Category Archives: IN THE SPOTLIGHT

this pressed: LIAM 004 – We do not Decide our Futures, We Decide our Habits – Life Is A Marathon : Life Coaching | Self-Esteem | Confidence | Personal Development | Positive Thinking | Community


People do not decide their futures, they decide their habits and their habits decide their futures.
— F. Matthias Alexander

via LIAM 004 – We do not Decide our Futures, We Decide our Habits – Life Is A Marathon : Life Coaching | Self-Esteem | Confidence | Personal Development | Positive Thinking | Community.

quotation: “There is nothing more thrilling in this world, I think, than having a child that is yours, …”: Agatha Christie


There is nothing more thrilling in this world, I think, than having a child that is yours, and yet is mysteriously a stranger.

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) Discuss

today’s holiday: Malta Independence Day


Malta Independence Day

This is a nationwide celebration of Malta’s independence, achieved on September 21, 1964. Malta was under the control of various political entities from its earliest days. In the early 19th century, the Maltese acknowledged Great Britain’s sovereignty. Malta’s heroic stand against the Axis in World War II won a declaration that self-government would be restored at the end of the war, and indeed self-government under another constitution was granted in 1947. It was revoked and restored before independence was finally granted. Independence Day is celebrated with parades and festivities throughout the country. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Stephen King (1947)


Stephen King (1947)

King is a popular American author of horror stories and one of the best-selling writers worldwide. His work bears the mark of the 19th-century Gothic tradition, often taking everyday situations and revealing their macabre and horrific potential. He is noted for his cinematic style, and several of his novels and stories have been made into successful movies, including The Shining, Stand by Me, and The Shawshank Redemption. Under what pen names has King published? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Empress Dowager Cixi Ends Hundred Days of Reform in China (1898)


Empress Dowager Cixi Ends Hundred Days of Reform in China (1898)

Empress Dowager Cixi was the de facto ruler of China for much of the period between 1861 and 1908. After the death of Emperor Xianfeng, as well as that of his only heir—his son by Cixi—she violated normal succession order and named her adoptive infant nephew Guangxu to the throne. In 1898, during the “hundred days of reform,” Guangxu issued a series of radical decrees modernizing China’s political and social structure. Cixi opposed the reforms and engineered a coup. What became of Guangxu? More… Discuss

Artificial Sweeteners May Be Bad for Blood Sugar


 


English: Great taste without the sugar. The se...

English: Great taste without the sugar. The secret: isomalt. While other sugar free products use artificial sweeteners which create an overly sweet after-taste, Walter Sugar Free Wheat Pandesal uses isomalt. This ensures that the bread keeps its delightful original flavor minus the sugar. This is ideal for bread lovers with diabetes problems. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Artificial Sweeteners May Be Bad for Blood Sugar

 

English: idealized curves of human blood gluco...

English: idealized curves of human blood glucose and insulin concentrations during the course of a day containing three meals; in addition, effect of sugar-rich meal is highlighted; (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The longstanding debate about the advisability of replacing sugar in one’s diet with artificial sweeteners just got a little more complicated. Researchers found that the no-calorie sugar substitutes, meant to help keep things like weight and blood sugar levels in check, alter the balance of gut microbes linked to metabolic diseases like diabetes and may lead, or contribute, to elevated blood sugar levels. The research focused on three common artificial sweeteners: saccharin, sucralose, and aspartame. More… Discuss

 

 

 

The Pomegranate


 

The Pomegranate

 

Pomegranate Fruits. Español: Una granada, frut...

Pomegranate Fruits. Español: Una granada, fruto del granado (Punica granatum). Eesti: Granaatõun. Français : La grenade, fruit du grenadier. Русский: Плод граната. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The pomegranate is a reddish-yellow fruit native to semitropical Asia. Slightly larger than an orange, it has a tough rind, juicy pulp, and many seeds. The fruit is eaten fresh, the juice is a key ingredient in grenadine syrup, and the rind has been used as a medicinal astringent for centuries. The pomegranate has long been a religious and artistic symbol as well, appearing in ancient Asian literature, the Bible, and Greek mythology. Which Greek goddess was tricked into eating pomegranate seeds? More… Discuss

 

Unmasking the truth, poetic thought by George-B (The Smudge and other poems)


Unmasking the truth, poetic thought by George-B

Unmasking the truth,
Unlike skinning
a mushroom,
a tree,
a hare, a crocodile, a bird of paradise
is a matter of
intellectual quest,
curiosity, of
pretending to have found the place of gathering
that
most people avoid
where only few have the what-ever-it-is
that
make people step out of the safety of
sheepish crowds,

and expose their brains to the elements,
all
natural or human or inhumanly made…
It is also a matter of taste, sometimes a choice
but mostly a matter of no other choice at all.

©Always, by George-B.

Seattle Genetics: Blood Cancer Awareness Month


Seattle Genetics: Blood Cancer Awareness Month.

Angela Gheorghiu: “Ständchen” by Franz Schubert: great compositions/performances


Angela Gheorghiu: “Ständchen” by Franz Schubert

Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952: great compositions/performances


Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952

Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20: great compositions/performances


Prazak Quartet & Zemlinsky Quartet : Felix Mendelssohn String octet E-flat major Op. 20

Saint of the Day for Saturday, September 20th, 2014: Sts. Andrew Kim Taegon, Paul Chong Hasang, and Companions


“It seldom happens that any felicity comes…”: Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616)


It seldom happens that any felicity comes so pure as not to be tempered and allayed by some mixture of sorrow.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

Other quotations from Cervantes:

When the severity of the law is to be softened,
let pity, not bribes, be the motive.
- Miguel de Cervantes

When thou art at Rome, do as they do at Rome.
- Miguel de Cervantes

The most difficult character in comedy is that of the fool,
and he must be no simpleton that plays that part.
- Miguel de Cervantes

Led Zeppelin – Stairway To Heaven ( Live, 1973 ) W/ LYRICS: make music part of your life series


   Led Zeppelin – Stairway To Heaven  ( Live, 1973 ) W/ LYRICS

“Stairway to Heaven” live (Rodrigo y Gabriela)


Plácido Domingo Sings “Malagueña Salerosa”


Sophia Loren (1934); Remember “La Ciociara” (“Two Women”)?


today’s birthday:  Sophia Loren (1934)

Sophia Loren is a famous film actress who grew up in poverty near Naples, Italy. With the help of Italian producer Carlo Ponti, whom she later married, she gained international fame, acting in both tragic dramas and boisterous comedies. She won the first Academy Award for a foreign-language performance for her role in the 1961 film Two Women, and she received a special Academy Award in 1991 for her body of work. Why did she serve more than two weeks in prison in 1982? More… Discuss

La Ciociara – Vittorio de Sica by GM

What is: Ciociara? Is to Ciocharia what Malagueña is for Malaga


Ciociaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fresco representing the Campagne and Maritime Province, in Vatican Museums

Ciociara (woman from Ciociaria) by Enrique Simonet.

Ciociaria (Italian pronunciation: [tʃotʃaˈɾiːa]) is the name of a traditional region of Central Italy without a defined border nor historical identity.[1] The name was adopted by a fascist movement of Frosinone as an ethnical denomination for the province of Frosinone, when it was created in 1927.[2] In the Middle Ages, this region was referred to as Campagna. The local dialect, now known as ciociaro, was earlier referred to as campanino. In more recent times, the term Campagna Romana, or Roman Campagna, a favorite subject of countless painters from all over Europe, has referred to the adjoining region to the north of Ciociaria, but part of the Province of Rome.

The name appears to be derived from the ciocia (plural cioce), the traditional footwear still worn by a few sheep and cattle herders in the Central Apennines.

this day in the yesteryear: John Lennon Leaves the Beatles (1969): remember John’s song “Woman”?


John Lennon Leaves the Beatles (1969)

Tensions were high during the recording sessions for what were to be the Beatles’ final albums. John Lennon described working on Let It Be as “hell.” Exactly a month after finishing “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)”—the last time all four Beatles would be in the studio together—Lennon told his bandmates that he was going solo. To avoid jeopardizing sales of Abbey Road, which was released just days later, Lennon’s departure was kept a secret. When was the group’s dissolution formalized? More… Discuss

John Lennon – Woman (2010)

People and places: The Mekong Delta


Brick factory - Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

Brick factory – Mekong Delta, Vietnam. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mekong Delta

The Mekong River—the longest river in Southeast Asia—flows from southern China through Tibet, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, where it enters the South China Sea. The sediments it carries on the 2,700-mile (4,350-km) journey form the vast, extremely fertile Mekong Delta, which occupies southeast Cambodia and southern Vietnam. One of the greatest rice-growing areas in Asia, the densely populated delta region has been called a “biological treasure trove.” What did scientists recently discover there? More… Discuss

 

Bathtub Bulletin: Access here


Bathtub Bulletin Access Here

Bathtub Bulletin Access Here

The Wine and the Cup -Rumi


The Wine and the Cup -Rumi

The wine of divine grace is limitless:
All limits come only from the faults of the cup.
Moonlight floods the whole sky from horizon to horizon;
How much it can fill your room depends on its windows.
Grant a great dignity, my friend, to the cup of your life;
Love has designed it to hold His eternal wine.

Old, yet embelished with passage of time: Rumi and the Play of Poetry – University of California Television (UCTV)



Rumi and the Play of Poetry

Eliot Fisk and Chiara Morandi play “Sonata concertata” for guitar and violin by Paganin


Eliot Fisk and Chiara Morandi play “Sonata concertata” for guitar and violin by Paganini

Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi : make music part of your life series


Mozart – The Marriage of Figaro Overture (K.492) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi (HD)

Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20: make music part of your life series


Edward Elgar – Allegro for strings, Op.47 & Serenade for strings, Op.20

Saint of the Day for Friday, September 19th, 2014: St. Januarius


Image of St. Januarius

St. Januarius

St. Januarius was born in Italy and was bishop of Benevento during the Emperor Diocletion persecution. Bishop Januarius went to visit two deacons and two laymen in prison. He was then also imprison … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: Feast of San Gennaro


Feast of San Gennaro

San Gennaro, or St. Januarius, 4th-century bishop of Benevento, is the patron saint of Naples, Italy. He is said to have survived a fiery furnace and a den of wild beasts before being beheaded during the reign of Diocletian. His body was brought to Naples, along with a vial containing some of his blood. The congealed blood, preserved since that time in the Cathedral of San Gennaro, is claimed to liquefy on the anniversary of his death each year—an event that has drawn crowds to Naples since 1389. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mika Waltari (1908)


Mika Waltari (1908)

Finnish author Mika Waltari is best known for his 1945 historical novel The Egyptian, which is set during the reign of the Pharaoh Akhenaten and was hailed by Egyptologists for its accuracy in describing ancient Egyptian life. The themes explored in the book struck a chord with readers in the aftermath of World War II, and it became an international bestseller, serving as the basis for the 1954 Hollywood movie of the same name. Where—and when—are some of his other historical novels set? More… Discuss

Richard III’s Remains Reveal Brutal Battle Wounds


Richard III’s Remains Reveal Brutal Battle Wounds

Analysis of the remains of King Richard III, discovered under a Leicester parking lot in 2012, lends credence to historical accounts of his final battle. Computed tomography (CT) scans and micro-CT imaging have revealed injuries he sustained from blows to his head and body on that fateful day in 1485. The extensive injuries to his skull suggest that he was not wearing a helmet, while the lack of defensive injuries on his arms and hands indicates that he was otherwise still armor-clad. More… Discuss

Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92: make music part of your life series


Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92

Quintet in G minor Op. 49 by Enrique Granados: make music part ofyour life series


Quintet in G minor Op. 49 by Enrique Granados
I. Allegro

Maria Overman, Susanna Haley, violins
Gina Lee, viola
Anna Conway, violoncello
Heliqiong Sun, piano

Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants: make music part of your life series


[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03jxe68RDEU[/embed]

Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants

today’s holiday: Constitution Day and Citizenship Day


Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

English: SIGONELLA, Sicily (July 20, 2010) Can...

English: SIGONELLA, Sicily (July 20, 2010) Candidates for U.S. citizenship recite the oath of citizenship during a naturalization ceremony at Naval Air Station Sigonella. Eleven candidates from eight countries became citizens during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Erica R. Gardner/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The US holidays Constitution Day and “I Am an American” Day have been combined into Citizenship Day, which a number of states and cities celebrate with special exercises on September 17. Schools make a special effort to acquaint their students with the history and importance of the Constitution. Naturalization ceremonies, re-creations of the signing of the Constitution, and parades are other popular ways of celebrating Citizenship Day and bring attention to the rights and obligations of citizenship. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Treaty of Fredrikshamn Signed (1809)


Treaty of Fredrikshamn Signed (1809)

In the 17th century, Sweden was a major European power and controlled most of the Baltic coast. However, its expansion in the Baltic Sea coastlands antagonized Russia, Denmark-Norway, and Saxony-Poland, which formed an anti-Swedish coalition. The resultant Great Northern War cost Sweden much of its territory and marked the emergence of Russia as a major power. After Russia and Sweden clashed again in the 19th century, the 1809 Treaty of Fredrikshamn forced Sweden to cede all of what country? More… Discuss

$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola (doctors without borders are needed at….borders without doctors)


$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola

With the Ebola outbreak in West Africa still uncontained, the UN is increasing its calls for funding in the fight against the epidemic from $100 million just a month ago to $1 billion today. This health crisis, the World Health Organization’s assistant director-general says, is “unparalleled in modern times,” with thousands infected thus far and the number of cases projected to double every three weeks if containment efforts are not stepped up. According to the president of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders, the response to the outbreak has been insufficient thus far and the window of opportunity to contain the outbreak is closing. More… Discuss

article: The Aswan High Dam


The Aswan High Dam

Located near Aswan, Egypt, the Aswan High Dam regulates the Nile River‘s annual flooding and produces a great deal of hydroelectric power. Constructed from 1960 to 1970, it was financed largely by the Soviet Union after the US and Britain withdrew their financial support in 1956 due to differences with Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser. The dam’s creation of Lake Nasser required the relocation of some 90,000 people. What else had to be relocated? More… Discuss

this pressed: House Majority’s Last-Ditch Effort to Undermine Public Protections, Award Corporate Giveaways | Center for Effective Government


About the Author:
Katie Weatherford is a Regulatory Policy Analyst for the Center for Effective Government’s Regulatory Policy team. Her work focuses on the regulatory and rulemaking processes that impact public health, safety, and the environment.

House Majority’s Last-Ditch Effort to Undermine Public Protections, Award Corporate Giveaways | Center for Effective Government.

From EUROPARL: Nigel Farage: Stop playing wargames with Putin – Video source: EbS (European Parliament)


Nigel Farage: Stop playing wargames with Putin

Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection – ProPublica


Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection – ProPublica.

Robert Schumann: Introduction & Allegro in D minor Op. 134: make music part of your life series


Robert Schumann: Introduction & Allegro in D minor Op. 134

Palestinian Christians


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Palestinian Christians are Palestinians who belong to one of a number of Christian denominations in Israel and the Palestinian territories, including Oriental Orthodoxy, Anglican, Eastern Orthodoxy, Catholic (Eastern and Western rites), Protestant, and others. In both the local dialect of Palestinian Arabic and in classical or modern standard Arabic, Christians are called Nasrani (a derivative of the Arabic word for Nazareth, al-Nasira) or Masihi (a derivative of Arabic word Masih, meaning “Messiah“).[1] In Hebrew, they are called Notzri (also spelt Notsri), which means “Nazarene”.

Today, Christians comprise less than 4% of the Palestinian population of Israel and the Palestinian territories – approximately 8% of the Arab population of the West Bank, less than 1% in the Gaza Strip, and nearly 10% of the Arab population in Israel.[2] According to official British Mandatory estimates, Palestine’s Christian population in 1922 comprised 9.5% of the total population (10.8% of the Palestinian population), and 7.9% in 1946.[3] The Palestinian Christian population greatly decreased from 1948 to 1967. A large number fled or were expelled from the area during the 1948 Arab–Israeli War, and a small number left during Jordanian control of the West Bank for economic reasons. Since 1967, the Palestinian Christian population has increased in excess of the continued emigration.[4]

Worldwide, there are nearly one million Palestinian Christians in these territories as well as in the Palestinian diaspora, comprising over 10% of the world’s total Palestinian population. Palestinian Christians live primarily in Arab states surrounding historic Palestine and in the diaspora, particularly in South America, Europe and North America.

Demographics and denominations

In 2009, there were an estimated 50,000 Christians in the Palestinian territories, mostly in the West Bank, with about 3,000 in the Gaza Strip.[5] Of the total Christian population of 154,000 in Israel, about 80% are Arabs, many of whom also self-identify as Palestinian.[5] The majority (56%) of Palestinian Christians live in the Palestinian diaspora.[6]

According to the CIA World Factbook, as of 2013, the population statistics on Palestinian and related Arab-Israeli Christians are as follows:[7][8][9]

Population group Christian population  % Christian
West Bank* 214,000 8
Gaza Strip 12,000 0.7
Arab Christians in Israel** 123,000 10
Non-Arab Christians in Israel 29,000 0.4
Total Arab Christians 349,000 6.0
Total Christians (including non-Arabs) 378,000 3.0
* The figure includes Samaritans and other unspecified minorities.[dubious ]**Arab Christians in Israel do not necessarily identify as Palestinian.

Around 50% of Palestinian Christians belong to the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, one of the 16 churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. This community has also been known as the Arab Orthodox Christians. There are also Maronites, Melkite-Eastern Catholics, Jacobites, Chaldeans, Roman Catholics (locally known as Latins), Syriac Catholics, Orthodox Copts, Catholic Copts, Armenian Orthodox, Armenian Catholic, Quakers (Friends Society), Methodists, Presbyterians, Anglicans (Episcopal), Lutherans, Evangelicals, Pentecostals, Nazarene, Assemblies of God, Baptists and other Protestants; in addition to small groups of Jehovah’s Witnesses, Mormons and others.

The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, Theófilos III, is the leader of the Palestinian and Jordanian Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, but Israel has refused to recognize his appointment.[10] If confirmed, he would replace Patriarch Irenaios (in office from 2001), whose status within the church became disputed after a term surrounded by controversy and scandal given that he sold Palestinian property to Israeli Orthodox Jews.[11] Archbishop Theodosios (Hanna) of Sebastia is the highest ranking Palestinian clergyman in the Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem.

The Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, is the leader of the Roman Catholics in Jerusalem, Palestine, Jordan, Israel and Cyprus. The Anglican Bishop in Jerusalem is Suheil Dawani,[12] who replaced Bishop Riah Abou Al Assal. Elias Chacour, a Palestinian refugee, of the Melkite Eastern Catholic Church is Archbishop of Haifa, Acre and the Galilee. Bishop Dr. Munib Younan is the president of the Lutheran World Federation and the Bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Jordan and the Holy Land (ELCJHL).

Alessandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor for Oboe, Strings Orchestra and Continuo: make music part of your life series


Alessandro Marcello, Concerto in D minor for Oboe, Strings Orchestra and Continuo

Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379: make music part of your life series


Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379

Saint of the Day Saint of the Day for September 16th, 2014: St. Cornelius


Saint of the Day

Saint of the Day for September 16th, 2014 Image    St. Cornelius

Cornelius whose feast day is September 16th. A Roman priest, Cornelius was elected Pope to succeed Fabian in an election delayed fourteen months by Decius‘ persecution of the Christians. The main … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

today’s holiday: Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine Matsuri


Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine Matsuri

After the opening ceremonies on September 14, the annual celebration at the Tsurugaoka Hachiman Shrine in Kamakura, Japan, begins on the 15th with a parade of three mikoshi, portable shrines to which the spirits of the gods are believed to descend. But the highlight occurs the following day, when the Yabusame takes place. Three skilled archers dressed in hunting clothes called karishozoku ride on horseback down a straight track near the shrine’s entrance. The archers then shoot at three targets set up along the route while traveling at high speeds. More… Discuss

quotation: The wise man does at once what the fool does finally. Niccolo Machiavelli


The wise man does at once what the fool does finally.

Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Federation of Malaysia Created (1963)


Federation of Malaysia Created (1963)

The Japanese occupation of the Malayan region during World War II weakened British influence there and unleashed anti-colonial, Malayan nationalism. With the help of the Chinese, the Malayan Communist Party grew stronger, fought the Japanese occupation, and threatened British interests. In response, the British established the multi-ethnic Federation of Malaya in 1948 as a part of a wider anti-communist plan. In 1963, “Malaya” became “Malaysia” with the acquisition of what territories? More… Discuss

endangered species: Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction


Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction

The Chinese sturgeon, considered a “living fossil” due to its 140-million-year history, may not be around for much longer. It is teetering on the brink of extinction, thanks in large part to rising pollution levels and the construction of numerous dams along the Yangtze River it calls home. Only 100 specimens are thought to remain in the wild, and for the first year on record, none reproduced naturally in the river in 2013. Without additional conservation efforts, there is little hope for the future of this ancient creature. More… Discuss