Tag Archives: Beethoven

Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker: make music part of your life series


Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55):
Berliner Philharmoniker

Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55), is a landmark musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.
The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.
Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in E flat, 2 trumpets in E flat and C, timpani in E flat and B flat, and strings.
Form
The piece consists of four movements:
1. Allegro con brio
2. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai in C minor
3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
4. Finale: Allegro molto

Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale”: make music part of your life series



From: ChamberMusicTube ChamberMusicTube

Ludwig van BeethovenSymphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale

From Wikipedia

The Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, also known as the Pastoral Symphony (German Pastoral-Sinfonie[1]), is a symphony composed by Ludwig van Beethoven, and completed in 1808. One of Beethoven’s few works containing explicitly programmatic content,[2] the symphony was first performed in the Theater an der Wien on 22 December 1808[3] in a four hour concert.[4]

Form

The symphony has five movements, rather than the four typical of symphonies of the Classical era. Beethoven annotated the beginning of each movement as follows:

  1. Erwachen heiterer Empfindungen bei der Ankunft auf dem Lande (Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the countryside): Allegro ma non troppo

  2. Szene am Bach (Scene by the brook): Andante molto mosso

  3. Lustiges Zusammensein der Landleute (Merry gathering of country folk): Allegro

  4. Gewitter, Sturm (Thunder. Storm): Allegro

  5. Hirtengesang. Frohe und dankbare Gefühle nach dem Sturm (Shepherd’s song; cheerful and thankful feelings after the storm): Allegretto

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827)

Work: Namensfeier ‘Name-Day Celebration‘ Overture in C major, Op.115

Movement: Maestoso – Allegro assai vivace

Herbert von Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra

© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (make music part of your life series)


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven’s 5th Piano concert (Emperor) -
Daniel Barenboim p
iano

Det kongelige kapel – Michael Schønvandt i Danmarks Radio Koncerthuset 2009
Ved prisoverrækkelsen af Sonningprisen 2009 på 600,000 DKK ~ 125.000 US$ The Sonning Prize Award! The copyright © owner to all content in this video with The Royal Orchestra & Daniel Barenboim conducted by Michael Schønwandt, is Danmarks Radio! Also listen to Barenboims version of Noctune op. 27 no 2 by Chopin: http://www.youtube.com//watch?v=7EcER…

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1, in G major, op. 40 

Igor Ozim, violin
Vienna Opera Orchestra
Moshe Atzmon

Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.

Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section. [allmusic.com]

great compositions/performances: Artur Schnabel plays Beethoven Piano Sonata No.30, Op.109


Artur Schnabel plays Beethoven Piano Sonata No.30, Op.109

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109, composed in 1820, is the antepenultimate of his piano sonatas. In it, after the huge Hammerklavier sonata, Op. 106, Beethoven returns to a smaller scale and a more intimate character. It is dedicated to Maximiliane Brentano, the daughter of Beethoven’s long-standing friend Antonie Brentano, for whom Beethoven had already composed the short piano trio in B flat major WoO 39 in 1812. Musically, the work is characterised by a free and original approach to the traditional sonata form. Its focus is the third movement, a set of variations that interpret its theme in a wide variety of individual ways.[1]

The three movements of this sonata are:

  • Vivace ma non troppo / Adagio espressivo, E major, 2/4 time
  • Prestissimo, E minor, 6/8 time
  • Gesangvoll, mit innigster Empfindung. Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo, E major, 3/4 time.

A performance lasts about twenty minutes, of which the third movement takes more than half. Overall, the sonata is endowed with abundant melody and interesting, complex harmony.[14](pp192–3)

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