Tag Archives: China

this day in the yesteryear: US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)


US Government Prohibits All Exports to Cuba (1960)

After Cuba gained independence from Spain in 1898, US influence over the island grew. The two countries traded heavily until Fidel Castro rose to power in a bloody coup, and Cuba expropriated many American-owned land holdings. The US then enforced a prohibition of all exports to Cuba in 1960. Two years later, the US blockaded the island in order to compel the Soviet Union to dismantle its nuclear missile base. Although the word “embargo” exists in Spanish, what is the US embargo called in Cuba? More… Discuss

Part 2 of 2: The BBC is allowed to film in Cuba and show life under the absurd US trade embargo. Whilst the US moralises over a tiny Cuba, they do nothing about the likes of Iran, China and North Korea, who all have dubious human rights records. But of course, it’s easy to pick on a little island instead of a big country.
Recorded from BBC 1pm News, 26 February 2010.

this pressed for your right to know: Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ


Of course, the U.S. has a lot of wealthy people because it’s a big country. But the analysis suggests that the U.S. is punching above its weight, even after accounting for population. Total wealth per adult increased by $340,340 in North America, or an increase of 10.2% from the prior year. Total wealth per adult grew by nearly $146,000 in Europe, an increase of 10.4%.

By contrast, wealth per adult grew just 2.3% in China and it fell 1.9% in Latin America and 3.1% in India.

via Where Do the World’s Wealthiest People Live? – Real Time Economics – WSJ.

The Weeping Willow


The Weeping Willow

Easily recognized by its long drooping branches and leaves, the weeping willow belongs to the Salicaceae family of deciduous trees and shrubs. It is native to China, but, as willow cuttings generally take root quite easily, it has been cultivated elsewhere for millennia. Legend has it that all of England‘s weeping willows are descended from a cutting sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain. Though it is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, the weeping willow is used by some to serve what function? More… Discuss

LEONARD COHEN LYRICS “Suzanne (…And when he knew for certain Only drowning men could see him He said “All men will be sailors then Until the sea shall free them”…): great compositions/performances



LEONARD COHEN LYRICS

“Suzanne”

Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by
You can spend the night beside her
And you know that she’s half crazy
But that’s why you want to be there
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then she gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you’ve always been her lover
And you want to travel with her
And you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you’ve touched her perfect body with your mind.

And Jesus was a sailor

When he walked upon the water
And he spent a long time watching
From his lonely wooden tower
And when he knew for certain
Only drowning men could see him
He said “All men will be sailors then
Until the sea shall free them”
But he himself was broken
Long before the sky would open
Forsaken, almost human
He sank beneath your wisdom like a stone
And you want to travel with him
And you want to travel blind
And you think maybe you’ll trust him
For he’s touched your perfect body with his mind. Now Suzanne takes your hand
And she leads you to the river
She is wearing rags and feathers
From Salvation Army counters
And the sun pours down like honey
On our lady of the harbour
And she shows you where to look
Among the garbage and the flowers
There are heroes in the seaweed
There are children in the morning
They are leaning out for love
And they will lean that way forever
While Suzanne holds the mirror
And you want to travel with her
And you want to travel blind
And you know that you can trust her
For she’s touched your perfect body with her mind.

quotation: “Thus, what is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy’s strategy.” Sun Tzu (544 BC-496 BC)


Thus, what is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy’s strategy.

Sun Tzu (544 BC-496 BC) Discuss

news: Tens of Thousands Protest in Hong Kong


Tens of Thousands Protest in Hong Kong

Tens of thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators have taken to the streets in Hong Kong to protest Beijing‘s plan to vet candidates for the post of chief executive of Hong Kong in the 2017 elections. Since 1997, when Britain handed Hong Kong back to China, the chief executive has been selected by a 1,200-member election committee with pro-Beijing leanings. Last month, China agreed to allow direct elections in 2017, with the proviso that voters will only be able to choose from a list of pre-approved, almost undoubtedly pro-Beijing candidates. The protesters are demanding the freedom to choose their candidates. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Japan Resumes Diplomatic Relations with China (1972)


Japan Resumes Diplomatic Relations with China (1972)

The first Sino-Japanese War in the late 19th century damaged relations between the two countries for decades, as it marked the emergence of imperial Japan and saw harsh terms imposed on a badly defeated China. Relations did not improve until Kakuei Tanaka was elected prime minister of Japan in 1972. Shortly after his election, Tanaka visited China and signed an agreement establishing diplomatic relations between Japan and the Beijing regime. Who else made a historic visit to China in 1972? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Confucius’s Birthday


Confucius’s Birthday

This is a time to commemorate the birth of the teacher Confucius, perhaps the most influential man in China’s history. In Qufu, Shandong Province, China, the birthplace of Confucius, there is a two-week-long Confucian Culture Festival. During the Cultural Revolution in the late 1960s, Red Guards defaced many of the buildings in Qufu. They have since been restored, and the festival held there attracts scholars from China and abroad. The festival opens with a ceremony accompanied by ancient music and dance and includes exhibitions and lectures on the life and teachings of Confucius. More… Discuss

Would You Like Opium with That?


Would You Like Opium with That?

In an effort to hook his customers and keep them coming back for seconds, a Chinese noodle shop owner added a little something extra to his recipe: opium poppy seeds. The scheme was discovered when one of the shop’s patrons failed a drug test after being stopped by police. Suspecting the noodles he had eaten earlier were to blame, the man enlisted some of his relatives test out his theory. After eating noodles from the same shop, they too tested positive for drugs. When confronted by police, the shop owner admitted to having laced his noodles with the banned substance. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Empress Dowager Cixi Ends Hundred Days of Reform in China (1898)


Empress Dowager Cixi Ends Hundred Days of Reform in China (1898)

Empress Dowager Cixi was the de facto ruler of China for much of the period between 1861 and 1908. After the death of Emperor Xianfeng, as well as that of his only heir—his son by Cixi—she violated normal succession order and named her adoptive infant nephew Guangxu to the throne. In 1898, during the “hundred days of reform,” Guangxu issued a series of radical decrees modernizing China’s political and social structure. Cixi opposed the reforms and engineered a coup. What became of Guangxu? More… Discuss

People and places: The Mekong Delta


Brick factory - Mekong Delta, Vietnam.

Brick factory – Mekong Delta, Vietnam. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mekong Delta

The Mekong River—the longest river in Southeast Asia—flows from southern China through Tibet, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, where it enters the South China Sea. The sediments it carries on the 2,700-mile (4,350-km) journey form the vast, extremely fertile Mekong Delta, which occupies southeast Cambodia and southern Vietnam. One of the greatest rice-growing areas in Asia, the densely populated delta region has been called a “biological treasure trove.” What did scientists recently discover there? More… Discuss

 

endangered species: Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction


Yangtze Fish Nearing Extinction

The Chinese sturgeon, considered a “living fossil” due to its 140-million-year history, may not be around for much longer. It is teetering on the brink of extinction, thanks in large part to rising pollution levels and the construction of numerous dams along the Yangtze River it calls home. Only 100 specimens are thought to remain in the wild, and for the first year on record, none reproduced naturally in the river in 2013. Without additional conservation efforts, there is little hope for the future of this ancient creature. More… Discuss

Filigree


Filigree

Filigree is an ornamental work of fine gold or silver wire, often wrought into an openwork design and joined with matching solder under the flame of a blowpipe. It was made in ancient Egypt, China, and India. Saxons, Britons, and especially the Celts in Ireland were skilled at devising intricate and ingenious designs in the Middle Ages. Today, it is employed in Mediterranean areas, as well as in Mexico, India, and Scandinavian countries. What is the origin of the word “filigree“? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Ginseng Festival


Ginseng Festival

This festival is a celebration of ginseng in Fusong, a county in the Changbai Mountains of China and the largest ginseng grower in the country. The people of Fusong have traditionally celebrated the ginseng harvest, and, in 1987, the government officially set aside three days for both a festival and a trade fair of ginseng products. The festival features performances of yangko, dragon, and lion dances; story-telling parties with a ginseng theme; art and photo exhibits; and a fireworks display. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Taiwan Armed Forces Day


Taiwan Armed Forces Day

Founded in 1955, Armed Forces Day in Taiwan honors the country’s military and celebrates their victory over the Japanese in World War II (called the War of Resistance in Taiwan). The day is marked by military parades featuring special units chosen for their precision and outstanding performance. A troop-cheering by the onlookers is part of the celebration, as are educational activities covering the history of the war period and the role of the Taiwanese military in defeating the enemy. The day is also marked by the members of the armed forces having a rare day off from work. More… Discuss

this pressed: Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to One Funeral – NYTimes.com


Sierra Leone’s explosion of Ebola cases in early summer all appears to stem from one traditional healer’s funeral at which 14 women were infected, according to scientists studying the blood of victims.

The funeral, which took place in mid-May, constitutes a “super-spreader” event comparable to a 2003 one in a Hong Kong hotel in which one doctor from China dying of SARS infected nine other guests who spread the virus throughout the city and to Vietnam and Canada.”

via Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone Is Tied to One Funeral – NYTimes.com.

Led Zeppelin – Immigrant Song (Live Video) : make music part of your life series



from

Led Zeppelin – Immigrant Song (Live Video)


“Immigrant Song”

Ah, ah,

We come from the land of the ice and snow,

From the midnight sun where the hot springs flow.

The hammer of the gods will drive our ships to new lands,

To fight the horde, singing and crying: Valhalla, I am coming!On we sweep with threshing oar, Our only goal will be the western shore.

Ah, ah,
We come from the land of the ice and snow,
From the midnight sun where the hot springs blow.
How soft your fields so green, can whisper tales of gore,
Of how we calmed the tides of war. We are your overlords.

On we sweep with threshing oar, Our only goal will be the western shore.

So now you’d better stop and rebuild all your ruins,
For peace and trust can win the day despite of all your losing.

Bubonic Plague Death Prompts Quarantine in China


Bubonic Plague Death Prompts Quarantine in China

The bubonic plague has a prominent place in history books, having killed about a quarter of the European and Asian population in the 14th century in a pandemic now known as the Black Death, but its story does not end there. Periodic outbreaks on a much smaller scale have taken place since that time, with 60 succumbing to the disease in Madagascar not long ago. Thus, when a man in Yumen city, China, died of the plague last week, officials acted quickly to quarantine anyone he had contact with—151 people—and establish four quarantine zones in the city, setting up checkpoints to ensure the areas remain sealed off until they are certain the danger has passed. More… Discuss

Pagodas


Pagodas

A pagoda is a tiered tower with multiple eaves common to China, Japan, Korea, and other parts of Asia. The pagoda evolved from the Indian stupa—a dome-shaped shrine for Buddhist relics—and, like the stupa, is typically built for religious, often Buddhist, purposes. Whether octagonal, hexagonal, or square, pagodas are intended mainly as monuments and tend to have very little usable interior space. What is the “demon-arrester” that tops some pagodas? More… Discuss

US Moving to Join Landmine Convention


US Moving to Join Landmine Convention

The Ottawa Convention, a UN treaty banning landmines, currently has 161 signatories, but noticeably absent are several world powers, including the US, Russia, and China. Though the number of people killed or maimed each year by landmines has fallen considerably since the convention came into force in 1999, thousands—the vast majority of whom are civilians—still fall victim to these weapons each year. Now, the US has announced its intention to eventually join the treaty, and it is taking steps toward this by committing to end production and purchasing of anti-personnel landmines, allowing existing stockpiles to dwindle as they expire. More… Discuss

The Abacus


The Abacus

An abacus is a calculation tool, often a frame with beads sliding on wires. Used for centuries before the adoption of the written Arabic numeral system, it is still utilized by merchants in China and elsewhere. Though often attributed to the Chinese, it is thought to have been invented by the ancient Babylonians. The first abacus was probably a flat tablet covered in sand. Lines were drawn in the sand and pebbles were used to make calculations. What is the origin of the instrument’s name? More…

Saint of the Day for Thursday, June 5th, 2014: St. Boniface of Mainz


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Boniface of Mainz

St. Boniface of Mainz

Winfrith had expected to return to England from Friesland (in what is now Holland) in triumph. He had left the land where he was a respected scholar, teacher, and priest because he was convinced he … continue reading

More Saints of the Day

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Tiananmen Square Anniversary



Tiananmen: Australias Witnesses – The rarely heard perspectives of Australia‘s embassy staff

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In the weeks leading up to June 3, 1989 tens of thousands of students massed in Beijing’s enormous central square, drawn together by the death of liberal Communist Party figure Hu Yaobang and their collective desire for significant and immediate change. They wanted their hard-line leaders to yield and reform.
They wanted a free, fairer China. For China’s communist rulers it was a great affront to their authority. A provocation. They answered with soldiers, tanks and wholesale slaughter. “We went to see the two major student leaders and that’s when one told us crying that that night the soldiers would come, that there would be a lot of bloodshed, that a lot of people would die.” PETER EVERETT Defence Attaché, Australian Embassy Beijing, 1989. A lot of people did die. Precisely how many, we’ll never know. And to this day many Chinese themselves don’t even know the massacre took place. Despite the warp-speed advances in China’s economy and — to a limited extent — its openness, Tiananmen is still an officially forbidden subject. Until now the collective perspectives of Australia’s witnesses to Tiananmen have pretty much stayed under wraps as well. But in this extraordinarily revealing Foreign Correspondent key Embassy staffers have assembled for the first time to give their accounts of what happened.

ABC Australia – Ref 6149

Journeyman Pictures is your independent source for the world’s most powerful films, exploring the burning issues of today. We represent stories from the world’s top producers, with brand new content coming in all the time. On our channel you’ll find outstanding and controversial journalism covering any global subject you can imagine wanting to know about.

Tiananmen Square Anniversary

Each year thousands of people in Hong Kong, China, gather on June 4 to commemorate the anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre with a candlelight vigil. On that day in 1989, Chinese government tanks rolled into Beijing‘s Tiananman Square, killing hundreds of demonstrators calling for democratic reforms in China, and injuring 10,000 more. Since 1997, the Chinese government has discouraged the Hong Kong commemorations and pressured foreign news correspondents not to cover the yearly event. In the year 2002 about 45,000 people attended the vigil. More… Discuss

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Chopsticks


Chopsticks

Chopsticks, developed about 3,000 to 5,000 years ago in China, are the traditional eating utensils of East Asia. Various materials, including wood, ivory, bamboo, and metal, have been used to produce the tapered sticks, which range from the plain to the ornately decorated. The etiquette surrounding chopstick use, and in fact the style of the sticks themselves, varies from culture to culture. To avoid unintentional insult at the table, one should keep in mind what rules when dining in China? More… Discuss

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Gunpowder tea (green tea): From Wikipedia


Gunpowder tea

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

China-Zhejiang.pngGunpowder tea (; pinyin: zhū chá) is a form of green Chinese tea produced in Zhejiang Province of China in which each leaf has been rolled into a small round pellet. It is believed to take its English name from the fact that the tea resembles grains of black powder. This rolling method of shaping tea is most often applied either to dried green tea (the most commonly encountered variety outside China) or Oolong tea.

Chinese Gunpowder Green Tea
Type: Green

Other names: Lo Chu Ch’a, Zhu Cha, 珠茶
Origin: Zhejiang Province China and others

Quick description: Popular worldwide. Flavor varies according to the growing location of tea used for production

Gunpowder tea production dates back to the Tang Dynasty 618–907. It was first introduced to Taiwan in the 19th century. Gunpowder tea leaves are withered, steamed, rolled, and then dried. Although the individual leaves were formerly rolled by hand, today most gunpowder tea is rolled by machines (though the highest grades are still rolled by hand). Rolling renders the leaves less susceptible to physical damage and breakage and allows them to retain more of their flavor and aroma. In addition, it allows certain types of oolong teas to be aged for decades if they are cared for by being occasionally roasted.

When buying gunpowder tea it is important to look for shiny pellets, which indicate that the tea is relatively fresh. Pellet size is also associated with quality, larger pellets being considered a mark of lower quality tea. High quality gunpowder tea will have small, tightly rolled pellets.[citation needed]

Varieties

When sold as a variety of tea, gunpowder tea has several varieties:

  • Pingshui gunpowder (平水珠茶): The original and most common variety of gunpowder tea with larger pearls, better color, and a more aromatic infusion, which is commonly sold as Temple of Heaven Gunpowder or Pinhead Gunpowder, the former, a common brand of this tea variety.[1][2]
  • Formosa gunpowder: A gunpowder style tea grown in Taiwan near Keelung, it is claimed to have its own characteristic aroma, different from that of Zhejiang Province gunpowder grown in mainland China. Formosa gunpowder teas are typically fresh or roasted oolongs.
  • Ceylon gunpowder: A gunpowder variant grown in Sri Lanka, usually at altitudes exceeding 1,800 metres (6,000 ft), see Green Ceylon teas.

Several types of green teas are commonly rolled into “gunpowder” form, including Chunmee, Tieguanyin, Huang Guanyin, and Dong Ding, as well as many other oolong and higher-end jasmine teas.

Etymology

In Chinese, gunpowder tea is called zhū chá (; literally “pearl tea” or “bead tea”; not to be confused with boba tea).

The origin of the English term may come from the tea’s similarity in appearance to actual gunpowder: greyish, dark pellets of irregular shape used as explosive propellant for early guns. The name may also have arisen from the fact that the grey-green leaf is tightly rolled into a tiny pellet and “explodes” into a long leaf upon being steeped in hot water. Another explanation is that the tea can also have a smoky flavor.

It is also possible that the English term may stem from the Mandarin Chinese phrase for “freshly brewed”, gāng pào de (), which sounds like the English word “gunpowder.”

Brewing methods

While brewing methods vary widely by tea and individual preferences, 1 teaspoon of looseleaf tea is recommended for every 150ml (5.07 oz) of water. Ideal water temperature for this type of tea is between 70 °C (158 °F) to 80 °C (176 °F). For the first and second brewing, leaves should be steeped for around one minute. It is also recommended that the tea cup or tea pot used should be rinsed with hot water prior to brewing the tea to warm the vessels. When brewed, gunpowder tea is a yellow color.

The flavor of brewed gunpowder tea is often described as thick and strong like a soft honey, but with a smokey flavor and an aftertaste that is slightly coppery. This type of tea is often seen as having a flavor that is somewhat grassy, minty, or peppery.

Use in the Maghreb

Moroccan tea ritual

Gunpowder tea is exported to the Maghreb where it is used in the preparation of traditional North African mint tea. The Moroccan tea ritual is at the heart of any social gathering, from an informal visit to a neighbour to lavish soirees with dignitaries. A minimum of two cups need to be drunk so as not to offend the host. Moroccan mint tea is made by adding mint and sugar or honey to gunpowder tea after brewing.

 

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Green tea: Is made from the leaves from Camellia sinensis


  • Green tea is made from the leaves from Camellia sinensis that have undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originated in China, but it has become associated with many cultures throughout Asia. Green tea has recently beco…
     
  • en.wikipedia.org
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TRAIN STATION ATTACK IN CHINA


Train Station Attack in China

Three people have been killed and another 79 injured in an attack on a train station in Urumqi, the capital of western China’s restive Xinjiang region. Officials say terrorists set off explosives in the station on Wednesday evening and stationed themselves at exits, where they proceeded to slash and stab the fleeing commuters. The perpetrators have yet to be identified, but many are attributing the attack to Uighur separatists. More than 100 people in Xinjiang have died in the past year as a result of sectarian tensions between Han Chinese and Uighurs, a Turkic-speaking, predominantly Muslim ethnic group.More…

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Taj Mahal + James Cotton – Honky Tonk Women And The Rolling Stones tooooo!



44 years after their first performance at Hyde Park, Rolling Stones are back in London this summer. To recollect that historic gig of 1969 you can watch Stones performing “Honky Tonk Women

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QUOTATION: H.G. Wells


Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature’s inexorable imperative.

H.G. Wells (1866-1946) Discuss

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ARTICLE: SUSHI


Sushi

Though it is one of the iconic dishes of Japanese cuisine, sushi originated in Southeast Asia. It later spread to China before being introduced to Japan, where the version we recognize today was developed. It is now popular all over the world. Outside Japan, “sushi” is often taken to mean “raw fish,” but it actually means “sour” and simply refers to a dish made with vinegared rice—it can include raw or cooked fish, vegetables, or egg. What popular sushi filling was introduced by NorwegiansMore… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: BONSAI


Bonsai

Bonsai, Japanese for “tray planting,” refers both to the art of cultivating dwarf trees and to trees grown by this method. Such trees are not naturally miniature—they are kept small with cultivation methods like pruning and tying branches with wire to “train” them. The art originated in China but has been developed primarily by the Japanese. Bonsai may live for a century or more and are passed from generation to generation as valued heirlooms. What harmed many of Japan’s bonsai trees in 1923? More…Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE 228 MASSACRE (1947)


The 228 Massacre (1947)

Following Japan‘s defeat in World War II, Taiwan was placed under the administrative control of the Republic of China. The transition did not go smoothly. The Taiwanese had been content under Japanese rule and quickly grew to resent the heavy-handed tactics of the Kuomintang. On February 27, 1947, a dispute between a cigarette vendor and authorities escalated the next day into an anti-government uprising that was violently suppressed. How many Taiwanese are thought to have been massacred? More… Discuss

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From sintesio: Censorship and Social Media in China


According to Sintesio: Almost 1 million articles were censored every day in China in 2010

According to Sintesio: Almost 1 million articles were censored every day in China in 2010

Almost 1 million articles were censored every day in China in 2010

Censorship and Social Media in China.

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Shivaree – Goodnight Moon


 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: SHAANXI EARTHQUAKE: DEADLIEST IN RECORDED HISTORY (1556)


 

 

January 23: Shaanxi Earthquake, devastation ki...

January 23: Shaanxi Earthquake, devastation kills 830,000 in China. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Shaanxi Earthquake: Deadliest in Recorded History (1556)

 

The 1556 Shaanxi Earthquake in China is the deadliest earthquake on record, having killed approximately 830,000 people and destroyed an area 520 miles (837 km) wide. According to Chinese annals, mountains moved and rivers changed course due to the massive quake, which affected places more than 200 miles (322 km) from the epicenter. Aftershocks continued for months. In addition to the quake’s force—its magnitude is estimated at 8.0—the high death toll is attributed to what other factors? More… Discuss

 

 

 

 

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Contemporary: Michael Abels – Global Warming



The Richmond Symphony Youth Orchestra plays Michael Abels‘ “Global Warming” on January 27, 2013 at the Carpenter Theatre with Erin Freeman conducting.

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE TWENTY-ONE DEMANDS (1915)


The Twenty-One Demands (1915)

Japan gained a large sphere of interest in northern China through its victories in the First Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, thus joining the ranks of the European imperialist powers scrambling to establish control over China. Japan used its 1914 declaration of war against Germany as grounds for invading German holdings in China. Then, ignoring the Chinese request to withdraw, Japan secretly presented the Chinese president with an ultimatum. What were some of the demands? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: HARBIN ICE AND SNOW FESTIVAL


Harbin Ice and Snow Festival

This extravaganza of ice sculptures takes place from January 5 to February 4 in the port city of Harbin, the second largest city of northeast China, located in Heilongjiang Province. The sculptures, using themes ofancient legends and stories and modern historic events, depict pavilions, temples, and mythic animals and persons. Located in Zhaolin Park, they shimmer in the sun by day, and at night are illuminated in a rainbow of colors. Theatrical events, art exhibitions, and a photo exhibition mark festival time, and wedding ceremonies are often scheduled at this time in the ice-filled park. More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE NESTORIAN STELE


The Nestorian Stele

The Nestorian Stele is an ancient stone artifact that reveals a Christian presence in 7th-century China. The Christian sect of Nestorianism originated in 5th-century Constantinople and reached China through missionaries. Inscribed in both Chinese and Syriac, the almost 10-foot (3-m) limestone stele, or stone slab, describes the existence of Christian communities in northern China and reveals that the Emperor Taizong had recognized Christianity by 635 CE. When was the stele unearthed?More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: 28,800 FLOATING BATH TOYS TOPPLE INTO OCEAN (1992)


28,800 Floating Bath Toys Topple into Ocean (1992)

Children’s bath toys may seem an unlikely source of oceanographic data, but that is just what they have been since 1992, when a shipment of Friendly Floatees from China went rogue while en route to Tacoma, Washington. It all began when 12 shipping containers went overboard during a storm in the Pacific. One broke open, releasing 28,800 toy ducks, beavers, frogs, and turtles into the water. Oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer began tracking their progress after the first Floatees washed ashore where? More… Discuss

 

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THE MONGOLIAN DEATH WORM


The Mongolian Death Worm

The terrifyingly named Mongolian death worm is a creature purported to live in China’s Gobi Desert. Though its existence is widely debated, it is described as a bright red worm with a wide body that is 2 to 5 feet (0.6 to 1.5 m) long and is said to resemble a cow’s intestine. Mongolian locals claim that the worm can emit an electrical shock and spew acid that kills humans on contact and corrodes anything it touches. How did the Western world find out about the Mongolian death worm in 1926? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: CUTTY SARK IS LAUNCHED (1869)


Cutty Sark Is Launched (1869)

The tea trade in the 1860s and 70s was intensely competitive, with merchant ships racing to be the first to arrive in London with that year’s crop from China. It was for this purpose that the three-masted clipper Cutty Sarkwas originally built. She became one of the swiftest and most celebrated British clippers, but within a few years of her launch, steamships had largely supplanted clippers in the tea trade, so she began carrying other cargos. What is the origin and meaning of her name? More… Discuss

 

Leonard Cohen Live: Suzanne (Rare Footage)


LEONARD COHEN SUSANNE LYRICS

 Send “SUSANNE” Ringtone to your Cell 

Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river.
You can hear the boats go by,
You can spend the night beside her.
And you know she’s half crazy,
But that’s why you want to be there.
And she feeds you tea and oranges that come all the way from China.
And just when you mean to tell her that you have no love to give her,
Then she gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you’ve always been her lover.

And you want to travel with her,
And you want to travel blind,
And you know she will trust you,
For you’ve touched her perfect body with your mind.

and Jesus was a sailor, when he walked opon the water
And he spent a long time watching from his lonely wooden tower.
And when he knew for certain, only drowning men could see him,
He said: “All men will be sailors then, until the sea shall free them.”
But he himself was broken
Long before the sky would open,
Foresaken, almost human,
He sank beneath your wisdom, like a stone

And you want to travel with him
And you want to travel blind
And you think maybe you’ll trust him
For he’s touched your perfect body with his mind.

Now Suzanne takes your hand and she leads you to the river.
She’s wearing rags and feathers from Salvation Army counters.
And the sun pours down like honey on our Lady of the Harbor.
And she shows you where to look, among the garbage and the flowers.
There are heros in the seaweed,
There are children in the morning,
They are leaning out for love,
They will lean that way forever,
While Suzanne holds the mirror.

And you want to travel with her,
And you want to travel blind,
And you know you can trust her
For she’s touched your perfect body with her mind.

 Send “SUSANNE” Ringtone to your Cell 

Further information: 

behind-the-song-Susanne - Leonard Cohen

behind-the-song-Susanne – Leonard Cohen (click to access story)

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Los Angeles LAWeekly- Living off the Grid-Susanne Verday (click to access story)

 

Article: THE HOUSE OF YI


The House of Yi

In the 13th century, Mongol forces from China invaded the nation that would become Korea. Peace came when Korea accepted Mongol suzerainty, but in 1392, Yi Songgye, a general who favored the Chinese Ming dynasty, seized the throne. He was the first of the House of Yi, or Joseon Dynasty, that ruled Korea until 1910. That year, Korea was formally annexed by Japan following the Sino-Japanese War, effectively ending the dynasty. Who are the living descendants of the House of Yi? More… Discuss

 

Article: SIMA QIAN


Sima Qian

Near the end of the 2nd Century BCE, Qian succeeded his father as grand historian of the Chinese court. He extended a project planned by his father into a history of China and all regions and peoples known at the time. TheShih chi became a model for subsequent Chinese dynastic histories, and its wide range, many-faceted characterizations, and vivid dialogue have won admiration for over 2,000 years. He finished it after being castrated as punishment by the emperor for what offense? More… Discuss

 

Chinese Occupation of Tibet: The New Tibet (part 2/5)


Published on Oct 29, 2013

NEXT PART, Oct 30th!

Since in 1958 the Chinese army invaded Tibet, Lhasa has undergone a major transformation from a small city feudal prohibited fabulous and a gross metropolis of concrete and glass, as the other major Chinese cities, not want to miss the train of progress.

Especially in the last 20 years, major investors in the Chinese east coast have looked in this remote region rich in natural resources and cheap labor, and where the local government has enormous fiscal and social advantages.

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This Day in the Yesteryear: THE UNITED NATIONS IS FORMALLY ESTABLISHED (1945)


The United Nations Is Formally Established (1945)

The United Nations (UN) is an international organization founded to promote peace, security, and economic development. Representatives from the US, the UK, the Soviet Union, and China first met in 1944 to discuss the problems involved in creating such an agency, and the results of their talks became the basis for the UN Charter that was ratified in 1945. Established immediately after WWII, it replaced the essentially powerless League of Nations. Who first coined the term “United Nations”? More… Discuss

 

SPACE WARFARE


Space Warfare

Though it may seem limited to science fiction, space warfare was a real concern in the 1960s as space was becoming more accessible to humans during the height of the Cold War. While the Soviet and American space programs were competing to launch satellites and make lunar landings, they were also pursuing other projects—Almaz and Blue Gemini, respectively—to prepare for battle beyond the atmospheric confines of Earth. What weapon did the Soviet Union reportedly test fire in space?More… Discuss

 

FROM REUTERS-_-Treasury Secretary says China to hand audit work to SEC


FROM REUTERS-_-Treasury Secretary says China to hand audit work to SEC

FROM REUTERS-_-Treasury Secretary says China to hand audit work to SEC (CLICK TO ACCESS REPORT)

12 April 2013 Breaking News China Signals it will Back North Korea in War end times news update 4-12-13



12 April 2013 Breaking News China Signals it will Back North Korea in War end times news update 4-12-13 

China won’t sell out North Korea, no matter how much it should, and that sends a message to the rest of the world.

Who would you rather have in your corner? Who is going to stand by you when times are tough? China or America?

Officially China may not be too happy about the way that North Korea is acting. Or maybe it is.

China isn’t too worried that Obama will actually drop his golf clubs and stand up to the Communist banker of his welfare state. It doesn’t want to appear too crazy in public, but it has moved to a more militarist stance and North Korean aggressiveness serves its interests by tying up the United States in Korea while allowing its leaders to be the ones who claim to have the choke hold on the Nuclear Hound of North Korea.

But if push does come to shove, then China has North Korea’s back. Unlike Obama Inc. which only has the Muslim Brotherhood’s back.

China continued moving tanks and armored vehicles and flying flights near North Korea this week as part of a military buildup in the northeastern part of the country that U.S. officials say is related to the crisis with North Korea.

The Obama administration, meanwhile, sought to play down the Chinese military buildup along the border with Beijing fraternal communist ally despite the growing danger of conflict following unprecedented threats by Pyongyang to attack the United States and South Korea with nuclear weapons. The buildup appears linked to North Korea’s March 30 announcement that it is in a state of war with South Korea after the United Nations imposed a new round of sanctions following the North’s Feb. 12 2013 nuclear test and because of ongoing large-scale joint U.S.-South Korea military exercises.

The People’s Liberation Army (PLA) troop and tank movements were reported in Daqing, located in northeastern Heilongjiang Province, and in the border city of Shenyang, in Liaoning Province.

Officials said one key military unit involved in the mobilization is the 190th Mechanized Infantry Brigade based in Benxi, Liaoning Province. The brigade is believed to be the PLA’s frontline combat unit that would respond to any regional conflict or refugee flows. Troops and tank movements also were reported in Dandong, in Liaoning Province. Fighter jets were reported flying in larger numbers in Fucheng, Hebei Province, and in Zhangwu and Changchun, Liaoning Provinces. Additionally, the troop buildup is a signal to Pyongyang that China will abide by its defense commitment to North Korea in the event of renewed conflict.

If the PRC really wanted to discourage North Korea’s misbehavior, then it would avoid the buildup. After all the only thing China really has to worry about is a flood of refugees and it doesn’t need jets or tanks to deal with them.

The message being sent is that China, unlike the United States, doesn’t abandon its allies.

Obama may have sold out Poland on missile defense and sold out the UK on the Falklands and Israel on Hamas. Obama sold out Mubarak and the leaders of most American allies in the Middle East.

March 31st 2013 Presstv reports – Russian president Putin orders unscheduled military drill in Black Sea Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered an unexpected military exercise involving dozens of ships and thousands of troops in the Black Sea.

Presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Thursday that Putin issued the order for the large-scale maneuvers overnight as he flew back from the South African city of Durban after a two-day summit of the BRICS group of emerging powers.

Peskov further said the drill is aimed at testing the battle-readiness of Russia’s Black Sea units. “These are large-scale unannounced test exercises. The main goal is to check the readiness and cohesion of the various units,” he said.

The ships taking part in the exercise have already left the Russia-leased Sevastopol port in Ukraine’s Crimea Peninsula, the Russian spokesman added.

According to a Kremlin statement, the drill will involve 36 vessels, up to 7,000 troops and an unspecified number of aircraft. However, the statement did not specify how long the exercise would last.

Russian foreign affairs analyst Fyodor Lukyanov, who is also the editor of Russia in Global Affairs journal, said, “It is flexing muscles and may have more to do with what is happening in the Mediterranean, around Syria, than in the Black Sea.”

In January, Russia launched its largest naval exercises in decades in the Mediterranean and Black Seas near the territorial waters of Syria.

Moscow said the drills were “held in line with the Russian Armed Forces‘ 2013 combat training plan,” and focused on “interoperability of task forces from several fleets while on a mission in a far-off maritime zone.”

In addition to Georgia and Ukraine, Russia shares the Black Sea with Turkey, Bulgaria and Romania.