Category Archives: QUOTATION

QUOTATION: Thomas Hardy


Poetry is emotion put into measure. The emotion must come by nature, but the measure can be acquired by art.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Herman Melville


It is not down in any map; true places never are.

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Gardens are not made by singing “Oh, how beautiful,” and sitting in the shade.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

Leonard Cohen Live – A Thousand Kisses Deep (“A light that doesn’t need to live and Doesn’t need to die”)



The poem is about accepting things we can’t change, and accepting a path we didn’t exactly envision for ourselves. Believe there is a quiet courage in accepting the path that is laid ahead of you, as you gather up your heart and go a thousand kisses deep.. 

[Thanks so much Monsieur Leonard Cohen!]

A Thousand Kisses Deep (poem) Lyrics

Leonard Cohen

You came to me this morning
And you handled me like meat.
You´d have to be a man to know
How good that feels, how sweet.
My mirror twin, my next of kin,
I´d know you in my sleep.
And who but you would take me in
A thousand kisses deep?

I loved you when you opened
Like a lily to the heat.
You see, I´m just another snowman
Standing in the rain and sleet,
Who loved you with his frozen love
His second-hand physique -
With all he is, and all he was
A thousand kisses deep.

I know you had to lie to me,
I know you had to cheat.
To pause all hot and high behind
the veils of sheer deceit
Our perfect porn aristocrat
So elegant and cheap
I’m old, but I’m still into that
A thousand kisses deep

I’m good at love, I’m good at hate
It’s in between I freeze
I’d work it out but it’s too late
It’s been too late for years
But you look good, you really do
They love you on the street
If you were here I’d kneel for you
A thousand kisses deep

The Autumn moved across your skin
Got something in my eye
A light that doesn’t need to live and 
Doesn’t need to die
A riddle in the book of love
obscure and obsolete
To witness tear and time and blood
A thousand kisses deep

And I’m still working with the wine
Still dancing cheek to cheek
The band is playing Auld Lang Syne
But the heart will not retreat
I ran with Diz I sang with Ray -
I did not have their sweep -
But once or twice, they let me play
A thousand kisses deep

I loved you when you opened
Like a lily to the heat
You see, I´m just another snowman
Standing in the rain and sleet,
Who loved you with his frozen love
His second-hand physique -
With all he is and all he was
A thousand kisses deep

But you don’t need to hear me now
And every word I speak
It counts against me anyhow
A thousand kisses deep

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15 Great Quotes From Voltaire – Listverse


1039 Image Voltaire
15 Great Quotes From Voltaire – Listverse.

MAKE MUSIC PAST OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Messiah-Part III: Worthy is the Lamb-


Messiah-Part III: Worthy is the Lamb-George Frideric Handel-bekhit

Worthy is the Lamb that was slain, and hath redeemed us to God by His blood, to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing. Blessing and honour, glory and power, be unto Him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb, for ever and ever. Amen.
(Revelation 5 : 12-13)

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QUOTATION: Washington Irving


A sharp tongue is the only edge tool that grows keener with constant use.

Washington Irving (1783-1859) Discuss

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QUOTATION: H.G. Wells


Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature’s inexorable imperative.

H.G. Wells (1866-1946) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Aesop – “Wit has always an answer ready.”


Wit has always an answer ready.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Daniel Defoe


And of all plagues with which mankind are curst, Ecclesiastic tyranny’s the worst.

Daniel Defoe (1660-1731) Discuss

QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Borrow trouble for yourself, if that’s your nature, but don’t lend it to your neighbors.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Gustave Flaubert


Nothing is more humiliating than to see idiots succeed in enterprises we have failed in.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) Discuss

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25 Most Famous Last Words Ever Uttered (YouTube)


Published on May 2, 2013 VIEWS: 482,894

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It is believed that people tend to become the most honest when they are about to die. Some have even said that of all the words a man utters in his entire lifetime, it is what he says on his death bed that makes the most sense. Here is a list of the 25 most famous last words ever uttered by some of the most celebrated heroes, celebrities and political leaders in the course of history, as well as relatively brief accounts of why they said those words.

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- Sir James Matthew Barrie – “I can’t sleep.”
- John Adams – “Thomas Jefferson…”
- Queen Marie Antoinette – “Pardon me, Sir, I did not do it on purpose.”
- Louisa May Alcott -”Is it not meningitis?”
- Mary Elizabeth Jenkins Surratt – “Please don’t let me fall.”
- James Donald French – “Hey fellas! How about this for a headline for tomorrow’s paper? French Fries!”
- John Quincy Adams – “This is the last of Earth! I am content!”
- Alexander the Great – “To the strongest!”
- John F. Kennedy – “No, you certainly can’t.”
- Alexander II – “Home to the palace to die.”
- Hector Hugh Munro – “Put out the bloody cigarette!”
- Salvador Allende – These are my last words, and I am certain that my sacrifice will not be in vain, I am certain that, at the very least, it will be a moral lesson that will punish felony, cowardice and treason.”
- Major John Andre – “I pray you to bear me witness that I meet my fate like a brave man.”
- James Brown – “I’m going away tonight.”
- Michael Faraday – “I shall be with Christ, and that is enough.”
- Joan Crawford – “Don’t you dare ask God to help me”
- Nostradamus – “Tomorrow, I shall no longer be here.”
- Jimmy L. Glass – “I’d rather be fishing.”
- Humphrey Bogart – “I should have never switched from Scotch to Martinis.”
- Jane Dornacker – “Hit the water, hit the water, hit the water!”
- Emperor Julian – “You have won, O Galilean.”
- Jessica Dubroff – “Do you hear the rain? Do you hear the rain?”
- Dominique Bouhours – “I am about to — or I am going to — die: either expression is correct.”
- Belinda Emmett – “Are you all right?”
- Aleister Crowley – “I am perplexed. Satan, get out!”

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QUOTATION: Henry Fielding


A rich man without charity is a rogue; and perhaps it would be no difficult matter to prove that he is also a fool.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


The silliest woman can manage a clever man; but it needs a very clever woman to manage a fool.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Bret Harte


Now, I hold it is not decent for a scientific gent
To say another is an ass—at least, to all intent;
Nor should the individual who happens to be meant
Reply by heaving rocks at him to any great extent.

Bret Harte (1836-1902) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Sun Tzu


The ultimate in disposing one’s troops is to be without ascertainable shape. Then the most penetrating spies cannot pry in nor can the wise lay plans against you.

Sun Tzu (544 BC-496 BC) Discuss

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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QUOTATION: George Bernard Shaw


Men are wise in proportion, not to their experience, but to their capacity for experience.

George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) Discuss

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QUOTATION: W. Somerset Maugham


The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic, and self-complacent is erroneous; on the contrary, it makes them, for the most part, humble, tolerant, and kind. Failure makes people cruel and bitter.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Samuel Taylor Coleridge


Talent, lying in the understanding, is often inherited; genius, being the action of reason or imagination, rarely or never.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Willa Cather


Some memories are realities, and are better than anything that can ever happen to one again.

Willa Cather (1873-1947) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: John Quincy Adams


Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) Discuss

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Brahms Piano concerto N° 2 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (German: [joˈhanəs ˈbʁaːms]; 7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist.

Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms’s popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the “Three Bs“.

Brahms composed for piano, chamber ensembles, symphony orchestra, and for voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works; he worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinistJoseph Joachim. Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. Brahms, an uncompromising perfectionist, destroyed some of his works and left others unpublished.[1]

Brahms is often considered both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Baroque and Classical masters. He was a master of counterpoint, the complex and highly disciplined art for which Johann Sebastian Bach is famous, and of development, a compositional ethos pioneered by Joseph HaydnWolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and other composers. Brahms aimed to honour the “purity” of these venerable “German” structures and advance them into a Romantic idiom, in the process creating bold new approaches to harmony and melody. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg and Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms’s works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers.

 

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


There’s no jealousy in the grave.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

QUOTATION: Thomas Hardy


A resolution to avoid an evil is seldom framed till the evil is so far advanced as to make avoidance impossible.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) Discuss

 

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Old saying: In each and every age joy and sorrow are mingled: Remain pious in joy, and be ready for sorrow with courage.


Old saying:

In each and every age
joy and sorrow are mingled:
Remain pious in joy,
and be ready for sorrow with courage.

QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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50 Common Misquotations: Mental Floss on YouTube (Ep.11)



A weekly show hosted by John Green, where knowledge junkies get their fix of trivia-tastic information. This week, John looks at 50 common misquotations and misattributions.

Mental Floss Video on Twitterhttp://www.twitter.com/mf_video
Images and Footage provided by Shutterstock: http://www.shutterstock.com

Artist acknowledgements for this episode: 
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Website: http://www.mentalfloss.com
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/mental_floss
Facebookhttp://www.facebook.com/mentalflossma…

 

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QUOTATION: Victor Hugo


When grace is joined with wrinkles, it is adorable. There is an unspeakable dawn in happy old age.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Jane Austen


There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Oscar Wilde


One’s past is what one is. It is the only way by which people should be judged.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Arthur Conan Doyle


It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Arthur Conan Doyle


It has long been an axiom of mine that the little things are infinitely the most important.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)

 

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QUOTATION: Mark Twain


Don’t tell fish stories where the people know you; but particularly, don’t tell them where they know the fish.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Jack London


The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.

Jack London (1876-1916) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Oscar Wilde


Children have a natural antipathy to books–handicraft should be the basis of education. Boys and girls should be taught to use their hands to make something, and they would be less apt to destroy and be mischievous.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Miguel de Cervantes


Everyone is as God has made him, and oftentimes a great deal worse.

Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Aristotle


All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.

Aristotle (384 BC-322 BC) Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Gilbert Chesterton


“My country, right or wrong,” is a thing that no patriot would think of saying except in a desperate case. It is like saying, “My mother, drunk or sober.”

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936) Discuss

QUOTATION: Homer (900 BC-800 BC)


There is nothing nobler or more admirable than when two people who see eye to eye keep house as man and wife, confounding their enemies and delighting their friends.

Homer (900 BC-800 BC) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


Books, not which afford us a cowering enjoyment, but in which each thought is of unusual daring; such as an idle man cannot read, and a timid one would not be entertained by, which even make us dangerous to existing institution–such call I good books.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Plato (427 BC-347 BC)


All men are by nature equal, made all of the same earth by one Workman; and however we deceive ourselves, as dear unto God is the poor peasant as the mighty prince.

Plato (427 BC-347 BC) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Alexander Hamilton


A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Mark Twain


Life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Jane Austen


One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.

Jane Austen (1775-1817) Discuss

 

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