Tag Archives: Beethoven

Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Valentina Lisitsa



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Lisitsa

Special for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont…

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture / Leonard Bernstein



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture / Leonard Bernstein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

 

Fidelio, Playbill of the Worldpremiere, Vienna, Kärntnertortheater, 23 May 1814

Fidelio (Leonore, oder Der Triumph der ehelichen Liebe: Leonore, or The Triumph of Married Love)[1] (Op. 72) is a Germanopera with spoken dialogue in two acts by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is his only opera. The German libretto was prepared by Joseph Sonnleithner from the French of Jean-Nicolas Bouilly, which had been used for the 1798 opera Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal by Pierre Gaveaux, and the 1804 opera Leonora by Ferdinando Paer (a score of which was owned by Beethoven).

The opera tells how Leonore, disguised as a prison guard named “Fidelio”, rescues her husband Florestan from death in apolitical prison.

Background

The theatrical mask contemplated by a putto on the Beethoven monument by Kaspar von Zumbusch(Vienna, 1880) commemorates Beethoven’s sole opera in the city where it made its debut

Bouilly’s scenario fits Beethoven’s aesthetic and political outlook: a story of personal sacrifice, heroism and eventual triumph (the usual topics of Beethoven’s “middle period”) with its underlying struggle for liberty and justice mirroring contemporary political movements in Europe.

As elsewhere in Beethoven’s vocal music, the principal parts of Leonore and Florestan, in particular, require great vocal skill and endurance in order to project the necessary intensity, and top performances in these roles attract admiration.[citation needed]

Some notable moments in the opera include the “Prisoners’ Chorus”, an ode to freedom sung by a chorus of political prisoners, Florestan’s vision of Leonore come as an angel to rescue him, and the scene in which the rescue finally takes place. The finale celebrates Leonore’s bravery with alternating contributions of soloists and chorus.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven: Symphony No.8 – Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.8 in F, Op.93
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Allegro vivace e con brio
9:05 II. Allegro scherzando
12:57 III. Tempo di Menuetto
17:36 IV. Allegro vivace

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live –



From Valentina:  “FSpecial for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont..

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Ludwig van Beethoven: Bagatelle #4 Op 126/4



Two versions of Sviatoslav Richter Playing Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Bagatelle for piano in B minor, Op. 126 No. 4

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in E flat Major, WoO 36, No. 1 – Amadeus Quartet



Make Music Part of Your Life:  Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in E flat Major, WoO 36, No. 1 – Amadeus Quartet

From David Hertzberg: “In this 1970 recording, Christoph Eschenbach and members of the Amadeus Quartet — Norbert Brainin, violin; Peter Schidlof, viola; and Martin Lovett, cello — perform the Beethoven Piano quartet in E flat major, WoO 36, No. 1. I recorded this video from a cassette I purchased back in the early 1970s, issued on the Deutsche Grammophon label (serial number 3335 174-10). 

Allegro con spirito (6:53)

(Last year I uploaded this recording in three separate segments.)

More Beethoven:

Beethoven / Gilels / Szell, 1968: Piano Concerto in G major, Op. 58 – Complete - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXoxpW…

Leonid Hambro, 1970: “Happy Birthday Dear Ludwig” – Variations in The Style of Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-Uga3…

Fur Elise – Wilhelm Kempff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9DSjo…

Fur Elise – Alicia de Larrocha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFMUEe…

Beethoven / Artur Balsam, 1952: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61a – Movement 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKKCGw…

David Oistrakh: Romance No. 2 in F major for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 50: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz4JEY…

Wilhelm Backhaus: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – London, 1950s, Karl Böhm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRSTwj…

Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37 (Rondo) Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeW79S…

Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C major, Op. 15 (Rondo) Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojL4Kx…

Emil Gilels, 1983, Beethoven Klaviersonate Nr. 4 Es-dur, Op. 7 -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEfGQ1…

Stephen Kovacevich, 1975: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37, Movement 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYBM5z…

Beethoven / Istomin-Stern-Rose Trio: Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 – Archduke (Allegro), 1966: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQAswV…

Solomon, 1958: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – Rondo -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_Vi8m…

Friedrich Gulda, 1954: Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1 (1) -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RwDZs…

Christoph Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBp3jh…

Artur Balsam: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61 – Rondo, 1950s - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD8ul2…

Stephen Kovacevich: Piano Sonata in C minor, Op. 13, Movement 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGamRs…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In European classical music, piano quartet denotes a chamber music composition for piano and three other instruments, or a musical ensemble comprising such instruments. Those other instruments are usually a string trio consisting of a violinviola and cello.

Piano quartets for that standard lineup were written by Wolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert SchumannLudwig van BeethovenJohannes BrahmsAntonín Dvořák andGabriel Fauré among others. In the 20th century, composers have also written for more varied groups, with Anton Webern‘s Quartet, opus 22 (1930), for example, being for piano, violin, clarinet and tenor saxophone, and Paul Hindemith‘s quartet (1938) as well as Olivier Messiaen‘s Quatuor pour la fin du temps (1940) both for piano, violin, cello and clarinet. An early example of this can be found in Franz Berwald‘s quartet for piano, horn, clarinet and bassoon (1819), his opus 1.[1]

A rare form of piano quartets consist of two pianos with two players at each piano. This type of ensemble is informally referred to as “8 hand piano”, or “2 piano 8 hands”. 8 hand piano was popular in the late 19th century before the advent of recordings as it was a mechanism to reproduce and study symphonic works. Music lovers could hear the major symphonic works all in the convenience of a parlour or music hall that had two pianos and four pianists. Many of the popular works of Wolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert SchumannJohannes BrahmsAntonín Dvořák were transcribed for two piano eight hands. The majority of 8 hand piano music consist of transcriptions, or arrangements.

 

Ludwig van Beethoven (Listeni/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈb.tvən/German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːt.hoːfən] ( listen); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 concertos for piano, 32 piano sonatas, and 16 string quartets. He also composed other chamber music, choral works (including the celebrated Missa Solemnis), and songs.

Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 and began studying with Haydn, quickly gaining a reputation as a virtuoso pianist. He lived in Vienna until his death. In about 1800 his hearing began to deteriorate, and by the last decade of his life he was almost totally deaf. 

The three piano quartets of WoO 36, written when the composer was 15, are among the most substantial of Beethoven‘s earliest compositions. They are so early, in fact, that the autograph score calls for “clavecin” instead of piano. The same manuscript gives “basso” instead of cello, with the pieces ordered C major, E flat major, and D major. The pieces were not printed until 1828 in Vienna, in the order E flat, D, and C. Material from the C major Trio was subsequently used in the Piano Sonatas, Op. 2, Nos. 1 and 3. These are the only works Beethoven composed for this ensemble, which he abandoned for the piano trio after moving to Vienna.

When he was a boy, Beethoven was musically influenced primarily by Christian Gottlob Neefe(1748-98), a composer and one of Beethoven‘s first music teachers, Abbé Franz Sterkel(1750-1817), one of the foremost pianists in Europe, and Mozart. Of these influences, Neefe’s was the most immediate and Mozart‘s the most profound. Each of the three quartets of WoO 36 draws on a specific violin sonata by Mozart, from the set published in 1781. The first ofBeethoven‘s quartets is modeled on Mozart‘s K. 379/373a, the second on K. 380/374f, and the third on K. 296. All three quartets of WoO 36 are in three movements.

The E flat major quartet is unusual in that its slow introductory movement jumps without pause into an Allegro con spirito in E flat minor. The E flat minor movement, in sonata form, features a tiny development, but contains some adventurous passages in the recapitulation. The final movement is a set of six variations in an ornamental style on a high-Classical-era theme with two eight-measure segments. Each of the segments is repeated, the first moving to the dominant and the second returning to the tonic. Beethoven follows this pattern in all of the variations, the fifth of which is in E flat minor. After the variations have run their course, the theme returns, only slightly rearranged, followed by a coda reminiscent of the first variation. Throughout the work, the piano dominates the proceedings.

Beethoven cast the D major quartet in a more traditional format, with a central slow movement enclosed by two fast ones. The opening Allegro is in sonata form and modulates to the dominant. Boasting a much larger development section than that of the E flat quartet, the movement touches on D minor before the recapitulation. The second movement, in F sharp minor, is in two parts and marked Andante con moto. The piano opens the concluding Rondo, a movement of youthful energy dominated by the keyboard part.

The quartet in C major is also in three movements, the second of which is in a relaxed F major. After a very brief development section, Beethoven begins the recapitulation on the subdominant, a procedure Schubert would use in several of his works. The second movement features some of the most compelling melodic passages of Beethoven‘s youth, although his tendency to double most of these robs them of some of their delicacy. Nearly all of the thematic material in the closing Rondo is concentrated in the piano part.

Despite the degree to which some aspects of the Piano Quartets, WoO 36, look forward to the mature Beethoven, they have little independent life as concert pieces that command interest for more than curiosity value

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989

Published on Mar 30, 2013

Conducted by Leonard Bernstein, THE BERLIN CELEBRATION CONCERT is an historic performance marking the fall of the Berlin Wall. Performed on Christmas Day 1989 in the former East Berlin, the concert unites an international cast of celebrated musicians and vocalists for a moving performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

Symphonieorchester des Bayerisches Rundfunks and members of Staatskapelle Dresden, Orchestra of the Leningrad Kirov Theatre, London Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic and Orchestre de Paris.

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Elly Ney plays Beethoven Andante favori WoO 57 in F major


Beethoven: Andante favori WoO 57 in F major
Elly Ney playing the historical Graf piano witch Ludwig van Beethoven played during the last years of his life. 
Recorded 1965

 

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Evgeny Kissin plays Rondo a capriccio,op.129 (‘Rage over the lost penny’) in Bucharest


Evgeny Kissin plays ‘Rage over the lost penny‘ as an encore after his performance of Beethoven 5th concerto with London Symphony Orchestra and Sir Colin Davis on Festival Enescu at 21st of September 2007th in Bucharest, Romania.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 - Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 - Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 - Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 - Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 - Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 - Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 - Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 - Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 - Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 - Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 - Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 - Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 - Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 - Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 - Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 - Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 - Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 - Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 - Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 - Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

 

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Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40


Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40

Emmy Verhey, Violin. Brabant Orchestra, Eduardo Marturet

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: .ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25



ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25
1995 in “Rathaus” City of Marl, Germany, Live Concert in the Concert Auditorium, Rainer Klaas, Piano, Catalin Ilea, Cello
Ernest Rozsa plays Massenet “Meditation” 1978 Roumanian State Radio Broadcast Tirgu-Mures Marosvasarhely Neumarkt

http://www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com
rozsavirtuoso@yahoo.de

1983 Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany, Miklos Bence was Solo-Contrabassist in the 
Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany
Biography: Ernest Rozsa was Professor on the Music Pedagocial Liceum in Tirgu-Mures, Roumania, from 1975-1982
He was Soloist of the State Philharmonic Orchestra Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1975-1981
He performed from 1973-1981 many concert as soloist with this orchestra in Roumania with Conductors like Szalman Lorant, C. Mandeal and others, the Violinconcertos by Brahms, Beethoven, Bartok (Nr. 2), Sibelius, Mozart, Tchaikowsky, Tchaikowsky-Trio, Shostakovitch. There was also Productions Recordings in the State Roumanian Radio-Broadcast of the City of Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1973 until 1981.
He was in the same orchestra also Associate Concertmaster in foreign countries tours.
Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the “Philharmonia Hungarica in Marl, Germany”, one of the major orchestras in Germany until the year of 1999, when this orchestra has been finished by th German Government. 
He performed also by the WDR3 The German Broadcast Company for Classical Music together with his son, Ernoe Rozsa 
(www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com) works by Bottesini Grand Duo Concertant (with Benze Miklos Contrabass), his son (at this time Ernoe Rozsa was 13 years old) Ernoe Rozsa recorded at this time Pugnani-Kreisler Introduction and Allegro, Pablo de Sarasate “Caprice Basque”, Dimitrescu “Dans Taranesc”.
Since 1999 Ernest Rozsa is retired and living in Germany.
His son, Ernoe Rozsa, is active violin soloist in Japan, Ernoe Rozsa recorded the original Versions of the Violinconcertos Nr. 3 E-Major and Nr. 4 d-minor by Niccolo Paganini by the Label of NAXOS, Hong Kong. Ernoe Rozsa performing his own cadenzas on both Paganini Violinconcertos. Ernest Rozsa was first violin teacher of his son Ernoe Rozsa, and later his son studied by Prof. Tibor Varga, Prof. Rosa Fain, Sir Georg Solti, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin. Ernoe Rozsa was also soloist in a series of concerts with Lord Yehudi Menuhin (conductor), Ernoe Rozsa played the Mozart Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-Major with the “Rhainland-Pfaelzische Philharomie Ludwigshafen-Mannheim”, Germany, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin was the conductor of this 5 concerts. The greatest concert was in the “Alte Oper Frankfurt” in 1990, in germany, where Ernoe Rozsa performed as soloist with Mozarts Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-major and Lord Menuhin was conductor of this concerts.

 

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Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

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Great Composers/Compositions: Igor Bukhvalov – Symphony no. 8 in F-Dur, Op. 93 by Ludwig van Beethoven



Igor Bukhvalov conducts Belarusian National Philharmonic performing Symphony #8 in F-Dur ,Op. 93 By Ludwig van Beethoven:

The Eighth Symphony consists of four movements:

 

  1. Allegro vivace e con brio
  2. Allegretto scherzando
  3. Tempo di Menuetto
  4. Allegro vivace
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 The Symphony No. 8 in F MajorOp. 93 is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1812. Beethoven fondly referred to it as “my little Symphony in F,” distinguishing it from his Sixth Symphony, a longer work also in F.[1]

The Eighth Symphony is generally light-hearted, though not lightweight, and in many places cheerfully loud, with many accented notes. Various passages in the symphony are heard by some listeners to be musical jokes.[2] As with various other Beethoven works such as the Opus 27 piano sonatas, the symphony deviates from Classical tradition in making the last movement the weightiest of the four.
The work was begun in the summer of 1812, immediately after the completion of the Seventh Symphony.[3]At the time Beethoven was 41 years old. As Antony Hopkins has noted, the cheerful mood of the work betrays nothing of the grossly unpleasant events that were taking place in Beethoven’s life at the time, which involved his interference in his brother Johann’s love life.[4] The work took Beethoven only four months to complete,[3] and is, unlike many of his works, without dedication.
The premiere took place on 24 February 1814, at a concert in the RedoutensaalVienna, at which theSeventh Symphony (which had been premiered two months earlier) was also played.[5] Beethoven was growing increasingly deaf at the time, but nevertheless led the premiere. Reportedly, “the orchestra largely ignored his ungainly gestures and followed the principal violinist instead.”[6]

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Wilhelm Kempff PlaysBeethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 16 Op. 31 in G major



Piano: Wilhelm Kempff

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 16 in G major, Op. 31 No. 1, was composed between 1801 and 1802.
The sonata consists of three movements. A typical performance lasts about 20 minutes.

  1. Allegro vivace
  2. Adagio grazioso
  3. Rondo, allegretto – presto

Although it was numbered as the first piece in the trio of piano sonatas which were published as Opus 31 in 1803, Beethoven actually finished it after the Op. 31 No. 2, the Tempest Sonata. [From Wikipedia]

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Best Classical Music YouTube Collection: Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


Make this the best post of 2014: RATE, LIKE, COMMENT! Above all ENJOY!

Published on Mar 29, 2013 - 751,382 view to date

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 - Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 - Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 - Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 - Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 - Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 - Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 - Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 - Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 - Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 - Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 - Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 - Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 - Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 - Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 - Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 - Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 - Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 - Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 - Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 - Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

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Claudio Arrau


Claudio Arrau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Claudio Arrau in 1974, by Allan Warren

Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991)[1] was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especiallyBeethovenSchubertChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century.

 

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Great Performances: Claude Debussy, Sarabande pour le Piano, L95. Claudio Arrau, piano. — Lista de reproducción Claude Debussy: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…


Claude Debussy
Sarabande pour le Piano, L95. 
Claudio Arrau, piano.

Lista de reproducción Claude Debussy:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

  • Claudio Arrau
    Pianist
  • Claudio Arrau León was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especially Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt and Brahms. Wikipedia
 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 – Jansons/BRSO(2009Live)



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Symphony No.3 in E flat major, op.55 “Eroica
Mariss Jansons
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Royal Albert Hall, London, 29 3/2009

The symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Allegro con brio (lasts 12–18 minutes)
  2. Marcia funebreAdagio assai in C minor (14–18 minutes)
  3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace (5–6 minutes)
  4. Finale: Allegro molto (10–14 minutes)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The title page of the Eroica Symphony, showing the erased dedication to Napoleon

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 55, also known as the Eroica(Italian for “heroic”), is a musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.[1][2]

The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.[3]

Dedication and premiere

Beethoven had originally conceived of dedicating the symphony to Napoleon Bonaparte. The biographerMaynard Solomon relates that Beethoven admired the ideals of the French Revolution, and viewed Napoleon as their embodiment. In the autumn the composer began to have second thoughts about that dedication. It would have deprived him of a fee that he would receive if he instead dedicated the symphony to Prince Franz Joseph Maximillian Lobkowitz. Nevertheless, he still gave the work the title ofBonaparte.

According to Beethoven’s pupil and assistant, Ferdinand Ries, when Napoleon proclaimed himselfEmperor of the French in May 1804, Beethoven became disgusted and went to the table where the completed score lay. He took hold of the title-page and tore it up in rage. This is the account of the scene as told by Ries:

In writing this symphony Beethoven had been thinking of Buonaparte, but Buonaparte while he was First Consul. At that time Beethoven had the highest esteem for him and compared him to the greatest consuls of ancient Rome. Not only I, but many of Beethoven’s closer friends, saw this symphony on his table, beautifully copied in manuscript, with the word “Buonaparte” inscribed at the very top of the title-page and “Ludwig van Beethoven” at the very bottom. … I was the first to tell him the news that Buonaparte had declared himself Emperor, whereupon he broke into a rage and exclaimed, “So he is no more than a common mortal! Now, too, he will tread under foot all the rights of man, indulge only his ambition; now he will think himself superior to all men, become a tyrant!” Beethoven went to the table, seized the top of the title-page, tore it in half and threw it on the floor. The page had to be recopied and it was only now that the symphony received the title “Sinfonia eroica.”[4]

FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.

 

Fabulous Performers: VICTOR MERZHANOV Plays – Beethoven’s Sonata no. 10 in G Major, op. 14, no. 2



VICTOR MERZHANOV, piano

Ludwig van Beethoven. Piano Sonata no. 10 in G Major, op. 14, no. 2
1. Allegro 
2. Andante variations 06:21
3. Scherzo: Allegro assai 11:09
Recorded in 1954.

 
 The Piano Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 14, No. 2, composed in 1798–1799, is an early-period work by Ludwig van Beethoven, dedicated to Baroness Josefa von Braun. A typical performance lasts 15 minutes. While it is not as well known as some of the more original sonatas of Beethoven’s youth, such as the ‘Pathetique’ or ‘Moonlight’ sonatas, Tovey[1] described it as an ‘exquisite little work.’

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Victor Merzhanov
Merzhanov-11-2010.jpg

Victor Merzhanov at Moscow Conservatory (2010)
Background information
Birth name Victor Karpovich Merzhanov
Born August 15, 1919
TambovRussia
Died December 20, 2012 (aged 93)
MoscowRussia
Genres Classical
Occupations PianistPedagogue
Instruments Piano

Victor Karpovich Merzhanov (Russian: Ви́ктор Ка́рпович Мержа́нов) (August 15, 1919 – December 20, 2012) was a Russian pianist

Merzhanov was born in Tambov and studied at Tambov Musical College with Solomon Starikov and Alexander Poltoratsky. Between 1936-1941 he studied at the Moscow Conservatory in the classes ofSamuil Feinberg (piano) and Alexander Goedicke (organ), graduating with distinction.

 

He achieved international recognition as a pianist in 1945 when he won the first prize (shared withSviatoslav Richter) at the Third All-Soviet-Union Piano Competition. In 1949, he was placed tenth at theInternational Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw. Merzhanov became a Moscow Philharmony soloist in 1946.

 

Merzhanov was a Professor at the Moscow Conservatory from 1947 until his death. Among his students are prize-winners of international competitions: Vladimir Bunin, Oleg Volkov, Igor Girfanov, Yuri DidenkoMikhail OlenevHideyo HaradaNazzareno CarusiTatiana ShebanovaRuslan SviridovIrina KhovanskayaAnna YarovayaAnahit NersesyanElena Ulyanova and many others. His name is inscribed on the Moscow Conservatory’s marble wall along with those of Alexander Scriabin andSergei Rachmaninoff. He was also a professor at the Tambov Rachmaninov Institute.

 

During his 60-year stage career, Merzhanov gave more than 2,000 recitals and concerts in Russia, Europe, the United States, China, and other countries, with such conductors as Lorin MaazelKurt SanderlingKirill Kondrashin, Nikolai Anosov, Aleksandr GaukGennady RozhdestvenskyYuri Temirkanov and Yevgeny Svetlanov.

 

His recordings (on major labels in the United States, Italy, Japan and the USSR) show his repertoire, including works from the Baroque period to contemporary music, from works by Bach and Beethoven to those by Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

 

 

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Beethoven’s Symphony No 8 in F major – BBC Proms 2012 (Daniel Barenboim)



The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, under the baton of Daniel Barenboim continues its Beethoven cycle with the compact Eighth in F major.
At the BBC PROMS – 2012 – Royal Albert Hall – LONDON

 

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Rimsky-Korsakov – Russian Easter Festival Overture, Op. 36



Also known as The Great Russian Easter Overture, is a concert overture written by the Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov between August 1887 and April 1888, and dedicated to the memories of Modest Mussorgsky and Alexander Borodin, two members of the legendary “Mighty Handful“.

It is subtitled “Overture on Liturgical Themes”. It is the last of the composer’s series of three exceptionally brilliant orchestral works, preceded by Capriccio Espagnol and Scheherazade. The work received its premiere in St. Petersburg in late December 1888.

Conductor: Zubin Mehta 
Orchestra: Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

Picture: Il’ja Efimovič Repin, Easter Procession in the region of Kursk (1880-1883)

 

Franz Schubert: Rondo for Violin & Orchestra in A D 438



Austrian composer Franz Schubert (1797-1828) was one of the great composers of the classical era in music that is associated with Vienna, the others being Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven
Schubert, who was born in a suburb of Vienna, was the fourth son of a schoolmaster. At age 5, he learned the violin from his father and the piano from an older brother. Because of Schubert’s excellent voice, at age 11 he became one of the Vienna Choir Boys at the Imperial Chapel. By the age of 16, Schubert wrote an opera, a series of quartets, and his Symphony No. 1

Shortly afterward, he left Vienna’s Imperial Chapel and began teacher training to become a schoolmaster. However, Schubert’s genius lay in musical creativity, and between 1813 and 1818 he had a surge of creativity where he wrote five symphonies, six operas, and 300 “Lieder” songs, a term which is usually used to describe songs composed to a German poem. 

While in the midst of all this creative composing, Schubert found teaching in a classroom to be too boring and in 1816 at age 19 he gave up teaching at the schoolhouse of his father and moved to Vienna where he devoted himself to composition, focusing on orchestral and choral works. During this creative activity, Schubert’s health deteriorated. He died at the age of thirty-one after a brief unconfirmed illness. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was written in June 1828, and may well have been intended to form a two-movement sonata along the lines of Beethoven’s E minor Sonata

It is lovingly modeled on the lyrical finale of Beethoven’s sonata: his theme follows a similar harmonic pattern, and even the keyboard layout of its opening bars, with the melody’s initial phrase followed by a more assertive answer in octaves, echoes Beethoven’s. 

Schubert mirrors Beethoven’s procedure, too, by transferring the final reprise of the Rondo theme to the sonorous tenor register, with a continuous pattern of semiquavers unfolding above it. 

But Schubert’s composition is far from a slavish imitation, and it can more than hold its own against Beethoven’s. Particularly beautiful is the manner in which one of the important subsidiary themes returns towards the end, surmounted by a shimmering pianissimo accompaniment in repeated chords from the primo player. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was published in December 1828, less than a month after Schubert died.

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings
Performed by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra
Pinchas Zukerman, Conductor

 

Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op.92



The Western Connecticut Youth Orchestra spring concert 2013. The orchestra plays Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92 by Ludwig van Beethoven. Performed in the Clune Auditorium at Wilton High School on 3rd March 2013.

 

Piotr Anderszewski: The complete “Diabelli Variations Op. 120″ by Beethoven



Ludwig van Beethoven ( 1770-1827)

33 Variatons on a Waltz by A. Diabelli Op. 120:
I. Tema. Vivace
II. Alla marcia, maestoso
III. Poco allegro
IV. L’istesso tempo
V. Un poco piu vivace
VI. Allegro vivace
VII. Allegro ma non troppo e serioso
VIII. Un poco piu allegro
IX. Poco vivace
X. Allegro pesante e risoluto
XI. Presto
XII. Allegretto
XIII. Un poco piu moto
IV. Vivace
XV. Grave e maestoso
XVI. Presto scherzando
XVII. Allegro
XVIII. L’istesso tempo
XIX. Poco moderato
XX. Presto
XXI. Andante
XXII. Allegro con brio-Meno allegro
XXIII. Allegro molto alla “Notte e giorno faticar”
XXIV. Allegro assai
XXV. Fughetta. Andante
XXVI. Allegro
XXVII. Allegretto
XXVIII. Vivace
XXIX. Allegro
XXX. Adagio ma non troppo
XXXI. Andante sempre cantabile
XXXII. Largo, molto espressivo
XXXIII. Fuga. Allegro
XXXIV. Tempo di Minuetto moderato

Piotr Anderszewski-piano

Complete score: http://javanese.imslp.info/files/imgl…

The 33 Variations on a waltz by Anton Diabelli, Op. 120, commonly known as the Diabelli Variations, is a set of variations for the piano written between 1819 and 1823 by Ludwig van Beethoven on a waltz composed by Anton Diabelli. One of the supreme compositions for the piano, it often shares the highest honours with J.S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations.
The music writer Donald Tovey called it “the greatest set of variations ever written”. The pianist Alfred Brendel has described it as “the greatest of all piano works”. It also comprises, in the words of Hans von Bülow, “a microcosm of Beethoven’s art”. In Beethoven: The Last Decade 1817 — 1827, Martin Cooper writes, “The variety of treatment is almost without parallel, so that the work represents a book of advanced studies in Beethoven’s manner of expression and his use of the keyboard, as well as a monumental work in its own right”. In his Structural Functions of Harmony, Arnold Schoenberg writes that the Diabelli Variations “in respect of its harmony, deserves to be called the most adventurous work by Beethoven”.
Beethoven’s approach to the theme is to take some of its smallest elements — the opening turn, the descending fourth and fifth, the repeated notes — and build upon them pieces of great imagination, power and subtlety. Alfred Brendel wrote, “The theme has ceased to reign over its unruly offspring. Rather, the variations decide what the theme may have to offer them. Instead of being confirmed, adorned and glorified, it is improved, parodied, ridiculed, disclaimed, transfigured, mourned, stamped out and finally uplifted”.
Beethoven does not seek variety by using key-changes, staying with Diabelli’s C-major for most of the set: among the first twenty-eight variations, he uses the tonic minor only once. Then, nearing the conclusion, Beethoven uses the tonic minor for Variations 29–31 and for Variation 32, a triple fugue, he switches to E-flat major. Coming at this late point, after such a long period in C-major, the key-change has an increased dramatic effect. At the end of the fugue, a culminating flourish consisting of a diminished seventh arpeggio is followed by a series of quiet chords punctuated by silences. These chords lead back to Diabelli’s C-major for Variation 33, a closing minuet.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabelli…

Buy the CD here: http://www.amazon.com/Piotr-Anderszew…

 

Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only minor key symphonies Mozart wrote. The 40th Symphony was completed on 25 July 1788. The composition occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks in 1788, during which time he also completed the 39th and 41st symphonies (26 June and 10 August, respectively). The symphony is scored (in its revised version) for flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, and strings. Notably missing are trumpets and timpani.
The work is in four movements, in the usual arrangement (fast movement, slow movement, minuet, fast movement) for a classical-style symphony:
1. Molto allegro, 2/2
2. Andante, 6/8
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Finale. Allegro assai, 2/2.
Every movement but the third is in sonata form; the minuet and trio are in the usual ternary form. This work has elicited varying interpretations from critics. Robert Schumann regarded it as possessing “Grecian lightness and grace”. Donald Francis Tovey saw in it the character of opera buffa. Almost certainly, however, the most common perception today is that the symphony is tragic in tone and intensely emotional; for example, Charles Rosen (in The Classical Style) has called the symphony “a work of passion, violence, and grief.”
Although interpretations differ, the symphony is unquestionably one of Mozart’s most greatly admired works, and it is frequently performed and recorded. Ludwig van Beethoven knew the symphony well, copying out 29 measures from the score in one of his sketchbooks. It is thought that the opening theme of the last movement may have inspired Beethoven in composing the third movement of his Fifth Symphony
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Ludwig van Beethoven – Triple Concerto Op.56 Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Triple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56


Ludwig Van Beethoven [ 1770 - 1827 ],
Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra
In C Major Op.56 ‘Thriple Concerto’I. Allegro
II. Largo – attacca
III. Rondo Alla Polacca 

Violin ; Isaac Stern [ 1920 - 2001 ]
Piano ; Emanuel Ax [ 1949 - ]
Cello ; Yo-Yo Ma [ 1955 - ]
Conducted By ; Michael Stern
London Symphony Orchestra
Narrated By ; Gregory Peck

From Album [ 1992, Sony Classical LD ]
Isaac Stern A Biography In Music
Live At Royal Festival Hall

 
 Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Concerto for Violin, Cello, and Piano in C major, Op. 56, more commonly known as the Triple Concerto, was composed in 1803 Continue reading

Beethoven : Violin Sonata No. 5 in F major, Op. 24 “Spring”



Beethoven : Violin Sonata No. 5 in F major, Op. 24 “Spring” 
Adolf Busch (Violin)
Rudolf Serkin (Piano)

(Rec.1933) Copyright: Public Domain

 

Beethoven: Symphony No.6, “Pastorale”;Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.6 in F, “Pastorale”, Op.68
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Pleasant, Cheerful feelings awakened in a person on arriving in the country. Allegro ma non troppo
12:10 II. Scene by the brook. Andante molto mosso
23:48 III. Merry gathering of country folk. Allegro
28:51 IV. Thunderstorm. Allegro
32:20 V. Shepherd’s Song. Happy and thankful feelings to the deity after the storm. Allegretto

 

Walters Pyramid-Long Beach: An Unlike Pyramid (my Photo Collection)


Walters Pyramid-Long Beach

Walters Pyramid-Long Beach

Walters Pyramid-Long Beach: An Unlike Pyramid (my Photo Collection)

 

Beethoven “Moonlight” Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa



Recording in Beethovensaal, Hannover Germany, Dec 2009. Wilhelm Kempff recorded Beethoven cycle in the very same hall.
Buy Moonlight Sonata DVD http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Al…

Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall
US iTuneshttp://bit.ly/iTunesUSVal 
US Amazon - http://bit.ly/ValRAH

 

Zimerman Beirnstein Beethoven piano concerto No. 3, in C major, Op. 15 (Live)



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN Piano Concerto No. 3 in C Major,Op, 15 Performed by Krystian Zimerman and Wiener Philharmoniker Soloist & Conductor – Leonard Bernstein 

1. Allegro con brio
2. Largo
3.Rondo, Allegro scherzando

 
 

Title page, first edition

The Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37, was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1800 and was first performed on 5 April 1803, with the composer as soloist. It was published in 1804. During that same performance, theSecond Symphony and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also premiered.[1] The composition was dedicated to Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia. The first primary theme is reminiscent of that of Mozart’s 24th Piano Concerto.

The concerto is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in E-flat, 2 trumpets in C, timpani,strings and piano soloist.

 

Valentina Lisitsa: Beethoven Sonata in F minor, No.23, Op 57 “Appassionata”



Rehearsal run before recital in Musikverein, Vienna

Piano Sonata No. 23 (Beethoven)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
For the 1974 Italian film, see Appassionata (film). For the album by Maksim Mrvica, see Appassionata (album).

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 (colloquially known as the Appassionata, meaning “passionate” in Italian) is a piano sonata. Among the three famous piano sonatas of his middle period (the others being the Waldstein, Op. 53 and Les Adieux, Op. 81a), it was composed during 1804 and 1805, and perhaps 1806, and was dedicated to Count Franz von Brunswick. The first edition was published in February 1807 in Vienna.

Unlike the early Sonata No. 8, Pathétique,[1] the Appassionata was not named during the composer’s lifetime, but was so labeled in 1838 by the publisher of a four-handarrangement of the work.

The Appassionata was considered by Beethoven to be his most tempestuous piano sonata until the twenty-ninth piano sonata (known as the Hammerklavier), being described as a “brilliantly executed display of emotion and music”.[citation needed] 1803 was the year Beethoven came to grips with the irreversibility of his progressively deteriorating deafness.

Movements/Sections
I. Allegro assai
II. Andante con moto
III. Allegro ma non troppo – Presto
Composition Year 1804–06

 

Valentina has uploaded a new video: Beethoven “Moonlight” Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa



Recording in Beethovensaal, Hannover Germany, Dec 2009. Wilhelm Kempff recorded Beethoven cycle in the very same hall.
Buy Moonlight Sonata DVD http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Al…

Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall
US iTuneshttp://bit.ly/iTunesUSVal 
US Amazon - http://bit.ly/ValRAH

 

Eroica: “Even Beethoven changed his tune, when he saw that the Emperor had no clothes!”


Eroica: 

“Even Beethoven changed his tune, when he saw that the Emperor had no clothes!”

Beethoven : String Quartet n°8 in F Major, op. 59-2 “Razumovsky”, Barylli Quartet



Recording of the Barylli Quartet playing Beethoven’s String Quartet n°8 in E Minor, op. 59-2 “Razumovsky“.

I. Allegro
II. Molto Adagio (11:01)
III. Allegretto (25:17)
IV. Presto (34:58)

Mozaartsaal Konzerthaus – 1956

 

Bernstein Beethoven Leonore Overture Nº3



Leonore Overture Nº 3 in C major, Op. 72b

The Amnesty International Concert

Orchestra: Bavarian Broadcast Symphony Orchestra
Venue: Munich, Germany.
Date: 17/10/1976

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 – 1827)
Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990)

 

Ludvig van Beethoven: 5 variationen über “Rule Britannia” (für klavier d-dur, 1803), WoO 79



komponiert von Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Yoshio Watanabe, fortepiano [Ferdinand Hofmann (1756-1829), Vienna c.1790]

 

“Beethoven’s Silence”



Autumn in Romania – Cheile Grădiştei (jud. Braşov), 8-10 octombrie 2008
Music: ERNESTO CORTAZAR (“Beethoven’s Silence”)

Great Music- in Best Hands: Oistrakh – Oborin – Beethoven Violin Sonata No.4, Op.23



00:00 - Presto
05:37 - Andante scherzoso, piu allegretto
12:05 - Allegro molto

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN.- 1770-1827- Quinteto in E-flat major Op. 16



LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN.- 1770-1827- 
Quinteto in E-flat major Op. 16  (1796)

Pianoforte: Jos Van Immerseel
Oboe: Paul Dombrecht
Clarinete: Elmar Schmid
Corno: Piet Dombrecht
Fagot: Danny Bond

From Wikipedia:    

Quintet in E-flat for Piano and Winds, Op. 16, was written by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1796. 
The quintet is scored for pianooboeclarinethorn, and bassoon. It was inspired by Mozart‘s Quintet, K. 452 (1784), which has the same scoring and is also in E-flat.
It is in three movements:

Beethoven subsequently transcribed the Op. 16 quintet as a quartet for piano and string trio (violinviola, and cello), using the same opus number, tempo markings, and overall timing.

 

Beethoven / 12 Variations on “Se vuol ballare” from Mozart’s “Le Nozze di Figaro, Wo0.40: Gidon Kremer : violin Elena Bashkirova : piano Recorded in 1980, Switzerland



Beethoven / 12 Variations on “Se vuol ballare” from Mozart’s “Le Nozze di Figaro, Wo0.40:

Gidon Kremer : violin
Elena Bashkirova : piano
Recorded in 1980, Switzerland

Ludwig van Beethoven – German Dances WoO 8


Beethoven`s German Dances, WoO 8 (Works without Opus number), like Minuets WoO 7, were composed on commission in 1795 and promptly performed, with them, on 22 November 1795 at ViennaEnsamble “Bella Musica de Vienne“Michael Dittrich – ViolinIvan Dimitrov – ViolinGünter Thomasberger – VioloncelloWerner Fleischmann – ContrabassMinuets - http://youtu.be/tEVmBYckL5U

 

Sviatoslav Richter, 1976: Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1


Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997) performs Beethoven’s first piano sonata in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1. From the LP you see above, issued in 1977 on the Angel label, serial number RL-32085.
Richter recorded this work while on tour in France in June 1976. So that listeners are assured of the provenance and authenticity of this and similarly important recordings, I rely principally on images of the LP label (1:22) and jacket (front, 11:22, reverse, 18:16) in the creation of these videos. (Note: the front of the jacket had the remnants of a large sticker on the left side, so I used some image editing software to cover it up.)

1. Allegro
2. Adagio (5:33)
3. Minuetto (10:09)
4. Prestissimo (14:06)

More recordings by Richter:
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Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major op.21 Haydn Orchestra Gustav Kuhn


Flashmob Flash Mob – Ode an die Freude ( Ode to Joy ) Beethoven Symphony


Flashmob Flash Mob – Ode an die Freude ( Ode to Joy ) Beethoven

Claudio Arrau Plays Beethoven”s Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 “Appassionata” (Uploaded on Jan 14, 2012 – 80,245 views)


Uploaded on Jan 14, 2012 – 80,245 Views

Piano Sonata No. 23 in F minor, Op. 57 “Appassionata”

  •     I.  Allegro assai - 00:36
  • II. Andante con moto - 11:07
  • III. Allegro ma non troppo - 17:47