Tag Archives: climate

THE HAPPIEST PLACE ON EARTH


The Happiest Place on Earth

A UN-sponsored survey of happiness and satisfaction around the globe names Denmark the world’s happiest country. Rounding out the top five are Norway, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and Sweden. Canada ranked 6th on the list, the US came in 17th, and the UK landed in the 22nd spot. The West African country of Togo was found to be the most unhappy of the 156 nations included in the report. While recent economic and political crises have greatly reduced happiness levels in many countries, over the past five years, the world overall has actually become slightly happier and more generous. More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: LOUISE ARNER BOYD (1887)


Louise Arner Boyd (1887)

Boyd was an American explorer of Greenland and the Arctic and the first woman to fly over the North Pole. After the deaths of her parents and brothers, she inherited the family fortune and chartered the ship of famed explorer Roald Amundsen for a trip to the Arctic. She gained notoriety for hunting polar bears and was called “The Girl Who Tamed the Arctic.” She later canceled another expedition, stating, “How could I go on a pleasure trip when those 22 lives were at stake?” What had happened? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: ULISSE ALDROVANDI (1522)


Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522)

After earning a degree in medicine, Aldrovandi took up botany and zoology, amassing a spectacular cabinet of curiosities containing thousands of specimens. He is said to have been the first to use the word “geology” in its modern sense. Carolus Linnaeus, the botanist who laid the groundwork for the modern system of naming species, hailed Aldrovandi as the father of natural history. Aldrovandi also founded Bologna‘s public botanical garden and was its first curator. Why was he arrested in 1549?More… Discuss

 

FOUNDER EFFECT (Hannibal Lecter)


Founder Effect

The founder effect is a form of genetic drift that occurs when a small group in a population splinters off and forms a new one. These founders can strongly affect the new colony’s genetic makeup far into the future, since their small gene pool may be unrepresentative of that of the population at large. Down the line, this can result in an increase in recessive traits, even maladaptive ones, like certain genetic diseases. What are some communities that have been impacted by the founder effect? More… Discuss

 

“Global Warming: Thinner is the ice” – Oil Thermograph (My art Collection)


"Global Warming: Thinner is the ice" - oil thermograph (My art Collection)

“Global Warming: Thinner is the ice” – oil thermograph (My art Collection)

MEASLES-LIKE VIRUS LIKELY BEHIND DOLPHIN DEATHS


Measles-Like Virus Likely Behind Dolphin Deaths

Scientists believe they have finally figured out what is causing the extensive dolphin die-off along the US east coast: a measles-like virus. In the past two months, more than 300 bottlenose dolphins have washed up dead or dying on beaches stretching from New York to North Carolina, about 10 times the average for this period. An outbreak of cetacean morbillivirus, which suppresses the immune system and leaves those affected vulnerable to other diseases, is thought to be responsible for the “unusual mortality event,” as it has been designated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric AdministrationMore… Discuss

 

EXTREMOPHILES


Extremophiles

Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in environments with extreme conditions, such as high or low temperatures or pH levels, high salt concentration, or high pressure. Found in hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, they produce the vivid colors of some hot springs. Due to extremophiles’ ability to thrive in conditions detrimental to most life on Earth, some scientists theorize that they may reflect what life may be like on other planets. How are extremophiles used industrially? More… Discuss

 

EYAM, ENGLAND


Eyam, England

The village of Eyam in Derbyshire, England, is best known for its decision to voluntarily quarantine itself when the Great Plague of London spread there in 1665. Villagers further tried to contain the disease by burying their own relatives and by leaving money disinfected in vinegar on a stone outside the village to pay for goods being delivered. The plague raged for 14 months and devastated Eyam, wiping out between 50 and 75 percent of its population. How was the plague brought to the village? More… Discuss

 

MEGAPODES


Megapodes

Megapodes are large-footed, chicken-like birds found in Australia and New Guinea. Rather than brood their eggs, females bury them in massive nest-mounds of decaying vegetation that males then tend. Megapode chicks are superprecocial, meaning they hatch in a very mature state that includes having open eyes, feathers, and, in some species, the ability to fly. They typically hatch unattended and therefore do not undergo imprinting. How then do they come to recognize other members of their species? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: MARCUS GARVEY (1887)


Marcus Garvey (1887)

Garvey was a Jamaican-born American proponent of black nationalism. His Universal Negro Improvement Association, established in 1914 to promote racial pride, quickly spread in black communities throughout the US, the Caribbean, and Central America, and Garvey became the most influential black leader of the early 1920s, with a following some two million strong. However, his movement foundered after his 1922 indictment for mail fraud. What religious movement considers Garvey one of its prophets? More… Discuss

 

THE MAUNDER MINIMUM


The Maunder Minimum

The Maunder Minimum was the 70-year period from about 1645 to 1715 when sunspots were exceedingly rare, as noted by the solar observers of the time. The years of the Maunder Minimum coincided with the coldest part of the Little Ice Age, during which Europe and North America were subjected to bitterly cold winters—leading to speculation that the phenomena were related. Astronomer John A. Eddy popularized the concept in his landmark 1976 paper “The Maunder Minimum.” Who was the eponymous Maunder? More…

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: EUROPEAN HEAT WAVE: UK’S HOTTEST DAY ON RECORD (2003)


European Heat Wave: UK’s Hottest Day on Record (2003)

The European heat wave of 2003 resulted in the deaths of more than 40,000 people. In France, where summers are usually very mild and many homes do not have air conditioning, nearly 15,000 people died from heat-related issues—at a time when many physicians were on summer holiday. So many died that undertakers ran out of room in their own facilities and had to keep corpses in off-site warehouses. The UK, meanwhile, suffered through violent storms and experienced what record high temperature? More… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: MATTHEW ALEXANDER HENSON (1866)


Matthew Alexander Henson (1866)

Orphaned in his youth, Henson went to work on a merchant ship at the age of 12. After nearly a decade at sea, he met American explorer Robert E. Peary and became his valet and assistant for the next 22 years. In 1909, Henson accompanied Peary on the first expedition credited with reaching the North Pole. Though Peary received many honors for this achievement, Henson, an African American, was largely ignored. What did both men leave behind when they returned to mainland America from the Arctic? More… Discuss

LAKE VOSTOK


Lake Vostok

Hundreds of subglacial lakes are hidden under the surface of Antarctica, and Lake Vostok is the largest. Located beneath some 13,000 ft (4,000 m) of ice, Lake Vostok’s pristine waters have been sealed off for perhaps more than a million years and may be home to life forms unknown to science. Researchers have spent years trying to drill through the ice to retrieve water samples despite concerns they might contaminate the lake in the process. In May 2005, what was found in the center of the lake? More… Discuss

 

CLIMATE CHANGE LINKED TO GLOBAL VIOLENCE


Climate Change Linked to Global Violence

A team of US researchers has found a strong correlation between changes in climate and violence around the globe. Warmer temperatures and changes in rainfallwere linked to increases in assaults, rapes, murders, group conflicts, and even wars. The researchers believe that climate change actually drives up the level of human conflict and suggest a couple of possible explanations for this. Economics, they say, could play a role, as climate change can affect economic conditions that then influence individuals’ decision-making. Physiology could also be involved, as studies indicate that heat makes people prone to aggression. More… Discuss

 

BIPARTISANSHIP: WHAT IT IS, WHAT IT DOES AND TO WHOM!


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bipartisanship is a political situation, usually in the context of a two-party system, in which opposing political parties find common ground[disambiguation needed] through compromise, in theory. Realistically, each party advances their own political agenda at the expense of the other party because of the conflicting ideologie…

As you can see, the so called in-fight  does not have anything to do with a moral, progressive or expected socio-political outcome from which the vast majority of the population to benefit in any way>>>>I wonder why? 

What does the outcome of two extreme right ideologies conflicting, has to do with the national progress and well being of the population of a country? 

From Reuters: Russians welcome asylum for Edward Snowden (video and Transcript)


Russians welcome asylum for Edward Snowden Video

Russians welcome asylum for Edward Snowden Video (Click to watch the video at Reuters, or don’t…your choice!)

Some Moscow residents approved of Russia’s decision to grant asylum to American fugitive Edward Snowden saying it showed Russia makes its own decisions. (SOUNDBITE) (Russian) MOSCOW RESIDENT YEKATERINA, SAYING: “Why Russia did this – I think they want to tell the Americans once again: guys, we do not have to adjust to your rules all the time, we are an independent great country and we have the right to make the decisions which are beneficial to us.” Russia granted the former spy agency contractor asylum for one year on Thursday when he was allowed to slip out of the Moscow airport where he had been holed up for over a month (SOUNDBITE) (Russian) MOSCOW RESIDENT ANASTASIA, SAYING: “I have nothing against Edward Snowden in Russia. If I was in his place, I would write a Sheremetyevo airport guidebook.” Snowden, who had his U.S. passport revoked by Washington, had bided his time in the transit area between the runway and passport control, which Russia considers neutral territory. U.S.-Russian relations were strained by the move, with several high-level U.S.-Russian talks being put in doubt. Prominent U.S. lawmakers – including Republicans and Democrats – condemned Russia’s action and urged Obama to take stern retaliatory steps.

ELECTRIC EELS


Electric Eels

Electric eels are the sluggish inhabitants of slow freshwater basins in South America. Cylindrical, scaleless, and gray-brown, they can grow to nine feet (2.75 m) long and weigh up to 49 pounds (22 kg). The electric eel, however, is not a true eel, but is rather a knifefish that can produce a shock—powerful enough to stun a human—while hunting or in self-defense. The shock is produced by the electric organs in its body that generate charge in a manner similar to what common household item?More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: K2 IS SUMMITED FOR THE FIRST TIME (1954)


K2 Is Summited for the First Time (1954)

Rising 28,251 ft (8,611 m) between China and Pakistan, K2 is the second-highest peak in the world after Mount Everest. Severe storms make K2 more dangerous to climb, however, and it has never been summited in winter. Measured in 1856, it was not summited until nearly 100 years later. In 1954, Italians Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli reached the top with the help of crew members who carried oxygen to above 26,245 feet (8,000 m). What thwarted an American attempt just one year earlier? More… Discuss

 

NEMESIS and Life in The Universe Documentary On History Channel


Nemesis

In 1984, paleontologists David Raup and Jack Sepkoski posited that mass extinction events are cyclical, happening about every 26 million years, and are often caused by large impact events—such as the asteroid that may have led to the end of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Some astronomers sought to explain the theory with Nemesis, a hypothetical companion star to the Sun about 1.5 light-years away. According to the hypothesis, how was Nemesis responsible for these extinction events? More… Discuss

Quotation: H.G. Wells on intelligence and need for…


It is a law of nature we overlook, that intellectual versatility is the compensation for change, danger, and trouble … Nature never appeals to intelligence until habit and instinct are useless. There is no intelligence where there is no change and no need of change.

H.G. Wells (1866-1946) Discuss

BENTO


Bento

Traditional Japanese bento is a style of boxed meal prepared in a thin plastic or lacquered wood box that is divided into small compartments, each of which contains a separate dish. Bento has existed in Japan for centuries. Today, these compartmentalized meals are available in convenience stores and kiosks, but some still prepare them at home as a special lunch for children or as a meal to bring to work. In one elaborate form of bento called kyaraben, the food is made to look like what? More… Discuss

Puente Hills Preservation Authority: Turnbull Canyon Map-1&2


Puente Hills Preservation Authority: Turnbull Canyon Map-1

Puente Hills Preservation Authority: Turnbull Canyon Map-1

Puente Hills Preservation Authority: Turnbull Canyon Map-2

Puente Hills Preservation Authority: Turnbull Canyon Map-2

Today cars parked along the road,  got tickets… So if you’re going to drive there, park only in the space allotted outside the access gate to the Canyon. A nice young woman told me about the fate they all had earlier in the day, so I moved my car and fortunately there was a empty space large enough for my compact :).  
It was a great day for a walk in the hills.

Can Robots Learn to be More Human?



Robotics expert and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Chad Jenkins says that coming breakthroughs in robotics will soon make robots a bigger part of everyday life, helping us perform more tasks in our homes and workplaces.

Read the article on National Geographic News:
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/ne….

 

Dragonfruit (Hylocereus undatus) delicious fruit…Not too sweet, low glycemic index, eat with or without seeds



Remarkable edible fruit. Easy to grow from seeds. Recommended to people in the drylands.

INDIAN SCHOOLCHILDREN SICKENED AND KILLED BY CONTAMINATED LUNCH


Indian Schoolchildren Sickened and Killed by Contaminated Lunch

At least 25 schoolchildren in the Indian state of Biharhave died and dozens of others have been hospitalized after consuming a school-provided lunch apparently contaminated with insecticide. India’s Mid-Day Meal Scheme is the world’s largest school feeding program, providing free meals to 120 million children. Regrettably, it seems the entire incident could have been avoided if the headmistress had simply heeded the cook’s warning that something smelled funny about the food. Instead, she demanded that it be served anyway. Once news of the mass poisoning broke, the headmistress fled. It is not yet known whether the contamination was intentional. More… Discuss

 

From National Geographic: Ship Made without Nails is Mighty (Published on Jul 18, 2013)


Published on Jul 18, 2013

Can a ship built without blueprints, power tools—or even nails—survive the sea? Four years in the making, this 150-foot ship, called a “dhow,” can withstand powerful monsoon winds, and it’s ready for action.

 

Phytoplankton’s influence on th eGlobal Carbon Cycle


Phyto plankton's influence on th eGlobal Carbon Cycle

Phytoplankton’s influence on the global  Carbon Cycle

THE UNTOUCHABLES (just a thought: Changing oneself…Doesn’t really changes the world, now does it?)



India
160 million people in India have been born outside any caste; they are called Untouchables and nobody is allowed to touch them for fear of infection!

They call themselves “dalit” which means “broken, shattered people”. Every day, two dalits are murdered, three dalit women are raped and two dalit homes are engulfed in flames, torched by members of the higher castes. In the province of Bihar entire villages of the “shattered” are wiped out by extreme right-wing paramilitaries of the higher castes. In other provinces, the Untouchables have no access to drinking water, cannot enter temples or use public transport. Even at police stations they are often asked to pay “admission”… The documentary records gruesome images of violence and discrimination; images of the trampling of every sense of human rights. Moreover, it reveals the extent of what international bodies describe as the “secret apartheid” of India. A stunning story of class and social discrimination which, with religion as an alibi, has reproduced itself for centuries.

60 MINUTES, AVAILABLE VERSIONS: Greek, English.


Hans Island

Hans Island is located between Canada and Greenland in the strait that connects Baffin Bay to the Arctic Ocean. Used by the Inuit as a hunting ground for centuries, it was later found by 19th-century British and American explorers searching for the Northwest Passage and the North Pole. The island was named after Greenlander Hans Hendrik, the guide of American explorer Charles Francis Hall. Though it is just 0.5 sq mi (1.3 sq km) and is barren and uninhabited, it is claimed by what two countries? More… Discuss

 

NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden: ‘I don’t want to live in a society that does these sort of things’



http://bradleymanning.org | http://justice4assange.com |http://freebarrettbrown.org | http://freejeremy.net

Copyright © 2013 Praxis Films / Laura Poitras
FAIR USE NOTICE: This video contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in an effort to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material in this video is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE SEVESO DISASTER (1976)


The Seveso Disaster (1976)

Around noon on July 10, 1976, an explosion occurred in the ICMESA manufacturing plant north of Milan, Italy, releasing a poisonous cloud of dioxin gas. Although dioxin is toxic—it was an ingredient in the herbicide Agent Orange used during the Vietnam War—evacuation efforts began slowly. Named for the small Italian town most affected, the Seveso disaster led to legislation aimed at preventing chemical accidents. How many animals were slaughtered to prevent toxins from entering the food chainMore… Discuss

 

All That Jazz ” You Better Change Your Ways ” Time for change…for a change



All That Jazz 
Ann Reinking 
” You Better Change Your Ways “

Nature of Change, poetic thought by George-B (“I’ve learned to look at the horizons…:)


 Nature of Change, poetic thought by George-B

I’ve learned to look at the horizons ahead
and clearly see the past
reenacted almost identically
like long time ago,

As if
nothing changes,
as the more things change….well,

the more they seem to stay the same:

A new generation desires change,
An old generation know that change to have been around

Once.

Already,
Then change occurs,

and change of change occurs….
And yet we’re always staying still,

Essentially,

with all that change!

FLATTOPS OUT, FLAT SPOTS IN


Flattops Out, Flat Spots In

Education programs aimed at encouraging parents to put babies to sleep on their backs have helped lower the mortality rate from sudden infant death syndrome, but they have also contributed to the growing incidence of flat spots on the backs of babies’ heads. Nearly half of Canadian two-month olds now have an observable head deformation. Though this is more of a cosmetic issue than a health risk, researchers say parents should still do their best to prevent flat spots from developing. Steps they can take include holding babies whenever possible, only putting them in car seats when traveling, and giving them supervised “tummy time” when they are awake.More… Discuss

 

from: coalition for sensible safeguards: A letter!


Groups to Obama today on trade negotiations: trade deal must not be used as way to weaken reg protections

 

tafta-letter-070813

From National Geographic -_- Culture & Places News -_ – Everest Tourism Changed Sherpa Lives


From National Geographic -_- Culture & Places News -_ - Everest Tourism Changed Sherpa Lives

From National Geographic -_- Culture & Places News -_ – Everest Tourism Changed Sherpa Lives

FLOWERS FOR GRAVES AN ANCIENT PRACTICE


Flowers for Graves an Ancient Practice

Flowers are commonly used nowadays in burial rituals the world over, but this is nothing new. Archeologists in Israel have found evidence that humans were decorating graves with flowers as early as 11,700 BCE. Impressions of stems and blossoms, quite possibly mint and sage, were uncovered in four graves in an ancient Natufian burial ground. The Natufians were among the first peoples to transition from nomadic hunting and gathering to permanent settlements and to establish graveyardsMore… Discuss

 

Dr. Helen Caldicott – Radiation and Fukushima, What They Aren’t Telling You (Atoms for Peace…Yeah right!)


Dr. Helen Caldicott - Radiation and Fukushima, What They Aren’t Telling You

Dr. Helen Caldicott – Radiation and Fukushima, What They Aren’t Telling You (Click to access website…Or don’t….and remain unclicked….Your Choice!)

From CNN: San Francisco protests the NSA spying program in July 4th march


From CNN: San Francisco protests the NSA spying program in July 4th march

From CNN: San Francisco protests the NSA spying program in July 4th march (click to access report…Or not: It’s your choice!)

We are staring into the abyss – Godfrey Bloom MEP (There are four (4) parties in the “CONSERVATIVE UK”



Rick Wiles talks to Godfrey Bloom MEP, UKIP (Yorkshire & Lincolnshire), Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) group -http://www.godfreybloommep.co.uk

Source: http://youtu.be/JMRfXLGLQnw (TRUNEWS Rick.Wiles, 59.04)

The working day of the average Englishman – Godfrey Bloom MEP (yeah Godfrey, say it the way it is Sir!): I know our lilliputian politicians here over the pond can… relate…


http://www.ukipmeps.org | Join UKIP:http://ukip.datawareonline.co.uk/Join…
European Parliament, Strasbourg, 02 July 2013

• Speaker: Godfrey Bloom MEP, UKIP (Yorkshire & Lincolnshire), Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) group -http://www.godfreybloommep.co.uk

• Debate: Implementing enhanced cooperation in the area of financial transaction tax
Report: Anni Podimata (A7-0230/2013)
- Report on the proposal for a Council directive implementing enhanced cooperation in the area of financial transaction tax
[COM(2013)0071 - - 2013/0045(CNS)]
Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs

………………..
• Video: EbS (European Parliament)
…………………………….

EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

This Day in the Yesteryear: INTERNATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL YEAR BEGINS (1957)


International Geophysical Year Begins (1957)

Undertaken during a period of maximum sunspot activity, the International Geophysical Year (IGY) was an 18-month period of cooperation among the scientists of 67 nations for concentrated and coordinated geophysical study, primarily of the solar and terrestrial atmospheres. It produced scientific cooperation unimpeded by the Cold War and was the largest and most important international scientific effort to that date. What are some of the dozens of advances and discoveries achieved during the IGY? More… Discuss

SEVEN AFRICAN COUNTRIES DRAMATICALLY CUT CHILDHOOD HIV INFECTIONS


Seven African Countries Dramatically Cut Childhood HIV Infections

Botswana, Ethiopia, Ghana, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, and Zambia have all made great strides in reducing new HIV infections in children. Since 2009, these seven countries have cut the number in half. Much of this success is the result of programs to getantiretroviral medications to HIV-positive pregnant women, thereby preventing the virus’ transmission to their offspring. Still, across most high-priority countries inAfrica, including those named above, access to AIDS drugs for pediatric patients remains “unacceptably low,” with only 30 percent of HIV-positive children getting the treatment they need. More… Discuss

FLIES AND BEETLES: FOOD OF OUR FOOD’S FUTURE?


Flies and Beetles: Food of Our Food’s Future?

Last month, the UN Food and Agriculture Organizationreported that insects are “underutilized” as food, and while many people are still reluctant to consider insects as a food source for themselves, they are less resistant to the idea of eating something that has previously eaten bugs. That is where French start-up company Ynsect, and others like it, come in. These companies are developing animal feeds that utilize insects rather than pricier soybeans as their source of protein. More… Discuss

This Day in the yesteryear: LAST DUSKY SEASIDE SPARROW DIES IN CAPTIVITY (1987)


Last Dusky Seaside Sparrow Dies in Captivity (1987)

Thousands of dusky seaside sparrows once inhabited the natural salt marshes around Merritt Island and the area along the St. Johns River in southern Florida. The non-migratory birds lived exclusively in this small area, and this proved to be their undoing. From the 1940s onward, pesticides, pollution, and habitat loss caused the subspecies’ population to decline precipitously. By 1979, just six males remained. Why were the remaining birds eventually relocated to Walt Disney World theme parkMore… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: JOHN HOWARD GRIFFIN (1920)


 

John Howard Griffin (1920)

 

Little Rock, 1959. Rally at state capitol, pro...

Little Rock, 1959. Rally at state capitol, protesting the integration of Central High School. Protesters carry US flags and signs reading “Race Mixing is Communism” and “Stop the Race Mixing March of the Anti-Christ”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Griffin was an American author who darkened his white skin with medication and sunlamps in order to experience the racial segregation of the southern US. He described his experiences in his

 

Tanning beds substantially raise risks of skin...

Tanning beds substantially raise risks of skin cancer, including melanoma. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

controversial 1961 book Black Like Me, which details his interactions with others—both white and black—and the problems he encountered while traveling and attempting to meet basic needs. It is often recounted that Griffin died from skin cancer resulting from his efforts to darken his skin. Is it true? More…

 

English: Jim Crow Painted rock on a stone beac...

English: Jim Crow Painted rock on a stone beach, Hunter’s Quay. The name was originally given to racial segregation laws in the United States. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

THE SOKAL AFFAIR


The Sokal Affair

In 1996, physics professor Alan Sokal submitted a parody article to the journal Social Text to see if the editors would publish it just because it “sounded good” and “flattered” their views. Though Sokal disregarded their requested edits, they still published his article. In a different journal, he revealed that his piece was a hoax meant to expose the unreliable nature of non-peer reviewed publications and the bias of “the academic Left.” What was the subject of Sokal’s article? More… Discuss

 

National Geographic Live! – Alison Wright: Portraits of the Human Spirit


Published on May 27, 2013

After confronting her own mortality in a near-fatal bus crash, photographer Alison Wright dedicates her career to capturing the human spirit through her photographs and writing.

Upcoming Events at National Geographic Live!
http://events.nationalgeographic.com/…

Get the Book
http://alisonwright.com/#/books/face-…
Related articles

National Geographic Live! – Poverty on the Homefront


Published on Jun 3, 2013

Photographer Alison Wright travels across the U.S., shedding light on the country’s shockingly large number of impoverished children.

Upcoming Events at National Geographic Live!
http://events.nationalgeographic.com/…

Get the Book
http://alisonwright.com/#/books/face-…

Thumbnail National Geographic Live!Season 5 Ep. 15Released: 06/03/13Running time: 5:29