Tag Archives: England

The Weeping Willow


The Weeping Willow

Easily recognized by its long drooping branches and leaves, the weeping willow belongs to the Salicaceae family of deciduous trees and shrubs. It is native to China, but, as willow cuttings generally take root quite easily, it has been cultivated elsewhere for millennia. Legend has it that all of England‘s weeping willows are descended from a cutting sent to Lady Suffolk from Spain. Though it is widely cultivated for ornamental purposes, the weeping willow is used by some to serve what function? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: King James II of England (1633)


King James II of England (1633)

King James II was the last Catholic monarch to rule over England, Scotland, and Ireland, reigning from 1685 to 1688. The birth of his son, a possible Catholic heir, brought about the Glorious Revolution, in which Protestants deposed James in favor of Mary II and William of Orange. The belief that James was the legitimate ruler became known as Jacobitism, and Jacobites thereafter attempted to restore the Stuart line to the thrones of England and Scotland. Who protected James when he fled England? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Sunday, October 12th, 2014: St. Wilfrid


today’s birthday: Louis-Philippe of France (1773)


Louis-Philippe of France (1773)

Louis-Philippe was the last king to rule France, reigning from 1830 to 1848. A nobleman who joined the liberal opposition to kings Louis XVIII and Charles X, he was made lieutenant general of the realm during the July Revolution of 1830 and then king. At first, he was much loved and called the “Citizen King,” but his increasingly autocratic rule as well as economic woes diminished his popularity. Faced with impending civil war, he abdicated and fled to England. How did he get there? More… Discuss

story: Arboretum


Arboretum

Fontana - Arboretum Trsteno

Fontana – Arboretum Trsteno (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants that are cultivated for scientific, educational, and ornamental purposes. The plants are labeled with their common and scientific names, and they are arranged in cultural or habitat groups, such as tropical, desert, and aquatic. One of the world’s oldest arboretums is the Trsteno Arboretum, near Dubrovnik in Croatia. What arboretum in England helped inspire the design for New York City’s Central Park? More… Discuss

 

article: (Hula) Hooping Through History


(Hula) Hooping Through History

Hoops, originally made from stiff grasses and other natural materials, have been popular toys for centuries—long before “hula” was added to their name in the 18th century. Doctors in medieval England blamed many injuries on a recreational “hooping” fad. Another craze surfaced in the 1950s, when the Wham-O company released its plastic hoop. Today, hoops have found renewed popularity among adults who perform hoop dances or enjoy hooping at concerts. What do you need to make your own hula hoop? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Horn Dance


Horn Dance

The ancient Horn Dance, believed by many to have originated in Norman times or before, is performed at Abbots Bromley, a small village in Staffordshire, England, as part of the Wakes Monday celebration each year. A dozen local men, ranging in age from 12 to more than 50, dress in 16th-century foresters’ costumes. Six of them carry reindeer antlers mounted on short wooden sticks. The men dance their way around the parish boundaries, stopping to perform at homes and farms along the way. There is also a Hobby Horse, a man dressed as Maid Marian, a Fool, and a young archer. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: King Richard I of England (1157)


King Richard I of England (1157)

Among the few kings of England remembered by reputation, not number, Richard the Lionheart reigned from 1189 to 1199. After rebelling against his father, Henry II, Richard rose to the throne upon Henry’s death. He set out on the Third Crusade shortly after his coronation. Unable to capture the strongly fortified city of Jerusalem, Richard negotiated a treaty with Saladin that allowed Christian pilgrims access to its holy sites. How much time did Richard spend in England during his entire reign? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)


Queen Elizabeth I of England (1533)

Queen Elizabeth, England‘s last Tudor monarch, came to the throne during a turbulent period in the nation’s history. Although she has been described as vain, miserly, and fickle, she was remarkably successful as queen. During her reign, England pursued a policy of expansionism in commerce and geographical exploration, defeating the Spanish Armada and becoming a major world power. Literature and the arts flourished during the period as well. To whom was the Queen married? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First Transatlantic Telegraph Sent (1858)


First Transatlantic Telegraph Sent (1858)

After the introduction of the working telegraph in 1839, the idea that countries and continents could be connected by a communications network became an exciting possibility. A working telegraph could transmit in mere minutes messages that had once taken weeks to deliver by sea. England and France were linked by submarine cable in 1850, but it took several attempts over the next eight years before a lasting connection could be maintained across the Atlantic. How long was this cable operational? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Hurricane Supplication Day


Hurricane Supplication Day

Observed in the U.S. Virgin Islands—St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John—Hurricane Supplication Day marks the beginning of the hurricane season. Special church services are held to pray for safety from the storms that ravage these and other Caribbean islands. The custom probably dates back to the “rogation” ceremonies (from the word rogare, meaning “to beg or supplicate”), which began in fifth-century England. Rogations usually followed a frightening series of storms, earthquakes, or other natural disasters. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Henry Knox (1750)


Henry Knox (1750)

A bookseller, Knox became active in the colonial militia in the lead-up to the American Revolution. Upon the outbreak of war with England, he volunteered for the revolutionary forces and soon proved himself a capable tactician and leader. He was so highly regarded that he was chosen to succeed George Washington as commander of the army at the war’s end and later served as the first US secretary of war. What did Knox accidentally swallow that caused an infection that claimed his life? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Mary Queen of Scots Is Deposed (1567)


Mary Queen of Scots Is Deposed (1567)

Mary Stuart was Queen of Scotland from 1542 to 1567. She was forced to abdicate the throne after her husband, Lord Darnley, was murdered and she was implicated in the plot. Mary then fled to England, where she faced a murder inquiry and became a prisoner of the English government. After conspiracies to put her on the throne of England were uncovered, she was tried for treason and ultimately beheaded. Some say her executioners asked for her forgiveness. What is she said to have replied? More… Discuss

Princess Caraboo


Princess Caraboo

“Princess Caraboo” was a famous imposter in 19th-century England. Her real-name was Mary Baker, and she was a cobbler’s daughter. She invented a fictitious language and created an exotic persona, claiming to be Princess Caraboo from the island of Javasu. She alleged that she had been captured by pirates but managed to jump from their ship and swim to safety. For several weeks, Princess Caraboo enjoyed the hospitality and company of local society. How was her true identity finally uncovered? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Tynwald Ceremony


Tynwald Ceremony

The Isle of Man, located off the coast of England in the Irish Sea, was once the property of the Vikings. It was here that they established their custom of holding an open-air court for the settling of disputes and the passing of laws. Today, the Tynwald Ceremony—whose name comes from the Norse Thing vollr, meaning a fenced open parliament—is held at St. John’s on Tynwald Hill on July 5, when the chief justice reads a brief summary of every bill that has been passed during the year—first in English, and then in Manx, the old language of the island. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Henry VIII of England (1491)


Henry VIII of England (1491)

Henry VIII, the second monarch of the Tudor dynasty, was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. Notable events during his reign include the break with Rome and establishment of the independent Church of England, the dissolution of the monasteries, and the union of England and Wales. However, he is best remembered for his turbulent love life—he was married six times—and for the callous way he ended two of his marriages—having his wives beheaded. What were the fates of the other four? More… Discuss

Eleanor of Aquitaine


Eleanor of Aquitaine

Eleanor was the queen consort of Louis VII of France and then of Henry II of England and mother of two kings of England, Richard I and John. She established a court at Poitiers noted for its cultivation of the concept of courtly love and later helped Richard secure the throne. When he was held captive in Europe, she forestalled John’s plots against him and worked to collect ransom for his release. She later facilitated the brothers’ reconciliation. Who was she rumored to have poisoned? More… Discuss

quotation: Henry Fielding


LOVE: A word properly applied to our delight in particular kinds of food; sometimes metaphorically spoken of the favorite objects of all our appetites.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

Phillips Exeter Academy


Phillips Exeter Academy

Exeter is one of the preeminent boarding schools in the world, along with Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and Eton College in England. Famous for its demanding and rigorous academics, Exeter also boasts one of the largest endowments of any secondary school in the US. Graduates typically matriculate to elite colleges, a tradition that has solidified the school’s long-standing relationships with Ivy League and other prestigious universities. Who are some of the academy’s famous alumni? More… Discuss

Life, poetic thought by George-B (my poetry collection ©ALWAYS)


Life, poetic thought by George-B

I’m strong in my weakness
I’m weak in my strength

I fear no change, I know what to expect
The closer the goals, the longer it takes and
The further it gets and yet
What’s to come, has come and passed,
In the past, like a turning wheel or
A turning page, one of many identical ones,
or
The wind prevailing from the South-West
Most of the time,
I know what’s to come,
From what has been passed…

my strength in my weakness,
my weakness in strength, and yet
still time to live with no regret,
knowing that giving was by far
the conquest

article: The Baths of Bath


The Baths of Bath

Bath is a city in southwest England famous for its baths, which are fed by the only natural hot springs in the country and which some believe have curative properties. The Romans established the city as Aquae Sulis in the first century, building elaborate, lead-lined baths with heating and cooling systems. These were rediscovered in 1755, by which time Bath, as it had since become known, had revived as a spa and become a resort city for the wealthy. What was Jane Austen‘s connection to Bath? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day June 7, 2014St. Willibald


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Willibald

St. Willibald

Bishop and missionary. A native of Wessex, England, he was the brother of Sts. Winebald and Walburga and was related through his mother to the great St. Boniface. After studying in a monastery in … continue reading

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Big Ben history and chimes!


Big Ben

Big Ben is the nickname of the clock tower at the Palace of Westminster in London. Famous for its accuracy, the clock rings in the new year in England.

Originally, only the Great Bell—the largest bell in the tower—was called “Big Ben,” but eventually, the moniker was applied to the clock itself and then to the entire tower. In 2012, the iconic British landmark was officially renamed Elizabeth Tower, in honor of Queen Elizabeth’s Diamond Jubilee. Who is generally accepted as the real-life “Ben”? More… Discuss

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Saint of the Day for Thursday, June 5th, 2014: St. Boniface of Mainz


Saint of the Day

Image of St. Boniface of Mainz

St. Boniface of Mainz

Winfrith had expected to return to England from Friesland (in what is now Holland) in triumph. He had left the land where he was a respected scholar, teacher, and priest because he was convinced he … continue reading

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quotation: “The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.” William Shakespeare


The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România


7 buruieni numai bune de inclus în meniu – Yahoo Ştiri România.

Plantain. In childhood, we treat abrasions, scratches and bruises plantain leaves freshly picked. This plant can be used in the kitchen but in salads, stews and soups. However, in addition to leaves, inflorescence and seeds are edible. Seeds, dried and ground are a rich source of fiber and are effective in the treatment of constipation. “

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today’s holiday: Shick-Shack Day


Shick-Shack Day

The Oxford English Dictionary suggests that this day takes its name from a corruption of a derogatory term for Protestants who did not follow the doctrines of the Church of England. It was later applied to those who did not wear the traditional sprig of oak on May 29, or Royal Oak Day—the birthday of Charles II, and the day in 1660 on which he made his entry into London as king. Shick-shack has since become synonymous with the oak-apple or sprig of oak itself, and May 29 is celebrated in memory of the restoration of King Charles and his preservation in the Royal Oak. More… Discuss

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this day in the yersteryear: Charles II of England Restored to Throne (1660)


Charles II of England Restored to Throne (1660)

After Oliver Cromwell’s death in 1658, the English republican experiment soon faltered. A strong reaction set in against Puritan supremacy and military control, and opinion favored recalling the exiled king. Charles II was persuaded to issue the Declaration of Breda, granting amnesty to former enemies of the house of Stuart, and return to England. As king, Charles reopened the country’s theaters, which Cromwell’s Puritanical government had closed, and encouraged what bawdy theatrical genre? More… Discuss

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Saint of the Day

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Saint of the Day may 27: St. Augustine of Canterbury


Image of St. Augustine of CanterburySt. Augustine of Canterbury

At the end of the sixth century anyone would have said that Augustine had found his niche in life. Looking at this respected prior of a monastery, almost anyone would have predicted he would spend … continue reading

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QUOTATION: E. M. Forster


 

The most successful career must show a waste of strength that might have removed mountains, and the most unsuccessful is not that of the man who is taken unprepared, but of him who has prepared and is never taken. On a tragedy of that kind our national morality is duly silent.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

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Ascot Racecourse


Ascot Racecourse

Ascot Racecourse, located southwest of London, England, in the small village of Ascot, is used for thoroughbred horse racing. Founded in 1711 by Queen Anne, it is still closely associated with the British Royal family. Ascot is perhaps most famous for the annual Royal Ascot, which takes place in June and is one of the world’s most renowned race meetings. It is also a major event on the British social calendar. What tends to overshadow the actual racing in press coverage of the Royal Ascot? More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edward Elgar – Chanson de Matin Opus 15 – No 2


Edward Elgar – Chanson de Matin Opus 15 – No 2

A tribute to Sir Edward Elgar – 1857 / 1934
The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by George Weldon

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Today’s Holiday: Garland Day


Garland Day

On Old May Day, the children of the Dorset fishing village of Abbotsbury still “bring in the May” by carrying garlands from door to door and receiving gifts in return. Each garland is constructed over a frame and supported by a broomstick, which is carried by two young people around the village. Later, the garlands are laid at the base of the local war memorial. At one time this was an important festival marking the beginning of the fishing season: fishermen rowed out to sea after dark and tossed the garlands to the waves with prayers for a safe and plentiful fishing season. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S SAINT, MAY 11: Frost Saints’ Days


Frost Saints’ Days

These three consecutive days in May mark the feasts of St. Mammertus, St. Pancras, and St. Servatus. In the wine-growing districts of France, a severe cold spell occasionally strikes at this time of year, inflicting serious damage on the grapevines; some in rural France have believed that it is the result of their having offended one of the three saints, who for this reason are called the “frost saints.” French farmers have been known to show their displeasure over a cold snap at this time of year by flogging the statues and defacing the pictures of Mammertus, Pancras, and Servatus. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Respighi – The Birds


Respighi – The Birds

Ottorino Respighi

Ottorino Respighi (Photo credit: lorenzog.)

Atlanta Symphony OrchestraLouis Lane conductor
For information and analysis of this work, visit http://muswrite.blogspot.com/2012/03/…
For information and analysis of other works, visit Musical Musings at : http://muswrite.blogspot.com/

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10-Year Cancer Survival Up in England and Wales


10-Year Cancer Survival Up in England and Wales

Better diagnostic tools as well as treatments are helping cancer patients live longer in England and Wales. Half of people now being diagnosed with cancer there will survive for at least a decade, double the rate of the early 1970s. However, for some cancers, like pancreatic cancer and lung cancer, survival rates remain extremely low. London-based Cancer Research UK lauded the progress but said that further inroads need to be made and set a goal of 75 percent 10-year survival within two decades. More… Discuss

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This Day in History: Thomas Blood Attempts to Steal Crown Jewels of England (1671)


Thomas Blood Attempts to Steal Crown Jewels of England (1671)

Blood was an Irish-born adventurer who served under Oliver Cromwell during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. After Charles II returned to the throne, Blood fled to Ireland. He later attempted to kidnap the Duke of Ormonde but failed. In 1671, Blood and his accomplices made an infamous attempt to steal the Crown Jewels of England. Having befriended the jewel keeper, Blood arranged a private viewing, during which time the men made off with the treasures. Why did Charles II pardon Blood? More… Discuss

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Helston Flora Day

According to legend, there was a large stone that blocked off the entrance to hell. One night Satan tried to steal the stone; on his way through Cornwall, England, he was intercepted by the Archangel Michael, who forced him to drop the stone and flee. The town where he dropped it was called Helston (from Hellstone). The people of Helston continue to celebrate the Archangel’s victory with the Helston Flora Day. The day’s festivities include the “Furry dance,” which is performed in the streets by men in top hats and women in fancy dresses, and a trip to the woods in search of flowers and leaves. More… Discuss

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SAINT OF THE DAY: May 4 Saint of the Day ST. FLORIAN – May 4


SAINT OF THE DAY

May 4 Saint of the Day

ST. FLORIAN
May 4: The St. Florian commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on May …Read More

May
4
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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: OLIVER CROMWELL (1599)


Oliver Cromwell (1599)

A controversial figure in English history, Cromwell was a leader of the parliamentary forces that battled the royalists in the English Civil War. After the execution of Charles I in 1649, Cromwell became lord protector and virtual dictator of England and raised his country’s status once more to that of a leading European power by means of a strict military administration and the enforcement of the Puritan moral code. What did the royalists do to his corpse when they returned to power in 1660? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ST. GEORGE’S DAY


St. George’s Day

Nothing much is known for certain about St. George, but the patron saint of England is popularly known in medieval legend for slaying a vicious dragon that was besieging a town in Cappadocia. When the people saw what had happened, they were converted to Christianity. To this day, St. George is often depicted with a dragon. St. George’s Day, sometimes referred to as Georgemas, has been observed as a religious feast as well as a holiday since the 13th century. More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: THE MOODY BLUES — Live at the Isle Of Wight Festival — 1970



THE MOODY BLUESLive at the Isle Of Wight Festival — 1970

01. Threshold Of A Dream
0 2. Return To The Island
03. Isle Of Wight Pop Festival 1970
04. Tear Down The Fences
05. Early Beginnings: Bo Diddley
06. The Mellotron
07. Psychedelia And Change
08. Introduction To The Concert
09. Gypsy
10. Tuesday Afternoon
11. Never Comes The Day
12. Tortoise And The Hare
13. Question
14. The Sunset
15. Melancholy Man
16. Nights In White Satin
17. Legend Of A Mind
18. Encore: Ride My See-Saw
19. Reflections
20. Late Lament

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SAINT OF THE DAY April 21: St. Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury and Confessor APRIL 21,A.D.


SAINT OF THE DAY

April 21 Saint of the Day

ST. ANSELM
April 21: St. Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury and Confessor APRIL 21,A.D. … Read More

April
21
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QUOTATION: Washington Irving


A sharp tongue is the only edge tool that grows keener with constant use.

Washington Irving (1783-1859) Discuss

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Fabulous Compositions: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101



Conductor: Jiři Stárek
Orchestra: SWR Rundfunkorchester Kaiserslautern

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Great Compositions/Performances: “The Wild Dove” , Antonin Dvorak , Alexander Rahbari with London Philharmonic Orchestra


The Wild Dove op.110 (Symphonic poem)
Composer : Antonin Dvorak
Conductor :Alexander Rahbari
London Philharmonic Orchestra , Henry Wood Hall 
Sound Engineer : Mike Clements

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield


Primrose Day

Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield, novelist, and twice prime minister of England, died on this day in 1881. When he was buried in the family vault at Hughenden Manor, near High Wycombe, Queen Victoria came to lay a wreath ofprimroses—thought to be his favorite flower—on his grave. Two years later, the Primrose League was formed to support the principles of Conservatism that Disraeli had championed. The organization’s influence ebbed after World War I, but Primrose Day is remembered in honor of Disraeli and his contribution to the Conservative cause. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: PEACE TREATY ENDS 335 YEARS’ WAR (1986)


Peace Treaty Ends 335 Years’ War (1986)

When hostilities between the Netherlands and the Isles of Scilly, an archipelago located off the southwest coast of England, ended, the warring parties recalled their troops, and the conflict was forgotten. Without a treaty declaring its end, however, the 1651 war peacefully became the world’s longest, technically lasting 335 years. Despite questions regarding the validity of the declaration of war, peace was officially declared in 1986. What 45-minute war is considered the world’s shortest? More… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale

Muzio Clementi (24 January 1752 — 10 March 1832) was a composer, pianist, pedagogue, conductor, music publisher, editor, and piano manufacturer. Born in Rome, he spent most of his life in England.

Work: Minuetto Pastorale

Orchestra: The Philharmonia

Conductor: Francesco d’Avalos

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