Category Archives: poetry, poems, poets

Foreigner – ‘I Want To Know What Love Is’ [Official Music Video]



Music video by Foreigner performing I Want To Know What Love Is.
Best quality available on YouTube

I do not own this material, I am just showing it to the rest of the world. 

Lyrics:

I gotta take a little time
A little time to think things over
I better read between the lines
In case I need it when I’m older
Aaaah woah-ah-aah

Now this mountain I must climb
Feels like a world upon my shoulders
And through the clouds I see love shine
It keeps me warm as life grows colder

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
Can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far
To change this lonely life

I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
I wanna feel what love is
I know you can show me
Aaaah woah-oh-ooh

I’m gonna take a little time
A little time to look around me, oooh ooh-ooh ooh-ooh oooh
I’ve got nowhere left to hide
It looks like love has finally found me

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
I can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far
To change this lonely life

I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
I wanna feel what love is
I know you can show me
I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
And I wanna feel, I want to feel what love is
And I know, I know you can show me

Let’s talk about love
(I wanna know what love is) the love that you feel inside
(I want you to show me) I’m feeling so much love
(I wanna feel what love is) no, you just cannot hide
(I know you can show me) yeah, woah-oh-ooh
I wanna know what love is, let’s talk about love
(I want you to show me) I wanna feel it too
(I wanna feel what love is) I wanna feel it too
And I know, and I know, I know you can show me
Show me what is real, woah (woah), yeah I know
(I wanna know what love is) hey I wanna know what love
(I want you to show me), I wanna know, I wanna know, want know
(I wanna feel what love is), hey I wanna feel, love
I know you can show me, yeah

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HOSTESS TWINKIES ARE INVENTED (1930)


Hostess Twinkies Are Invented (1930)

The Twinkie was invented by baker James Dewar, who noticed that the shop’s shortcake pans were only used during the strawberry season and otherwise sat idle. His thrifty idea to use the pans during the off-season led to the development of the banana-filled Twinkie snack cake. During a World War II banana shortage, vanilla filling replaced the original banana. Twinkies disappeared from US shelves in 2012 when Hostess declared bankruptcy but returned in 2013. What is the “Twinkie defense”? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: JOHN DONNE


John Donne

The greatest of the metaphysical poets, Donne wrote original, witty, erudite, and often obscure verse characterized by a brilliant use of paradox, hyperbole, and imagery and distinguished by a remarkable blend of passion and reason. Neglected for some 200 years, he was rediscovered by 20th-century critics. Author of the famous phrase “for whom the bell tolls,” a reference to the tolling of church bells upon someone’s death, Donne commissioned what macabre painting shortly before his own passing? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: MAYA ANGELOU (1928)


Maya Angelou (1928)

Angelou is an African-American writer and performer and the author of several volumes of poetry. Her seven autobiographical volumes, including I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, recount her traumatic youth and explore themes of economic, racial, and sexual oppression. In 1993, she was given the honor of reciting her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at Bill Clinton’s presidential inauguration. Angelou was not always so vocal; she endured several years of mutism in childhood. What triggered it? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: OCTAVIO PAZ (1914)


Octavio Paz (1914)

Paz was a Mexican poet, critic, and diplomat, and the winner of the 1990 Nobel Prize in Literature. He wrote with a revealing depth of insight, elegance, and erudition that place him among the generation’s best writers. Influenced by Marxism, surrealism, existentialism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, his poetry uses rich imagery to deal with his most prominent theme: the human ability to overcome existential solitude through love and creativity. Paz was born in Mexico City during what political event?More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JOSEF MENGELE (1911)


Josef Mengele (1911)

Mengele, the “Angel of Death,” was an SS officer and doctor in the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz. He supervised the selection of arriving transports of prisoners, determining who would be killed immediately and who would be a forced laborer. He also selected inmates to be test subjects in horrific experiments, during which they were frequently subjected to sterilization surgeries, limb amputations, injections into the eyes, and other brutal procedures. What became of Mengele after the war? More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Haïku – California Winter, By George-B (inspired by the 88 degrees Fahrenheit on the trail today)


Haïku - California Winter, By George-B

confusing winter
hides behind the few green leaves
of a slim palm tree. 

Desert Oasis with California Fan Palm Trees Stock Photo - 4272950

Viata, cugetare poetica de George-B


Viata, cugetare poetica de George-B

precum corfa de rachita
sant amintirile împletiturii
în care ne petrecem 

Regina Spektor – “Don’t Leave Me (Ne Me Quitte Pas)” Official Music Video


Published on Jun 12, 2012/2,132,381 views

© 2012 WMG “Don’t Leave Me (Ne Me Quitte Pas)” as heard on Regina‘s album What We Saw from the Cheap Seats is out now:http://smarturl.it/whatwesawitunes

Directed by: Ace Norton
Connect with Regina:
http://facebook.com/ReginaSpektor
http://ReginaSpektor.com

Buy “Don’t Leave Me (Ne Me Quitte Pas)” on

Google PlayiTunesAmazonMP3

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Cohen London 2009 live – If It Be Your Will


If it be your will,  Leonard Cohen(London 2009 – live) 

If it be your will 
That I speak no more 
And my voice be still 
As it was before 
I will speak no more 
I shall abide until 
I am spoken for 
If it be your will 
If it be your will 
That a voice be true 
From this broken hill 
I will sing to you 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 

If it be your will 
If there is a choice 
Let the rivers fill 
Let the hills rejoice 
Let your mercy spill 
On all these burning hearts in hell 
If it be your will 
To make us well 

And draw us near 
And bind us tight 
All your children here 
In their rags of light 
In our rags of light 
All dressed to kill 
And end this night 
If it be your will 

If it be your will

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Adventurer Account, by George-B


Adventurer Account, by George-B

I have been walking Northbound
until there was no mere North to go to
and then I took the opposite direction,
found myself upside down hanging by
the branches of the Southern tree…
I was by exhausted,
hungry,
unshaven…
So I took a long rest
next day
I started west, and kept at it, for a while
and then I hit a bump in the road
at Greenwich
and had to heal my foot…
Then I considered continuing my walk
same direction


Late that year I draw a conclusion

and build a house of red bricks,
a picket fence
a kidney bean pool
a tennis court
a trail with 5 flights of stairs, wooden,
to the sandy beach. 

Enhanced by Zemanta

The poem of everything, by George-B


The poem of everything, by George-B

Poems have been written about
air, water, clouds and humus
mountains, deserts, everything that moves, and that’s been dead

loves, loves, love and lovers, and its heartaches
colors and the transparent fragrance of flowers and the air
surrounding the sea
the fantasm of the night and total exposure of days to the skin-
guiding verses to fry eggs in the dry sands, and find seashells.

poems have been written just about everything…

now the poet writes the unifying poem of all things,
the poem of all poems,
the universal poem…
quiet! let the poet write!

Haïku – Destiny, by George -B


Haïku - Destiny, by George -B

First the body dies
then it’s moved six feet under
headstone falls over.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Hannibal (2001) – Opera Scene ‘Vide Cor Meum’


Hannibal (2001) – Opera Scene ‘Vide Cor Meum

Published on Mar 27, 2013

English: Dante Alighieri's portrait by Sandro ...

“Vide Cor Meum” is a song composed by Patrick Cassidy based on Dante’sLa Vita Nuova“, specifically on the sonnet “A ciascun’alma presa”, in chapter 3 of the “Vita Nuova”. The song first appeared in the movie Hannibal (2001), while Dr. Hannibal Lecter and Inspector Pazzi see an outdoor opera in Florence, Italy.

Enhanced by Zemanta

What’s missing in picture, by George-B


What’s missing in picture,  by George-B

If the images would have words
it would tell of the cold and heat
The sun hidden by the trees,
sun looking through  the trees
the murmur of the  water somewhere
not far enough, but just as far as to be invisible …

 Grass fragrance  barely being mowed and
now fanned to dry, 

the wind fluttering through the branches and leaves-
all 
would look at us through the frame of the picture…

Ce-i lipseste pozei, de George-B


Ce-i lipseste pozei, de George-B 

Daca imaginile ar avea cuvinte,
ne-ar povesti de frig si cald,
de soarele ascuns de arbori,
de soarele privind prin brazi
de apa sipotind de-undeva,
nu prea departe, destul sa fie nevazuta…

Aroma ierbii, de abia cosita si
rasfirata ca sa se usuce,
si vantul fîlfîind prin ramuri si frunze-toate
ne-ar privi din cadrul unei poze…

Fotografia saptamanii 21: Moieciu in saptamana luminata de Ioan Chiriac

TODAY’S HOLIDAY: NATIONAL COWBOY POETRY GATHERING


National Cowboy Poetry Gathering

The National Cowboy Poetry Gathering is a celebration of the old tradition of cowboy poetry in the buckaroo town of Elko, Nevada. The gathering, which began in 1985 with about 50 working cowboys, has become a six-day affair in the last week of January that now includes folk music concerts, western dances, exhibits of cowboy gear, and workshops not only on writing but also on such topics as horse-hair braiding and photography. Poetry remains the heart of the festival, and the poets—all working ranch people—include men, women, and children. More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Haïku – Creativity, by George – B


Haïku – Creativity, by George-B

Creativity
bursts like a ripe blister head:
pheromones richness

High-Res Stock Photography: Man Framing Sunset with Fingers

Haiku – Snowdrops, by George-B


Haiku – Snowdrops, by George-B

Haiku – Snowdrops

Snowdrops pierce winter
Snows are blushingly thawing
Nature rejoices!

 Related articles

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: LORD BYRON (1788)


Lord Byron (1788)

Despite being a social outcast—and self-conscious of his noticeable limp—Byron became the rock star of the Romantic period. His poetic travelogue Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage won him fame, while his complex personality, dashing good looks, and scandalous love affairs captured the imagination of Europe. His literary legacy includes the satirical epic Don Juan and the lonely, rebellious, and brooding “Byronic hero.” Who famously described Byron as “mad, bad, and dangerous to know”? More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composers/Compositions: Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich



Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft (Lively)
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (Scherzo) (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (not fast) (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (Solemn) (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft (Lively)

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, threetrombonestimpani and strings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

Biographical context

Throughout his life, Schumann explored a diversity of musical genres, including chambervocal, and symphonic music. Although Schumann wrote an incomplete G minor symphony as early as 1832-33 (of which the first movement was performed on two occasions to an unenthusiastic reception),[3]he only began seriously composing for the symphonic genre after receiving his wife’s encouragement in 1839.[4] Schumann gained quick success as a symphonic composer following his orchestral debut with his warmly-received First Symphony, which was composed in 1841 and premiered in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. By the end of his career Schumann had composed a total of four symphonies. Also in 1841 he finished the work which was later to be published as his Fourth Symphony. In 1845 he composed his C major Symphony, which was published in 1846 asNo. 2, and, in 1850, his Third Symphony. Therefore, the published numbering of the symphonies is not chronological. The reasoning for the “incorrect” numerical sequencing of the symphonies is because his Fourth Symphony was originally completed in 1841, but it was not well received at its Leipzig premiere. The lukewarm reception caused Schumann to withdraw the score and revise it ten years later in Düsseldorf. This final version was published in 1851 after the “Rhenish” Symphony was published

Genesis

The same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt to them as if they were on a pilgrimage.[5] As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity.[6]

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composers/Compositions: Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102



Dmitri Shostakovich
Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

Dmitri Shostakovich, piano movements:

  1. Allegtro (A jolly main theme)
  2. Andante (The second movement is subdued and romantic)
  3. Allegro (The finale is a lively dance in duple time)

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
André Cluytens, conductor

From Wikipedia

Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102, by Dmitri Shostakovich was composed in 1957 for his son Maxim’s 19th birthday. Maxim premiered the piece during his graduation at the Moscow Conservatory. It is an uncharacteristically cheerful piece, much more so than most of Shostakovich’s works.
The work is scored for solo piano, three flutes (third doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four hornstimpanisnare drum andstrings.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Marin Marais (1656-1728) – Sonnerie de Sainte-Geneviève du Mont de Paris (1723)


 

 

 

 

 

 

Marin Marais (1656-1728), composer

Marin Marais (1656-1728), composer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Marin Marais (1656-1728) – Sonnerie de Sainte-Geneviève du Mont de Paris [The Bells of St. Genevieve] from La Gamme et Autres Morceaux de Symphonie (1723)

New Comma Baroque – Matthew C. Cataldi, Baroque violin, Phillip W. Serna, viola da gamba & Emily J. Morlan, historical keyboards

 

Various Viols Nederlands: Diverse typen violas

Various Viols Nederlands: Diverse typen violas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Recorded March 27th-28th, 2012 at Bethany Lutheran Church, Crystal Lake, IL 

All video content © 2012 New Comma Baroque -

 

Baroque !

Baroque ! (Photo credit: fred_v)

 

http://www.newcommabaroque.org/

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sonnerie de Ste-Geneviève du Mont-de-Paris, “The Bells of St. Genevieve” in English, is a work by Marin Marais written in 1723 for violviolin and harpsichord withbasso continuo. It can be considered a passacaglia or a chaconne, with a repeating D, F, E bass line. Being a student of Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe, it is perhaps Marais’ most famous composition that explores the various techniques of the viol.

 

The work begins with 4 measures of the bass line played by the continuo and viol, then, on the 5th measure the violin takes over the melody. Throughout the piece, the violin and viol take turns with the melody.

 

The viol part is of great difficulty because of Marais’s mastery of that instrument. The centerpiece is not the melody, the violin, but the viol. His work can be thought of as something to showcase the violist’s skill, despite that it does not always have the melody.

 

The piece also exists in a version for solo double bass, having been arranged by Norman Ludwin for Ludwin Music. An electronic version on aFairlight synthesizer was used in the soundtrack of the 1982 film “Liquid Sky“.

 

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Ridichea neagra, leac excelent impotriva tusei – Yahoo Ştiri România


Ridichea neagra, leac excelent impotriva tuseiRidichea neagra, leac excelent impotriva tusei – Yahoo Ştiri România.

Leonard Cohen & U2 : Tower Of Song



Tower Of Song – Video clip from the film ‘I’m Your Man
Video INCLUDED in DVD version – U2 : Window in the Skies

Well, my friends are gone and my hair is grey
I ache in the places where I used to play
And I’m crazy for love but I’m not comin’ on
I’m just payin’ my rent every day in the Tower of Song

I said to Hank Williams: “How lonely does it get?”
Hank Williams hasn’t answered yet
But I hear him coughing all night long
Oh, a hundred floors above me in the Tower of Song

I was born like this, I had no choice
I was born with the gift of a golden voice
And twenty-seven angels from the Great Beyond
They tied me to this table right here in the Tower of Song

So you can stick your little pins in that voodoo doll
I’m very sorry, baby, it doesn’t look like me at all
I’m standin’ by the window where the light is strong
Ah, they don’t let a woman kill you, not in the Tower of Song

Now, you can say that I’ve grown bitter but of this you may be sure:
The rich have got their channels in the bedrooms of the poor
And there’s a mighty Judgement comin’ but I may be wrong
You see, I hear these funny voices in the Tower of Song

I see you standin’ on the other side
I don’t know how the river got so wide
I loved you, baby, way back when…
And all the bridges are burnin’ that we might’ve crossed
But I feel so close to everything that we lost
We’ll never, we’ll never have to lose it again

Now, I bid you farewell, I don’t know when I’ll be back
They’re movin’ us tomorrow to the tower down the track
But you’ll be hearin’ from me, baby, long after I’m gone
I’ll be speakin’ to you sweetly from a window in the Tower of Song.

Yeah, my friends are gone and my hair is grey
I ache in the places where I used to play
And I’m crazy for love but I’m not comin’ on
I’m just payin’ my rent everyday in the Tower of Song

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Neil Young – Heart of Gold/Lyrics


I want to live,
I want to give
I’ve been a miner
for a heart of gold.
It’s these expressions
I never give
That keep me searching
for a heart of gold
And I’m getting old.
Keeps me searching
for a heart of gold
And I’m getting old.

I’ve been to Hollywood
I’ve been to Redwood
I crossed the ocean
for a heart of gold

I’ve been in my mind,
it’s such a fine line
That keeps me searching
for a heart of gold
And I’m getting old.
Keeps me searching
for a heart of gold
And I’m getting old.

Keep me searching
for a heart of gold
You keep me searching
for a heart of gold
And I’m getting old.
I’ve been a miner
for a heart of gold.

 

LISZT La Campanella (S.141/3) – F.R.Duchable, 1974



Franz LISZT: Grandes études de Paganini, S.141, LW.A173 (1851)0:10 / No.3 – La Campanella. Allegretto in G-sharp minor (based on Paganini‘s 2nd Violin Concerto Op.7) [4'36'']
François-René DUCHABLE, piano
(rec: Paris, Salle Wagram, 1974)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 

The Grandes études de Paganini are a series of six études for the piano by Franz Liszt, revised in 1851 from an earlier version (published asÉtudes d’exécution transcendante d’après Paganini, S.140, in 1838). It is almost exclusively in the final version that these pieces are played today.

The pieces are all based on the compositions of Niccolò Paganini for violin, and are among the most technically demanding pieces in the piano literature (especially the original versions, before Liszt revised them, thinning the textures and removing some of the more outrageous technical difficulties). The pieces run the gamut of technical hurdles, and frequently require very large stretches by the performer of an eleventh (although all stretches greater than a tenth were removed from the revised versions).

 

News: MOTHERS PREDISPOSED TO “BABY” BABY


Mothers Predisposed to “Baby” Baby

Mothers are often criticized for “babying” their youngest child, but we should cut them some slack—they may not be able to help it. Researchers say mothers can estimate the height of their older children with a fair degree of accuracy but consistently underestimate the height of their youngest child by an average of 3 inches (7.5 centimeters). This height illusion could be an adaptive mechanism that makes mothers more likely to nurture and protect what are typically their most vulnerable offspring. More…

 

ODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SIR JOSEPH JOHN “J. J.” THOMSON (1856)


Sir Joseph John “J. J.” Thomson (1856)

One of the founders of modern physics, Thomson helped revolutionize the knowledge of atomic structure. He is known primarily for his discovery of the electron and his investigation of its charge and mass, his development of the mathematical theory of electricity and magnetism, and his role in the discovery of isotopes and invention of mass spectrometry. His research into the electrical conductivity of gases earned him a Nobel Prize in 1906. What did Thomson originally call electrons? More…Discuss

 

The ancestor, poetic thought by George-B


The ancestor, poetic thought by George-B

to tempt a butterfly
he lit
the most brilliant light in the sky.

To tempt  a shark
he draw blood,
just at a tiny water drop weight.

To tempt Divinity
he drew,
ten sculpt
then he objected,
and denied,
and outlawed,

and find a lonely definition: Idolatry, he called it.

To tempt the storm
he built an ark, up on the highest mountain, 
splurged its population, 
and wasn’t swallowed but survived, and then, 
he passed the genome, from one to all:
Every now and then we dream of him, the ancestor.

The thing, poetic thought by George-b


The thing, poetic thought by George-b

Can’t ever encompass all there is
some obscure meaningless “thing”
avoids the net and stands outside it,
free, brilliantly contemptuous – at the same time –
colorfully mimicking the fanned tail of the peacock…
standing outside the bounds of the net…

synthetic-landscapes-maya-desai-image_1

Perimeters, poetic thought by George-B


Perimeters, poetic thought by George-B

My extremes move further,
further from my point of origin. 
I am galaxy…in a universal incontinence.
The sacrilege is forgetting continence,
solidity,
adherence,
attraction,
perimeter…

Perimeters, when fixed, require no knowledge
of complicated calculus, when once mapped
unlike ever-expanding perimeters…

Let’s keep things simple,
mappable,
knowable,
reachable. 

Haiku: Curiosity, by George-B


Haiku: Curiosity, by George-B

Curiosity 
Birthed the cat – and same killed:
Curiosity

Quotation: William Makepeace Thackeray about humility


Oh, be humble, my brother, in your prosperity! Be gentle with those who are less lucky, if not more deserving.

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: GEORGE ELIOT (1819)


George Eliot (1819)

Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans, was raised with a strong religious piety but broke with orthodoxy in her 20s and turned to fiction, writing such classic Victorian novels asSilas Marner, Daniel Deronda, and Middlemarch, in which she developed a method of psychological analysis that would become a characteristic of modern fiction. Although her novels are serious in tone, they still contain humorous moments. With which philosopher did Eliot have a lengthy, scandalous affair?More… Discuss

 

SHI


 

Shi

Shi is the Chinese word for “poetry” or “poem.” As early poetry was often sung or chanted, folk poetry was adapted from song form into written shi by the Chinese literati. Some forms of shi include gushi, an ancient style with no formal constraints aside from line length and rhyme, and jintishi, a modern form regulated by tone patterns that emerged during the T’ang period, widely considered the golden age of Chinese poetry. What was the first collection of Chinese poetry?More… Discuss

 

 

James Earl Jones Performs Shakespeare’s “Othello” at the White House Poetry Jam (2009)



http://thefilmarchive.org/

May 12, 2009

James Earl Jones (born January 17, 1931) is an American actor. Since his Broadway debut in 1957, Jones has spent more than five decades as “one of America’s most distinguished and versatile actors” and has been termed “one of the greatest actors in American history.” On November 12, 2011, Jones received an Honorary Academy Award.

He is well known for his distinctive bass voice and for his portrayal of characters of substance, gravitas and leadership.

His first film role was as a young and trim Lt. Lothar Zogg, the B-52 bombardier in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb in 1964. His first big role came with his portrayal of boxer Jack Jefferson in the The Great White Hope a reprise of the role he had performed on Broadway play, which was based on the life of boxer Jack Johnson. For his role, Jones was nominated Best Actor by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, making him the second African-American male performer (following Sidney Poitier) to receive a nomination.

In the early 1970s, James appeared with Diahann Carroll in a film called Claudine, the story of a woman who raises her six children alone after two failed marriages and one “almost” marriage. Ruppert, played by Jones, is a garbage man who has deep problems of his own. The couple somehow overcomes each other’s pride and stubbornness and get married.

Jones also played the villain Thulsa Doom in Conan the Barbarian, “Few Clothes” Johnson in John Sayles Matewan, the author Terence Mann in Field of Dreams, the feared neighbor Mr. Mertle in The Sandlot, King Jaffe Joffer in Coming to America, Reverend Stephen Kumalo in Cry, the Beloved Country, Raymond Lee Murdock in A Family Thing, and Vice Admiral James Greer in The Hunt for Red October, Patriot Games, and Clear and Present Danger, among many others.

Jones is also well known as the voice of Darth Vader in the original Star Wars trilogy. Darth Vader was portrayed in costume by David Prowse in the original trilogy, with Jones dubbing Vader’s dialogue in postproduction due to Prowse’s strong West Country accent being unsuitable for the role. At his own request, he was originally uncredited for the release of the first two films (he would later be credited for the two in the 1997 re-release): When Linda Blair did the girl in The Exorcist, they hired Mercedes McCambridge to do the voice of the devil coming out of her. And there was controversy as to whether Mercedes should get credit. I was one who thought no, she was just special effects. So when it came to Darth Vader, I said, no I’m just special effects. But it became so identified that by the third one, I thought, OK I’ve been denying it, I’ve been saying it sounds like the uncola nut guy Holder. Geoffrey Holder! … But for the third one, I said OK, I’ll let them put my name on it.

Although uncredited, Jones’ voice is briefly heard as Darth Vader at the conclusion of Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. When specifically asked whether he had supplied the voice, possibly from a previous recording, Jones told New York Newsday: “You’d have to ask Lucas about that. I don’t know.” However, on the issue of the voice, the commentary on the DVD release states that, while it will always be uncredited, any true Star Wars fan “should know the answer.”

Jones reprised his role as the voice of Vader several times: he is credited in the movie Robots with the voice of Darth Vader from a voice module. Playing the king of Zamunda in the comedy Coming to America, he echoed four Darth Vader phrases. He also vocally appeared as Vader in the comedy film The Benchwarmers and the video games Star Wars: Monopoly and Star Wars: The Interactive Video Board Game. Jones’ voice is also used for the Jedi Training Academy attraction at Disneyland and at Disney’s Hollywood Studios. Jones returned as Vader for the video game: Lego Star Wars III: The Clone Wars. Jones also reprised his role as Vader in the new Disney attraction; Star Tours: The Adventures Continue.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Ea…

 

Far-de noima, gand poetic de George-B


Far-de noima, gand poetic de George-B

Am visat un vis far-de noima
natura moarta, omorata far-de noima
nenaturalul ridicat pe pedestal far-de noima…

Apoi  m-am ridicat far-de noima
doar ca sa deslusesc far-de noima
ca visul s-a trezit si el far-de noima…

Haiku Equilibrium, poetic thought by george-b Equilibrium: Stones shouldering each other with air for mortar.


Haiku Equilibrium, poetic thought by george-b

Equilibrium:
Stones shouldering each other
with air for mortar.
File:Rock balancing (Counter Balance).jpg

NEW Widget AT EuZicAsa: HAIKU TOPICS (ACCESS HERE)


HAIKU TOPICS (ACCESS HERE)

HAIKU TOPICS (ACCESS HERE)

Introducing Haiku Poets and Topics . . . . . WKD

Introducing Haiku Poets, Famous People, Places and Haiku Topics 
A project of the World Kigo Database. 

This is an educational site for reference purposes of haiku poets worldwide. 

Dr. Gabi Greve, Japan, Daruma Museum. 

 

Introducing Haiku Poets and Topics . . . . . WKD: Pound, Ezra Pound


 

Introducing Haiku Poets and Topics . . . . . WKD: Pound, Ezra Pound.

WKD (NEWSLETTER) … World Kigo Database


 

WKD (NEWSLETTER) … World Kigo Database.

FCC Looks the Other Way as a New Wave of Consolidation Devours Local TV Stations | Free Press


 

FCC Looks the Other Way as a New Wave of Consolidation Devours Local TV Stations | Free Press.

“YETI” DNA POINTS TO POLAR BEAR RELATIVE


“Yeti” DNA Points to Polar Bear Relative

Most scholars reject the existence of the yeti, a large, hairy, humanoid creature reputed to inhabit theHimalayas, but a respected British geneticist believes there may be something to the stories. He tested hair samples collected from two unidentified animals purported to be yetis and matched the DNA to that of an ancient polar bear jawbone from Svalbard, a Norwegian archipelago north of the Arctic Circle, that dates back 40,000 to 120,000 years. This, he says, could mean that an as-yet-unidentified bear species, perhaps some sort of brown bear-polar bear hybrid, resides in the region and is behind at least some yeti sightings.More… Discuss

 

A comment, (poetic thought by George-B)


A comment, (poetic thought by George-B)

Pain unscaleable,
unquantifiable on a scale from 1-10
with faces drawn 
more or less happy,
and some sad,

pain that hides in its own shadow,
become its shadow,

cut the branch we’ve landed on, to rest for a while…
While… all you can do
is imagine being painless for a quantum of an eternal moment:  
a note may be, or an entire song,
a rhyme, or even an entire poem,
While… letting go and sharing pain free,
glamourless, natural,
denuded of inhumanity,
hoping that you may be understood, taken seriously,
at face value,
as an immortal soul – in the making,
a mortal – body in the making,
as a star  - in the making,
a universe – in the making,
as a molecule – in the making,
a Rigs Boson – in the making ,
God in the making,
as an…!
(Exhale 1-2-3-4 [Held Breath 1-2] Inhale 1-2-3-4 [Hold Breath] REPEAT…n times)

All we hope for, (poetic thought by George-B)


All we hope for, (poetic thought by George-B)

GOD’ biggest gift to us is Hope:
to keep our  unreasonable dreams bathing in light…
to bridge over the hopeless depths of all sorts of crevices,
holes,
and cracks,
some more material than others…
Hope that there is life identical to ours-somewhere else
and that we’ll find and reach that place and then
that we will drain its entirety, its life, as we are doing, for whole history,  to ours…

But, above all, the hope that it will be all forgiven and forgotten,
that HE will be back for us, to read to us
bed time stories and sing us to sleep by hermetic lullabies, because:
We are HIS children, and all we hope for is in the hopes. 

 

Winter Night by Boris Pasternak


Winter Night by Boris Pasternak
It snowed and snowed ,the whole world over,
Snow swept the world from end to end.
A candle burned on the table;
A candle burned.As during summer midges swarm
To beat their wings against a flame
Out in the yard the snowflakes swarmed
To beat against the window pane

The blizzard sculptured on the glass
Designs of arrows and of whorls.
A candle burned on the table;
A candle burned.

Distorted shadows fell
Upon the lighted ceiling:
Shadows of crossed arms,of crossed legs-
Of crossed destiny.

Two tiny shoes fell to the floor
And thudded.
A candle on a nightstand shed wax tears
Upon a dress.

All things vanished within
The snowy murk-white,hoary.
A candle burned on the table;
A candle burned.

A corner draft fluttered the flame
And the white fever of temptation
Upswept its angel wings that cast
A cruciform shadow

It snowed hard throughout the month
Of February, and almost constantly
A candle burned on the table;
A candle burned.

Boris Pasternak (1890 – 1960)
Boris Pasternak
Enlarge Picture
View Boris Pasternak:
Poems
Quotes
Biography
Books
Boris Leonidovich Pasternak (1890-1960), born in Moscow, was the son of talented artists: his father a painter and illustrator of Tolstoy’s works, his mother a well-known concert pianist. Pasternak’s education began in a German Gymnasium in Moscow and was continued at the University of Moscow. Under the influence of the composer Scriabin, Pasternak took up the study of musical composition for six years from 1904 to 1910. By 1912 he had renounced music as his calling in life and went to the Unive..

Haiku- Survival (poetic thought by George-B)


Haiku- Survival (poetic thought by George-B)

One’s survival helps
a many succeeding where
many will fail alone.

 

Haiku – Cyan Flamenco (poetic thought by George-B)


Haiku – Cyan Flamenco (poetic thought by George-B)

Cyan flamenco
assumes the steel-toe rhythm
and castanets‘ tocks.

 

Magenta Flamenco oil Painting Digital (my Art Collection) 32X41- FotoSketch

Cyan Flamenco oil Painting Digital (my Art Collection) 32X41- FotoSketch

 

 

Haiku – True Beauty (poetic thought by George-B)


Haiku – True Beauty (poetic thought by George-B)

True beauty knows not
of the beholder mind’s eye
nor of reflection.