Category Archives: MY TAKE ON THINGS

QUOTATION: Daniel Defoe


And of all plagues with which mankind are curst, Ecclesiastic tyranny’s the worst.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) Discuss

The Beatles – Back in the USSR


The Beatles - Back in the USSR

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


Drink moderately, for drunkeness neither keeps a secret, nor observes a promise.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: “Nearer My God To Thee” I SALONISTI


Enhanced by Zemanta

SAINT OF THE DAY April 14: ST. LYDWINE


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 14 Saint of the Day

ST. LYDWINE
April 14: St. Lydwine is the patroness of sickness Lydwine of Schiedam was … Read More

April
14
Enhanced by Zemanta

Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band ( Full Album Remastered 2009) – The Beatles


Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band ( Full Album Remastered 2009) – The Beatles

1. Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band - 0:00
2. With a Little Help from My Friends - 2:02
3. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds - 4:46
4. Getting Better - 8:15
5. Fixing a Hole - 11:03
6. She’s Leaving Home - 13:39
7. Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite - 17:14
8. Within You Without You - 19:53
9. When I’m Sixty-Four - 24:57
10. Lovely Rita - 27:35
11. Good Morning Good Morning - 30:17
12. Sgt Pepper’s (Reprise) - 33:00
13. A Day in the Life - 34:20

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (often shortened to Sgt. Pepper) is the eighth studio album by the English rock band The Beatles, released on 1 June 1967 on the Parlophone label and produced by George Martin. The album is widely regarded as one of the greatest of all time, and has since been recognised as one of the most important albums in the history of popular music, including songs such as “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” and “A Day in the Life”. Recorded over a 129-day period beginning in December 1966, Sgt. Pepper saw the band developing the production techniques of their previous album, Revolver. Martin’s innovative and lavish production included the orchestra usage and hired musicians ordered by the band. Genres such as music hall, rock and roll, pop rock, and traditional Indian music are covered. The album cover art, by English pop artist Peter Blake, depicts the band posing in front of a collage of their favourite celebrities, and has been widely acclaimed and imitated.

From Wikipedia: The Grammy Award-winning album packaging was art-directed by Robert Fraser, designed by Peter Blake andJann Haworth, his wife and artistic partner, and photographed by Michael Cooper. It featured a colourful collage of life-sized cardboard models of famous people on the front of the album cover and the lyrics printed in full on the back cover, the first time this had been done on a rock LP.[147] In the guise of the Sgt. Pepper band, the Beatles, all mustachioed, were dressed in custom-made satin day-glo-coloured military-style outfits (Lennon inlime, Harrison in tangerine, McCartney in cyan, and Starr in magenta). The suits were conceived by the Beatles and manufactured by the theatrical costumer M. Berman Ltd. in London,[148] with some parts designed byManuel Cuevas.[149][150] Among the insignia on their uniforms are: MBE medals on McCartney’s and Harrison’s jackets, the Royal Coat of Arms of the United Kingdom on Lennon’s right sleeve and an Ontario Provincial Police flash on McCartney’s sleeve.

The centre of the cover depicts the Beatles standing behind a drum skin, on which are painted the words of the album’s title. The skin was painted by fairground artist Joe Ephgrave.[151] In front of the drum skin is a series of flowers that spell out “Beatles”. A collage depicts around 60 famous people, including writers, musicians, film stars, and (at Harrison’s request) a number of Indian gurus. The final grouping included: Mahavatar BabajiIssy BonnMarlon BrandoLenny BruceLarry BellWallace BermanWilliam S. BurroughsLewis CarrollAleister CrowleyMarlene DietrichDiana DorsBob DylanW.C. FieldsSigmund FreudOliver HardyAldous Huxley,Carl Gustav JungStan LaurelT. E. LawrenceKarl MarxMarilyn MonroeSir Robert PeelEdgar Allan PoeKarlheinz StockhausenH. G. WellsMae WestOscar WildeShirley TempleParamahansa Yogananda and Yukteswar Giri.[152] Also included was the image of the original Beatles’ bassist, the late Stuart SutcliffePete Best said in a later NPR interview that Lennon borrowed family medals from his (Best’s) mother Mona for the shoot, on condition that he did not lose them. Adolf Hitlerand Jesus Christ were requested by Lennon, but ultimately they were left out.[153] Images from the session reveal that a cutout of Hitler was indeed produced and brought to the studio, but never incorporated into the final tableau. A photo also exists of a rejected cardboard printout with a cloth draped over its head; its identity is unknown. The final cost for the cover art was nearly £3,000 (equivalent to £46,104 today) an extravagant sum for a time when album covers would typically cost around £50.[154]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Blue Skies (gypsy jazz) – Gonzalo Bergara Quartet with Leah Z on vocals – Steve’s Live Music



Gypsy Jazz with the right balance of vocals and hot instrumentals, and above all rock steady driving rhythm. Thanks to Charlie and Steve for bringing this group through Atlanta.

Enhanced by Zemanta

“Blue Skies” performed by Nina Simone



“Blue Skies” performed by Nina Simone
Recording session: Live in Cologne at One World Music Festival, 7/22/1990

Enhanced by Zemanta

Blue Skies: Willie Nelson & Kenny Rogers



Willie Nelson and Kenny Rogers sing “Blue Skies” live from the NBC Kenny, Dolly and Willie special. I won a prime time Emmy for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Variety or Music Series or a Special for my mix of this show.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich: Ballet Suite No. 4



The Queer Urban Orchestra, under the direction of Nolan Dresden, performs Dmitri Shostakovich’s Ballet Suite No. 4 at our Mysterium concert, March 20, 2011. The work is in three movements: I – Introduction and Variations; II – Waitz; and III – Scherzo.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Rachmaninoff’s Variation 18 Rhapsody on Themes of Paganini Valentina Lisitsa



Live footage from the recording session. London Symphony Orchestra , Michael Francis conducting. The recording is available now on Decca. Get yours today! :-)
iTunes: http://smarturl.it/paganinirhapsody
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/LisitsaPaganini

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ioana Radu – Primăvara a sosit (Romanta)


Enhanced by Zemanta

Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures



Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures
(Welcome to all the pleasures (An Ode for St. Cecilia’s Day), for soloists, chorus & instruments, Z. 339)

Welcome to All the Pleasures is one of the Odes written for the celebration of St. Cecilia’s Day byHenry Purcell. The libretto is by Christopher Fishburn. Purcell had been writing Odes for the Royal Family since 1680, but in 1683 the Musical Society of London commissioned him to write an ode in honor of the public celebration of the feast of St. Cecilia. The “Musical Society” was a group of amateur and professional musicians that had organized a festival for the “great patroness of music.” It was the first year of their festival and Purcell was their first commissioned composer. Purcell composed the work for three solo voices, chorus, four-part strings, and continuo. Formally, he produces a concerto grosso effect when he balances the trio of voices (concertino) against the chorus and orchestra (ripieno).

The opening symphony has two movements; one maestoso and the second vivace. The maestoso is full of suspensions and canonic entrances and has a full texture. The vivace is contrapuntal throughout. The words “Welcome to all the Pleasures” are set on imitative entrances. When each voice proclaims “Welcome!,” an echo of invitations is produced. “Hail Great Assembly” breaks out in fugal style. The movement ends with an instrumental ritornello.

Here the Deities Approve is a countertenor solo written over a three measure ground bass. The vocal line is lyrical and plastic; the countertenor soars above the rest of the ensemble. There follows a string ritornello. Throughout this ode Purcell uses instruments at least as much as the voices. While joys Celestial sets joys on dotted rhythmic figures, and places the word “Celestial” on a falling, augmented dotted figure. The effect is joyful and celestial. Then there follows an instrumental ritornello based on the dotted rhythmic theme. Purcell imitates and varies this theme within a highly contrapuntal texture.

Then Lift up your Voices features a solo and chorus. Again the chorus begins with imitative entrances, but eventually comes together in homophony. Afterwards there is a solo harpsichord interlude, which can be played extemporaneously, making for a beautiful respite from the rest of the ode. Beauty, thou scene of love is a beautiful tenor solo. The solo is in two sections, the first of which is repeated. The ritornello takes over the solo line from the tenor voice as Purcell sets it in an inventive four-part contrapuntal style.

In a consort of voices has a diatonic, joyful melody in E major, and adds a bright feeling to the movement. The tenor voice has a solo based on the opening theme, and soon the chorus enters canonically. One of the most striking aspects of this movement is Purcell’s setting of the name “Cecilia,” which he repeats many times in all the voices and registers. He sets the music to the sound of the word. He ends the piece by having the singers drop out one by one, starting with the treble voices. Finally the bass is left alone to quietly sing the final “Ce-cil-ia.”

Liana Brook Guberman, Soprano
Jenny Green, Soprano
Alexandra Lushtak, Soprano
Christopher Sokolowski, Tenor
Christian Zaremba, Bass 
Hudson Valley Chamber Singers,
Hudson Valley Singers,
NYMO Ensemble,
Anastasia Dedik, Harpsichord
Eu, Harpsichord, organ, direction

Enhanced by Zemanta

Apr 13 – Homily: St. Martin I, Suffering in Faith



Apr 13 – Homily: St. Martin I, Suffering in Faith
Fr. Elias on the life of St. Martin I the last Pope to be martyred in 655. He suffered greatly and even complained but in a fruitful way.
Ave Maria! 
Mass: St. Martin I – Opt Mem – Form: OF
Readings: Saturday 2nd Week of Easter
1st: act 6:1-7
Resp: psa 33:1-2, 4-5, 18-19
Gsp: joh 6:16-21
To Download Audio go to http://airmaria.com?p=34919

    1.  

 

 

  • The Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore, or church of Santa Maria Maggiore, is the largest Catholic Marian church in Rome, Italy. Wikipedia

 

 

 

  • AddressPiazza di S. Maria Maggiore, 42, 00100 Roma, Italy

 

 

 

 

 

  • Phone+39 06 6988 6800

 

 

 

 

    1.  

 

  • Archbasilica of St. John Lateran
    Basilica in Rome, Italy

 

  • The Papal Archbasilica of St. John Lateran, commonly known as St. John Lateran’s Archbasilica, St. John Lateran’s Basilica, and just The Lateran Basilica, is the cathedral church of the Diocese of Rome … Wikipedia

 

 

 

  • AddressPiazza di San Giovanni in Laterano, 4, Roma, Italy

 

 

 

 

  • Phone+39 06 6988 6433

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Gustave Flaubert


Nothing is more humiliating than to see idiots succeed in enterprises we have failed in.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

25 Most Famous Last Words Ever Uttered (YouTube)


Published on May 2, 2013 VIEWS: 482,894

Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/f27GV

It is believed that people tend to become the most honest when they are about to die. Some have even said that of all the words a man utters in his entire lifetime, it is what he says on his death bed that makes the most sense. Here is a list of the 25 most famous last words ever uttered by some of the most celebrated heroes, celebrities and political leaders in the course of history, as well as relatively brief accounts of why they said those words.

https://twitter.com/list25
https://www.facebook.com/list25
http://list25.com

Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-most-famous-last…

Here’s a preview:

- Sir James Matthew Barrie – “I can’t sleep.”
- John Adams – “Thomas Jefferson…”
- Queen Marie Antoinette – “Pardon me, Sir, I did not do it on purpose.”
- Louisa May Alcott -”Is it not meningitis?”
- Mary Elizabeth Jenkins Surratt – “Please don’t let me fall.”
- James Donald French – “Hey fellas! How about this for a headline for tomorrow’s paper? French Fries!”
- John Quincy Adams – “This is the last of Earth! I am content!”
- Alexander the Great – “To the strongest!”
- John F. Kennedy – “No, you certainly can’t.”
- Alexander II – “Home to the palace to die.”
- Hector Hugh Munro – “Put out the bloody cigarette!”
- Salvador Allende – These are my last words, and I am certain that my sacrifice will not be in vain, I am certain that, at the very least, it will be a moral lesson that will punish felony, cowardice and treason.”
- Major John Andre – “I pray you to bear me witness that I meet my fate like a brave man.”
- James Brown – “I’m going away tonight.”
- Michael Faraday – “I shall be with Christ, and that is enough.”
- Joan Crawford – “Don’t you dare ask God to help me”
- Nostradamus – “Tomorrow, I shall no longer be here.”
- Jimmy L. Glass – “I’d rather be fishing.”
- Humphrey Bogart – “I should have never switched from Scotch to Martinis.”
- Jane Dornacker – “Hit the water, hit the water, hit the water!”
- Emperor Julian – “You have won, O Galilean.”
- Jessica Dubroff – “Do you hear the rain? Do you hear the rain?”
- Dominique Bouhours – “I am about to — or I am going to — die: either expression is correct.”
- Belinda Emmett – “Are you all right?”
- Aleister Crowley – “I am perplexed. Satan, get out!”

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11, Sergiu Celibidache conducting



Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11
George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana nr.1
Sergiu Celibidache conducting
This is THE perfect one ! No other conductor/orchestra makes me feel it and live it like this.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Smetana, Kubelik:Great Compositions/Performances: Ma Vlast (From Bohemia’s Fields and Meadows, 4/6)



Smetana, Kubelik: Ma Vlast (From Bohemia‘s Fields and Meadows, 4/6)
IV: Z Ceskych Luhu a Haju (From Bohemia’s Fields and Meadows)
Bedrich Smetana, composer
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
Studio Recording, 1952 (Mercury Living Presence)

Enhanced by Zemanta

SAINT OF THE DAY: ST. ACACIUS: Feastday: April 9


Image of St. AcaciusST. ACACIUS

Feastday: April 9

Death: 425 

Acacius was bishop of Amida (Diarbekir), Mesopotamia. He sold the sacred vessels of his church to aid victims of the Persian persecution. His actions so impressed King Bahram V that he is reported to have ordered an end to the persecution of the Christians. His feast day is April 9th.

April
9

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Trust in Me (English)- Jungle Book ( Is this close to the global political reality….Or what!)


Uploaded on Jul 20, 2008 / views: 1,067,737

Kaa singing “Trust in Me” from the Disney movie: THE JUNGLE BOOK

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Schubert – Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


Uploaded on Feb 5, 2009/523,782Views

Enhanced by Zemanta

Le Malade Imaginaire – Le Roi Danse


TODAY’S HOLIDAY: HANA MATSURI


Hana Matsuri

Hana Matsuri is a celebration of the Buddha‘s birthday, observed in Buddhist temples throughout Japan, where it is known as Kambutsue. The highlight of the celebration is a ritual known as kambutsue (“ceremony of ‘baptizing’ the Buddha”), in which a tiny bronze statue of the Buddha, standing in an open lotus flower, is anointed with sweet tea. People use a small bamboo ladle to pour the tea, made of hydrangea leaves, over the head of the statue. The custom is supposed to date from the seventh century, when perfume was used, as well as tea. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

SAINT OF THE DAY April 8: ST. JULIE BILLIART (1751-1816)


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 8 Saint of the Day

ST. JULIE BILLIART
April 8: St. Julie (Julia) Billiart was born in 1751 and died in 1816. As … Read More

April
8
Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: JOMO KENYATTA SENTENCED TO SEVEN YEARS HARD LABOR (1953)


Jomo Kenyatta Sentenced to Seven Years Hard Labor (1953)

Kenyatta was an African political leader and the first president of an independent Kenya. His activities were integral to the effort to liberate Kenya from British colonial rule. In 1953, British leaders sentenced Kenyatta to seven years in prison for his suspected ties to the Mau Mau guerilla organization. Released in 1959, he participated in negotiations with the British to write a new constitution for Kenya, which became independent in 1963. What did he achieve during his 14-year presidency? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Foreigner – ‘I Want To Know What Love Is’ [Official Music Video]



Music video by Foreigner performing I Want To Know What Love Is.
Best quality available on YouTube

I do not own this material, I am just showing it to the rest of the world. 

Lyrics:

I gotta take a little time
A little time to think things over
I better read between the lines
In case I need it when I’m older
Aaaah woah-ah-aah

Now this mountain I must climb
Feels like a world upon my shoulders
And through the clouds I see love shine
It keeps me warm as life grows colder

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
Can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far
To change this lonely life

I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
I wanna feel what love is
I know you can show me
Aaaah woah-oh-ooh

I’m gonna take a little time
A little time to look around me, oooh ooh-ooh ooh-ooh oooh
I’ve got nowhere left to hide
It looks like love has finally found me

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
I can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far
To change this lonely life

I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
I wanna feel what love is
I know you can show me
I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
And I wanna feel, I want to feel what love is
And I know, I know you can show me

Let’s talk about love
(I wanna know what love is) the love that you feel inside
(I want you to show me) I’m feeling so much love
(I wanna feel what love is) no, you just cannot hide
(I know you can show me) yeah, woah-oh-ooh
I wanna know what love is, let’s talk about love
(I want you to show me) I wanna feel it too
(I wanna feel what love is) I wanna feel it too
And I know, and I know, I know you can show me
Show me what is real, woah (woah), yeah I know
(I wanna know what love is) hey I wanna know what love
(I want you to show me), I wanna know, I wanna know, want know
(I wanna feel what love is), hey I wanna feel, love
I know you can show me, yeah

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Aesop


Distrust interested advice.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BCDiscuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music PArt of Your Life: Farscape Aeryn’s Death: Die Me Dichotomy (Agnus Dei), Composer: Guy Gross



Farscape Classics, Vol. 2: Music from the Episodes Die Me Dichotomy and In The Lion’s Den, Part 2 (Audio CD)
Available at Amazon.com


Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Enhanced by Zemanta

Pause the Blog: Lose the pooch – best exercises for lower ABS


Lose the pooch – best exercises for lower abs

Have you tried our “Ab workouts for men and women” app? 
http://www.steadyhealth.com/ab-workou…
You should! The personal trainers who helped us build this app tried this workout and nutritional plan with their clients and they all report weight loss, more toned muscles and a self-esteem boost in less than 3 weeks.

Find us on Facebook & get the latest info about healthy nutrition and workout plans: 
https://www.facebook.com/steadyhealth

If you have any questions for our personal trainer, please post your question here: http://www.steadyhealth.com/discussio…

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale

Muzio Clementi (24 January 1752 — 10 March 1832) was a composer, pianist, pedagogue, conductor, music publisher, editor, and piano manufacturer. Born in Rome, he spent most of his life in England.

Work: Minuetto Pastorale

Orchestra: The Philharmonia

Conductor: Francesco d’Avalos

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


 

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel ...

Busto de Miguel de Cervantes / Bust of Miguel de Cervantes (Photo credit: Lumiago)

Take care, your worship, those things over there are not giants but windmills.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: WE NEED TO CLEAR THE AIR


We Need to Clear the Air

Pollution is going to be the death of us. According to World Health Organization estimates, air pollution contributed to the deaths of seven million people in 2012, making it the world’s greatest environmental health risk. The deaths were concentrated most heavily in low- and middle-income countries, primarily in Southeast Asia and the Western Pacific region. Indoor air pollution appears to be a greater threat than outdoor air pollution, contributing to 3.3 million deaths in 2012 compared to 2.6 million for the latter. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Most Beautiful Music: Dvořák Symphony No 9 “New World” Celibidache, Münchner Philharmoniker, 1991



Dvořák – Symohony No. 9 in E minor op. 95 “From The New World”
Münchner Philharmoniker conducted by Sergiu Celibidache
Recorded 1991
1. Adagio – Allegro molto
2. Largo
3. Scherzo. Molto vivace
4. Allegro con fuoco

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Bret Harte


Now, I hold it is not decent for a scientific gent
To say another is an ass—at least, to all intent;
Nor should the individual who happens to be meant
Reply by heaving rocks at him to any great extent.

Bret Harte (1836-1902) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Aesop


Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture / Leonard Bernstein



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture / Leonard Bernstein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

 

Fidelio, Playbill of the Worldpremiere, Vienna, Kärntnertortheater, 23 May 1814

Fidelio (Leonore, oder Der Triumph der ehelichen Liebe: Leonore, or The Triumph of Married Love)[1] (Op. 72) is a Germanopera with spoken dialogue in two acts by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is his only opera. The German libretto was prepared by Joseph Sonnleithner from the French of Jean-Nicolas Bouilly, which had been used for the 1798 opera Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal by Pierre Gaveaux, and the 1804 opera Leonora by Ferdinando Paer (a score of which was owned by Beethoven).

The opera tells how Leonore, disguised as a prison guard named “Fidelio”, rescues her husband Florestan from death in apolitical prison.

Background

The theatrical mask contemplated by a putto on the Beethoven monument by Kaspar von Zumbusch(Vienna, 1880) commemorates Beethoven’s sole opera in the city where it made its debut

Bouilly’s scenario fits Beethoven’s aesthetic and political outlook: a story of personal sacrifice, heroism and eventual triumph (the usual topics of Beethoven’s “middle period”) with its underlying struggle for liberty and justice mirroring contemporary political movements in Europe.

As elsewhere in Beethoven’s vocal music, the principal parts of Leonore and Florestan, in particular, require great vocal skill and endurance in order to project the necessary intensity, and top performances in these roles attract admiration.[citation needed]

Some notable moments in the opera include the “Prisoners’ Chorus”, an ode to freedom sung by a chorus of political prisoners, Florestan’s vision of Leonore come as an angel to rescue him, and the scene in which the rescue finally takes place. The finale celebrates Leonore’s bravery with alternating contributions of soloists and chorus.

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta
Gallery

A closer look: The trail in details (my photo collection)

This gallery contains 18 photos.


Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

ST. MARY OF EGYPT – Feastday: April 2


Image of St. Mary of Egypt
Facts

Feastday: April 2

Patron of Chastity (warfare against the flesh; deliverance from carnal passions); Demons (deliverance from); Fever; Skin diseases; Temptations of the flesh

Birth: 344

Death: 421

In Cyril of Scythopolis‘ life of St. Cyryacus, he tells of a woman named Mary found by Cyryacus and his companions living as a hermitess in the Jordanian desert. She told him she had been a famous singer and actress who had sinned and was doing penance in the desert. When they returned, she was dead. Around the story was built an elaborate legend that had tremendous popularity during the Middle Agesaccording to which she was an Egyptian who went to Alexandria when she was twelve and lived as an actress and courtesan for seventeen years. She was brought to the realization of her evil life before an icon of the Blessed Virgin, and at Mary’s direction, went to the desert east of Palestine, where she lived as a hermitess for forty-seven years, not seeing a single human being and beset by all kinds of temptations, which were mitigated by her prayers to the Blessed Virgin. She was discovered about 430 by a holy man named Zosimus, who was impressed by her spiritual knowledge and wisdom. He saw her the following Lent, but when he returned, he found her dead and buried her. When he returned to his monastery near the Jordan, he told the brethren what had happened and the story spread. Her feast day is April 2.

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Men often bear little grievances with less courage than they do large misfortunes. Aesop


Men often bear little grievances with less courage than they do large misfortunes.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

SUNDAY OF ST. MARY OF EGYPT


Sunday of St. Mary of Egypt

The Sunday of St. Mary of Egypt is celebrated by Orthodox Christians on the fifth Sunday of Great Lent, and also on April 1. St. Mary was a sinful, lustful woman who repented and became devout. She is seen as the least worthy person, who through God’s mercy became a treasure chosen by God. She is revered as a patron saint of penitent women. On the fifth Sunday of Great Lent, St. Mary of Egypt is the subject of sermons during the Divine Liturgy. On this day, Orthodox priests typically bless dried fruit after the services. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: WILLIAM MANCHESTER (1922)


William Manchester (1922)

Manchester, an American historian, biographer, and bestselling author, published 18 books during his lifetime, including three popular volumes on US president John F. Kennedy. His writings have been translated into multiple languages. He served as a Marine during World War II, and his wartime experiences formed the basis for Goodbye, Darkness: A Memoir of the Pacific War. Why did Jacqueline Kennedy file a lawsuit to prevent the publication of Manchester’s The Death of a PresidentMore… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Angela Gheorghiu: “Quia respexit” (Magnificat) by Bach


[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YV3DwZBlx9c&list=PLjKj2KXwkeG2n_uBNAvnwcxv2FhR-eOwT]
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Magnificat en majeur, BWV 243 / in D major / in D-Dur

Aria : “Quia respexit humilitatem”

Angela Gheorghiu, soprano

Madrigal Chamber Choir Romania 
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Ion Marin , Marin Constantin
1998

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Ralph Waldo Emerson


It is one of the blessings of old friends that you can afford to be stupid with them.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: OCTAVIO PAZ (1914)


Octavio Paz (1914)

Paz was a Mexican poet, critic, and diplomat, and the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature. He wrote with a revealing depth of insight, elegance, and erudition that place him among the generation’s best writers. Influenced by Marxism, surrealism, existentialism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, his poetry uses rich imagery to deal with his most prominent theme: the human ability to overcome existential solitude through love and creativity. Paz was born in Mexico City during what political event?More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Herman Melville


Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored…

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live –



From Valentina:  “FSpecial for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont..

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta