Category Archives: Yerba Mate, green tea, yacon, una de gato, cinnamon,

Schubert – Piano sonata D.664 – Richter London 1979: great compositions/performances


Schubert – Piano sonata D.664 – Richter London 1979

this day in the yesteryear: Cortés Conquers Tenochtitlán (1521)


Cortés Conquers Tenochtitlán (1521)

Tenochtitlán was the flourishing capital of the Aztec Empire with an estimated population of between 200,000 and 300,000, a unique system of lake agriculture known as chinampas, and a ceremonial precinct that contained a great pyramid sacred to the Aztec war god Huitzilopochtli. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés was chased from the city in 1520, but returned a year later, took the city after a three-month siege, and razed it. What tragedy helped Cortés to defeat the Aztecs this time? More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier


Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E-flat major, “Kegelstatt”, K. 498 (1786)
Trio pour clarinette, alto et piano en Mi bémol majeur:
I     Andante;
II   Menuetto;
III Rondo: Allegretto

Portal: clarinet / clarinette
Pasquier: viola / alto
Pennetier: piano

 

Pope Francis, the Eucharist, and the Culture of Mate | First Thoughts | First Things


mate2In the midst of political, religious, national, and personal battles, there is one thing that unites all Argentines: Mate.

Mate (pronounced máh-teh), despite what you may have heard, is not an herbal green tea. That makes it sound sissy. It is a tea-like drink made from a green-colored yerba (herb), but it is much more robust than tea. For Argentines,

via Pope Francis, the Eucharist, and the Culture of Mate | First Thoughts | First Things.

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The Culture of Yerba Mate: Tradition, tradition, tradition


<b>SOLD!</b> \"Labyrinth\" Mate Gourd & Bombilla, By Javier Zinna
 

The most traditional way to drink yerba mate is like the Indians did – from a cup (gourd) and straw (bombilla). Genuine mate drinkers say a well “cured” mate contributes to the good taste of the drink. Also by using the cup and straw it forcibly removes far more of the valuable nutrients which yerba mate has to offer. Other methods do not. You will need to try your own combination of cups and straws as yerba mate will taste differently in each type. Each person must experiment to find which best suits his taste. !Yerba Mate cups can be made from many different types of material. These include the natural gourd, wood, horns, ceramic, glass or metal.

Click here to learn more about Yerba Mate Gourds

How do I CURE my Yerba Mate Gourd

  • Pyrography is the art of decorating wood or other materials (in this case a Yerba Mate gourd) with burn marks resulting from the controlled application of a heated object such as a poker. It is also known as pokerwork or wood burning.
    Pyrography means “writing with fire” and is the traditional art of using a heated tip or wire to burn or scorch designs onto natural materials such as wood or leather. Burning can be done by means of a modern solid-point tool (similar to a soldering iron) or hot wire tool, or a more basic method using a metal implement heated in a fire, or even sunlight concentrated with a magnifying lens. Pyrography is also a traditional folk art in many European countries, including Hungary, as well as countries such as Argentina in South America.

    • Javier Zinna is one of the greatest mate gourds artisan in Argentina. He is currently living in Misiones, the land of Yerba Mate. Last year the FAM (Feria Artesanías Mercosur) held a contest among the exhibitors who chose their best work to compete. Javier won it. It is a great honor to have his works back in our catalog.

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Matepiece: Yerba Mate


matepiece: Yerba Mate

matepiece: Yerba Mate

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Yerba mate (from Spanish [ˈʝeɾβa ˈmate]; Portuguese: erva-mate [ˈɛɾvɐ ˈmatʃe]) is a species of the holly (family Aquifoliaceae), with the binomial name of Ilex paraguariensis.


Yerba_mate_young_plant (Ilex Paraguariensis)

Yerba_mate_young_plant (Ilex Paraguariensis)

Yerba mate (from Spanish [ˈʝeɾβa ˈmate]; Portuguese: erva-mate [ˈɛɾvɐ ˈmatʃe]) is a species of the holly (family Aquifoliaceae), with the binomial name of Ilex paraguariensis.

It is well known as the source of the beverage called mate, Chimarrão, Tererê (or Tereré) and other variations, traditionally consumed in subtropical South America, particularly northeastern Argentina, Bolivia, southern Brazil, Uruguay and Paraguay.[1] It was first used and cultivated by the Guaraní people and in some Tupí communities in southern Brazil, prior to the European colonization. It was scientifically classified by the Swiss botanist Moses Bertoni, who settled in Paraguay in 1895.

Yerba mate, erva mate, mate, or maté
Ilex paraguariensis
Ilex paraguariensis
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Aquifoliales
Family: Aquifoliaceae
Genus: Ilex
Species: I. paraguariensis
Binomial name
Ilex paraguariensis
A. St. Hil.

Use as a beverage

Main article: Mate (beverage)

Steaming mate infusion in its customary gourd

The infusion, called mate in Spanish-speaking countries or chimarrão in south Brazil, is prepared by steeping dry leaves (and twigs) of the mate plant in hot water rather than in boiling water. It is consumed similar to a tea, more traditionally hot, but sometimes cold.

Drinking mate with friends from a shared hollow gourd (also called a guampa, porongo or mate in Spanish, or cabaça or cuia in Portuguese, or zucca in Italian) with a metal straw (a bombilla in Spanish, bomba in Portuguese) is a common social practice in Uruguay, Argentina and southern Brazil among people of all ages.

Yerba mate is most popular in Uruguay, where people are seen walking on the street carrying the “mate” and “termo” in their arms and where you can find hot water stations to refill the “termo” while on the road. In Argentina, 5 kg (11 lb) of yerba mate is consumed each year per every man, woman, and child, while in Uruguay, the largest consumer of mate per capita, 10 kg (22 lb) of yerba mate is consumed per person per year.[5]

The flavor of brewed mate resembles an infusion of vegetables, herbs, and grass, and is reminiscent of some varieties of green tea. Some consider the flavor to be very agreeable, but it is generally bitter if steeped in boiling water. Flavored mate is also sold, in which the mate leaves are blended with other herbs (such as peppermint) or citrus rind.[6]

In Paraguay, Brazil and Argentina, a toasted version of mate, known as mate cocido (Paraguay), chá mate (Brazil) or just mate, is sold in teabags and in a loose leaf form. It is often served sweetened in specialized shops or on the street either hot or iced with fruit juice or milk. In Argentina and southern Brazil, this is commonly consumed for breakfast or in a café for afternoon tea, often with a selection of sweet pastries.

An iced, sweetened version of toasted mate is sold as an uncarbonated soft drink, with or without fruit flavoring.[7][better source needed] In Brazil, this cold version of chá mate is specially popular in South and Southeast regions, and can easily be found in retail stores in the same cooler as soft-drinks.[8] Mate batido, which is toasted, has less of a bitter flavor and more of a spicy fragrance. Mate batido becomes creamy when shaken. Mate batido is more popular in the coastal cities of Brazil, as opposed to the far southern states, where it is consumed in the traditional way (green, consumed with a silver straw from a shared gourd), and called chimarrão.and in Argentina, this is called cimarrón.[9]

In Paraguay, western Brazil (Mato Grosso do Sul, west of São Paulo) and the Litoral Argentino, a mate infusion is also consumed as a cold or iced beverage and called tereré or tererê (in Spanish and Portuguese, respectively), and is usually sucked out of a horn cup called guampa with a bombilla. Tereré can be prepared using cold or iced water (the most common way in Paraguay) or using cold or iced fruit juice (the most common way in Argentina). The “only water” version may be too bitter, but the one prepared using fruit juice is sweetened by the juice itself. Medicinal herbs, known as yuyos, are mixed in a mortar and pestle and added to the water for taste or medicinal reasons. Tereré is most popular in Paraguay, Brazil, and the Litoral (northeast Argentina).[10]

In the Rio de la Plata region, people often consume daily servings of mate. It is common for friends to convene to matear several times a week. In cold weather, the beverage is served hot and in warm weather the hot water is often substituted with lemonade, but not in Uruguay. Children often take mate with lemonade or milk, as well.[citation needed]

As Europeans often meet at a coffee shop, drinking mate is the impetus for gathering with friends in Argentina, southern Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. Sharing mate is ritualistic and has its own set of rules. Usually, one person, the host or whoever brought the mate, prepares the drink and refills the gourd with water. In these three countries, the hot water can be contained in a vacuum flask, termo (appropriate for drinking mate in the outside) or garrafa térmica (Brazil), or in a pava (kettle), which only can be done at home.[citation needed]

The gourd is passed around, often in a circle, and each person finishes the gourd before giving it back to the brewer. The gourd (also called a mate) is passed in a clockwise order. Since mate can be rebrewed many times, the gourd is passed until the water runs out. When persons no longer want to take mate, they say gracias (thank you) to the brewer when returning the gourd to signify they do not want any more.[citation needed]

During the month of August, Paraguayans have a tradition of mixing mate with crushed leaves, stems, and flowers of the plant known as flor de Agosto[11] (the flower of August, plants of the Senecio genus), which contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Modifying mate in this fashion is potentially toxic, as these alkaloids can cause a rare condition of the liver, veno-occlusive disease, which produces liver failure due to progressive occlusion of the small venous channels in the liver.[12]

In South Africa, mate is not well known, but has been introduced to Stellenbosch by a student who sells it nationally. In the tiny hamlet of Groot Marico in the northwest province, mate was introduced to the local tourism office by the returning descendants of the Boers, who in 1902 had emigrated to Patagonia in Argentina after losing the Anglo Boer War. It is also commonly consumed in Lebanon, Syria and some other parts of the Middle East, as well as amongst communities of expatriate from the Southern Cone.[13]

Chemical composition and properties

Xanthines

Yerba mate contains three xanthines: caffeine, theobromine and theophylline, the main one being caffeine. Caffeine content varies between 0.7% and 1.7% of dry weight[14] (compared with 0.4– 9.3% for tea leaves, 2.5–7.6% in guarana, and up to 3.2% for ground coffee);[15] theobromine content varies from 0.3% to 0.9%; theophylline is present in small quantities, or can be completely absent.[16] A substance previously called “mateine” is a synonym for caffeine (like theine and guaranine).

Preliminary limited studies of mate have shown that the mate xanthine cocktail is different from other plants containing caffeine, most significantly in its effects on muscle tissue, as opposed to those on the central nervous system, which are similar to those of other natural stimulants.[citation needed] The three xanthines present in mate have been shown to have a relaxing effect on smooth muscle tissue, and a stimulating effect on myocardial (heart) tissue.[citation needed]

Mineral content

Yerba mate also contains elements such as potassium, magnesium and manganese.[17]

Health effects

As of 2011 there has not been any double-blind, randomized prospective clinical trial of mate drinking with respect to chronic disease.[18] However, yerba does contain polyphenols, which may benefit the immune system,[19][20] relieve allergies,[21] reduce the risk of diabetes and hypoglycemia in mice,[22] contain compounds that, when extracted from green tea burns more calories,[23] acts as an appetite suppressant and weight loss tool,[24][25] increases the supply of nutrients and oxygen to the heart,[26] may reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes,[27] increases mental energy and focus,[28][29] improves mood,[30] and promotes a deeper sleep, however sleep may be affected in people who are sensitive to caffeine.[28][31]

Lipid metabolism

Some non-blinded studies have found mate consumption to be effective in lipid lowering.[18] Studies in animals and humans have observed hypocholesterolemic effects of Ilex paraguariensis aqueous extracts. A single-blind controlled trial of 102 volunteers found that after 40 days of drinking 330 mL / day of mate tea (concentration 50g dry leaves / L water), people with already-healthy cholesterol levels experienced an 8.7% reduction in LDL, and hyperlipidemic individuals experienced an 8.6% reduction in LDL and a 4.4% increase in HDL, on average. Participants already on statin therapy saw a 13.1% reduction in LDL and a 6.2% increase in HDL. The authors thus concluded that drinking yerba mate infusions may reduce the risk for cardiovascular diseases.[32]

Cancer

Any hot consumption of mate is associated with oral cancer[33] esophageal cancer, cancer of the larynx,[34] and squamous cell of the head and neck.[35][36] Studies show a correlation between temperature and likelihood of cancer, making it unclear how much a role mate itself plays as a carcinogen.[34]

A study by the International Agency for Research on Cancer showed a limited correlation between oral cancer and the drinking of large quantities of “hot mate”.[37] Smaller quantities (less than 1 liter daily) were found to increase risk only slightly, though alcohol and tobacco consumption had a synergistic effect on increasing oral, throat, and esophageal cancer. The study notes the possibility that increased risk could be credited to the high (near-boiling) temperatures at which the mate is consumed in its most traditional way, the chimarrão. The cellular damage caused by thermal stress could lead the esophagus and gastric epithelium to be metaplastic, adapting to the chronic injury. Then, mutations would lead to cellular dysplasia and to cancer.[38] While the IARC study does not specify a specific temperature range for “hot mate”, it lists general (not “hot”) mate drinking separately, but does not possess the data to assess its effect. It also does not address, in comparison, any effect of consumption temperature with regard to coffee or tea.

Obesity

Few data are available on the effects of yerba mate on weight in humans and further study may be warranted.[39]

Mechanism of action

E-NTPDase activity

Research also shows that mate preparations can alter the concentration of members of the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) family, resulting in an elevated level of extracellular ATP, ADP, and AMP. This was found with chronic ingestion (15 days) of an aqueous mate extract, and may lead to a novel mechanism for manipulation of vascular regenerative factors, i.e., treating heart disease.[40]

Antioxidants

In an investigation of mate antioxidant activity, there was a correlation found between content of caffeoyl-derivatives and antioxidant capacity (AOC).[41][42] Amongst a group of Ilex species, Ilex paraguariensis antioxidant activity was the highest.[41]

History

Main article: History of yerba mate

Yerba mate growing in the wild

Mate was first consumed by the indigenous Guaraní and also spread in the Tupí people that lived in southern Brazil and Paraguay, and became widespread with the European colonization.[citation needed] In the Spanish colony of Paraguay in the late 16th century, both Spanish settlers and indigenous Guaranís, who had, to some extent, before the Spanish arrival, consumed it.[citation needed] Mate consumption spread in the 17th century to the River Plate and from there to Argentina, Chile, Bolivia and Peru.[citation needed] This widespread consumption turned it into Paraguay’s main commodity above other wares, such as tobacco, and Indian labour was used to harvest wild stands.[citation needed]

In the mid 17th century, Jesuits managed to domesticate the plant and establish plantations in their Indian reductions in Misiones, Argentina, sparking severe competition with the Paraguayan harvesters of wild stands.[citation needed] After their expulsion in the 1770s, their plantations fell into decay, as did their domestication secrets.[citation needed] The industry continued to be of prime importance for the Paraguayan economy after independence, but development in benefit of the Paraguayan state halted after the War of the Triple Alliance (1864–1870) that devastated the country both economically and demographically.[citation needed] Some regions with mate plantations in Paraguay became Argentinean territory.[citation needed]

Lithograph of José Gaspar Rodríguez de Francia, a 19th-century ruler of Paraguay, with a mate and its respective bombilla

Brazil then became the largest producer of mate.[43] In Brazilian and Argentine projects in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the plant was domesticated once again, opening the way for plantation systems.[citation needed] When Brazilian entrepreneurs turned their attention to coffee in the 1930s, Argentina, which had long been the prime consumer,[44] took over as the largest producer, resurrecting the economy in Misiones Province, where the Jesuits had once had most of their plantations. For years, the status of largest producer shifted between Brazil and Argentina.[44]

Now, Brazil is the largest producer, with 53%, followed by Argentina, 37% and Paraguay, 10%.[4]

There is a Parque Historico do Mate, funded by the State of Parana, Brazil, to educate people on the sustainable harvesting methods needed to maintain the integrity and vitality of the oldest wild forests of mate in the world.[3]

Nomenclature

The name given to the plant in Guaraní, language of the indigenous people who first cultivated and enjoyed mate, is ka’a, which has the same meaning as “herb”.[citation needed] Congonha, in Portuguese, is derived from the Tupi expression, meaning something like “what keeps us alive”, but a term rarely used nowadays.[citation needed] Mate is from the Quechua mati,[45] a word that means container for a drink, infusion of an herb, as well as gourd.[46] The word mate is used in both, Portuguese and Spanish languages.[citation needed]

The pronunciation of yerba mate in Spanish is [ˈʝe̞rβ̞ä ˈmäte̞][45] The accent on the word is on the first syllable, not the second as might be implied by the variant spelling “maté”.[45] The word hierba is Spanish for “herb”; yerba is a variant spelling of it which was quite common in Argentina.[47] (Nowadays in Argentina “yerba” refers exclusively to the “yerba mate” plant.[47]) Yerba mate, therefore, originally translated literally as the “gourd herb”, i.e. the herb one drinks from a gourd.[citation needed]

The (Brazilian) Portuguese name is either erva-mate [ˈɛʁvɐ ˈmätʃi] (also pronounced [ˈɛrvɐ ˈmäte] or [ˈɛɾvɐ ˈmätɪ] in some regions), the most used term, or rarely “congonha” [kõˈɡõȷ̃ɐ], from Old Tupi kõ’gõi, which means “what sustains the being”.[48] It is also used to prepare the drinks chimarrão (hot), tereré (cold) or chá mate (hot or cold). While the chá mate (tea) is made with the toasted leaves, the other drinks are made with green leaves, and are very popular in the south of the country and Mato Grosso. Most people colloquially address both the plant and the beverage simply by the word mate.[8]

Both the spellings “mate” and “maté” are used in English, but the latter spelling is never used in Spanish where it means “I killed” as opposed to “gourd”.[49] There are no variation of spellings in Spanish.[45] The addition of the acute accent over the final “e” was likely added as a hypercorrection, indicating that the word and its pronunciation are distinct from the common English word “mate“.[50][51][52][53][54]

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Gunpowder tea (green tea): From Wikipedia


Gunpowder tea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

China-Zhejiang.pngGunpowder tea (; pinyin: zhū chá) is a form of green Chinese tea produced in Zhejiang Province of China in which each leaf has been rolled into a small round pellet. It is believed to take its English name from the fact that the tea resembles grains of black powder. This rolling method of shaping tea is most often applied either to dried green tea (the most commonly encountered variety outside China) or Oolong tea.

Chinese Gunpowder Green Tea
Type: Green

Other names: Lo Chu Ch’a, Zhu Cha, 珠茶
Origin: Zhejiang Province China and others

Quick description: Popular worldwide. Flavor varies according to the growing location of tea used for production

Gunpowder tea production dates back to the Tang Dynasty 618–907. It was first introduced to Taiwan in the 19th century. Gunpowder tea leaves are withered, steamed, rolled, and then dried. Although the individual leaves were formerly rolled by hand, today most gunpowder tea is rolled by machines (though the highest grades are still rolled by hand). Rolling renders the leaves less susceptible to physical damage and breakage and allows them to retain more of their flavor and aroma. In addition, it allows certain types of oolong teas to be aged for decades if they are cared for by being occasionally roasted.

When buying gunpowder tea it is important to look for shiny pellets, which indicate that the tea is relatively fresh. Pellet size is also associated with quality, larger pellets being considered a mark of lower quality tea. High quality gunpowder tea will have small, tightly rolled pellets.[citation needed]

Varieties

When sold as a variety of tea, gunpowder tea has several varieties:

  • Pingshui gunpowder (平水珠茶): The original and most common variety of gunpowder tea with larger pearls, better color, and a more aromatic infusion, which is commonly sold as Temple of Heaven Gunpowder or Pinhead Gunpowder, the former, a common brand of this tea variety.[1][2]
  • Formosa gunpowder: A gunpowder style tea grown in Taiwan near Keelung, it is claimed to have its own characteristic aroma, different from that of Zhejiang Province gunpowder grown in mainland China. Formosa gunpowder teas are typically fresh or roasted oolongs.
  • Ceylon gunpowder: A gunpowder variant grown in Sri Lanka, usually at altitudes exceeding 1,800 metres (6,000 ft), see Green Ceylon teas.

Several types of green teas are commonly rolled into “gunpowder” form, including Chunmee, Tieguanyin, Huang Guanyin, and Dong Ding, as well as many other oolong and higher-end jasmine teas.

Etymology

In Chinese, gunpowder tea is called zhū chá (; literally “pearl tea” or “bead tea”; not to be confused with boba tea).

The origin of the English term may come from the tea’s similarity in appearance to actual gunpowder: greyish, dark pellets of irregular shape used as explosive propellant for early guns. The name may also have arisen from the fact that the grey-green leaf is tightly rolled into a tiny pellet and “explodes” into a long leaf upon being steeped in hot water. Another explanation is that the tea can also have a smoky flavor.

It is also possible that the English term may stem from the Mandarin Chinese phrase for “freshly brewed”, gāng pào de (), which sounds like the English word “gunpowder.”

Brewing methods

While brewing methods vary widely by tea and individual preferences, 1 teaspoon of looseleaf tea is recommended for every 150ml (5.07 oz) of water. Ideal water temperature for this type of tea is between 70 °C (158 °F) to 80 °C (176 °F). For the first and second brewing, leaves should be steeped for around one minute. It is also recommended that the tea cup or tea pot used should be rinsed with hot water prior to brewing the tea to warm the vessels. When brewed, gunpowder tea is a yellow color.

The flavor of brewed gunpowder tea is often described as thick and strong like a soft honey, but with a smokey flavor and an aftertaste that is slightly coppery. This type of tea is often seen as having a flavor that is somewhat grassy, minty, or peppery.

Use in the Maghreb

Moroccan tea ritual

Gunpowder tea is exported to the Maghreb where it is used in the preparation of traditional North African mint tea. The Moroccan tea ritual is at the heart of any social gathering, from an informal visit to a neighbour to lavish soirees with dignitaries. A minimum of two cups need to be drunk so as not to offend the host. Moroccan mint tea is made by adding mint and sugar or honey to gunpowder tea after brewing.

 

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Green tea: Is made from the leaves from Camellia sinensis


  • Green tea is made from the leaves from Camellia sinensis that have undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originated in China, but it has become associated with many cultures throughout Asia. Green tea has recently beco…
     
  • en.wikipedia.org
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Paschal Troparion ‘Christ is risen” in different languages part 2


Paschal TroparionChrist is risen” in different languages part 2

It is probably the most known and beautiful Orthodox Christian hymn. It is sung at the Feast of Feasts – the Holy Pascha (Easter) that’s the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ.

In this part the troparion is chanted by various choirs in different melodies in such languages:
French – Christ est ressuscité

Ukrainian:
Христос воскрес із мертвих,
смертю смерть подолав,
і тим, що в гробах,
життя дарував

Swedish – Kristus är uppstånden

Filipino (Tagalog):
Si Kristo ay nabuhay mula sa mga patay,
Sa pamamagitan ng kanyang kamatayan,
nilupig niya ang kamatayan,
At ang mga nasa himlayan
Ay binigyan niya ng buhay

Spanish (espanol) – ¡Cristo ha resucitado!

Greek:
Χριστὸς ἀνέστη ἐκ νεκρῶν,
θανάτῳ θάνατον πατήσας,
καὶ τοῖς ἐν τοῖς μνήμασι,
ζωὴν χαρισάμενος

Old Church Slavonic (the version of Old Believers) – Christos woskresie!
Swahili – Kristo Amefufukka
Arabic – المسيح قام
Romanian – Hristos a înviat
Afrikaans (Paasfees) – Christus het opgestaan

Finnish (Pääsiäinen):
Kristus nousi kuolleista,
kuolemallaan kuoleman voitti
ja haudoissa oleville elämän antoi 

Latin – Christus resurrexit
German – Christus ist auferstanden
Albanian (Pashka) – Krishti u ngjall!
English
Church Slavonic – Христос воскресе
Catalan – Crist ha ressuscitat
Romanian
Church Slavonic – Hristos voskrese
Hungarian

Dutch:
Christus is opgestaan uit de doden,
door Zijn dood vertreedt Hij de dood
en schenkt het Leven
aan hen in het graf

Greek:
Christos anesti ek nekrón,
thanáto thánaton patísas,
ké tís en tís mnímasi,
zoín charisámenos

Armenian – Քրիստոս յարեաւ ի մեռելոց՜ 
K’ristos haryav i mereloc’.
Mahvamb zmah koxeac’
yev merelyac’
kyank pargevec’av

Czech:
Vstal z mrtvých Kristus,
smrtí smrt překonal
a jsoucím ve hrobech,
život daroval

Coptic – Pikhristos Aftonf

Italian:
Cristo è risorto dai morti,
Con la morte ha vinto la morte,
E a quelli nelle tombe
Ha donato la vita

English
Georgian – ქრისტე აღსდგა
Kriste aghsdga mkvdretit,
sikvdilita sikvdilisa damtrgunveli,
da saplavebis shinata
tskhovrebis mimnichebeli

Church Slavonic:
Христос воскресе из мертвих, 
смертију смерт поправ 
и сушчим во гробјех живот даровав

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: TUNISIA GAINS INDEPENDENCE FROM FRANCE (1956)


Tunisia Gains Independence from France (1956)

Over the centuries, many nations have fought over, won, and lost the African country of Tunisia. It was under Ottoman rule from 1574 until the late 19th century, when France, England, and Italy contended for it. France emerged the victor. In 1955, it granted Tunisia complete internal self-government. Full independence came in 1956. A year later, the monarchy was abolished and Tunisia became a republic. Prior to the 2011 revolution, how many presidents had Tunisia had since gaining independence? More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonín Dvořák – Slavonic Dances, Op. 46



Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, John Farrer

Antonín Dvořák – Slavonic Dances, Op. 46
1. No.1 in C major 4’00
2. No.2 in E minor 6’00
3. No.3 in A flat major 5’22
4. No.4 in F major 7’59
5. No.5 in A major 3’16
6. No.6 in D major 5’15
7. No.7 in C minor 3’34
8. No.8 in G minot 4’05
Related articles

 

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*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati


*Breathing Techniques* (Yoga, Meditation, Relaxation, Stress, Cancer, Blood Pressure) Kapalbhati

Free Teachings: http://acharyashreeyogeesh.com 
Facebookhttp://fb.com/acharyashreeyogeesh
Spiritual Retreats & Classes: http://siddhayatan.org

Acharya Shree Yogeesh conducts his first online video tutorial which covers a breathing technique called kapalbhati. He describes kapalbhati’s history, purpose, and benefits of this ancient yogic breathing technique, and teaches you how to do it.

= About Acharya Shree Yogeesh =
Acharya Shree Yogeesh is a living enlightened master of this era and founder of the Siddhayatan Tirth and Spiritual Retreat, a unique 200+ acre spiritual pilgrimage site and meditation park in North America providing the perfect atmosphere for spiritual learning, community, and soul awakening to help truth seekers advance spiritually. Acharya Shree Yogeesh is also the founder of the Yogeesh Ashram near Los Angeles, California, Yogeesh Ashram International in New Delhi, India, and the Acharya Yogeesh Primary & Higher Secondary School in Haryana, India.

As an inspiring revolutionary spiritual leader and in-demand speaker worldwide, for over forty years Acharya Shree Yogeesh has dedicated his life to helping guide hundreds of thousands of people on their spiritual journey of self-improvement and self-realization. 

It is Acharya Shree Yogeesh’s mission to spread the message of nonviolence, vegetarianism, oneness, and total transformation. 

= Connect with Acharya Shree Yogeesh =
Teachings: http://acharyashreeyogeesh.com
Facebook: http://facebook.com/acharyashreeyogeesh
Spiritual Retreats: http://siddhayatan.org

= Connect with Sadhvi Siddhali Shree =
Free Book: http://siddhalishree.com
Facebook: http://facebook.com/siddhalishree

Other resources:
http://awakenchakras.com (Awaken Chakras, Activate Kundalini)
http://siddhalishree.com (Sadhvi Siddhali Shree, Spiritual Blog)
http://siddhayatan.org (Siddhayatan Spiritual Retreat and Ashram)
http://spiritualchildrenscamp.com (Spiritual Children’s Camp)

 

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TODAY’S QUOTATION: E. M. Forster


There’s nothing like a debate to teach one quickness.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

Tart Cherries for Insomnia | NutritionFacts.org


Tart Cherries for Insomnia | NutritionFacts.org.

 

From The Blog – Huff Post Green- Danielle Nierenberg – 11 Chefs Changing the Food System….(but don’t just take my word for it: check it out for yourselves!)


From The Blog - huff Post Green- Danielle Nierenberg - 11 Chefs Changing the Food System

From The Blog – Huff Post Green- Danielle Nierenberg – 11 Chefs Changing the Food System (click to access story….Of forever regret that your didn’t… :(  )

Image

Scan-pics_ bad Android! -1

Scan-pics_ bad Android! -1 (Don’t rug your eyes!)

 Scan-pics_ bad Android! -2.jpg


Scan-pics_ bad Android! -2.jpg (bad android, good scans!)

If I can stop Whatever’s in this Box getting out, ….The question of the hours is who’s got the Pandorica? ( DRINK KEFIR!)


If I can stop Whatever's in this Box getting out, .... (see pic 2)

If I can stop Whatever’s in this Box getting out, ….
(see pic 2)

Lifeway Organic -2- Kefir - Yeah!

From pic 1…..The question of the hours is who’s got the Pandorica?

Regina Spektor – Samson



You are my sweetest downfall
I loved you first, I loved you first
Beneath the sheets of paper lies my truth
I have to go, I have to go
Your hair was long when we first met

Samson went back to bed
Not much hair left on his head
He ate a slice of wonder bread, and went right back to bed
And history books forgot about us and the Bible didn’t mention us
And the Bible didn’t mention us, not even once

You are my sweetest downfall
I loved you first, I loved you first
Beneath the stars came fallin’ on our heads
But they’re just old light, they’re just old light
Your hair was long when we first met

Samson came to my bed
Told me that my hair was red
Told me I was beautiful, and came into my bed
Oh, I cut his hair myself one night
A pair of dull scissors in the yellow light
And he told me that I’d done alright
And kissed me till the mornin’ light, the mornin’ light
And he kissed me till the mornin’ light

Samson went back to bed
Not much hair left on his head
Ate a slice of wonder bread, and went right back to bed
Oh, we couldn’t bring the columns down
Yeah, we couldn’t destroy a single one
And history books forgot about us
And the Bible didn’t mention us, not even once

You are my sweetest downfall
I loved you first

Find more amazing compositions by Regina Spektor here http://www.youtube.com/user/ReginaSpektor

Regina Spektor “Samson” Directed by Peter Sluszka

Regina’s new album ‘What We Saw from the Cheap Seats‘ is available now:
http://smarturl.it/whatwesawitunesyt

For more Regina: 
http://Facebook.com/ReginaSpektor 
http://ReginaSpektor.com
http://myspace.com/ReginaSpektor

Regina Spektor

Regina Spektor (Photo credit: Man Alive!)

World Health Organisation says has found new SARS-like virus (via Reuters)


 

World Health Organisation says has found new SARS-like virus (From Reuters)

World Health Organisation says has found new SARS-like virus (From Reuters) (click to access report)

(Reuters) – A new virus belonging to the same family as the SARS virus that killed 800 people in 2002 has been identified in Britain in a man who had recently been in Saudi Arabia, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Sunday.  More

 
 
Coronavirus
Virus classification
Group: Group IV ((+)ssRNA)
Order: Nidovirales
Family: Coronaviridae
Genus: Coronavirus
Species: SARS coronavirus

The SARS coronavirus, sometimes shortened to SARS-CoV, is the virus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).[1] On April 16, 2003, following the outbreak of SARS in Asia and secondary cases elsewhere in the world, the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a press release stating that the coronavirus identified by a number of laboratories was the official cause of SARS. Samples of the virus are being held in laboratories in New YorkSan FranciscoManilaHong Kong, and Toronto.

On April 12, 2003, scientists working at the Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia finished mapping thegenetic sequence of a coronavirus believed to be linked to SARS. The team was led by Dr. Marco Marra and worked in collaboration with theBritish Columbia Centre for Disease Control and the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg, Manitoba, using samples from infected patients in Toronto. The map, hailed by the WHO as an important step forward in fighting SARS, is shared with scientists worldwide via the GSC website (see below).

Dr. Donald Low of Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto described the discovery as having been made with “unprecedented speed.”[2]

The sequence of the SARS coronavirus has since been confirmed by other independent groups. More

 

Yacón Tea and glycemic index ( there may be natural rememedies out there, worth trying)


Yacón Tea is a tea that is made from the leaves of the Yacón plant which is indigenous to the Andes.

A healthy yacon plant.

A healthy yacon plant. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The leaves have been used by ancient civilizations in South America for centuries and it has been introduced recently to western societies. The tea is used by many diabetics since the tea reduces blood sugar level. Research has been done about this property of the Yacon leaves in Argentina and it showed that a normal dose of tea (three servings per day) over a 30 day period actually reduced glucose levels, increased plasma insulin and other body characteristics improved such as body weight, and renal parameters. Because of this sugar reducer property, the product is becoming popular among people with diabetes and dieters.

More about yacon (from Wikipedia):

The Yacón (Smallanthus sonchifolius, Syn.: Polymnia edulis, P. sonchifolia) is a perennial plant traditionally grown in the Northern and Central Andes from Ecuador to Argentina for its crisp, sweet-tasting tuberous roots. The texture and flavour are very similar to jicama mainly differing in that yacon has some slightly sweet resinous and floral (similar to violet) undertones to its flavor. This flavoring is probably due to a sweet substance called inulin, as replicates the sweet taste found in the roots of elecampane, which also contains this substance. Another name for the yacón is Peruvian ground apple. The tuber is composed mostly of water and fructo-oligosaccharides.

Commonly called “jicama” in Ecuador, yacón is sometimes confused with this unrelated plant. Yacón is actually a close relative of the sunflower and Jerusalem artichoke. The plants produces a perennial rhizome to which the edible succulent storage roots are attached, the principal economic product of the plant. The rhizome develops just under the soil surface and produces continuously the aerial shoots. Dry and/or cold seasons cause the aerial shoots to die back, but the plant re-sprouts from the rhizome in favourable conditions of temperature and moisture. The edible storage tubers are large and typically weigh a few hundred grams to one kg.

These edible tubers contain fructooligosaccharides, an indigestible polysaccharide made up of fructose. Fructooligosaccharides taste sweet, but pass the human digestive tract unmetabolised and hence have very low caloric value. Moreover, fructooligosaccharides have prebiotic effect, meaning that they are used by “friendly” bacteria that favor colon health and digestion.

Yacón plants can grow to over 2 meters in height and produce small, yellow inconspicuous flowers at the end of the growing season. Unlike many other root vegetables domesticated by the Indigenous Peoples of the Andes (ulluco, oca) and mashua, yacón is not photoperiod sensitive, and can produce a commercial yield also in the subtropics.

Yacón storage roots are traditionally used by farmers at mid-elevations in the eastern slopes of the Andes that descend toward the Amazon. Yacon is grown occasionally along field borders where the juicy roots provide a welcome source of refreshment during field work. Until as late as the early 2000s, yacon was hardly known outside of its limited native range, and was not available from urban markets, however press reports of its use in Japan for its purported anti-hyperglycemic properties made the crop more widely known in Lima and other Peruvian cities. Companies have also developed novel products such as yacón syrup and yacón tea. Both products are popular among diabetic people and dieters.


Brazil indigenous Guarani leader Nisio Gomes killed (from BBC)

Brazil indigenous Guarani leader Nisio Gomes killed (from BBC) (click here to read the article at BBC)

Brazil indigenous Guarani leader Nisio Gomes killed

Nisio Gomes in a photo taken two days before his deathMr Gomes was also a religious leader or shaman

An indigenous leader in western Brazil has been shot dead in front of his community, officials say.

Nisio Gomes, 59, was part of a Guarani Kaiowa group that returned to their ancestral land at the start of this month after being evicted by ranchers.

He was killed by a group of around 40 masked gunmen who burst into the camp. (Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-15799712)

 

Guaraní

7 Ways to Increase Metabolism-via Livestrong


7 Ways to Increase Metabolism-via Livestrong

7 Ways to Increase Metabolism-via Livestrong (click to read the article at LiveStrong)

Yerba Mate-Rosamonte – My Digital Oil Pictures


Yerba Mate-Rosamonte_My Digital Oil Paintings Series

Yerba Mate-Rosamonte©_My Digital Oil Paintings Series

Network: Where do you get your yerba mate?


One of my readers asked where can she reconnect with yerba mate, here in Southern California around the cities of Long Beach and Lakewood. The place I buy mine is:

Luis Meat Market _ Yerba Mate

Luis Meat Market _ Yerba Mate

Luis Meat Market
9071 Imperial Hwy, Downey, CA  90242 (at Rose Street)
Tel: (562) 622-1188
They have a new place:

Luis Meat Market Bellflower
10308 Artesia Blvd., Bellflower CA  90706
Tel: (562) 461-1111

They have large variety of products from Argentina, Paraqguai, Uruguai, and “mucho mas” (much more). My  brands are Tarragui, Cruz de Malta, Rasamonte, but there are at least 5 other brands to choose from: In the end they are all the same plant- Ilex paraguariensis (Synonyms:I. paraguensis, I. mate, I. domestica, I. sorbilis )
I enjoy the natural dried (not smoke dried), and “sin palo” (without twigs), but some are into “con palo” (with twigs) and smoke dried. Most important thing about this tea: Do not boil, do not add to boiling water, but rather let the water cool for a minute (160-180°F is best for preparing.)

Another thing is: You can buy tea bags, or loose (by the kilogram -2.2 lb), or both (that’s what I do, so I can make tea at work. I make a good quantity of tea green tea, and yerba mate tea, in my 12 cup coffeemaker (perfect temperature interval). The truth is: I drink green tea like water, and it helps control my blood sugar, cholesterol, and appetite.

But daily workout is crucial for a healthy life, at any age. In two generations we changed our traditional lifestyle so much, and what we eat, and how. Two generations back sugar was in many households a Sunday treat, while today it is added to every processed food, making it impossible to avoid.  Like many others I believe that food needs to be natural, instead of  processed.

I’ll leave you with a question: Where do you buy your yerba mate? 

Diabetes on the Rise via The Lancet


Diabetes onthe Rise _ At the Antipode of Starvation
Diabetes on the Rise _ At the Antipode of Starvation

(Click o the picture to read the story at “The Lancet”)

Daily Workout (one hour of brisk walking for example), preferably outdoors, will contribute to your wellness both physical and mental. If you can walk four miles in one hour, you are at a good pace. 

Yerba Mate – Friends Share: Did you have your cup of mate today?


Teenagers share drinking mate on a parkbench
Teenagers share drinking mate on a park bench

Never  late to try a cup of Yerba Mate:
Start today!

You’re Invited To a Cup of Tea: (Not the Five O’clock? Well, have a cup of tea anyway!)


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