Category Archives: MY TAKE ON THINGS

My Mushroom Foraging Adventure: Abbey’s Kitchen Learns How To Find Edible Mushrooms in the Forest



From:  Abbey Sharp   Abbey Sharp

My Mushroom Foraging Adventure: Abbey’s Kitchen Learns How To Find Edible Mushrooms in the Forest

In this webisode Abbey Sharp from Abbey’s Kitchen will be learning how to identify edible mushrooms from poisonous ones as she explores a beautiful forest just outside the GTA in Ontario with a professional mushroom forager. She will teach you a little bit about the different varieties of mushrooms and which pack the biggest “umami” flavour punch. Join Abbey on her gastronomic adventure!
Abbey’s Kitchen webisode # 4
For the full series, see:
http://www.abbeyskitchen.com

And follow Abbey:

@AbbeysKitchen
http://www.facebook.com/abbeys-kitchen
http://www.pinterest.com/abbeyskitchen
http://www.instagram.com/abbeyskitchen

this pressed from Washington Post: The people designing your cities don’t care what you want. They’re planning for hipsters. – The Washington Post


The people designing your cities don’t care what you want. They’re planning for hipsters. – The Washington Post.

Fryderyk Chopin, Scherzo E-dur Op.54 nr 4, Barbara Hesse-Bukowska,1954: great compositions/performances



From:  Czarmuzyki Ewa Chamiec

Fryderyk Chopin, Scherzo E-dur Op.54 nr 4, Barbara Hesse-Bukowska,1954

(Fryderyk Chopin, Scherzo E-dur Op.54 nr 4, Barbara Hesse-Bukowska –1954! — Archiwum Polskiego Radia.)

Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman: great compositions/performances



From:  Silvio Finotti  Silvio Finotti

Dvořák Humoresque Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Boston Symphony Orchestra / Seiji Ozawa

Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 – Claudio Arrau – HD: great compositions/performances



FROM:

hellsan631    hellsan631

Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 – Claudio Arrau – HD

Includes all 3 movements. Taken from “Liszt: The Piano Concertos; 3 Etudes de Concert (1976)”

1. Il lamento  0:00 to 10:40

2. La leggierezza  10:50 to 16:16

3. Un sospiro  16:24 to 22:28

**Quality – AAC, audio bitrate: 320kbps
Video MP4 – 348kbps

***Perhaps the most Beautiful piece of music is the 3rd movement. There is another version of it on YouTube, but it is in extremely low audio quality. With this recording, you can sometimes hear the performer’s clothes move, or his breathing, only slightly.

***If I enjoy the rest of the CD enough, I will upload the other 2 piano concertos.

Credits:
Franz Liszt
Claudio Arrau (Piano)
Recorded in London England, November of 1976
Philips Classics

*Change to 720p Video to get the a 192 kbps Audio Stream (the highest you can get on YouTube)

Liszt: The Piano Concertos; 3 Etudes de Concert
Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 (LW A118)

MQ0001081958
MC0002358753
F 2049358
C 11442


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Three Concert Études (Trois études de concert), S.144, are a set of three piano études by Franz Liszt, composed between 1845–49 and published in Paris as Trois caprices poétiques with the three individual titles as they are known today.[1] As the title indicates, they are intended not only for the acquisition of a better technique, but also for concert performance. The Italian subtitles now associated with the studies – Il lamento (“The Lament”), La leggierezza (“Lightness”), Un sospiro (“A sigh”) – were not in early editions.[2]

Étude No. 1, Il lamento

Il lamento is the first of Liszt’s Three Concert Études. Written in A-flat major, it is among the composer’s longest pieces in this genre. It starts with a four-note lyrical melody which folds itself through the work, followed by a Chopin-like chromatic pattern which reappears again in the coda section. Although this piece opens and ends in A-flat major, it shifts throughout its three parts to many other keys including A, G, B, D-sharp, F-sharp and B.[1]

Étude No. 2, La leggierezza

La leggierezza (meaning “lightness”) is the second of the Three Concert Études. It is a monothematic piece in F minor with a very simple melodic line in each hand under an unusual Quasi allegretto tempo marking, usually ignored in favour of something a bit more frenetic.[3] It starts with a fast, but delicate sixteen chromatic-note arpeggio divided in thirds and sixths under an irregular rhythmic subdivision and cadenza so as to underline the light atmosphere of its title.[3] The technical difficulties involved are fast passages of minor thirds in the right hand and light, but quick leggiero chromatic scales.

Étude No. 3, Un sospiro

The third of the Three Concert Études is in D-flat major, and is usually known as Un sospiro (Italian for “A sigh”). However, it is likely that the title did not originate with Liszt. Although there is no evidence that he actively attempted to remove the subtitle, none of the editions or subsequent printings of the Three Concert Études published by Kistner during Liszt’s lifetime used them; he simply ignored such subtitles in later years, always referring to the piece by key.

The étude is a study in crossing hands, playing a simple melody with alternating hands, and arpeggios. It is also a study in the way hands should affect the melody with its many accentuations, or phrasing with alternating hands. The melody is quite dramatic, almost Impressionistic, radically changing in dynamics at times, and has inspired many listeners.

Un sospiro consists of a flowing background superimposed by a simple melody written in the third staff. This third staff—an additional treble staff—is written with the direction to the performer that notes with the stem up are for the right hand and notes with the stem down are for the left hand. The background alternates between the left and right hands in such a way that for most of the piece, while the left hand is playing the harmony, the right hand is playing the melody, and vice versa, with the left hand crossing over the right as it continues the melody for a short while before regressing again. There are also small cadenza sections requiring delicate fingerwork throughout the middle section of the piece.

Towards the end, after the main climax of the piece, both hands are needed to cross in an even more complex pattern. Since there are so many notes to be played rapidly and they are too far away from other clusters of notes that must be played as well, the hands are required to cross multiple times to reach dramatic notes near the end of the piece on the last page.

This étude, along with the other Three concert études, was written in dedication to Liszt’s uncle, Eduard Liszt (1817–1879), the youngest son of Liszt’s grandfather and the stepbrother of his own father. Eduard handled Liszt’s business affairs for more than thirty years until his death in 1879.

In film

Brahms viola sonata op. 120 no. 2 in E flat major: great compositions/performances



FROM:

Brahms viola sonata op. 120 no. 2 in E flat major

Piano: Daniel Barenboim
Viola: Pinchas Zukerman
Be apart of my Facebook page! http://www.facebook.com/Blop888

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The viola sonata is a sonata for viola, sometimes with other instruments, usually piano. The earliest viola sonatas are difficult to date for a number of reasons:

  • in the Baroque era, there were many works written for the viola da gamba, including sonatas (the most famous being Johann Sebastian Bach‘s three, now most often played on the cello)
  • in the Classical era and early Romantic, there were few works written with viola specifically in mind as solo instrument, and many of these, like those of the Stamitz family, may have been written for the viola d’amore, like most of their viola works – though it is now customary to play them on the viola; it was more typical to publish a work or set, like George Onslow‘s opus 16 cello sonatas, or Johannes Brahms‘s opus 120 clarinet sonatas in the late 19th century, that specified the viola as an alternate. Two early exceptions were the viola sonatas of Felix Mendelssohn (1824, posthumously published around 1981) and the opus 1 sonata of the composer Ernst Naumann (1832-1910), published in 1854.

just a thought: Robin Williams


Robin Williams was one of the people who actively fought for what he believed in (with the vast majority of people), and had the courage to make politicians to see their real reflection in the mirror of history…”

this pressed at EUZICASA: from Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne – préhistoire


 

Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne – préhistoire.

this pressed: from lovepanky – How to Love Someone without Smothering Them – Lovepanky


Embedded image permalinkHow to Love Someone without Smothering Them – Lovepanky.

or ⇒ Don’t pass the onion please!

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)


A la découverte de l'encyclopédie Larousse

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)

Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays “Gabriel’s Oboe” : great compositions/performances


Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays “Gabriel’s Oboe

The oboist Henrik Chaim Goldschmidt plays Ennio Morricone’s “Gabriel’s Oboe” with The Faroe Islands Philharmonic Orchestra, 10.01.2009

http://www.singh-goldschmidt.dk

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Twelve Variations “Ah, vous dirai-je, maman” (Piano Solo): make music part of your life series



FROM:
steven960929   steven960929

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Twelve Variations “Ah, vous dirai-je, maman” (Piano Solo)

Twelve Variations on “Ah vous dirai-je, Maman”, K. 265/300e, is a piano composition by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composed when he was around 25 years old (1781 or 1782). This piece consists of twelve variations on the French folk song “Ah! vous dirai-je, Maman”. The French melody first appeared in 1761, and has been used for many children’s songs, such as “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”, “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep” and the “Alphabet Song“.

JOHN BARRY: “GIVE ME A SMILE”: make music part of your life series


FROM:
John Dunlea    John Dunlea


JOHN BARRY:   “GIVE ME A SMILE”
(A tribute to the musical genius of John Barry)

what was that tune again?…Leroy Anderson’S The Typewriter (Voces para La Paz- La Paz Symphony Orchestra): make music part of your life series


Typewriter symphony Orchestra

The Typewriter, by Leroy Anderson

Liszt Concerto #2 file1 Valentina Lisitsa (audio): great compositions/performances


FROM:

Liszt Concerto #2 file1 Valentina Lisitsa (audio)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Franz Liszt wrote drafts for his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 2 in A major, S.125, during his virtuoso period, in 1839 to 1840. He then put away the manuscript for a decade. When he returned to the concerto, he revised and scrutinized it repeatedly. The fourth and final period of revision ended in 1861. Liszt dedicated the work to his student Hans von Bronsart, who gave the first performance, with Liszt conducting, in Weimar on January 7, 1857.

Form

This concerto is one single, long movement, divided into six sections that are connected by transformations of several themes:

  • Adagio sostenuto assai

    The key musical idea of this concerto comes at the beginning. Quietly yet confidently, half a dozen woodwinds, no more than five at a time, play a sequence of two chords—an A major chord with a C sharp on top, then a dominant seventh on F natural. The first chord sounds very ordinary. The second opens possibilities unhinted by what preceded it. One note connects the two chords—an A. This sequence sounds colorful and strange yet inevitable and easily grasped.

  • Allegro agitato assai

    This is technically the scherzo of the piece. It starts in B-flat minor and ends in C-sharp minor.

  • Allegro moderato

    This section contains a great deal of lyricism and proceeds at an unhurried pace. Among its charms is a metamorphosis of the opening theme, played by solo cello while accompanied by the piano, showing the influence of Italian bel canto on Liszt’s work.

  • Allegro deciso

  • Marziale un poco meno allegro

    Yet another transformation of the gentle opening theme, this movement has also nearly always been attacked as vulgar and a betrayal of both the initial character of this theme and the concerto on the whole. American musicologist Robert Winter disagreed. He called the march “a masterstroke that demonstrates the full emotional range of thematic transformation.”[1] The march contains the force and weight needed to reestablish the home key of A major, from which the music has been moving quite far since the concerto opened.

  • Allegro animato

Elevazione – Adagio para oboé violoncelo, orquestra de cordas e orgão. Domenico Zipoli: make music part of your life series


Elevazione – Adagio para oboé violoncelo, orquestra de cordas e orgão. Domenico Zipoli

 FROM

Recital de formatura em oboé. Oboé: Lília Reis; Cello: Rodolpho Borges.
Escola de Música de Brasília. 10/09/2009.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Domenico Zipoli (17 October 1688 – 2 January 1726) was an Italian Baroque composer who worked and died in Córdoba (Argentina). He became a Jesuit in order to work in the Reductions of Paraguay where his musical expertise contributed to develop the natural musical talents of the Guaranis. He is remembered as the most accomplished musician among Jesuit missionaries.

Early training and career

Zipoli was born in Prato, Italy, where he received elementary musical training. However, there are no records of him having entered the cathedral choir. In 1707, and with the patronage of Cosimo III, Grand Duke of Tuscany, he was a pupil of the organist Giovani Maria Casini in Florence. In 1708 he briefly studied under Alessandro Scarlatti in Naples, then Bologna and finally in Rome under Bernardo Pasquini. Two of his oratorios date to this early period: San Antonio di Padova (1712) and Santa Caterina, Virgine e martire (1714). Around 1715 he was made the organist of the Church of the Gesù (a Jesuit parish, the mother church for The Society of Jesus), in Rome, a prestigious post. At the very beginning of the following year, he finished his best known work, a collection of keyboard pieces titled Sonate d’intavolatura per organo e cimbalo.

Jesuit musician-missionary

For reasons that are not clear, Zipoli travelled to Sevilla, Spain, in 1716, where, on 1 July, he joined the Society of Jesus with the desire to be sent to the Reductions of Paraguay in Spanish Colonial America. Still a novice, he left Spain with a group of 53 missionaries who reached Buenos Aires on 13 July 1717.

He completed his formation and sacerdotal studies in Cordoba (in contemporary Argentina) (1717–1724) though, for the lack of an available bishop, he could not be ordained priest. All through these few years he served as music director for the local Jesuit church. Soon his works came to be known in Lima, Peru. Struck by an unknown infectious disease, Zipoli died in the Jesuit house of Cordoba, on 2 January 1726. A previous theory placing his death in the ancient Jesuit church of Santa Catalina, in the hills of the Province of Córdoba (Argentina), has now been discredited. His burial place has never been found.

Legacy

Zipoli continues to be well known today for his keyboard music. His Italian compositions have always been known but recently some of his South American church music was discovered in Chiquitos, Bolivia: two Masses, two psalm settings, three Office hymns, a Te Deum laudamus and other pieces. A Mass copied in Potosí, Bolivia in 1784, and preserved in Sucre, Bolivia, seems a local compilation based on the other two Masses. His dramatic music, including two complete oratorios and portions of a third one, is mostly gone. Three sections of the ‘Mission opera’ San Ignacio de Loyola – compiled by Martin Schmid in Chiquitos many years after Zipoli’s death, and preserved almost complete in local sources – have been attributed to Zipoli.

Society of Jesus
The JHS or IHS monogram of the name of Jesus (...

The JHS or IHS monogram of the name of Jesus (or traditional Christogram symbol of western Christianity), derived from the first three letters of the Greek name of Jesus, Iota-Eta-Sigma (ΙΗΣΟΥΣ). Partly based on memories of church decorations. Has some degree of resemblance to a portion of the emblem of the Jesuits, due to common medieval influences (see Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus), but is not exactly the same, nor intended to be so. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

History of the Jesuits
Regimini militantis
Suppression

Jesuit Hierarchy
Superior General
Adolfo Nicolás

Ignatian Spirituality
Spiritual Exercises
Ad majorem Dei gloriam
Magis

Notable Jesuits
St. Ignatius of Loyola
St. Francis Xavier
St. Peter Faber
St. Aloysius Gonzaga
St. Robert Bellarmine
St. Peter Canisius
St. Edmund Campion
Pope Francis

 

 

Ottorino Respighi – Three Botticelli Pictures: grest compositions/performances


Ottorino Respighi – Three Botticelli Pictures

FROM: 

Agustín Barrios – Confesión César Amaro guitarra: make music part of your life series


Agustín Barrios – Confesión César Amaro guitarra

FROM:

CESAR  AMARO

(La famosa romanza compuesta en Río de Janeiro en 1919.)

 

quotation: The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls. Pablo Picasso


The Hot Zone Quotes


The Hot Zone Quotes

The Hot Zone The Hot Zone by Richard Preston

46,786 ratings, 4.06 average rating, 2,291 reviews

buy a copy

The Hot Zone Quotes (showing 1-16 of 16)

“In biology, nothing is clear, everything is too complicated, everything is a mess, and just when you think you understand something, you peel off a layer and find deeper complications beneath. Nature is anything but simple.”
Richard Preston, The Hot Zone

Read all quotations HERE

Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo: make music part of your life series


Franz Liszt – Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo

FROM

Saint Saens – Piano conc.No.2 – Arthur Rubinstein: great compositions/performances


Saint Saens – Piano conc.No.2 – Arthur Rubinstein

Benjamin Britten: Simple Symphony op.4: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Benjamin Britten: Simple Symphony op.4

1. Boisterous Bourree 0:00
2. Playful Pizzicato 3:17
3. Sentimental Saraband 6:45
4. Frolicsome Finale 13:07

Filharmonický orchestr Iwasaki / Iwasaki Philharmonic Orchestra Prague
dirigent: Chuhei Iwasaki

recorded XI.2013 in recording studio HAMU, Prague
Recording director: Kristina Štanclová
Recording engeneer: Jaroslav Pokorný

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141: great compositions/performances


Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49

new at EuZicAsa: In the public domain: Pics, Images…WIDGET(access here)


frog-208591_640

Widget: Public domain Images (Access Here)

W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major Do major) (Harnoncourt): great compositions/performances


W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major (Harnoncourt)

Uploaded on Feb 10, 2012

W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788):
1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

quotation: Wisdom is a sacred communion. Victor Hugo (1802-1885)


Wisdom is a sacred communion.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

Ebola Crisis Deepens


Ebola Crisis Deepens

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has claimed 729 lives in four countries thus far, making it the deadliest and widest ranging such outbreak the world has ever seen. Dozens of healthcare workers have fallen victim, complicating efforts to combat it. Though the disease is outpacing current efforts to contain its spread, the head of the World Health Organization (WHO) still believes that the “unprecedented” outbreak could be stopped if proper steps are taken at both the national and international levels. To this end, a new, $100 million (75 million euro) Ebola response plan is being launched to combat the disease. More… Discuss

The Tepee


The Tepee

The tepee was once a typical dwelling of Native North Americans of the Great Plains. Such structures usually consisted of conically arranged tent poles over which skins, often bison hide and occasionally elaborately decorated, would be tightly stretched. These dwellings provided strong shelter against the weather yet could also be easily dismantled and loaded onto pack animals when a tribe was on the move, making them ideal for nomadic hunters. How does a teepee differ from a wigwam? More… Discuss

CANNERY ROW (1982) – FORGOTTEN TREASURE


CANNERY ROW (1982) – FORGOTTEN TREASURE

Uploaded on May 5, 2010

CANNERY ROW (1982) DIRECTED BY DAVID S WARD, STARRING NICK NOLTE , DEBRA WINGER, AUDRA LINDLEY, FRANK MCRAE, M. EMMETT WALSH, AND JOHN HOUSTON AS THE NARRATOR. RAQUEL WELCH WAS FAMOUSLY FIRED AND WAS REPLACED BY WINGER PRIOR TO THE PRODUCTION OF THIS FILM. AUDRA LINDLEY (MRS. ROPER FROM “THREE’S COMPANY”) GIVES A STAND OUT PERFORMANCE IN THIS FORGOTTEN TREASURE!

Saint of the Day – August1, 2014: St. Alphonsus Marie Liguori


Saint of the Day

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Divertimento in F major KV 138: make music part of your life series


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Divertimento in F major KV 138

Number: KV 138 Composer: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Date: March 1772 Place: Salzburg, Austria Extra: Also called as ‘The Salzburg Symphony No. 3′:
I. Allegro
II. Andante
III. Presto

 

Alfredo Catalani “Notturno in G sharp minor” for Rowna: mke music part of your life series


Alfredo Catalani “Notturno in G sharp minor” for Rowna

Notturno in G sharp minor for piano
by Alfredo Catalani
Riccardo Caramella, piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alfredo Catalani (19 June 1854 – 7 August 1893) was an Italian operatic composer. He is best remembered for his operas Loreley (1890) and La Wally (1892). La Wally was composed to a libretto by Luigi Illica, and features Catalani’s most famous aria “Ebben? Ne andrò lontana.” This aria, sung by American soprano Wilhelmenia Fernandez, was at the heart of Jean-Jacques Beineix’s 1981[1] cult[2] movie Diva.[3] Catalani’s other operas were less successful, partly hampered by inferior libretti.

Life and career

Catalani was born in Lucca and trained at the Conservatory of Milan under Antonio Bazzini.

Despite the growing influence of the verismo style of opera during the 1880s Catalani chose to compose in a more traditional manner. As a result his operas have largely lost their place in the modern repertoire, even compared to those of Massenet and Puccini, whose style his works most closely resemble.

The influence of Amilcare Ponchielli can also be recognized in Catalani’s work. Like Ponchielli, Catalani’s reputation now rests almost entirely on one work. However, while La Wally enjoys occasional revivals, Ponchielli’s La Gioconda has always been the more popular opera of the two (287 performances to date at the Metropolitan Opera, New York, as opposed to only four for La Wally).

In 1893, upon his premature death from tuberculosis in Milan, Catalani was interred in the Cimitero Monumentale, where Ponchielli and conductor Arturo Toscanini also lie. Toscanini was a strong advocate of Catalani’s music and named his daughter Wally in recognition of the composer’s most successful opera. Toscanini recorded the prelude to Act IV of La Wally and the “Dance of the Water Nymphs” from Loreley in Carnegie Hall in August 1952 with the NBC Symphony Orchestra for RCA Victor.

Operas

  • La falce (“The Sickle”), Milan, 19 July 1875
  • Elda, Turin, 31 January 1880 (radically revised as Loreley)
  • Dejanice, Milan, 17 March 1883
  • Edmea, Milan, 27 February 1886
  • Loreley, Turin, 16 February 1890
  • La Wally, Milan, 20 January 1892

Symphonic works

  • Sinfonia a piena orchestra (“Symphony for Full Orchestra”), 1872
  • Il Mattino, sinfonia romantica (“Morning”, Romantic symphony), 1874
  • Ero e Leandro, poema sinfonico (“Hero and Leander”, Symphonic tone poem), Milan, 9 May 1885

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827)

Work: Namensfeier ‘Name-Day Celebration‘ Overture in C major, Op.115

Movement: Maestoso – Allegro assai vivace

Herbert von Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra

Tunnel (according to Farlex) not to be mistaken for other definitions)


Noun 1. tunnel - a passageway through or under something, usually underground (especially one for trains or cars)tunnel - a passageway through or under something, usually underground (especially one for trains or cars); “the tunnel reduced congestion at that intersection”

auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; “he needs a car to get to work”
 
catacomb - an underground tunnel with recesses where bodies were buried (as in ancient Rome)
 
passageway - a passage between rooms or between buildings
 
railroad tunnel - a tunnel through which the railroad track runs
 
shaft - a long vertical passage sunk into the earth, as for a mine or tunnel
 
underpass, subway - an underground tunnel or passage enabling pedestrians to cross a road or railway
  2. tunnel - a hole made by an animal, usually for sheltertunnel - a hole made by an animal, usually for shelter

hollow, hole - a depression hollowed out of solid matter
 
rabbit warren, warren - a series of connected underground tunnels occupied by rabbits
Verb 1. tunnel - move through by or as by diggingtunnel - move through by or as by digging; “burrow through the forest”

cut into, delve, dig, turn over - turn up, loosen, or remove earth; “Dig we must”; “turn over the soil for aeration”
  2. tunnel - force a way throughtunnel - force a way through                  

penetrate, perforate - pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance; “The bullet penetrated her chest”
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

Granados – Quejas, o la maja y el ruiseñor/The Maiden and the Nightingale: make music part of your life series


Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857): make music part of your life series


Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)

Johannes Brahms

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina
Conductor: Andreas Spering

quotation : It is easier to get into the enemy’s toils than out again. Aesop


It is easier to get into the enemy’s toils than out again.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live): make music part of your life series


from:  thiagoblanco:
F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy – Suite ‘Ein Sommernachtstraum’ / A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live)

Suite – “Ein Sommernachtstraum” op. 61 / Suite – A Midsummer Night’s Dream Op. 61 (Live)

- Overture
- Scherzo
- Intermezzo
- Nocturne
- Wedding March

Orchestra: WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln
Conductor: Ton Koopman
Composer: Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809 – 1847)

 

 

Emmanuel Chabrier: Le Roi malgré lui – Danse slave [Choeur et scène] (Acte III): make music part of your life series


Emmanuel Chabrier: Le Roi malgré lui – Danse slave [Choeur et scène] (Acte III)

FROM

The “Danse slave” at the beginning of Act III from the comic opera “Le Roi malgré lui” (King in spite of himself) by French composer Emmanuel Chabrier (1841-1894).

The libretto of this opera is a real mess, as it was written by in collaboration by two mediocre playwrights Emile de Najac and Paul Burani, partially revised by the poet Jean Richepin and later by Chabrier himself after Richepin gave up the work, disgusted. Chabrier called the libretto a “a bouillabaisse of Najac and Burani, cooked by Richepin, into which I throw the spices.” A synopsis of this convoluted opera can be found here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_roi_m…

Nonetheless, the music of “Le roi malgré lui” is truly wonderful. Maurice Ravel wrote that when the opening bars of the Prelude were first played, harmony in French music completely changed course. In this series of videos, I will present selections from the opera. The famous Fête polonaise from the beginning of Act II was already posted on this channel and can be found here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TbNhug…

You can follow along with a vocal score here:
http://imslp.org/wiki/Le_Roi_malgr%C3…

Minka: Barbara Hendricks
Alexina: Isabel Garcisanz
Henri: Gino Quilico
Comte de Nangis: Peter Jeffes
Conductor: Charles Dutoit
Nouvel Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France
Chœurs de Radio France

Quotations 101: Henry Miller (tropic of capricorn, tropic of cancer)


“To walk in money through the night crowd, protected by money, lulled by money, dulled by money, the crowd itself a money, the breath money, no least single object anywhere that is not money, money, money everywhere and still not enough, and then no money or a little money or less money or more money, but money, always money, and if you have money or you don’t have money it is the money that counts and money makes money, but what makes money make money?”

“No man is great enough or wise enough for any of us to surrender our destiny to. The only way in which anyone can lead us is to restore to us the belief in our own guidance.”

“Take a good look at me. Now tell me, do you think I’m the sort of fellow who gives a fuck what happens once he’s dead? “

Read more about Henry Miller, here

Chopin Etude Op 25 No.11 HQ – Valentina Lisitsa: great performances


Chopin Etude Op 25 No.11 HQ

 FROM:

Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl: make music part of your life series


Prokofiev – Romeo And Juliet – Juliet As A Young Girl

 FROM:

today’s Saint, July28, 2014: St. Innocent I


Image of St. Innocent I

St. Innocent I

Innocent was born at Albano, Italy. He became Pope, succeeding Pope St. Anastasius I, on December 22, 401. During Innocent’s pontificate, he emphasized papal supremacy, commending the bishops of Africa for referring the decrees of their councils at Carthage and Millevis in 416, condemning Pelagianism, to the Pope for confirmation. It was his confirmation of these decrees that caused Augustine to make a remark that was to echo through the centuries: “Roma locuta, causa finitas” (Rome has spoken, the matter is ended). Earlier Innocent had stressed to Bishop St. Victrius and the Spanish bishops that matters of great importance were to be referred to Rome for settlement. Innocent strongly favored clerical celibacy and fought the unjust removal of St. John Chrysostom. He vainly sought help from Emperor Honorius at Revenna when the Goths under Alaric captured and sacked Rome. Innocent died in Rome on March 12. His feast day is July 28th.

quotation: Jane Austen


It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind; but when a beginning is made–when the felicities of rapid motion have once been, though slightly, felt–it must be a very heavy set that does not ask for more.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

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Time to clean your fridge: According to USA TODAY, YOU mayneedto!


Embedded image permalink

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quotation: Maya Angelou (1928-2014)


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Security Council: The situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question


Security Council: The situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question

United Nations Webcast- webtv.un.org

United Nations Webcast- webtv.un.org (Click to access)

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2-framed) my art collection_FotoSketcher


along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2) my art collection

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2) my art collection

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2-framed) my art collection_FotoSketcher

along the trail by George-B_FotoSketcher (Painting 8-excessive strokes-2-framed) my art collection_FotoSketcher

Marlene Dietrich “Je m’ennuie” 1933


Marlene Dietrich “Je m’ennuie” 1933

LilyMarleneDietrich

Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992) enregistrée le 15 juillet 1933 à Paris.

De ce que fut mon enfance,
Je n’ai plus de souvenirs.
C’est peut-être que la chance
Ne m’offrit pas de plaisirs.
Et chaque jour qui se lève
Ne m’apporte aucun espoir.
Je n’ai même pas de rêve
Quand luit l’etoile du soir.

Moi, je m’ennuie,
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Je n’y peux rien..
Le plaisir passe,
Il me dépasse.
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien.
Partout je traîne,
Comme une chaîne,
Ma lourde peine,
Sans autre bien.
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Moi, je m’ennuie…

Par de longs vagabondages,
J’ai voulu griser mon coeur,
Et souvent, sur mon passage,
J’ai vu naître des malheurs.
Sur chaque nouvelle route,
A l’amour j’ai dû mentir ;
Et le soir, lorsque j’écoute
La plainte du vent mourir…

Moi, je m’ennuie…
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Je n’y peux rien..
Le plaisir passe,
Il me dépasse.
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien.
Partout je traîne,
Comme une chaîne,
Ma lourde peine,
Sans autre bien.
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Moi, je m’ennuie…