Tag Archives: Allegro

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré



Camille Saint-Saëns

Concerto pour piano et orchestre no 1
en ré majeur – opus 17

Jeanne-Marie Darré 

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
Louis Fourestier 

Enregistré en 1956

I- Andante – Allegro assai 00:00

II- Andante sostenuto quasi adagio 10:19

III- Allegro con fuoco 17:52

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Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Daneses Symphoniques



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

- Symphonic Dances on Norwegian motifs, Op. 64
- Danses symphoniques sur des motifs norvégiens, op. 64

I. Allegro moderato e marcato
II. Allegro grazioso
III. Allegro giocoso
IV. Andante – Allegro molto e risoluto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven: Symphony No.8 – Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.8 in F, Op.93
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Allegro vivace e con brio
9:05 II. Allegro scherzando
12:57 III. Tempo di Menuetto
17:36 IV. Allegro vivace

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Carl Maria von Weber – Symphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50



John Georgiadis. Queensland Orchestra
Carl Maria von WeberSymphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50
I. Allegro con Fuoco 00:07:56
II. Andante 00:06:20
III. Scherzo and Trio 00:04:06
IV. Finale: Presto 00:06:47

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Mozart Violin Sonata K.301 Hilary Hahn & Natalie Zhu



W. A. Mozart Sonata for violin and piano in G major, K.301/293a (No.18)

Violin Sonata No. 18 in G Major (K 301) was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in March 1778 in Mannheim, Germany and was first published in the same year as part of Mozart’s Opus 1 collection, which was dedicated to Maria Elisabeth, Electress of the Palatinate and are consequently known as the Palatine Sonatas.

The work consists of two movements:

- [Allegro con spirito]
- [Allegro]

Hilary Hahn (violin/violon)
Natalie Zhu (piano)
Official website : http://www.hilaryhahn.com/index.html 
Deutsche Grammophon :http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/art…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde”



Brandis Quartet, Thomas Brandis, violin. Peter Brem, violin. Wilfried Strehle, viola. Wolfgang Boettcher, cello. 
Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Menuetto, allegro
IV. Allegro moderato

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Lipatti & Ansermet – Schumann Concerto in A minor Op. 54



1. Allegro affettuoso
2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (15:32)
3. Allegro vivace (20:26)

Dinu Lipatti, piano
Ernest Ansermet conducting the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
live – Geneva, February 22, 1950

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano



I Allegro moderato
II Poco adagio
III Moderato innocente
Paolo Restani, piano
Orchestre Philharmonique de Nice
Marco Guidarini, conductor

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven – Violin Sonata No. 3 in Eb, op. 12 no. 3



I. Allegro con spirito [0:00]
II. Adagio con molta espressione [8:52]
III. Rondo: Allegro molto [14:19]

Hiro Kurosaki, violin
Linda Nicholson, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

 

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Z.Francescatti – R.Casadesus: BEETHOVEN Sonata No.8 Op.30,3 (1961)



Ludwig van BEETHOVEN – The Sonatas for Violin & Piano
Violin Sonata No.8 in G major, Op.30/3
0:05 / I. Allegro assai [5'48'']
5:56 / II. Tempo di minuetto, molto moderato e grazioso [6'53'']
12:54 / III. Allegro vivace [3'22'']
Zino FRANCESCATTI, violin – Robert CASADESUS, piano 
(Rec. 1961 – vinyl CBS77426 (p) 1982)
audio restoring / vinyl remaster: Emilio Pessina, 2013
________________________________________­__________
10 Violin Sonatashttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Joshua Bell – Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35

1 Allegro moderato
2 Canzonetta: Andante
3 Finale. Allegro vivacissimo

Joshua Bell, violin

National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America
Valery Gergiev, conductor

Live recording. London, Proms 2013

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)



Johannes Brahms

Work: Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857) for orchestra

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina

Conductor: Andreas Spering

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3 in D major, Op. 29 (Fedoseyev)



Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskySymphony No. 3 ["Polish"] in D major, Op. 29 (1875)
1. Introduzione e Allegro
2. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice
3. Andante elegiaco
4. Scherzo. Allegro vivo
5. Finale. Allegro con fuoco

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Schumann – Symphony No. 2 in C Op.61 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Shostakovich – Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 [Kirill Kondrashin, USSR State SO, 1951]



Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 (1923-25)

I. Allegretto – Allegro non troppo [0:00]
II. Allegro (Scherzo) [9:16]
III. Lento – [13:43]
IV. Allegro molto [23:29]

The first symphony by Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975), which he dedicated to his friend Mikhail Kvadri. Shostakovich completed the work at age 19 as his graduation assignment for the Petrograd (formerly St. Petersburg, later Leningrad) Conservatory, which was directed at the time by Alexander Glazunov. Shostakovich’s main composition teacher Maximilian Steinberg oversaw the project. The composer initially wished to use his Scherzo, Op. 7 (1923-24) as the second movement of the symphony, but Steinberg was appalled by its grotesque character and suggested that Shostakovich compose a different movement. He followed his teacher’s advice in composing a new movement, but it was ever more steeped in grotesquerie than the earlier scherzo, and the same brash, brittle character pervades much of the symphony; as Shostakovich wrote to his friend Lev Oborin, “It would be more fitting to call this work the ‘Symphony-Grotesque’.” Although the symphony is vintage Shostakovich, it also bears the influence of earlier Russian masters – from the piquant harmonies of Stravinsky’s Petrushka and the sharp wit of the young Prokofiev to the lush colours and chromaticism of Scriabin and the long-drawn lyricism of Tchaikovsky.

The symphony’s premiere on May 12, 1926 in the Great Hall of the Leningrad Philharmonic (conducted by Nikolai Malko) was a resounding success. Shostakovich’s mother recalled the performance: “All went more than brilliantly – a splendid orchestra and magnificent execution … At the end, Mitya was called to the stage over and over again. When our handsome young composer appeared, looking almost like a little boy, the enthusiasm turned into one long thunderous ovation.”

This recording dates from 1951. The conductor Kirill Kondrashin leads the USSR State Symphony Orchestra.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13'29'']
13:42 / II. Andantino [4'34'']
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6'06'']
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in E flat Major, WoO 36, No. 1 – Amadeus Quartet



Make Music Part of Your Life:  Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in E flat Major, WoO 36, No. 1 – Amadeus Quartet

From David Hertzberg: “In this 1970 recording, Christoph Eschenbach and members of the Amadeus Quartet — Norbert Brainin, violin; Peter Schidlof, viola; and Martin Lovett, cello — perform the Beethoven Piano quartet in E flat major, WoO 36, No. 1. I recorded this video from a cassette I purchased back in the early 1970s, issued on the Deutsche Grammophon label (serial number 3335 174-10). 

Allegro con spirito (6:53)

(Last year I uploaded this recording in three separate segments.)

More Beethoven:

Beethoven / Gilels / Szell, 1968: Piano Concerto in G major, Op. 58 – Complete - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXoxpW…

Leonid Hambro, 1970: “Happy Birthday Dear Ludwig” – Variations in The Style of Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-Uga3…

Fur Elise – Wilhelm Kempff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9DSjo…

Fur Elise – Alicia de Larrocha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFMUEe…

Beethoven / Artur Balsam, 1952: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61a – Movement 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKKCGw…

David Oistrakh: Romance No. 2 in F major for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 50: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz4JEY…

Wilhelm Backhaus: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – London, 1950s, Karl Böhm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRSTwj…

Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37 (Rondo) Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeW79S…

Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C major, Op. 15 (Rondo) Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojL4Kx…

Emil Gilels, 1983, Beethoven Klaviersonate Nr. 4 Es-dur, Op. 7 -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEfGQ1…

Stephen Kovacevich, 1975: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37, Movement 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYBM5z…

Beethoven / Istomin-Stern-Rose Trio: Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 – Archduke (Allegro), 1966: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQAswV…

Solomon, 1958: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – Rondo -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_Vi8m…

Friedrich Gulda, 1954: Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1 (1) -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RwDZs…

Christoph Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBp3jh…

Artur Balsam: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61 – Rondo, 1950s - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD8ul2…

Stephen Kovacevich: Piano Sonata in C minor, Op. 13, Movement 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGamRs…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In European classical music, piano quartet denotes a chamber music composition for piano and three other instruments, or a musical ensemble comprising such instruments. Those other instruments are usually a string trio consisting of a violinviola and cello.

Piano quartets for that standard lineup were written by Wolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert SchumannLudwig van BeethovenJohannes BrahmsAntonín Dvořák andGabriel Fauré among others. In the 20th century, composers have also written for more varied groups, with Anton Webern‘s Quartet, opus 22 (1930), for example, being for piano, violin, clarinet and tenor saxophone, and Paul Hindemith‘s quartet (1938) as well as Olivier Messiaen‘s Quatuor pour la fin du temps (1940) both for piano, violin, cello and clarinet. An early example of this can be found in Franz Berwald‘s quartet for piano, horn, clarinet and bassoon (1819), his opus 1.[1]

A rare form of piano quartets consist of two pianos with two players at each piano. This type of ensemble is informally referred to as “8 hand piano”, or “2 piano 8 hands”. 8 hand piano was popular in the late 19th century before the advent of recordings as it was a mechanism to reproduce and study symphonic works. Music lovers could hear the major symphonic works all in the convenience of a parlour or music hall that had two pianos and four pianists. Many of the popular works of Wolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert SchumannJohannes BrahmsAntonín Dvořák were transcribed for two piano eight hands. The majority of 8 hand piano music consist of transcriptions, or arrangements.

 

Ludwig van Beethoven (Listeni/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈb.tvən/German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːt.hoːfən] ( listen); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 concertos for piano, 32 piano sonatas, and 16 string quartets. He also composed other chamber music, choral works (including the celebrated Missa Solemnis), and songs.

Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 and began studying with Haydn, quickly gaining a reputation as a virtuoso pianist. He lived in Vienna until his death. In about 1800 his hearing began to deteriorate, and by the last decade of his life he was almost totally deaf. 

The three piano quartets of WoO 36, written when the composer was 15, are among the most substantial of Beethoven‘s earliest compositions. They are so early, in fact, that the autograph score calls for “clavecin” instead of piano. The same manuscript gives “basso” instead of cello, with the pieces ordered C major, E flat major, and D major. The pieces were not printed until 1828 in Vienna, in the order E flat, D, and C. Material from the C major Trio was subsequently used in the Piano Sonatas, Op. 2, Nos. 1 and 3. These are the only works Beethoven composed for this ensemble, which he abandoned for the piano trio after moving to Vienna.

When he was a boy, Beethoven was musically influenced primarily by Christian Gottlob Neefe(1748-98), a composer and one of Beethoven‘s first music teachers, Abbé Franz Sterkel(1750-1817), one of the foremost pianists in Europe, and Mozart. Of these influences, Neefe’s was the most immediate and Mozart‘s the most profound. Each of the three quartets of WoO 36 draws on a specific violin sonata by Mozart, from the set published in 1781. The first ofBeethoven‘s quartets is modeled on Mozart‘s K. 379/373a, the second on K. 380/374f, and the third on K. 296. All three quartets of WoO 36 are in three movements.

The E flat major quartet is unusual in that its slow introductory movement jumps without pause into an Allegro con spirito in E flat minor. The E flat minor movement, in sonata form, features a tiny development, but contains some adventurous passages in the recapitulation. The final movement is a set of six variations in an ornamental style on a high-Classical-era theme with two eight-measure segments. Each of the segments is repeated, the first moving to the dominant and the second returning to the tonic. Beethoven follows this pattern in all of the variations, the fifth of which is in E flat minor. After the variations have run their course, the theme returns, only slightly rearranged, followed by a coda reminiscent of the first variation. Throughout the work, the piano dominates the proceedings.

Beethoven cast the D major quartet in a more traditional format, with a central slow movement enclosed by two fast ones. The opening Allegro is in sonata form and modulates to the dominant. Boasting a much larger development section than that of the E flat quartet, the movement touches on D minor before the recapitulation. The second movement, in F sharp minor, is in two parts and marked Andante con moto. The piano opens the concluding Rondo, a movement of youthful energy dominated by the keyboard part.

The quartet in C major is also in three movements, the second of which is in a relaxed F major. After a very brief development section, Beethoven begins the recapitulation on the subdominant, a procedure Schubert would use in several of his works. The second movement features some of the most compelling melodic passages of Beethoven‘s youth, although his tendency to double most of these robs them of some of their delicacy. Nearly all of the thematic material in the closing Rondo is concentrated in the piano part.

Despite the degree to which some aspects of the Piano Quartets, WoO 36, look forward to the mature Beethoven, they have little independent life as concert pieces that command interest for more than curiosity value

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467 (Elvira Madigan) Pollini/Muti



Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala
Maurizio Pollini, piano
Riccardo Muti, conductor
(2004)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 21 in C majorK. 467, was completed on March 9, 1785 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, four weeks after the completion of the previous D minor concerto, K. 466.[1][2]

The concerto has three movements:

 

  1. Allegro maestoso; in common time. The tempo marking is in Mozart’s catalog of his own works, but not in the autograph manuscript.[3]
  2. Andante in F major. In both the autograph score and in his personal catalog, Mozart notated the meter as Alla breve[4]
  3. Allegro vivace assai

Recordings:  This work has been recorded numerous times by many famous pianists including Géza AndaPiotr Anderszewski,Vladimir AshkenazyDaniel BarenboimMalcolm BilsonAlfred BrendelRobert CasadesusIvan DrenikovAnnie FischerWalter GiesekingFriedrich GuldaStephen HoughKeith JarrettWilhelm KempffWalter KlienAlicia de LarrochaGiorgi LatsabidzeRosina LhevinneDinu LipattiRadu LupuMurray PerahiaMaria João Pires,Maurizio PolliniArthur RubinsteinFazil SayAndrás SchiffArtur SchnabelRudolf SerkinHoward Shelley,Mitsuko Uchida, and Christian Zacharias.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart / Divertimento in B-flat major, K. 137



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Divertimento in B-flat major for string quartet, K. 137/125b (1772)
00:00 - Andante
07:52 - Allegro di molto
11:17 - Allegro assai
(Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields Chamber Ensemble (1986))

“Three early Mozart pieces, K. 137, 137 and 138, are labeled divertimentos on the manuscripts and are so listed in Grove. However, few Mozart scholars accept that tag as an accurate description of the works, and most doubt that the title came from Mozart. For one thing, a divertimento should have two minuets, and these three have none. At first glance they seem to be straightforward string quartets–yet many experts contend that they don’t sound at all like string quartets. 

So what are they? Mozart scholar Alfred Einstein fancies them as small symphonies for strings, to which the composer was prepared to add extra parts for winds; they are sometimes known as the ‘Salzburg symphonies.’ Musicologist Hans Keller has given them the curious designation of ‘orchestral quartets.’ Others insist that they are indeed string quartets even if they lack the serious temper of that rarefied form. Yet (to complete the confusion) they are universally referred to as divertimentos–the one thing everyone agrees they are not.

Whatever they’re called, they are fine examples of Mozart’s early essays in chamber music…Mozart composed them in 1772, when he was 16, not long before leaving Salzburg on his third (and, as it turned out, his last) trip to Italy. He was going to Milan to produce the opera ‘Lucio Silla‘ on a commission from Count Firmian, governor-general of that city. He probably expected, from previous experience, to need music to entertain the count’s court while he was at work on the opera. So it seems likely that these three works were composed to meet that need. Mozart may have planned to present them with a small orchestra, as Einstein surmises, but here they are played by the four instruments of a string quartet.

The Divertimento in B flat, K. 137…differs from [K. 136 & K. 138] by starting with a slow movement. This affecting ‘Andante’ is led by the first violin and is punctuated by dramatic responses from the accompanying strings. A spirited ‘Allegro di molto’ movement follows, leading to a delicate finale marked ‘Allegro assai’. This section, while not actually a minuet, has a courtly air that suggests a roomful of dancers bowing and curtsying under brilliant chandeliers.” – Harvey B. Loomis

Painting: Still Life (Morning Glories, Toad, & Insects), Otto Marseus van Schrieck

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Dances Symphoniques (Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra Neeme Järvi)



Great Compositions/Performances:  Edvard GriegSymphonic Dances / Dances Symphoniques

Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

- Symphonic Dances on Norwegian motifs, Op. 64
- Danses symphoniques sur des motifs norvégiens, op. 64

I. Allegro moderato e marcato
II. Allegro grazioso
III. Allegro giocoso
IV. Andante – Allegro molto e risoluto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Saint-Saëns – Violin Sonata No. 1 – Heifetz, Smith



Camille Saint-Saëns, Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 75 (1885)

I. Allegro agitato
II. Adagio (6:45)
III. Allegro moderato (12:33)
IV. Allegro molto (16:13)

Jascha Heifetz, Brooks Smith

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Symphony No 8 in F major Op 93 Christian Thielemann


Buy “Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: IV. Allegro vivace” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3

Artist
Christian Thielemann

 

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Anna Amalia of Prussia Flute Sonata en F


Anna Amalia, Abbess of Quedlinburg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Anna Amalia
Antoine Pesne hofdame ; Prinzessin Amalia von Preussen als Amazone.jpg
Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg
Reign 1756-1787
Predecessor Maria Elisabeth
Successor Sophia Albertina
 
Spouse Friedrich von der Trenck
House House of Hohenzollern
Father Frederick William I of Prussia
Mother Sophia Dorothea of Hanover
Born 9 November 1723
BerlinPrussia
Died 30 March 1787 (aged 63)
Religion Lutheranism
Prussian Royalty
House of Hohenzollern
Wappen Deutsches Reich - Königreich Preussen (Grosses).png
Frederick William I
Children
   Frederick Louis, Prince of Orange
   Wilhelmine, Margravine of Bayreuth
   Friedrich William, Prince of Orange
   Princess Charlotte Albertine
   Frederick II
   Friederike Luise, Margravine of Ansbach
   Philippine Charlotte, Duchess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
   Prince Ludwig Karl Wilhelm
   Sophia Dorothea, Margravine of Schwedt
   Louisa Ulrika, Queen of Sweden
   Prince Augustus William
   Anna Amalie, Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg
   Prince Henry
   Prince Augustus Ferdinand

Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia (9 November 1723 – 30 March 1787) was Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg. She was one of ten surviving children of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover.

 

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Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

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Great Composers/Compositions: Mozart – Symphony No. 29 in A, K. 201



The Symphony No. 29 in A major, K. 201/186a, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on 6 April 1774. It is, along with Symphony No. 25, one of his better known early symphonies. Stanley Sadie characterizes it as “a landmark … personal in tone, indeed perhaps more individual in its combination of an intimate, chamber music style with a still fiery and impulsive manner.” The symphony is scored for 2 oboes, 2 horns and strings, as was typical of early-period Mozart symphonies.
There are four movements:
1. Allegro moderato, 2/2
2. Andante, 2/4
3. Menuetto: Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Allegro con spirito, 6/8
The first movement is in sonata form, with a graceful principal theme characterized by an octave drop and ambitious horn passages. The second movement is scored for muted strings with limited use of the winds, and is also in sonata form. The third movement, a minuet, is characterized by nervous dotted rhythms and staccato phrases; the trio provides a more graceful contrast. The energetic last movement, another sonata-form movement in 6/8 time, connects back to the first movement with its octave drop in the main them

 

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Franz Anton Hoffmeister – Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)


Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Cover of Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Franz Anton Hoffmeister 
Work: Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)

Mov.I: Allegro brioso 00:00
Mov.II: Adagio 15:07
Mov.III: Allegretto 22:57

Pianist: Wilhelm Neuhaus
Orchestra: Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Conductor: Helmut Müller-Brühl (1933 – 2012)

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GREAT COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Photo credit: photoAtlas)

The Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K. 488) is a musical composition for piano and orchestra written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was finished, according to Mozart’s own catalogue, on March 2, 1786, around the time of the premiere of his opera, The Marriage of Figaro. It was one of three subscription concerts given that spring and was probably played by Mozart himself at one of these. The concerto is scored for piano solo and an orchestra consisting of one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns and strings. In Mozart’s later works the wind instruments are equal to the stringed instruments, and this is also the case in this concerto. It has three movements:
1. Allegro in A major and common time.
2. Adagio in F-sharp minor and 6/8 time (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Andante).
3. Allegro assai in A and alla breve (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Presto). In Rondo form.
The first movement is mostly sunny and positive with the occasional melancholic touches typical of Mozart pieces in A major and is in sonata form. The piece begins with a double exposition, the first played by the orchestra, and the second when the piano joins in. The first exposition is static from a tonal point of view and is quite concise, the third theme is not yet revealed. The second exposition includes the soloist and is modulatory. It is also includes the third previously unheard third theme. The second exposition is ornamented as opposed to the first exposition which is not. The second theme has harmonic tension. This is expressed by dissonances that are played on the beat, and then solved by an interval of a second going downwards. This is also expressed in the use of chromatics in the melody and bass lines which is a cause for harmonic tension, as the listeners anticipate the arrival of the tonic.
The second, slow movement, in ternary form, is melancholic and somewhat operatic in tone. The piano begins alone with a theme characterized by unusually wide leaps. This is the only movement by Mozart in F sharp minor. The dynamics are soft throughout most of the piece. The middle of the movement contains a brighter section in A major announced by flute and clarinet that Mozart would later use to introduce the trio “Ah! taci ingiusto core!” in his opera Don Giovanni. The third movement is a vigorous and cheerful rondo, shaded by moves into other keys as is the opening movement (to C major from E minor and back during the secondary theme in this case, for instance) and with a central section whose opening in F sharp minor is interrupted by a clarinet tune in D major, an intrusion that reminds us, notes Girdlestone, that instrumental music at the time was informed by opera buffa and its sudden changes of point of view as well as of scene. 

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Great Performances: Wynton Marsalis: Joseph Haydn – Trumpet Concerto in E flat major



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Joseph Haydn‘s Concerto per il Clarino, (Hob.: VIIe/1) (Trumpet Concerto in E flat major) was written in 1796 for his long-time friend Anton Weidinger. Joseph Haydn was 64 years of age.

Form

The work is composed in three movements (typical of a Classical period concerto), they are marked as followed:

  • I. Allegro (sonata)
  • II. Andante (sonata)
  • III. Allegro (rondo)

In addition to the solo trumpet, the concerto is scored for an orchestra consisting of strings, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, 2 (presumably natural) trumpets (which generally play in support of the horns or timpani rather than the solo trumpet), and timpani.

Original instrument

Anton Weidinger developed a keyed trumpet which could play chromatically throughout its entire range. Before this, the trumpet was valveless and could only play a limited range of harmonic notes by altering the vibration of the lips; also called by the name of natural trumpet. Most of these harmonic notes were clustered in the higher registers, so previous trumpet concertos could only play melodically with the high register only (e.g., Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 2). Haydn’s concerto includes melodies in the middle and lower register, exploiting the capabilities of the new instrument.

There were attempts all over Europe around the mid-classical era to expand the range of the trumpet using valves, but Weidinger’s idea of drilling holes and covering them with flute-like keys was not a success as it had very poor sound quality. Thus the natural trumpet still had continual use in the classical orchestra while the keyed trumpet had barely any repertoire. The valved trumpets used today was first constructed and used in the 1830s.

 

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Great Performances: Carl. Maria von. Weber – Concerto No.1, in F minor, Op.73 (Sabine Meyer)



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Carl Maria von Weber wrote his Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73 (J. 114) for the clarinettist Heinrich Bärmann in 1811. The piece is considered a gem in the instrument’s repertoire. It is written for clarinet in B♭. The work consists of three movements in the form of fast, slow, fast.

Structure

  1. Allegro in F minor modulating into A-flat major and later returning to F minor with a meter of 3/4
  2. Adagio ma non troppo in C major transforming into C minor and E flat major and afterward reverting to C major with a meter of 4/4
  3. RondoAllegretto in F major with a meter of 2/4

Instrumentation

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 2 trumpetstimpanistrings, and solo clarinet

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826[1]) was a Germancomposerconductorpianistguitarist[2] and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romanticschool.

Weber’s operas Der FreischützEuryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. Der Freischütz came to be regarded as the first German “nationalist” opera,Euryanthe developed the Leitmotif technique to a hitherto-unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn‘s music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber’s lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures. This interest was first manifested in Weber’sincidental music for Schiller‘s translation of Gozzi‘s Turandot, for which he used a Chinese melody, making him the first Western composer to use an Asian tune that was not of the pseudo-Turkish kind popularized by Mozart and others.

A brilliant pianist himself, Weber composed four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor, which influenced composers such as ChopinLiszt and Mendelssohn. The Konzertstückprovided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt’s, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber’s shorter piano pieces, such as the Invitation to the Dance, were later orchestrated byBerlioz, while his Polacca Brillante was later set for piano and orchestra by Liszt.

Weber compositions for woodwind instruments occupy an important place in the musical repertoire. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet, a duo concertante, and variations on a theme (posthumously), are regularly performed today. His Concertino for Horn and Orchestra requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing—a technique known as “multiphonics“. His bassoon concerto and the Andante e Rondo ungarese (a reworking of a piece originally for viola and orchestra) are also popular with bassoonists.

Weber’s contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th-century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten ([Four] Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin.

Weber’s orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers – Berlioz referred to him several times in hisTreatise on Instrumentation while Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument.

His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as MarschnerMeyerbeer and Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Glinka. Homage has been paid to Weber by 20th-century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky,Mahler (who completed Weber’s unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber).

Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3



Ottorino Respighi (1879 – 1936)
Ancient Airs and Dances / Antiche arie e danze per liuto
Suite No. 3 (1932)

I. Italiana (0:00)
II. Arie di corte (1:55)
III. Siciliana (8:39)
IV. Passacaglia (12:18)

Sir Neville Marriner
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
1976
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)

 

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schubert Symphony No 6 C major, D 589 Bavarian RSO Maazel



Franz Schubert Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589 
Lorin Maazel conducts Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589,[1] is a symphony by Franz Schubert composed between October 1817 and February 1818.[2] Its first public performance was in Vienna in 1828. It is nicknamed the “Little C major” to distinguish it from his later Ninth Symphony, in the same key, which is known as the “Great C major“.[3]

There are four movements:

  1. Adagio, 3/4 - Allegro, 2/2 7:23
  2. Andante, 2/4 in F major 12:27
  3. ScherzoPresto; Trio: Piu lento (Trio in E major), 3/4 17:12
  4. Allegro moderato, 2/4

 

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Fabulous Compositions/ Performances: Ludwig van Beethoven, Sesta Sinfonia Op. 68 in Fa maggiore, “Pastorale” (Beethoven’s Six Symphony in E major, Op. 68) – Riccardo Muti conducts the Filarmonica della Scala di Milano



Epoca: 1807 – 1808
Composizione:
ottavino, 2 flauti, 2 oboi, corno inglese, 2 clarinetti, 2 fagotti,
2 corni, 2 trombe, 2 tromboni, timpani, archi

Movimenti:
I Allegro ma non troppo 0:00
II Andante molto mosso 12:40
III Allegro 25:12
IV Allegro vivace 30:43
V Allegretto 34:37

Filarmonica della Scala di Milano
Direttore: RICCARDO MUTI

 

Riccardo Muti

Cover of Riccardo Muti

 

 

 

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances / Danses Norvégiennes



Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

- Danses norvegiénnes (pour orchestre), op. 35
- Norwegian Dances (for Orchestra), Op. 35

I. Allegro marcato
II. Allegro tranquille e grazioso
III. Allegro moderato alla marcia
IV. Allegro molto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schumann – Symphony n°2 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Published on Mar 6, 2013
Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).

Schumann began to sketch the symphony on December 12, 1845, and had a robust draft of the entire work by December 28. He spent most of the next year orchestrating, beginning February 12, 1846.[1] His depression and poor health, including ringing in his ears, prevented him finishing the work until October 19. Publication followed in 1847.

The uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable in the face of Schumann’s health problems—the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism. It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor); the work is thus homotonal:

  1. Sostenuto assai — Allegro, ma non troppo
  2. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
  3. Adagio espressivo
  4. Allegro molto vivace
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Antonín Dvořák – From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68


Published on Sep 23, 2012

Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano

Antonín Dvořák – From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68

  • In the Spinning Room,  Allegro molto [D major] 
  • By the Black Lake,  Lento [F sharp minor/major] 
  • Walpurgis Night,  Molto vivace [B falt major] 
  • In Wait,  Allegro comodo [F major
  • Silent Woods,  Lento e molto cantabile [D flat major
  • From Troubled Times,  Allegro con fuoco [A minor]

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Sergei Rachmaninov – Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 19



SERGEI RACHMANINOV – Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 19

In this 1994 recording, Michael Grebanier plays the cello while Janet Guggenheim plays the piano. Naxos is the official owner of this recording.

1. Lento/Allegro Moderato (0:00)
Photo #1: Autumn Leaves, by maddox74
http://pixabay.com/en/autumn-leaves-f…
Photo #2: The Nature of Leaves, by gapa66
http://pixabay.com/en/autumn-the-natu…

2. Allegro Scherzando (10:54)
Photo: Deciduous Tree, by Hans
http://pixabay.com/en/beech-fagus-syl…

3. Andante (17:29)
Photo: Weser Uplands, by AnnaER
http://pixabay.com/en/landscape-autum…

4. Allegro mosso (23:43)
Photo #1: Autumn Colors, by giani
http://pixabay.com/en/fall-colors-fal…
Photo #2: Alpine Mountains, by stux
http://pixabay.com/en/hair-dryer-land…

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Great Composers/Compositions: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 – Jansons/BRSO(2009Live)



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Symphony No.3 in E flat major, op.55 “Eroica
Mariss Jansons
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Royal Albert Hall, London, 29 3/2009

The symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Allegro con brio (lasts 12–18 minutes)
  2. Marcia funebreAdagio assai in C minor (14–18 minutes)
  3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace (5–6 minutes)
  4. Finale: Allegro molto (10–14 minutes)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The title page of the Eroica Symphony, showing the erased dedication to Napoleon

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 55, also known as the Eroica(Italian for “heroic”), is a musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.[1][2]

The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.[3]

Dedication and premiere

Beethoven had originally conceived of dedicating the symphony to Napoleon Bonaparte. The biographerMaynard Solomon relates that Beethoven admired the ideals of the French Revolution, and viewed Napoleon as their embodiment. In the autumn the composer began to have second thoughts about that dedication. It would have deprived him of a fee that he would receive if he instead dedicated the symphony to Prince Franz Joseph Maximillian Lobkowitz. Nevertheless, he still gave the work the title ofBonaparte.

According to Beethoven’s pupil and assistant, Ferdinand Ries, when Napoleon proclaimed himselfEmperor of the French in May 1804, Beethoven became disgusted and went to the table where the completed score lay. He took hold of the title-page and tore it up in rage. This is the account of the scene as told by Ries:

In writing this symphony Beethoven had been thinking of Buonaparte, but Buonaparte while he was First Consul. At that time Beethoven had the highest esteem for him and compared him to the greatest consuls of ancient Rome. Not only I, but many of Beethoven’s closer friends, saw this symphony on his table, beautifully copied in manuscript, with the word “Buonaparte” inscribed at the very top of the title-page and “Ludwig van Beethoven” at the very bottom. … I was the first to tell him the news that Buonaparte had declared himself Emperor, whereupon he broke into a rage and exclaimed, “So he is no more than a common mortal! Now, too, he will tread under foot all the rights of man, indulge only his ambition; now he will think himself superior to all men, become a tyrant!” Beethoven went to the table, seized the top of the title-page, tore it in half and threw it on the floor. The page had to be recopied and it was only now that the symphony received the title “Sinfonia eroica.”[4]

Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Op. 10



Symfonie č. 3 Es dur, Op. 10

00:00 Allegro moderato
11:33 Adagio molto, tempo di marcia
28:27 Finale. Allegro vivace

Czech philharmonic orchestra, Václav Neumann
-
Česká filharmonie, Václav Neumann
EN
Symphony no.3 in E flat major was premiered by Bedřich Smetana in 1874. It was a great moment for young Dvořák, because it was his first big score played in public. You can heard in this symphony typical dvořák’s melodies but also some inspiration from Liszt or Wagner (work with motives, harmonies).

 

Duo Kontarsky @ BIZET Jeux d’enfants Op.22 – 1982



Georges BIZET: Jeux d’enfants Op.22, 12 pieces for piano 4 hands -complete-
0:05 / 1. L’Escarpolette (Reverie. Andantino) [2'52'']
2:57 / 2. La Toupie (Impromptu. Allegro vivo) [0'57'']
3:53 / 3. La Poupée (Berceuse. Andantino semplice) [2'49'']
6:42 / 4. Les Chevaux de Bois (Scherzo. Allegro vivo) [1'18'']
8:01 / 5. Le Volant (Fantaisie. Andantino molto) [1'14'']
9:15 / 6. Trompette et Tambour (Marche. Allegretto) [2'07'']
11:22 / 7. Les Bulles de Savon (Rondino. Allegretto) [1'22'']
12:44 / 8. Les Quatre Coins (Esquisse. Allegro vivo) [2'07'']
14:52 / 9. Colin-Maillard (Nocturno. Andante non troppo) [1'58'']
16:50 / 10. Saute-Mouton (Caprice. Allegro molto) [1'21'']
18:10 / 11. Petit Mari, petite Femme! (Duo. Andantino) [3'00'']
21:10 / 12. Le Bal (Galop. Presto) [1'39'']
Alfons & Aloys Kontarsky, piano (rec. 1982 – vinyl (p)1983 DGG)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bizet orchestrated five of these (Nos. 6, 3, 2, 11, 12) as the Petite Suite. The remaining movements were later orchestrated by Roy Douglas andHershy Kay and the complete orchestral suite has been recorded.[1]

Sigfrid Karg-Elert wrote his orchestral suite after Bizet’s Jeux d’enfants, Op. 21, in 1902.[2]

In 1955, George Balanchine choreographed the entire suite as the ballet Jeux d’enfants. In 1975 he made a new ballet, The Steadfast Tin Soldier, using only four of the movements.

 

Maurice Ravel – Introduction & Allegro for Harp, Flute, Clarinet & String Quartet



Introduction & Allegro for harp, flute, clarinet & string quartet (1905)

Stuttgart Chamber Music Ensemble

The Introduction and Allegro (1905) is one of the few pieces by Ravel that has remained more or less in the shadows — save in the minds of harpists — throughout the last century. While it is certainly not among the composer’s most striking works, it is nevertheless a pleasant enough showpiece that looks forward to the raw sensuality of Daphnis et Chloé while hearkening back with great affection to the music of Chabrier and, especially, Franck. The full title of the work is Introduction and Allegro for Harp, Accompanied by a Quartet of Strings, Flute, and Clarinet. Although it is often conveniently designated a septet, it is really a kind of miniature (10-minute) harp concerto, complete with virtuoso writing and an extended central cadenza for the instrument. Chamber performances of the work, in fact, are few and far between; it is far more frequently heard in the orchestra hall with a full complement of strings. The general simplicity of form and harmony have led some to conclude that the Introduction and Allegro might have originally been composed as a test piece for the Paris Conservatoire; certainly it did not stand out sufficiently in Ravel’s own memory for him to include it in his list of works. 

The brief Très lent introduction presents two themes, the first for the woodwinds in leaping parallel thirds, the second an inverted-arch-shaped gesture sung by the strings in octaves. Presently a shimmering texture of arpeggios and woodwind double-tonguing takes over, inviting the cello to explore another melody before the harp rejoins the lush musical fabric. 

Twenty-six bars into the piece the Allegro commences. Now, as the harp makes an extended solo exploration of the melody presented earlier by the strings, a sonata form begins to take shape. A second, hemiola-ridden theme arrives in the woodwinds, accompanied pizzicato by the strings. The development of this material takes place in the usual fragmentary manner, building to an excited fff climax that breaks away abruptly as the harp assumes center stage with a cadenza. The recapitulation is quite straightforward, and the work ends without extensive fireworks or bombast of any kind. The Introduction and Allegro was first performed in late February 1907. [allmusic.com]

Art by Jean-Léon Gérôme

 

Schubert: Rondo el la mayor para violin y cuerdas D 438



Federico Agostini, violin 
Orquesta de Camara Abril. Concierto de Clausura.
0:11
3:43

Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59



Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano

Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59
1. Allegretto non troppo, quasi andantino [D minor] 3’03
2. Molto moderato [G major] 4’08
3. Allegro giusto [G minor] 4’11
4. Molto maestoso [C major] 5’30
5. Allegro giusto [A flat major] 4’16
6. Allegro con moto [C sharp minor] 4’21
7. Allegretto grazioso [A major] 2’14
8. Un poco allegretto e grazioso, quasi andantino [F major] 3’16
9. Andante con moto [D major] 2’27
10. Andante [B flat minor] 3’14

 

Fabulous Compositions/ Composers: Howard Hanson – Symphony No.1 in E-minor, Op.22 “Nordic” (1922)



Howard Hanson (1896 – 1981)

Work: Symphony No.1 in E-minor, Op.22 “Nordic” (1922) 

Mov.I: Andante solenne – Allegro con forza 00:00
Mov.II: Andante teneramente, con semplicita 12:45
Mov.III: Allegro con fuoco 18:55

Orchestra: Seattle Symphony

Conductor: Gerard Schwarz

 

Fabulous Compositions/ Composers: L. Bernstein – Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in Dmajor/D minor “Reformation” Op.107



Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in D major/D minor “Reformation” Op.107 Complete

1. Andante — Allegro con fuoco
2. Allegro vivace
3. Andante
4. Andante con moto — Allegro maestoso

NY Philharmonic Orchestra
Leonard Bernstein Conductor

Divine Compositions: Franz Schubert – Quintet for piano, violin, viola, cello & double-bass, in A major, D 667 “The Trout



Amati Chamber Ensemble. Gil Sharon, violin. Ron Ephrat, viola. Alexander Hülshoff, cello. Jean Sassen, double-bass. Dalia Ouziel, piano.
Franz Schubert – Quintet for piano, violin, viola, cello & double-bass, in A major, D 667 “The Trout
I. Allegro vivace
II. Andante 
III. Scherzo, presto
IV. Tema con variazioni (Die Forelle)
V. Allegro giusto

 

J. Haydn – Symphony No. 6 in D major ‘La Matin’



Composer: Joseph Haydn (1732 – 1809).
Symphony No. 6 in D major Hob I/6 (1762):

1. Adagio-Allegro: 0:00
2. Adagio-Andante-Adagio: 5:46
3. Menuet & Trio: 13:38
4. Finale, Allegro: 18:10

By The Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra.