Tag Archives: 19th Century

QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Herman Melville


Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored…

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

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QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce


Academy: A modern school where football is taught.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


Books, not which afford us a cowering enjoyment, but in which each thought is of unusual daring; such as an idle man cannot read, and a timid one would not be entertained by, which even make us dangerous to existing institution–such call I good books.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Mark Twain


Life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: “One must be poor to know the luxury of giving.” (George Eliot)


One must be poor to know the luxury of giving.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot ABOUT A TYRANT


If a man means to be hard, let him keep in his saddle and speak from that height, above the level of pleading eyes, and with the command of a distant horizon.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


I am as desirous of being a good neighbor as I am of being a bad subject.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot about conceited people


I’ve never any pity for conceited people, because I think they carry their comfort about with them.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington ABOUT WORK


Nothing ever comes to me, that is worth having, except as the result of hard work.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce


The desire to know whether or not a woman is cursed with curiosity is one of the most active and insatiable passions of the masculine soul.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)

 

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QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce ABOUT NOSES AND THEIR FAVORITE RETREAT!


It has been observed that one’s nose is never so happy as when thrust into the affairs of others, from which some physiologists have drawn the inference that the nose is devoid of the sense of smell.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


I heartily accept the motto, “That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce


A word which some lexicographer has marked obsolete is ever thereafter an object of dread and loathing to the fool writer, but if it is a good word and has no exact modern equivalent equally good, it is good enough for the good writer.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot (1819-1880)


It is well known to all experienced minds that our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium.

George Eliot (1819-1880)

 

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau ABOUT EVIL


There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: George Eliot ON SAFETY


A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

George Eliot


What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about undue respect for a law


A common and natural result of an undue respect for the law is, that you may see a file of soldiers … marching in admirable order over hill and dale to the wars, against their wills, ay, against their common sense and consciences.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

QUOTATION: Ralph Waldo Emerson


Man postpones or remembers; he does not live in the present, but with reverted eye laments the past, or, heedless of the riches that surround him, stands on tiptoe to foresee the future.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: GEORGE ELIOT (1819)


George Eliot (1819)

Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans, was raised with a strong religious piety but broke with orthodoxy in her 20s and turned to fiction, writing such classic Victorian novels asSilas Marner, Daniel Deronda, and Middlemarch, in which she developed a method of psychological analysis that would become a characteristic of modern fiction. Although her novels are serious in tone, they still contain humorous moments. With which philosopher did Eliot have a lengthy, scandalous affair?More… Discuss

 

Quotation: Herman Melville


Why did the old Persians hold the sea holy? Why did the Greeks give it a separate deity … ? Surely all this is not without meaning … But that same image, we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans. It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

 

Quotation: Mark Twain on patriotism vs. institutionalism


My kind of loyalty was loyalty to one’s country, not to its institutions or its office-holders. The country is the real thing, the substantial thing, the eternal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; institutions are extraneous, they are its mere clothing, and clothing can wear out.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot


Men’s lives are as thoroughly blended with each other as the air they breathe: evil spreads as necessarily as disease.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about our place in the world (what it should be…)


I came into this world, not chiefly to make this a good place to live in, but to live in it, be it good or bad.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson about flattery


We love flattery even though we are not deceived by it, because it shows that we are of importance enough to be courted.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


Most of the luxuries, and many of the so-called comforts of life, are not only not indispensable, but positive hindrances to the elevation of mankind.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Mark Twain


He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it—namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

Quotation: Mark Twain on life and death


All say, “How hard it is that we have to die”—a strange complaint to come from the mouths of people who have had to live.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)

 

Quotation: William Makepeace Thackeray – About marriage


If people only made prudent marriages, what a stop to population there would be!

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about being “men first, and subjects afterwards”!


Must the citizen ever for a moment, or in the least degree, resign his conscience to the legislator? Why has every man a conscience then? I think that we should be men first, and subjects afterward.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about Unjust laws


Unjust laws exist: shall we be content to obey them, or shall we endeavor to amend them, and obey them until we have succeeded, or shall we transgress them at once?

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Quotation: Mark Twain


Nothing so needs reforming as other people’s habits.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

Quotation: Mark Twain


Let us endeavor so to live that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

Quotation: Herman Melville


Insensible as he is to a thousand wants, and removed from harassing cares, may not the savage be the happier man of the two?

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

 

Ralph Waldo Emerson about first journeys discoveries, a fool’s paradise


Traveling is a fool’s paradise. Our first journeys discover to us the indifference of places.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot (1819-1880)


Don’t let us rejoice in punishment, even when the hand of God alone inflicts it. The best of us are but poor wretches, just saved from shipwreck: can we feel anything but awe and pity when we see a fellow-passenger swallowed by the waves?
(From Scenes of Clerical Life by George Eliot–1858–Book 3–Chapter 22. The story was originally published in 1858 in Blackwood’s Magazine. The first edition of the novel was published in 1910 after she passed away.)
George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot – On Truth and Lie


Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

The above quote comes from “Adam Bede“–Book Two–Chapter XVII–1859. The quote is in the fifth paragraph.

Read the book at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/507/507-h/507-h.htm#2HCH0017

Find Out more about George Eliot a
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Eliot

 

Quotation Of the Day (June 16, 2011) – Washington Irving benevolence, kindness of heart


 How easy it is for one benevolent being to diffuse pleasure around him; and how truly is a kind heart a fountain of gladness, making everything in its vicinity to freshen into smiles!

Washington Irving (1783-1859) Discuss (Please click this link to read some ‘effervescent’ comments ( not all out of place) about this idyllic, romantic yes, but still true today: it’s easier to put a happy face, than a grumpy one, see what I mean?)

Quotation of the day: Mark Twain (1835-1910)


Good breeding consists in concealing how much we think of ourselves and how little we think of the other person.
                                                    Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss
 
This is what I think about this:

‘Listening to others is an effective way of learning more about their  problems. That will make one think about their own problem, in comparison: Now we have an internal dialogue, that externalize and brings about core feelings that we all have in out make, such as true interest, compassion, motivation to help.  So what may start as ‘good breeding’ may end up being a very healthy way to value your own true needs, and wants, when balanced against of those of others.
Of course it all is , like everything else relative, in an ever dynamically relative perception of the evolving reality.’ ©

Quote Of The Day: Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)


Flowers…are a proud assertion that a ray of beauty outvalues all the utilities of the world.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss