Category Archives: MY PREFERATE RHYMES

today’s birthday: William Makepeace Thackeray (1811)


William Makepeace Thackeray (1811)

Thackeray was an English novelist and satirist. In his lifetime, he was seen as the only possible rival of Charles Dickens for his pictures of contemporary life. Thackeray achieved widespread popularity in 1848 with Book of Snobs, but he is best known for another of his novels published that year, Vanity Fair, a satirical panorama of upper-middle-class London life in the early 19th century. Who were Charles James Yellowplush, Michael Angelo Titmarsh, and George Savage Fitz-Boodle? More… Discuss

make muisc part of your life series: Erik Satie – Gnossienne, 5. Modéré (08)


Erik Satie – Gnossienne, 5. Modéré (08)

Erik Satie – Gnossienne, 5. Modéré (08)

Daniel Varsano, Philippe Entremont – Erik Satie: Piano Works

Prokofiev – Piano sonata n°6 – Richter Locarno 1966 (great compositions/performances)


Prokofiev – Piano sonata n°6 – Richter Locarno 1966

Sergei Prokofiev:
Piano sonata n°6 op.82

I. Allegro moderato 0:00
II. Allegretto 8:55
III. Tempo di valzer lentissimo 12:45
IV. Vivace 19:07

Sviatoslav Richter
Live recording, Locarno, 18.IX.1966

make music part of your life series: Gabriel Faure, Pelleas and Melisande Suite, Op. 80


Gabriel Faure, Pelleas and Melisande Suite, Op. 80

GABRIEL FAURE: Pelleas and Melisande Suite, Op. 80:

1. Prelude – 00.10
2. Entr’acte: La Fileuse – 06.20
3. Sicilienne de Pelleas et Melisande – 09.20
4. La mort de Melisande – 13.10

Sinfonietta Sofia Orchestra,  conductor Christo Pavlov
New Concert Hall, 01 Oct 2011

Sofia, Bulgaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Fauré at about the time of his Pelléas et Mélisande music

Pelléas et Mélisande, Op. 80 is a suite derived from incidental music by Gabriel Fauré for Maurice Maeterlinck‘s play of the same name. He was the first of four leading composers to write music inspired by Maeterlinck’s drama. Debussy, Schoenberg and Sibelius followed in the first decade of the 20th century.

Fauré’s music was written for the London production of Maeterlinck’s play in 1898. To meet the tight deadline of the production, Fauré reused some earlier music from incomplete works and enlisted the help of his pupil Charles Koechlin, who orchestrated the music. Fauré later constructed a four-movement suite from the original theatre music, orchestrating the concert version himself.

History

 

The score was commissioned in 1898 by Mrs Patrick Campbell for the play’s first production in English, in which she starred with Johnston Forbes-Robertson and John Martin-Harvey.[n 1] Mrs Campbell had invited Debussy to compose the music, but he was busy working on his operatic version of Maeterlinck’s play, and declined the invitation.[2] Debussy in his letter said: “j’aimerai toujours mieux une chose où, en quelque sorte, l’action sera sacrifiée à l’expression longuement poursuivie des sentiments de l’âme. Il me semble que là, la musique peut se faire plus humaine, plus vécue, que l’on peut creuser et raffiner les moyens d’expression” (“I will always prefer a thing in which, in a way, the action is sacrificed for the expression sought after by the soul. It seems to me that in that case, the music is more human, more lived, that we can refine our means of expression”).[3]

 

 

Fauré was in London in March and April 1898, and was introduced to Mrs Campbell by the musical benefactor Frank Schuster.[4] Fauré accepted her invitation to compose the music for the production, despite the tight deadline – the play was to open in June of that year. He wrote to his wife, “I will have to grind away hard for Mélisande when I get back. I hardly have a month and a half to write all that music. True, some of it is already in my thick head!”[5] It was Mrs Campbell who commissioned Fauré to write the incidental music to the play. She “felt sure M. Gabriel Fauré was the composer needed.”[6]

 

As he often did, Fauré reused music written for incomplete or unsuccessful works.[7] A sicilienne from his unfinished 1893 score for Le Bourgeois gentilhomme was the most substantial piece retrieved for Pelléas et Mélisande.[8] Pressed for time, and never greatly interested in orchestrating, Fauré enlisted the help of his pupil Charles Koechlin, who accompanied him to London.[5] The complete incidental music comprised 19 pieces (2 are missing) of varying length and importance.[9]

 

Fauré conducted the orchestra for the premiere, at the Prince of Wales’s Theatre on 21 June 1898.[10] Mrs Campbell was enchanted by his music, in which, she wrote, “he had grasped with most tender inspiration the poetic purity that pervades and envelops M. Maeterlinck’s lovely play”.[11] She asked him to compose further theatre music for her in the first decade of the 20th century, but to his regret his workload as director of the Paris Conservatoire made it impossible.[12] Over the next 14 years, she revived the play, always using Fauré’s score. In 1904, the music was used for a production of the original French version of the play, starring Sarah Bernhardt.[9] Fauré’s incidental music was used again in Georgette Leblanc‘s production of the play in the cloisters and gardens of Saint-Wandrille abbey in August 1910, conducted by Albert Wolff.[13]

 

There are two different versions of the original theatre score for Pelléas et Mélisande in existence. The first is Koechlin’s autograph of the orchestral score, dating from May and June 1898, and incorporating several rough sketches by Fauré in short score.[9] The second is the conducting score used by Fauré in London; this is also a manuscript in Koechlin’s handwriting.[9]

 

Fauré later reused the music for Mélisande’s song in his song cycle La chanson d’Ève, adapting it to fit words by the Symbolist poet Charles van Lerberghe.[14] The Sicilienne became very popular as an independent piece, with arrangements for flute and piano (by Henri Büsser among others), for cello and piano, as well as other instruments. Extracts from Pelléas et Mélisande were used by George Balanchine as the score for the Emeralds section of his 1967 ballet Jewels.

 

After Fauré, three other leading composers completed works inspired by Maeterlinck’s drama: Debussy‘s opera (1902), Schoenberg‘s early tone poem (1903) and Sibelius‘s incidental music (1905).[15]

Survivors, poetic thought by George-B ©Always (The smudge and other poems)


Survivors, poetic thought by George-B ©Always (The smudge and other poems)

I’ve witnessed moments like this
Made of lights and shadows,
with aroma of licorice and tarragon
tasting like roasted bell peppers and eggplants

I’ve witnessed moments like this
In sepia, and black and white, faintly smelling of retouching indigo

Papillon:

In the depth of the jungle, the smell of mushrooms is stronger
that any other smell except that of decaying matter

I’ve witnessed moments like this
of serenity: when being takes over the fear of dying,
of falling, through the holes in the old dragnet:
tilapia is a smart fish: it turns on one side,
at the bottom,
just above the mud,
avoiding the net…
other fishes are learning the technique: They are survivors.

The Tomb of Nakht, 1500 BC, contains a tilapia hieroglyph just above the head of the central figure.

Regina Spektor – “Samson” [OFFICIAL VIDEO] and lyrics


Regina Spektor – “Samson” [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Regina Spektor “Samson” Directed by Peter Sluszka

REGINA SPEKTOR  – Samson

You are my sweetest downfall

I loved you first, I loved you first

Beneath the sheets of paper lies my truth

I have to go, I have to go

Your hair was long when we first met

Samson went back to bed
Not much hair left on his head
He ate a slice of wonder bread and went right back to bed
And history books forgot about us and the bible didn’t mention us
And the bible didn’t mention us, not even once

You are my sweetest downfall
I loved you first, I loved you first
Beneath the stars came fallin’ on our heads
But they’re just old light, they’re just old light
Your hair was long when we first met

Samson came to my bed
Told me that my hair was red
Told me I was beautiful and came into my bed
Oh I cut his hair myself one night
A pair of dull scissors in the yellow light
And he told me that I’d done alright
And kissed me ’til the mornin’ light, the mornin’ light
And he kissed me ’til the mornin’ light

Samson went back to bed
Not much hair left on his head
Ate a slice of wonderbread and went right back to bed
Oh, we couldn’t bring the columns down
Yeah we couldn’t destroy a single one
And history books forgot about us
And the bible didn’t mention us, not even once

You are my sweetest downfall
I loved you first
 ////////////////////////|\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\

Regina’s album ‘What We Saw from the Cheap Seats‘ is available now:
http://smarturl.it/whatwesawitunesyt

For more Regina:
http://Facebook.com/ReginaSpektor
http://ReginaSpektor.com
http://myspace.com/ReginaSpektor 

make music part of your life series: Aram Khachaturian: Spartacus – Ballet Suite No. 2


The monument of the composer Aram Khachaturian...

The monument of the composer Aram Khachaturian (1903 – 1978). http://www.armeniapedia.org/index.php?title=Aram_Khachaturian (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Aram Khachaturian: Spartacus – Ballet Suite No. 2

1. Adagio of Spartacus and Phrygia
2. Entrance of Merchants, Dance of a Roman Courtesan, General Dance 8:52
3. Entrance of Spartacus, Quarrel, Harmodius’ Treachery 13:15
4. Dance of the Pirates 19:21

Scottish National Orchestra
Neeme Järvi – conductor

make music part of your life series: Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)


Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Missa Brevis No. 8 in C major, K. 259, is a mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, probably in 1776.[1] It is scored for SATB soloists, SATB choir, violin I and II, 2 oboes, 2 clarini (high trumpets), 3 trombones colla parte, timpani and basso continuo.

Although classed as a missa brevis (brief mass), the inclusion of trumpets in the scoring makes it a missa brevis et solemnis.[1][2] The mass derives its nickname Orgelmesse or Orgelsolomesse (Organ Solo Mass) from the obbligato organ solo entry of the Benedictus.[1][3] This is one of three masses Mozart composed in November and December 1776, all set in C major, including the Credo Mass (K. 257) and the Piccolominimesse (K. 258).[4]

The work consists of six movements. Performances require approximately 10–15 minutes.

  1. “Kyrie” Andante, C major, common time
  2. “Gloria” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  3. “Credo” Allegro, C major, common time
  4. Sanctus” Adagio maestoso, C major, 3/4
    “Pleni sunt coeli et terra…” Allegro, C major, cut common time
  5. “Benedictus” Allegro vivace, G major, 3/4
    “Hosanna in excelsis…” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  6. Agnus Dei” Adagio, C major, common time
    Dona nobis pacem…” Allegro, C major, 3/4

FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki

great compositions/performances: Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart’s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel :-)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Neuer Markt in Vienna with Capuchin Church and Haus zur Mehlgrube on the right, painting by Bernardo Bellotto, 1760

The Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K. 466, was written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1785. The first performance took place at the Mehlgrube Casino in Vienna on February 11, 1785, with the composer as the soloist.[1]

Movements

The concerto is scored for solo piano, flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. As is typical with concertos, it is in three movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Romanze
  3. Allegro assai

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this day in the yersteryear: The Bahamas Gain Independence from the British Commonwealth (1973)


 

The Bahamas Gain Independence from the British Commonwealth (1973)

 

English: Reception of the American Loyalists b...

English: Reception of the American Loyalists by Great Britain in the Year 1783. Engraving by H. Moses after Benjamin West. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Bahama Islands became a British colony in the 18th century, when they were a haven for pirates such as Blackbeard. After the American Revolution, many Loyalists settled there, bringing slaves to labor on cotton plantations. Later, during the prohibition era in the US, the Bahamas became a base for rum-running. It was not until 1973 that the islands became a sovereign state within the Commonwealth of Nations. What happened to the native tribe that Columbus first encountered there in 1492? More… Discuss

 

make music part of your life series: George Gershwin – Cuban Overture


George GershwinCuban Overture

Uploaded on Aug 9, 2010

Born the son of Russian-Jewish immigrants into the vibrant life of Manhattan, George Gershwin created much of the twentieth century’s musical highlights, with an endless stream of hit shows. His fascination with classical music, and his fusion of many varied musical forms like jazz, blues and ragtime, brought us the likes of Porgy and Bess and Rhapsody in Blue.

Cuban Overture (running time : 11:16)
Courtesy goes to Richard Hayman and his Symphony Orchestra.

Gershwin’s Cuban Overture, described aptly as a “Rhumba” , was written in 1932. It is a lively evocation of the spirit of Cuba, bringing together the two sides of composer’s abilities, a synthesis of art, jazz and Latin America.