

The vote largely fell along party lines. All Senate Republicans supported construction of the pipeline but they were joined by 14 Democrats, including three of the four Democrat incumbents who lost their re-election bids earlier this month. For Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.), the bill’s main sponsor, the vote was considered an important test of her effectiveness in advance of a Dec. 6 runoff that will determine whether she keeps her seat. In the House, 31 Democrats crossed the aisle to side with the Republican majority.

via Senate Keystone “Yea” Votes Took In Six Times More Oil & Gas Money Than Opponents | OpenSecrets Blog.

this pressed for your right to know: House Republicans sue over #Obamacare— Reuters Politics (@ReutersPolitics) November 21, 2014


Malnutrition a Global Problem


Malnutrition a Global Problem

When we think of malnutrition, we typically think of undernutrition, but in truth the term refers to all types of bad nutrition, including overnutrition. With this definition in mind, a new report finds that malnutrition has become a serious public health issue for every nation in the world, with all but China having already crossed a “malnutrition red line.” Complicating the problem is the fact that about half of the world’s nations are grappling with both undernutrition and overnutrition at the same time. More… Discuss

quotation: “Humans in space suits make monkeys nervous.” ― Richard Preston, “The Hot Zone…”


The Hot Zone

The Hot Zone (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Humans in space suits make monkeys nervous.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the Origins of the Ebola Virus

this pressed: 10 Shocking Things About Ebola : Discovery News


Early symptoms of Ebola can appear harmless — fever, headache, aches, chills and sore throat. They could be the stuff of a normal illness.

But as the virus progresses, victims will experience nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, rash, chest pain and cough, weight loss and bleeding. In some cases, organs will shut down and cause unstoppable bleeding.

In the last stages of the disease, in a process known as a cytokine storm, the immune system goes haywire and inflammatory molecules called cytokines attack the body’s own tissue. Technically, then, it’s not the virus that kills people but instead their own immune systems ultimately turn against them.

Show here is Dr. Kent Brantly, a doctor who treated patients in Liberia before contracting the virus himself. Fortunately, he survived.

Samaritan’s Purse

via 10 Shocking Things About Ebola : Discovery News.

Study Finds Supplements Do Not Ward Off Dementia


Study Finds Supplements Do Not Ward Off Dementia

Higher levels of a chemical called homocysteine are believed to raise the risk of strokes and dementia, and vitamin B12 and folic acid lower homocysteine levels, leading researchers to investigate B12 and folic acid supplements as a possible means of preventing dementia. However, the results of a recent study found no difference in memory and thinking skills between those taking the supplements and those taking a placebo, suggesting that these supplements have little to no protective effect when it comes to dementia. More… Discuss

For all the people persecuted, for the “Ain’t Got No” around the world: Ain’t Got No, I Got Life – Nina Simone |Uploaded on Jun 22, 2010 views: 4,146,339 WOW!



Ain’t Got No, I Got Life – Nina Simone

 

 

climate change: More Lightning to Come with Warmer Climate


 

More Lightning to Come with Warmer Climate

As global temperatures rise, so too will lightning strikes, says one team of climate researchers. According to the team’s projections, every 1°C rise in global temperatures will lead to a 12 percent increase in lightning strikes, so that by 2100 there will be three lightning strikes for every two in 2000. Increased lightning strikes have both positive and negative implications for the environment. Lightning strikes currently ignite half of all wildfires in the US, so it stands to reason that wildfires may increase along with lightning. However, on a more positive note, lightning also produces nitrogen oxides, which indirectly regulate greenhouse gases like ozone and methane. More… Discuss

 

health: Jellyfish


 

Jellyfish

Jellyfish are marine invertebrates with umbrella-shaped bodies of a semi-transparent jellylike substance. Many of them have visible pink or orange internal structures. Jellyfish feed on small animals by paralyzing them with the stinging cells in their tentacles. A jellyfish sting typically causes minor discomfort to a human, but contact with the tentacles of the Portuguese man-of-war or the Australian box jellyfish can be life-threatening. What is the best way to treat a jellyfish sting? More… Discuss

 

The Future of Food: National Geographic



The Future of Food

 

This pressed: One in 30 American Children Is Homeless, Report Says – NBC News.com


So many families are living on the edge of poverty, that one little setback can push them into the abyss of homelessness. A new report released Monday shows that about one in 30 American children was homeless at some point last year. That’s about 2.5 million kids, and an 8 percent increase to “an historic high,” according to the study from the National Center on Family Homelesness. Just over half are younger than six years old.

via One in 30 American Children Is Homeless, Report Says – NBC News.com.

let’s not forget: Smallpox (1908). Eradicated thanks to marvels of vaccinations — Lindsey Fitzharris (@DrLindseyFitz)


this pressed for your right to know: Things Whole Foods doesn’t want you to know


Things Whole Foods doesn’t want you to know

There are few supermarket chains that enjoy a better reputation than Whole Foods Market. With nearly 400 locations, about 60,000 employees, and almost $13 billion in revenue for 2013, its dedication to selling natural and organic foods has clearly struck a chord with a population that’s looking to eat healthier, less-processed foods. But like any big company, there are plenty of things going on behind the scenes that they’d probably be happier if you didn’t know about.

Whole Foods has quite an intriguing history. Founders John Mackey and Renee Lawson borrowed $45,000 from friends and family to open a health food store called SaferWay in Austin in 1978, and after being evicted from their apartment for storing food in it, they took up residence in the store itself. Two years later, Mackey partnered with the owners of another natural store and opened the original Whole Foods, which was one of the largest health food stores in the country at the time. The following year, a flood devastated the store, resulting in about $400,000 in damages, but it had become so beloved by that time that the community pitched in to help it recover, and it reopened less than a month later.

via Things Whole Foods doesn’t want you to know.

this pressed: Surgeon who contracted Ebola virus in Sierra Leone dies at Nebraska hospital | Fox News


In this April 2014, file photo, provided by the United Methodist News Service, Dr. Martin Salia poses for a photo at the United Methodist Church‘s Kissy Hospital outside Freetown, Sierra Leone. (AP)

 

A surgeon who contracted the Ebola virus while working in Sierra Leone died at a Nebraska hospital where he was transported for treatment, the facility said Monday.

A statement released Monday by Nebraska Medical Center said Dr. Martin Salia “has passed away as a result of the advanced symptoms of the disease.”

“Dr. Salia was extremely critical when he arrived here, and unfortunately, despite out best efforts, we weren’t able to save him,” said Dr. Phil Smith, medical director of the biocontainment unit.

Salia, 44, was being treated in the medical center’s biocontainment unit. He arrived Saturday by plane from West Africa, and was transported by ambulance for treatment at the hospital, where two other Ebola patients have been successfully treated. Officials said Salia might be more ill than the first Ebola patients treated successfully in the United States. On Sunday officials had described his condition as “an hour-by-hour situation.”

via Surgeon who contracted Ebola virus in Sierra Leone dies at Nebraska hospital | Fox News.

Bike Fatalities Up in US


Bike Fatalities Up in US

As adults increasingly ditch their vehicles for more eco-friendly and waistline-friendly modes of transportation, more bikes end up on the road, and this isn’t all good. Simply put, more biking means more accidents and more fatalities. Between 2010 and 2012, the number of bicyclists killed in motor vehicle crashes in the US climbed 16 percent. The vast majority were adult males, most were not wearing helmets at the time, and a quarter of them were in fact legally drunk. More… Discuss

Be active/check this link:>>>>>>>>> MORE

“Be happy with what you have” — Being Human


this pressed for our collectice memory: #NBCNews Health Secretary Defends Affordable Care Act: HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell


Just a thought: “Transparency…is a one way mirror: one side can see through, while from the other you looks at your reflection”

Russia says Ukraine monitors biased


Russia says Ukraine monitors biased http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-30056604


UN Panel: Fossil Fuels Must Be Phased Out by 2100

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, a UN-backed panel of experts, has concluded that the unrestricted use of fossil fuels without carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology should be phased out by 2100 if we are to avoid dangerous climate change. While the costs of phasing out fossil fuel use and transitioning to renewable energy sources will undoubtedly be steep, failing to make the necessary changes will be more costly in the long run. More… Discuss

For your Health: Children Mistake Laundry Pods for Toys or Candy


Children Mistake Laundry Pods for Toys or Candy

Brightly colored detergent pods containing concentrated laundry soap have sent more than 700 children in the US to the hospital in the two years since the pods became widely available there, and poison control centers have fielded thousands of calls from worried parents and caregivers whose charges have been exposed to or ingested the contents of these packets. Some manufacturers have already altered their packaging to make the pods safer for children, and this seems to have had some positive effect, but it is still advisable to store such products out of the sight and reach of youngsters. More… Discuss

Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare, de Ion Creanga


Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare_ Ion Creanga (click to access here)

Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare_ Ion Creanga (click to access here)

Just a thought: Take a full sensorial visit in nature:… by George-B


Just a thought: “Take a full sensorial visit in nature: No, not the tunnel type, meant to exclude senses but one, rather a total immersion in nature: see everything, hear everything, experience everything, without judgement, with the sole purpose of…being in that moment!” -George-B

Take a Break from Taking a Load Off ( in order to keep our old memories alive we need to create new ones)


Take a Break from Taking a Load Off

It has been well documented that physical activity is vital to maintaining one’s health. While moderate to vigorous exercise provides the greatest benefit, even simply shifting from a sitting to a standing position could greatly benefit older adults. Researchers found that highly sedentary older adults who repeatedly break-up their sedentary behavior throughout the day have higher physical function than those who do not. They therefore recommend that for every hour spent in sedentary behavior, older adults interrupt it nine times. More… Discuss

The Northern Lights


 

Northern lights over Kulusuk, Greenland

Northern lights over Kulusuk, Greenland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Northern Lights

 

The northern lights, or aurora borealis, are a luminous display of various forms and colors in the night sky of the Northern Hemisphere. They are caused by

Plasmasphere

Plasmasphere (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

high-speed electrons and protons from the Sun, which are trapped in the radiation belt above Earth and channeled toward the polar regions by Earth’s magnetic field. These electrically charged particles enter the atmosphere and collide with air molecules, exciting them to luminosity. Who coined the name “aurora borealis” for this phenomenon? More… Discuss

 

Health and Civilization: Happiness and Aging (


Happiness and Aging

Polls of populations around the globe show that life satisfaction often waxes and wanes with age and differs depending on where people live. In Western nations, happiness bottoms out between the ages of 45 and 54 before rising again into old age, while in the former Soviet Union and Latin America, it declines throughout life. The reasons for these trends are complex and multifaceted, but one factor that seems to have a strong influence is a region’s economic prosperity, suggesting that money does in fact buy some measure of happiness. More… Discuss

this pressed: Austrian forensic experts may shed light on Mexico massacre | Reuters


Television cameramen walk at a garbage dump where remains were found outside the mountain town of Cocula, near Iguala in the southwestern state of Guerrero, November 8, 2014. REUTERS/Henry Romero

Television cameramen walk at a garbage dump where remains were found outside the mountain town of Cocula, near Iguala in the southwestern state of Guerrero, November 8, 2014. Credit: Reuters/Henry Romero

 

(Reuters) – Austrian forensics experts who helped solve the mystery of Russia’s murdered imperial family could soon shed light on the apparent massacre of 43 Mexican students through analysis of the tiniest of DNA fragments from badly burned remains.

The bodies of students abducted by corrupt police in Mexico six weeks ago were apparently burnt to ashes by drug gang members in an attempt to destroy the evidence.

Mexican authorities have said they would send the remains to Innsbruck‘s Medical University for DNA identification.

via Austrian forensic experts may shed light on Mexico massacre | Reuters.

Pressed as a mind opener: “Uncovered: The War On Iraq”


From Nourished Kitchen: Access from sidebar widget: Milk Kefir: What It Is and How to Brew It


Ethics, Environmental, Health: IS YOUR RIGHT TO KNOW ENOUGH? Effects of Feeding GMO Potatoes To Rats (Pt. 1)


Effects of Feeding GMO Potatoes To Rats (Pt. 1)

this pressed: Ebola virus refuses to stick to the script | Follow Ebola


English: Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC mi...

English: Ebola virus virion. Created by CDC microbiologist Cynthia Goldsmith, this colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) revealed some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“What has been revealed over the past two months is how skittish and profoundly insecure we feel, as individuals and as a species, and how fear is a brushfire easily fanned, by memories of best-selling books like Richard Preston’s 1994 “The Hot Zone” — soon to be a television miniseries, directed by Ridley Scott! — and by the fear-mongering of news media and politicians like New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. Most unnerving is that the virus isn’t conforming to popular expectation. A doctor in the full hazmat regalia still got infected? That’s not supposed to happen. The CDC proving to be as fallible as any human organization? Who’s writing this thing?Well, no one is. That’s how reality works. Things fall apart and get put back together — or not — in ways you wouldn’t believe. Entropy happens.”

via Ebola virus refuses to stick to the script | Follow Ebola.

Pathogenesis schematic

Pathogenesis schematic (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Engineers Develop Safer Button Battery


Engineers Develop Safer Button Battery

Button batteries, those easily ingested, little, disc-shaped batteries that power things like toys, watches, and hearing aids, are responsible for thousands of children’s emergency room visits every year. Some suffer severe injuries and even death as a result of the current these batteries release while in the digestive tract or as a result of battery leakage. However, a simple and cheap solution has been devised that could render the batteries harmless if swallowed. Engineers coated button batteries with a material that prevents them from releasing current unless they are squeezed firmly, as by springs in a battery compartment, and with a sealant that minimizes the risk of battery leakage. More… Discuss

Boston Could Someday Be the Venice of North America


Boston Could Someday Be the Venice of North America

Sinking land and rising sea levels have cities along the US east coast facing an uncertain future. Planners in Boston, Massachusetts, are so concerned that they are considering flooding the city intentionally. Well, not quite flooding so much as creating a system of canals that would crisscross the low-lying Back Bay area. While it seems unlikely that officials will elect such a drastic approach over simply shoring up foundations and raising infrastructure in anticipation of potential flooding, the plan to bring canal systems to North America has raised awareness of the challenges Boston and cities like it will face in the coming decades. More… Discuss

this pressed for your right to know: Number of people being actively monitored for Ebola in New York has tripled to 357 — Los Angeles Times


Ruby Bridges, the first black child to attend a white school in the American south: The temerity carry the world’s weight on your shoulder and understand: that is faith!


 

this pressed for your health: Preventing kidney stones: It may be as simple as changing your diet – The Washington Post


Removing kidney stones can be a complicated, sometimes painful process involving medication, surgery or even sound waves to break up the deposits. But preventing them may be as simple as drinking more water.

(Bigstock)

(Bigstock)

Kidney stones are extremely common — about 13 percent of men and 7 percent of women in the United States will get one in their lifetime — and occur when tiny crystals in the urine (calcium, phosphorus and other minerals or salts) come together to form a hard deposit. Studies have shown that 35 to 50 percent of people who get them will get them again within five years without treatment.

via

Preventing kidney stones: It may be as simple as changing your diet – The Washington Post.

Note: If you’re drinking bottles water choose one that clearly stated the adding of minerals present in drinking water.

this pressed: Louisiana Leper Home documents panic in the face of disease – The Globe and Mail


Baton Rouge, LA - 10/30/2014 - Mr. Simeon Peterson (aka "Mr. Pete" 86) sits in the physical therapy room at the National Hansen's Disease Center in Baton Rouge. Mr. Peterson was relocated to the leprosy camp in Carville, LA from his native US Virgin Islands in 1951. He is one of the last living residents of the leprosy center. (William Widmer/William Widmer)Baton Rouge, LA – 10/30/2014 – Mr. Simeon Peterson (aka “Mr. Pete” 86) sits in the physical therapy room at the National Hansen’s Disease Center in Baton Rouge. Mr. Peterson was relocated to the leprosy camp in Carville, LA from his native US Virgin Islands in 1951. He is one of the last living residents of the leprosy center. (William Widmer/William Widmer)

Louisiana Leper Home documents panic in the face of disease
***Omar El Akkad CARVILLE, LA. — The Globe and Mail

***Published Monday, Nov. 03 2014, 9:54 PM EST

via Louisiana Leper Home documents panic in the face of disease – The Globe and Mail.

today’s holiday: New York City Marathon


New York City Marathon

The New York City Marathon began in 1970 as a race four times around Central Park. In 1976, Fred Lebow and the New York Road Runners Club, the world’s largest running club and the race’s sponsor, decided to invite top runners from all over the world, and to run the course through all five New York boroughs. About 30,000 runners compete in the race, and over a million New Yorkers turn out to watch. The runners say that the crowds are enthusiastic and friendly, and city dwellers look upon it as a time to forget racial and ethnic differences and cheer the runners on. More… Discuss

This pressed: Cake to celebrate the success of the atomic testing program, 1946 — Historical Pics


this presssed for your bat week experience: National Bat Week Pictures: Just in Time for Halloween!


Mexican free-tailed bats fleeing a bat-cave preserve.

Bats on the Wing Photograph by Joel Sartore with Cole Sartore, National Geographic Creative

Bats on the Wing

Photograph by Joel Sartore with Cole Sartore, National Geographic Creative

Bats have long been associated with vampires, witches, and Halloween. But their bad reputation looks more like a trick than a treat.

Bats matter in a big way in countless ecosystems around the world. In truth, the only thing scary about bats is the rate at which they’re disappearing.

Bats are a wildly diverse order of mammals, with more than 1,300 species worldwide. About one out of every five mammal species is a bat.

Despite the way they’re often depicted in movies and television, only three species of bats feed exclusively on blood. Most species—around 70 percent—dine on insects, making them invaluable partners in human agriculture by removing crop pests. The rest eat nectar and fruit and serve as some of the best pollinators and seed dispersers on the planet.

via National Bat Week Pictures: Just in Time for Halloween!.

Skunks


Skunks

These small black-and-white mammals are best known for the foul-smelling oily liquid they expel when threatened. Skunks do not make use of this weapon unless severely provoked and then only after raising their tails in a warning display. Most animals quickly learn to avoid skunks because the odor of skunk spray is so strong. In addition to stinking, the spray causes choking and tearing of the eyes. What do researchers believe is essential to successfully neutralizing the skunk smell? More… Discuss