Tag Archives: Christianity

Saint of the day, July 20, 2014: St. Margaret of Antioh


Image of St. Margaret of AntiochNothing certain is known of her, but according to her untrustworthy legend, she was the daughter of a pagan priest at Antioch in Pisidia. Also known as Marina, she was converted to Christianity, whereupon she was driven from home by her father. She became a shepherdess and when she spurned the advances of Olybrius, the prefect, who was infatuated with her beauty, he charged her with being a Christian. He had her tortured and then imprisoned, and while she was in prison she had an encounter with the devil in the form of a dragon. According to the legend, he swallowed her, but the cross she carried in her hand so irritated his throat that he was forced to disgorge her (she is patroness of childbirth). The next day, attempts were made to execute her by fire and then by drowning, but she was miraculously saved and converted thousands of spectators witnessing her ordeal-all of whom were promptly executed. Finally, she was beheaded. That she existed and was martyred are probably true; all else is probably fictitious embroidery and added to her story, which was immensely popular in the Middle Ages, spreading from the East all over Western Europe. She is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, and hers was one of the voices heard by Joan of Arc. Her feast day is July 20th.

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Saint of the Day June 30 2014: Martyrs of the See of Rome


Saint of the Day

Saint of the Day, June 20, 2014: St. Vincent Kaun


Saint of the Day

today’s saint Sunday, June 1, 2014: St. Justin Martyr


Saint of the Day for Sunday, June 1st, 2014

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Saint of the Day may 27: St. Augustine of Canterbury


Image of St. Augustine of CanterburySt. Augustine of Canterbury

At the end of the sixth century anyone would have said that Augustine had found his niche in life. Looking at this respected prior of a monastery, almost anyone would have predicted he would spend … continue reading

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Saint of the Day – May 18: St. John I, Pope and Martyr (Feast day – May 18)


Saint of the Day

May 18 Saint of the Day

St. Pope John I
May 18: St. John I, Pope and Martyr (Feast day – May 18) A native of Tuscany in Italy, John was elected Pope while he was still an archdeacon upon the death of Pope Hormisdas in 523. At that time, the ruler of Italy was Theodoric the Goth who subscribed to the Arian brand of Christianity, but had tolerated and even favored his Catholic subjects during the early part of his reign. However, about the time of St. John’s accession to the Papacy, Theodoric’s policy underwent a drastic change as a result of two events: the treasonable (in the sovereign’s view) correspondence between ranking members of the Roman Senate and Constantinople and the severe edict against heretics enacted by the emperor Justin I, who was the first Catholic on the Byzantine throne in fifty years. …Read More

May
18
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Saint of the Day MAY 17 : St. Paschal Baylon – Franciscan lay brother and mystic


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Paschal Baylon

St. Paschal Baylon

Franciscan lay brother and mystic. Born to a peasant family at Torre Hermosa, in Aragon, on Whitsunday, he was christened Pascua in honor of the feast. According to accounts of his early life, … continue reading

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Pope Innocent XI (1611)


Pope Innocent XI (1611)

In 1676, Benedetto Odescalchi was elected pope despite the strong opposition of Louis XIV of France, with whom he had a long, bitter quarrel over Gallicanism—a French Roman Catholic tradition of resistance to papal authority. He took the name Innocent XI. As Pope, Innocent lived very parsimoniously and sought to curb nepotism among the cardinals. He closed all of the theaters in Rome—deemed centers of vice and immorality—and brought a temporary halt to the flourishing tradition of what? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S SAINT, MAY 11: Frost Saints’ Days


Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S SAINT: St. Peter of Tarantaise May 8: Cistercian Archbishop


May 8 Saint of the DaySt. Peter of Tarantaise
May 8: Cistercian archbishop. Peter was born near Vienne, in Dauphine, … Read More

May
8
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Expectation, poetic thought by George B (my poetry collection)


Expectation, poetic thought by George B

It happen once before, creation,
when all there wasn’t turned into being
But then it all fell into complacency
And we became accustomed to just this -
We call being…

Being interrupted,
takes one to before creation,
when nothing was, yet,
everything had an equal chance to become…
fifty- fifty chance,
either – or
neither–nor,
it is that simple,
being, not being,
it’s expected…

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Soren Kierkegaard (1813)


Soren Kierkegaard (1813)

Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher and theologian and is generally considered, along with Friedrich Nietzsche, to be a founder of existentialism. Much of Kierkegaard’s work deals with religious problems, as he rejected organized Christianity and emphasized man’s moral responsibility and freedom of choice. Kierkegaard stressed the importance of the self and argued that “subjectivity is truth” and “truth is subjectivity.” Why did Kierkegaard publish many of his earlier works under pseudonyms? More… Discuss

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US news articles and blogs – The Christian Science Monitor – CSMonitor.com


US news articles and blogs – The Christian Science Monitor – CSMonitor.com.

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ST.OF THE DAY: ST. ATHANASIUS May 2:


SAINT OF THE DAY

May 2 Saint of the Day

ST. ATHANASIUS
May 2: St. Athanasius, the great champion of the Faith was born at … Read More

May
2
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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ROBINSON CRUSOE IS PUBLISHED (1719)


Robinson Crusoe Is Published (1719)

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe is a fictional autobiography of the eponymous English castaway marooned on a desert island for 28 years. During this time, Crusoe encounters cannibals, captives, and mutineers and endures endless hardships while preserving his human integrity. The first volume of Defoe’s Crusoe story was published in 1719 and garnered immediate acclaim. It is considered by some critics to be the first true English novel. What is the book’s full title? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ST. GEORGE’S DAY


St. George’s Day

Nothing much is known for certain about St. George, but the patron saint of England is popularly known in medieval legend for slaying a vicious dragon that was besieging a town in Cappadocia. When the people saw what had happened, they were converted to Christianity. To this day, St. George is often depicted with a dragon. St. George’s Day, sometimes referred to as Georgemas, has been observed as a religious feast as well as a holiday since the 13th century. More… Discuss

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SAINT OF THE DAY April 22: ST. ABDIESUS April 22


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 22 Saint of the Day

ST. ABDIESUS
April 22: Also called Hebed Jesus, a deacon in the Christian community of … Read More

April
22

 

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Saint of the Day: ST. APOLLONIUS THE APOLOGIST (April 18)


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 18 Saint of the Day

ST. APOLLONIUS THE APOLOGIST
April 18: Martyr whose Apologia, or defense of the faith, is considered … Read More

April
18
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SAINT OF THE DAY April 14: ST. LYDWINE


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 14 Saint of the Day

ST. LYDWINE
April 14: St. Lydwine is the patroness of sickness Lydwine of Schiedam was … Read More

April
14
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SAINT OF THE DAY: ST. ACACIUS: Feastday: April 9


Image of St. AcaciusST. ACACIUS

Feastday: April 9

Death: 425 

Acacius was bishop of Amida (Diarbekir), Mesopotamia. He sold the sacred vessels of his church to aid victims of the Persian persecution. His actions so impressed King Bahram V that he is reported to have ordered an end to the persecution of the Christians. His feast day is April 9th.

April
9

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE NOTRE-DAME AFFAIR (1950)


The Notre-Dame Affair (1950)

The Notre-Dame Affair was an anti-Catholic intervention performed by radical members of the Lettrist movement on Easter Sunday 1950. During a quiet moment in the Easter High Mass, Michel Mourre, disguised as a Dominican monk, climbed to the rostrum and declaimed a blasphemous anti-sermon on the death of God. Not surprisingly, his statements enraged the thousands of faithful present at the mass, who went after Mourre and his co-conspirators and may well have lynched them had it not been for whom?More… Discuss

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SAINT OF THE DAY April 8: ST. JULIE BILLIART (1751-1816)


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 8 Saint of the Day

ST. JULIE BILLIART
April 8: St. Julie (Julia) Billiart was born in 1751 and died in 1816. As … Read More

April
8
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SAINT OF THE DAY April 6: ST. WILLIAM OF ESKILSOE


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 6 Saint of the Day

ST. WILLIAM OF ESKILSOE
April 6: Missionary. Born at Saint-Germain, France, circa 1125, he served … Read More

April
6
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SAINT OF THE DAY: ST. PETER REGULATUS March 30


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 30 Saint of the Day

ST. PETER REGULATUS
March 30: Also Peter Regalado, Franciscan reformer. Peter was born at … Read More

March
30

 

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TODAY’S SAINT: ST. BERTHOLD March 29


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 29 Saint of the Day

ST. BERTHOLD
March 29: Considered by some historians to be the founder of the Carmelite … Read More

March
29
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SAINT OF THE DAY March 24: ST. ALDEMAR March 24


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 24 Saint of the Day

ST. ALDEMAR
March 24: Abbot and miracle worker, called “the Wise.” Born in … Read More

March
24
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SAINT OF THE DAY March 23: ST. TORIBIO ALFONSO DE MOGROVEJO


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 23 Saint of the Day

ST. TORIBIO ALFONSO DE MOGROVEJO
March 23: Bishop and defender of the rights of the native Indians in Peru, … Read More

March
23

 

 

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SAINT OF THE DAY March 22: Saint of the Day ST. LEA


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 22 Saint of the Day

ST. LEA
March 22: A letter which St. Jerome wrote to St. Marcella provides the … Read More

March
22

 

 

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ARTICLE: JOSEPH PRIESTLEY


Joseph Priestley

Priestley was an English theologian and scientist. He prepared for the Presbyterian ministry but gradually rejected orthodox Calvinism for Unitarianism. His History of the Corruptions of Christianity, published in 1782, was officially burned in 1785, and he immigrated to the US in 1794, befriending the nation’s founders. As a scientist, his manipulation of gases enabled him to discover new ones, including “dephlogisticated air,” a breakthrough whose magnitude escaped him. What gas was it? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE VÖLKNER INCIDENT (1865)


The Völkner Incident (1865)

After New Zealand was named a British crown colony in 1840, Christian missionaries began to disseminate their teachings among the native Maori people. In the early 1860s, a religious-military Maori cult emerged, mingling Christian beliefs with native spiritual elements and urging followers to violently oppose the European presence. In March 1865, members of this Pai Marire movement killed missionary Carl Sylvius Völkner in a gruesome manner, hanging him before supposedly doing what to his body? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S SAINT: St. John Theristus


Image of St. John TheristusSt. John Theristus

Benedictine monk, called Theristus or “Harvester.” He was of Calabrian lineage, born in Sicily. His mother was a slave of the Saracens. John escaped at a young age and became a monk. continue reading

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TODAY’S SAINT: St. Polycarp


St. Polycarp

St. Polycarp

Feastday: February 23

Imagine being able to sit at the feet of the apostles and hear their stories of life with Jesus from their own lips. Imagine walking with those who had walked with Jesus, seen him, and touched him. That was what Polycarp was able to do as a disciple of Saint John the Evangelist.Feastday: February 23
But being part of the second generation of Church leaders had challenges that the first generation could not teach about. What did you do when those eyewitnesses were gone? How do you carry on the correct teachings of Jesus? How do you answer new questions that never came up before?

With the apostles gone, heresies sprang up pretending to be true teaching, persecution was strong, and controversies arose over how to celebrate liturgy that Jesus never laid down rules for.

Polycarp, as a holy man and bishop of Smyrna, found there was only one answer — to be true to the life of Jesus and imitate that life. Saint Ignatius of Antioch told Polycarp “your mind is grounded in God as on an immovable rock.”

When faced with heresy, he showed the “candid face” that Ignatius admired and that imitated Jesus’ response to the Pharisees. Marcion, the leader of the Marcionites who followed a dualistic heresy, confronted Polycarp and demanded respect by saying, “Recognize us, Polycarp.” Polycarp responded, “I recognize you, yes, I recognize the son of Satan.”

On the other hand when faced with Christian disagreements he was all forgiveness and respect. One of the controversies of the timecame over the celebration of Easter. The East, where Polycarp was from, celebrated the Passover as the Passion of Christ followed by a Eucharist on the following day. The West celebrated Easter on the Sunday of the week following Passover. When Polycarp went to Rome to discuss the difference with Pope Anicetus, they could not agree on this issue. But they found no difference in their Christian beliefs. And Anicetus asked Polycarp to celebrate the Eucharist in his own papal chapel.

Polycarp faced persecution the way Christ did. His own church admired him for following the “gospel model” — not chasing after martyrdom as some did, but avoiding it until it was God’s will as Jesus did. They considered it “a sign of love to desire not to save oneself alone, but to save also all the Christian brothers and sisters.”

One day, during a bloody martyrdom when Christians were attacked by wild animals in the arena, the crowd became so mad that they demanded more blood by crying, “Down with the atheists; let Polycarp be found.” (They considered Christians “atheists” because they didn’t believe in their pantheon of gods.) Since Polycarp was not only known as a leader but as someone holy “even before his grey hair appeared”, this was a horrible demand.

Polycarp was calm but others persuaded him to leave the city and hide at a nearby farm. He spent his time inprayer for people he knew and for the Church. During his prayer he saw a vision of his pillow turned to fire and announced to his friends that the dream meant he would be burned alive.

As the search closed in, he moved to another farm, but the police discovered he was there by torturing two boys. He had a little warning since he was upstairs in the house but he decided to stay, saying, “God’s will be done.”

Then he went downstairs, talked to his captors and fed them a meal. All he asked of them was that they give him an hour to pray. He spent two hours praying for everyone he had every known and for the Church, “remembering all who had at any time come his way — small folk and great folk, distinguished and undistinguished, and the wholeCatholic Church throughout the world.” Many of his captors started to wonder why they were arresting this holy, eighty-six-year-old bishop.

But that didn’t stop them from taking him into the arena on the Sabbath. As he entered the arena, the crowd roared like the animals they cheered. Those around Polycarp heard a voice from heaven above the crowd, “Be brave, Polycarp, and act like a man.”

The proconsul begged the eighty-six-year-old bishop to give in because of his age. “Say ‘Away with the atheists’” the proconsul urged. Polycarp calmly turned to the face the crowd, looked straight at them, and said, “Away with the atheists.” The proconsul continued to plead with him. When he asked Polycarp to swear by Caesar to save himself, Polycarp answered, “If you imagine that I will swear by Caesar, you do not know who I am. Let me tell you plainly, I am a Christian.” Finally, when all else failed the proconsul reminded Polycarp that he would be thrown to the wild animals unless he changed his mind. Polycarp answered, “Change of mind from better to worse is not a change allowed to us.”

Because of Polycarp’s lack of fear, the proconsul told him he would be burned alive but Polycarp knew that the fire that burned for an hour was better than eternal fire.

When he was tied up to be burned, Polycarp prayed, “Lord God Almighty, Father of your beloved and blessed SonJesus Christ, through whom we have received knowledge of you, God of angels and powers, of the whole creationand of the whole race of the righteous who live in your sight, I bless you, for having made me worthy of this day and hour, I bless you, because I may have a part, along with the martyrs, in the chalice of your Christ, to resurrection in eternal life, resurrection both of soul and body in the incorruptibility of the Holy Spirit. May I be received today, as a rich and acceptable sacrifice, among those who are in you presence, as you have prepared and foretold and fulfilled, God who is faithful and true. For this and for all benefits I praise you, I bless you, I glorify you, through the eternal and heavenly High Priest, Jesus Christ, your beloved Son, through whom be to you with him and the Holy Spirit glory, now and for all the ages to come. Amen.”

The fire was lit as Polycarp said Amen and then the eyewitnesses who reported said they saw a miracle. The fire burst up in an arch around Polycarp, the flames surrounding him like sails, and instead of being burned he seemed to glow like bread baking, or gold being melted in a furnace. When the captors saw he wasn’t being burned, they stabbed him. The blood that flowed put the fire out.

The proconsul wouldn’t let the Christians have the body because he was afraid they would worship Polycarp. The witnesses reported this with scorn for the lack of understanding of Christian faith: “They did not know that we can never abandon the innocent Christ who suffered on behalf of sinners for the salvation of those in this world.” After the body was burned, they stole the bones in order to celebrate the memory of his martyrdom and prepare others for persecution. The date was about February 23, 156.

In His Footsteps:

When faced with challenges to your Christian life, try a version of Polycarp’s prayer of martyrdom: “Lord GodAlmighty, Father of your beloved and blessed Son Jesus Christ, through whom we have received knowledge of you, God of angels and powers, of the whole creation and of the whole race of the righteous who live in your sight, I bless you, for having made me worthy of this day and hour, I bless you, because I may have a part, along with the martyrs, in the chalice of your Christ, to resurrection in eternal life, resurrection both of soul and body in the incorruptibility of the Holy Spirit. For this and for all benefits I praise you, I bless you, I glorify you, through the eternal and heavenly High Priest, Jesus Christ, your beloved Son, through whom be to you with him and the Holy Spirit glory, now and for all the ages to come. Amen.”

Prayer:

Saint Polycarp, sometimes Christ seems so far away from us. Centuries have passed since he and the apostles walk the earth. Help us to see that he is close to us always and that we can keep him near by imitating his life as you did.Amen

 

 

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TODAY’S SAINT ST. DANIEL


Image of St. Daniel

St. Daniel

Died in 309, He and four companions, Elias, Isaias, Jeremy and Samuel were Egyptians who visited Christians condemned to work in the mines of Cilicia during Maximus persecution, to comfort them. … continue reading

 

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Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 8th, 2014


Saint of the Day for Saturday, February 8th, 2014

Image of St. Jerome Emiliani

Feastday: February 8
1481 – 1537

Jerome Emiliani lay chained in the dark dirty dungeon. Only a short time before he had been a military commander for Venice in charge of a fortress. He didn’t care much about God because he didn’t need him — he had his own strength and the strength of his soldiers and weapons. When Venice’s enemies, the League of Cambrai, captured the fortress, he was dragged off and imprisoned. There in the dungeon, Jerome decided to get rid of the chains that bound him. He let go of his worldly attachments and embraced God.

When he finally was able to escape, he hung his metal chains in the nearby church of Treviso – in gratitude not only for being freed from physical prison but from his spiritual dungeon as well.

After a short time as mayor of Treviso he returned his home inVenice where he studied for the priesthood. The war may have been over but it was followed by the famine and plague war’s devastation often brought. Thousands suffered in his beloved city. Jerome devoted himself to service again — this time, not to the military but the poor and suffering around him. He felt a special call to help the orphans who had no one to care for them. All the loved ones who would have protected them and comforted them had been taken by sickness or starvation. He would become their parent, their family.

Using his own money, he rented a house for the orphans, fed them, clothed them, and educated them. Part of his education was to give them the first known catechetical teaching by question and answer. But his constant devotion to the suffering put him in danger too and he fell ill from the plague himself. When he recovered, he had the ideal excuse to back away, but instead his illness seemed to take the last links of the chain from his soul. Once again he interpreted his suffering to be a sign of how little the ambitions of the world mattered.

He committed his whole life and all he owned to helping others. He founded orphanages in other cities, a hospital, and a shelter for prostitutes. This grew into a congregation of priests and brothers that was named after the place where they had a house: the Clerks Regular of Somascha. Although they spent time educating other young people, their primary work was always Jerome’s first love — helping orphans.

His final chains fell away when he again fell ill while taking care of the sick. He died in 1537 at the age of 56.

He is the patron saint of abandoned children and orphans.

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Saint of the Day for Sunday, February 2nd, 2014


Saint of the Day for Sunday, February 2nd, 2014

Image of St. Joan de Lestonnac

Feastday: February 2
Patron of abuse victims, people rejected by religious orders, widows
1556 – 1640

St. Joan de Lestonnac was born in Bordeaux, France, in 1556. She married at the age of seventeen. The happy marriage produced four children, but her husband died suddenly in 1597. After herchildren were raised, she entered the Cistercian monastery at Toulouse. Joan was forced to leave the Cistercians when she became afflicted with poor health. She returned to Bordeaux with the idea of forming a new congregation, and several young girls joined her as novices. They ministered to victims of a plague that struck Bordeaux, and they were determined to counteract the evils of heresy promulgated by Calvinism. Thus was formed the Congregation of the Religious of Notre Dame of Bordeaux. In 1608, Joan and her companions received the religious habit from the Archbishop of Bordeaux. Joan was elected superior in 1610, and many miracles occurred at her tomb. She was canonized in 1949 by Pope Pius XII. Her feast day is February 2.

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TODAY’S SAINT: Saint of the Day for Saturday, January 25th, 2014


Saint of the Day for Saturday, January 25th, 2014

Image of St. Peter Thomas

St. Peter Thomas

Carmelite Latinpatriarch and papal legate. Peter was born in Gascony, France and joined the Carmelites while still a young man. In 1342 he was appointed procurator of the order and, from Avignon, he … continue reading

 

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Saint of the Day for Thursday, January 23rd, 2014: ST. ILDEPHONSUS


Saint of the Day for Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

 

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Saint of the Day for Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014: ST. VINCENT PALLOTTI


Saint of the Day for Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014

 

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QUOTATION: Friedrich Nietzsche


Whence come the highest mountains? … They come out of the sea. That testimony is inscribed on their stones, and on the walls of their summits. Out of the deepest must the highest come to its height.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) Discuss

 

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RESPIGHI Suite for Organ and Strings In G



RESPIGHI Suite for Organ and Strings
Performed by Ars Nova Chamber Orchestra at Vienna Presbyterian Church on October 27​, 2012.

 

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ARTICLE: THE EIGHT EVIL THOUGHTS


The Eight Evil Thoughts

Evagrius Ponticus struggled with adulterous desires and physical illness before devoting his life to Christianity, becoming an ascetic monk in 383 CE. Despite later accusations of heresy, Evagrius exerted a tremendous influence on the church through his writings and is best known for categorizing eight forms of temptation. These eight evil thoughts are gluttony, greed, sloth, sorrow, lust, anger, vainglory, and pride. Who later revised the list to form the more commonly known Seven Deadly Sins?More… Discuss

 

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WORD: WRETCH


wretch 

Definition: (noun) A person pitied for his misfortune.
Synonyms: poor devil
Usage: If the poor wretch waked in the flames and perished, no one cared.

 

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ARTICLE: THE NESTORIAN STELE


The Nestorian Stele

The Nestorian Stele is an ancient stone artifact that reveals a Christian presence in 7th-century China. The Christian sect of Nestorianism originated in 5th-century Constantinople and reached China through missionaries. Inscribed in both Chinese and Syriac, the almost 10-foot (3-m) limestone stele, or stone slab, describes the existence of Christian communities in northern China and reveals that the Emperor Taizong had recognized Christianity by 635 CE. When was the stele unearthed?More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: BENIN NATIONAL VODOUN DAY


Benin National Vodoun Day

Vodoun is an ancient, African, pantheistic religion. When it was brought to the Americas by African slaves, it was blended with elements of Christianity into what is known as “Voodoo.” The present African country of Benin, situated on the former kingdom of Dahomey, is known as a center of Vodoun culture. The day is celebrated throughout Benin with processions, Vodoun rituals, dances, and even an international film festival. The celebration’s central activity, however, is the re-enactment of the journey from the slave auction block in the center of town to the ships in the harbor. More… Discuss

 

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Quotation: Friedrich Nietzsche about man and tree…a comparison


It is the same with man as with the tree … The more he seeketh to rise into the height and light, the more vigorously do his roots struggle earthward, downward, into the dark and deep—into the evil.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) Discuss

This Day in the Yesteryear: MERCURIUS BECOMES POPE JOHN II (533 CE)


Mercurius becomes Pope John II (533 CE)

Though Catholics today are accustomed to the pope taking a new name once elected, Mercurius was the first to do so. As his birth name honored the pagan god Mercury, he chose to become John II upon elevation to the papacy. Though he died just two years later, he served at a time when sacred artifacts were regularly being sold and simony—the purchase or sale of church offices or preferment—was rampant in the selection of church officials. What other scandals did John face in his brief tenure? More… Discuss

 

Bach – Cantate BWV 190 – Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied (Sing to the Lord a new song )



JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH BWV 225 Sing to the LORD A NEW SONG LYRICS

Sing to the Lord a new song 

Sing to the Lord a new song, the congregation of saints praise him. Israel rejoice in him that made him.The children of Zion rejoice in their King sei’n, Let them praise his name in the series, with timbrels and with harps they want to play him. 

As a father pities 
God, you also receive our on, 
About his young infants, 
So the Lord is doing all of us, 
So we childlike fear him pure. 
He knows our frailty, 
God knows we are only dust, 
Because without you nothing is done 
With all our stuff. 
Just as the grass from the rake, 
A Blum and falling leaves. 
The wind only blows over it, 
So it is no longer there, 
Drum you be our shield and light, 
And do not deceive us our hope, 
So you’re going to make it further. 
So man passes away, 
Its end, which is close to him. 
Blessed is the only stiff and strong 
Relies on you and your bounty. 

Praise the Lord for his mighty acts, praise him according to his excellent greatness! 
Everything that has breath praise the Lord Hallelujah! 

English: Sing ye the Lord a new refrain, the assembly of saints shoulderstand be telling his praises.Israel joyful be in him who hath made him. Let Zion’s children rejoice in him who is mighty Their king, let them be praising his name’s honor in dances, with timbrels and with psalt’ries unto him be playing. 

Chorale (Chorus II) 

As a father doth mercy show 

Aria (Chorus I) 

God, take quiet Further now our part, 
To his own little children dear, 
Thus doth the Lord to all men, 
If pure as children we fear him. 
He sees our feeble powers, 
God knows we are but dust; 
For, lacking thee, naught shall we gain 
Of all our Endeavors synthesis. 
Just as the grass in mowing, 
Or bud and falling leaf, 
If wind but o’er it bloweth, 
It is no longer there, 
So be thou our shield and true light, 
And if our hope betray us not, 
Thou wilt Malthus henceforth help us. 
E’en so one’s life is passing, 
His end is near to him. 
Blest he Whose hope Both strong and firm 
On thee and on thy grace doth rest. 

[Ps 150:2 and 6] (Chorus I, Chorus II) 

Praise ye the Lord in all his doings, praise ye him in all his might and majesty! 

(Chorus I and II) 

All things Which do draw breath, praise ye the Lord, hallelujah!

 

Quotation: Jerome K. Jerome about writers and readers and what the Providence has to do with it


You and I, dear reader, are each the center of the universe in our respective opinions. You, as I understand it, were brought into being by a considerate Providence in order that you might read and pay me for what I write; while I, in your opinion, am an article sent into the world to write something for you to read.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859-1927) Discuss

 

Hymn to the Theotokos at Sinaia Monastery in Romania



Pilgrims singing in Sinaia monastery church in Romania