Tag Archives: Franz Schubert

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Schubert – Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: ROBERT SCHUMANN – Overture, Scherzo und Finale, Op.52



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: ROBERT SCHUMANN – Overture, Scherzo und Finale, Op.52:

GILBERTO SEREMBE, conductor
O.R.T. – Orchestra Regionale Toscana
Firenze, Teatro della Compagnia, 9 June 1995
http://www.italianconductingacademy.com

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde”



Brandis Quartet, Thomas Brandis, violin. Peter Brem, violin. Wilfried Strehle, viola. Wolfgang Boettcher, cello. 
Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Menuetto, allegro
IV. Allegro moderato

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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D 957, No. 4 Standchen ~ Franz Schubert



Schwanengesang (“Swan song“) is the title of a posthumous collection of songs by Franz Schubert.

The tombstone of Franz Schubert

The tombstone of Franz Schubert (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Unlike the earlier Die schöne Müllerin and Winterreise, it uses poems by three poets, Ludwig Rellstab (1799–1860), Heinrich Heine (1797–1856) and Johann Gabriel Seidl (1804-1875). Schwanengesang has the number D 957 in the Deutsch catalogue.

The collection was named by its first publisher Tobias Haslinger, presumably wishing to present it as Schubert’s final musical testament to the world.

In the original manuscript in Schubert’s hand, the first 13 songs were copied in a single sitting, on consecutive manuscript pages, and in the standard performance order. Some[who?] claim that the last song, Taubenpost, text by Johann Gabriel Seidl (1804–1875), catalogue number D 965 A, is not part of the cycle as Schubert conceived it. However, it’s not clear that Schubert intended it to be a cycle at all, or if he did, that he completed it before he died. It may have been Tobias Haslinger, Schubert’s publisher, who conceived of it as a cycle, or attempted to finish an incomplete work by adding Taubenpost onto the end. So most people consider Haslinger’s published version ‘the’ version, and that’s how it’s performed today. Taubenpost is considered to be Schubert’s last Lied.

Franz Liszt later transcribed these songs for solo piano.

Schubert also set to music a poem named Schwanengesang by Johann Senn, unrelated to this collection (number D744 in the Deutsch catalogue). ~Taken from Wikipedia

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FABULOUS COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Marian Anderson “Ave Maria” by Schubert



Marian Anderson “Ave Maria” by Schubert
With Leopold Stokowski, 1944
Latin Text
Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum.
Benedicta tu in mulieribus,
et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Iesus.
Sancta Maria, Mater Dei,
ora pro nobis peccatoribus,
nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.

English Translation
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou among women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

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Eggner Trio – Schubert Nocturne – Schubertiade Schwarzenberg



Schubertiade Schwarzenberg 2009,
Fr.Schubert: Adagio Es-Dur, op.post.148, D897, Notturno

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Schubert, Die Nacht D.983c (Krummacher)



SCHUBERTIADE 2013
In memory of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Pietà, passioni e gioia: Lieder e canti corali”

Rossella Giacchero: soprano; Federico Tibone, piano; Coro da Camera di Torino diretto da Dario Tabbia; Olivia Manescalchi, voce narrante e aiuto regia.
Contributi video a cura di Davide Livermore. Realizzazione video: Marco Fantozzi.

Progetto di Erik Battaglia e Valentina Valente.

Torino, Unione Musicale, Teatro Vittoria, 12 Marzo 2013

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Maurice Ravel – Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, I-V



Valses nobles et sentimentales, for piano (or orchestra) (1911)

I. Modéré
II. Assez lent
III. Modéré
IV. Assez animé
V. Presque lent
VI. Assez vif
VII. Moins vif
VIII. Epilogue: Lent

Philharmonia Slavonica
H. Adolph

Maurice Ravel could be slightly obsessive in the way he allowed certain musical interests to reappear throughout his compositions. Two such interests were dance and the past, and in Valses nobles et sentimentales one can hear how Ravel was able to effectively fuse these two curiosities together. While Le Tombeau de Couperin was inspired by the eighteenth century, the Valses was oriented toward the nineteenth century. Written out of homage to Schubert’s piano piece of the same name, the composer declared that the work’s title, “indicates clearly enough my intention of composing a chain of waltzes following the example of Schubert. The virtuoso element that was the basis of Gaspard de la nuit is here replaced by a writing of greater clarity, which has the effect of sharpening the harmony as well as the outline of the music.” Ravel achieved his goal of clarity, as the waltzes were written using intense precision, sophistication, and technical flawlessness. 

Valses nobles et sentimentales contains eight waltzes presented in the following order: Modéré, Assez lent, Modéré, Assez animé, Presque lent, Assez vif, Moins vif, and the Epilogue. Originally written for solo piano, the waltzes stimulate but do not disturb, while displaying different aspects of Ravel’s imagination including pride, tenderness, and sentiment. The work was dedicated to Louis Aubert and it was he who gave the first performance on May 9, 1911, at a concert held by the Société Musicale Indépendante, where Schubert’s piece of the same name was also premiered. As a little game, the composers’ names were withheld, leaving the audience to guess who had written each piece. Audience suggestions included Eric Satie, Zoltán Kodály, and even a correct answer from Debussy, whose ears could not be fooled by the identifiable quality he appreciated. Even though several of Ravel’s friends confessed their dislike, others claimed to be strongly drawn to the piece. Tristan Klingsor commented that he was one among several who, “were immediately seduced by the music, and yet he had taken a lot of risks, at least for the period….He had taken the use of unresolved dissonances to its furthest point. What we now find very piquant was extremely daring at the time. The first bars of the Valses seemed quite extraordinary. Then, since there was nothing there that was not well thought-out, the ear quickly grew to enjoy these pseudo-’wrong notes,’ and a glance at the score revealed that they had a proper harmonic justification.” 

As with Ma mère l’oye Ravel allowed only himself to alter Valses nobles et sentimentales through orchestration. He adapted the waltzes for the ballet Adélaïde ou Le langage des fleurs, for a performance by the troupe of Natasha Trouhanova, and it was premiered as an orchestral work on April 22, 1912, at the Théâtre du Châtelet. Some say that the ironic overtones of the Valses foreshadow the superb choreographic poem La Valse while confirming to audiences that dissonance was indeed an essential element of his musical style. [Allmusic.com]

Art by Antoine Blanchard

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Horowitz plays : Schubert’s Impromptu in G flat major D899 No.3 (in Vienna)


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encore: Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa Plays Paganini-Liszt “La Campanella”


Paganini-Liszt La Campanella

Live from Seoul. Encore #1. Liszt “La Campanella”
Buy La Campanella video http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Al..

 

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Great compositions/Performances: “Impromptu, Op. 90 D899 No. 3 in G-Flat Major” by Franz Schubert



Great compositions/Performances:  “Impromptu, Op. 90 D899 No. 3 in G-Flat Major” by Franz Schubert performed by Alexandre Tharaud as heard in Michael Haneke‘s Palme d’Or winner “Amour

 

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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664, Op. 120 ( summer of 1819):
Movements
I. Allegro moderato, A major
II. Andante, D major
III. Allegro, A major

Well regarded among pianists, the “Little” A major sonata is so called to distinguish it from the hefty 1828 sonata in the same key. The manuscript, completed in July 1819, was dedicated to Josephine von Koller of Steyr in Upper Austria, whom he considered to be “very pretty” and “a good pianist.” The lyrical, buoyant, in spots typically poignant nature of this sonata fits the image of a young Schubert in love, living in a summery Austrian countryside, which he also considered to be “unimaginably lovely.”[1]

The A major sonata is straightforward, with a dulcet melodic opening. It was the first of Schubert’s piano sonatas where the sonata form as perfected by his idol, Beethoven, does not seem wrestled with; rather, it is a “joyous breakthrough,” a carefree triumph over strict rules of construction.[2]

The manuscript to this “little” sonata has been lost.[3]

Biography

Early life and education

Schubert was born in Himmelpfortgrund (now a part of Alsergrund), Vienna on January 31, 1797. His father, Franz Theodor Schubert, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother, Elisabeth Vietz, was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of Franz Theodor’s fourteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1783),[1] nine died in infancy; five survived. Their father was a well-known teacher, and his school in Lichtental, a part of Vienna’s 9th district, was well attended.[2] He was not a musician of fame or with formal training, but he taught his son some elements of music.[3]

 

The house in which Schubert was born, today Nussdorfer Strasse 54, in the 9th district of Vienna.

At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at his father’s school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin,[3] and his brother Ignaz gave him piano lessons.[4] At 7, Schubert began receiving lessons from Michael Holzer, the local church organist and choirmaster. Holzer’s lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[5] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner‘s apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he had the opportunity to practice on better instruments.[6] He also played the viola in the family string quartet, with brothers Ferdinand and Ignaz on violin and his father on the cello. Schubert wrote many of his early string quartets for this ensemble.[7]

Schubert first came to the attention of Antonio Salieri, then Vienna’s leading musical authority, in 1804, when his vocal talent was recognized.[7] In October 1808, he became a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial seminary) through a choir scholarship. At the Stadtkonvikt, Schubert was introduced to theovertures and symphonies of Mozart.[8] His exposure to these pieces and various lighter compositions, combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge.[9]One important musical influence came from the songs of Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, who was an importantLied composer of the time, which, his friend Joseph von Spaun reported, he “wanted to modernize”.[10]Schubert’s friendship with Spaun began at the Stadtkonvikt and endured through his lifetime. In those early days, the more well-to-do Spaun furnished the impoverished Schubert with manuscript paper.[9]

Meanwhile, his genius began to show in his compositions. Schubert was occasionally permitted to lead the Stadtkonvikt’s orchestra, and Salieri decided to begin training him privately in musical composition andtheory in these years.[11] It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal of chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D. 31) and Salve Regina (D. 27), an octet for wind instruments (D. 72/72a, said to commemorate the 1812 death of his mother),[12] a cantata for guitar and male voices (D. 110, in honor of his father’s birthday in 1813), and his first symphony (D. 82).[13]

Teacher at his father’s school

At the end of 1813, he left the Stadtkonvikt, and returned home for studies at the Normalhauptschule to train as a teacher. In 1814, he entered his father’s school as teacher of the youngest students. For over two years, the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success.[14] There were, however, other interests to compensate. He continued to receive private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s musical training than any of his other teachers. Salieri and Schubert would part ways in 1817.[11]

In 1814, Schubert met a young soprano named Therese Grob, the daughter of a local silk manufacturer. Several of his songs (Salve Regina and Tantum Ergo) were composed for her voice, and she also performed in the premiere of his first Mass (D. 105) in September[15] 1814.[14] Schubert intended to marry Grob, but was hindered by the harsh marriage consent law of 1815,[16] which required the ability to show the means to support a family.[17] In November 1816, after failing to gain a position at Laibach, Schubert sent Grob’s brother Heinrich a collection of songs, which were retained by her family into the 20th century.[18]

Schubert’s most prolific year was probably 1815. He composed over 20,000 bars of music, more than half of which was for orchestra, including nine church works, a symphony, and about 140 Lieder.[19] In that year, he was also introduced to Anselm Hüttenbrenner and Franz von Schober, who would become his lifelong friends. Another friend, Johann Mayrhofer, was introduced to him by Spaun in 1814.[20]

Supported by friends

 

Josef Abel(?) portrait of an anonymous young man with glasses (possibly Schubert)

Significant changes happened in 1816. Schober, a student of good family and some means, invited Schubert to room with him at his mother’s house. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made the unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach, and he had also decided not to resume teaching duties at his father’s school. By the end of the year, he became a guest in Schober’s lodgings. For a time, he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. “I compose every morning, and when one piece is done, I begin another.”[21] During this year, he focused on orchestral and choral works, although he also continued to write Lieder.[22] Much of this work was unpublished, but manuscripts and copies circulated among friends and admirers.[23]

In early 1817, Schober introduced Schubert to Johann Michael Vogl, a prominent baritone twenty years Schubert’s senior. Vogl, for whom Schubert went on to write a great many songs, became one of Schubert’s main proponents in Viennese musical circles. He also met Joseph Hüttenbrenner (brother to Anselm), who also played a role in promoting Schubert’s music.[24] These, and an increasing circle of friends and musicians, became responsible for promoting, collecting, and, after his death, preserving, his work.[25]

In late 1817, Schubert’s father gained a new position at a school in Rossau (not far from Lichtental). Schubert rejoined his father and reluctantly took up teaching duties there. In early 1818, he was rejected for membership in the prestigious Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, something that might have furthered his musical career.[26] However, he began to gain more notice in the press, and the first public performance of a secular work, an overture performed in February 1818, received praise from the press in Vienna and abroad.[27]

Schubert spent the summer of 1818 as music teacher to the family of Count Johann Karl Esterházy at their château in Zseliz (then in Hungary, now in Slovakia). His duties were relatively light (teaching piano and singing to the two daughters, Marie and Karoline), and the pay relatively good. As a result, he happily continued to compose during this time. It may have been at this time that he wrote one of his now world-famous compositions, the Marche militaire No. 1 in D major. On his return from Zseliz, he took up residence with his friend Mayrhofer.[26] The respite at Zseliz led to a succession of compositions for piano duet.[28]

The tight circle of friends that Schubert surrounded himself with was dealt a blow in early 1820. Schubert and four of his friends were arrested by the Austrian secret police, who were suspicious of any type of student gatherings. One of Schubert’s friends, Johann Senn, was put on trial, imprisoned for over a year, and then permanently banned from Vienna. The other four, including Schubert, were “severely reprimanded”, in part for “inveighing against [officials] with insulting and opprobrious language”.[29] While Schubert never saw Senn again, he did set some of his poems, “Selige Welt” and “Schwanengesang”, to music. The incident may have played a role in a falling-out with Mayrhofer, with whom he was living at the time.[30]

Musical maturity

The compositions of 1819 and 1820 show a marked advance in development and maturity of style[31]. The unfinished oratorio “Lazarus” (D. 689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D. 706), the Gesang der Geister (D. 705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D. 703), and the “Wanderer Fantasy” for piano (D. 760). Of most notable interest is the staging in 1820 of two of Schubert’s operas: Die Zwillingsbrüder (D. 647) appeared at the Theater am Kärntnertoron June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D. 644) appeared at the Theater an der Wien on August 21.[32]Hitherto, his larger compositions (apart from his masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position, addressing a wider public.[32] Publishers, however, remained distant, withAnton Diabelli hesitantly agreeing to print some of his works on commission.[33] The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meager pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. The situation improved somewhat in March 1821 when Vogl sang “Der Erlkönig” at a concert that was extremely well received.[34] That month, he composed a variation on a waltz by Anton Diabelli (D. 718), being one of the fifty composers who contributed to Vaterländischer Künstlerverein.

The production of the two operas turned Schubert’s attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage, where, for a variety of reasons, he was almost completely unsuccessful. In 1822, Alfonso und Estrella was refused, partly owing to its libretto.[35] Fierrabras (D. 796) was rejected in the fall of 1823, but this was largely due to the popularity of Rossini and the Italian operatic style, and the failure of Carl Maria von Weber‘s Euryanthe.[36] Die Verschworenen (D. 787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the grounds of its title),[37] and Rosamunde (D. 797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of the play for which Schubert had written incidental music. Of these works, the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierrabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822, he made the acquaintance of both Weber and Beethoven, but little came of it in either case. Beethoven is said to have acknowledged the younger man’s gifts on a few occasions, but some of this is likely legend and in any case he could not have known the real scope of Schubert’s music – especially not the instrumental works – as so little of it was printed or performed in the composer’s lifetime. On his deathbed, Beethoven is said to have looked into some of the younger man’s works and exclaimed, “Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!”[38] but what would have come of it if he had recovered we can never know.

 

Schubert in 1825 (watercolor by Wilhelm August Rieder)

…read more here

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schubert – Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990))



Franz Schubert (1797-1828):
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (1822)
1. Allegro moderato00:00 
2. Andante con moto - 13:32
Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990).
Painting: Wanderer in the Storm, Karl Julius von Leypold

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schubert Symphony No 6 C major, D 589 Bavarian RSO Maazel



Franz Schubert Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589 
Lorin Maazel conducts Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589,[1] is a symphony by Franz Schubert composed between October 1817 and February 1818.[2] Its first public performance was in Vienna in 1828. It is nicknamed the “Little C major” to distinguish it from his later Ninth Symphony, in the same key, which is known as the “Great C major“.[3]

There are four movements:

  1. Adagio, 3/4 - Allegro, 2/2 7:23
  2. Andante, 2/4 in F major 12:27
  3. ScherzoPresto; Trio: Piu lento (Trio in E major), 3/4 17:12
  4. Allegro moderato, 2/4

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Felix Mendelssohn, Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12, I. Adagio – Allegro moderato



Felix Mendelssohn
Romain Descharmes, Tianwa Yang, Descharmes, Romain, Gallois, Patrick, Sinfonia Finlandia Jyvaskyla, Yang, Tianwa
Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12
Mendelssohn: Violin Concertos – Violin Sonata in F minor
8.572662
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

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Schumann, Albumblatt op. 124 Nr. 16 (Schlummerlied), Wolfgang Weller 2012.



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856)
Albumblätter op. 124 Nr. 16 “Schlummerlied”
Wolfgang Weller

Tempo Giusto

This recording is part of the ongoing Schumann-Project:
ROBERT SCHUMANN / COMPLETE PIANO WORKS / WOLFGANG WELLER

 

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Claudio Arrau


Claudio Arrau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Claudio Arrau in 1974, by Allan Warren

Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991)[1] was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especiallyBeethovenSchubertChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century.

 

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Schubert – Notturno in E flat major, Op. 148, D. 897



Franz Schubert (1797-1828)

Notturno in E flat major, Op. 148, D. 897

Written c. 1827.

Suk Trio:
Josef Suk, violin
Jan Panenka, piano
Josef Chuchro, cello

Recorded in 1964. Re-release from 1979.

ClassicalRecords is a Youtube channel where I upload some excellent performances from the LPs in my collection. I’m uploading these LPs because they are either not available on CD, out of print on CD, or just difficult to find.

 

Divine Compositions: Franz Schubert – Quintet for piano, violin, viola, cello & double-bass, in A major, D 667 “The Trout



Amati Chamber Ensemble. Gil Sharon, violin. Ron Ephrat, viola. Alexander Hülshoff, cello. Jean Sassen, double-bass. Dalia Ouziel, piano.
Franz Schubert – Quintet for piano, violin, viola, cello & double-bass, in A major, D 667 “The Trout
I. Allegro vivace
II. Andante 
III. Scherzo, presto
IV. Tema con variazioni (Die Forelle)
V. Allegro giusto

 

Franz Schubert: Rondo for Violin & Orchestra in A D 438



Austrian composer Franz Schubert (1797-1828) was one of the great composers of the classical era in music that is associated with Vienna, the others being Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven
Schubert, who was born in a suburb of Vienna, was the fourth son of a schoolmaster. At age 5, he learned the violin from his father and the piano from an older brother. Because of Schubert’s excellent voice, at age 11 he became one of the Vienna Choir Boys at the Imperial Chapel. By the age of 16, Schubert wrote an opera, a series of quartets, and his Symphony No. 1

Shortly afterward, he left Vienna’s Imperial Chapel and began teacher training to become a schoolmaster. However, Schubert’s genius lay in musical creativity, and between 1813 and 1818 he had a surge of creativity where he wrote five symphonies, six operas, and 300 “Lieder” songs, a term which is usually used to describe songs composed to a German poem. 

While in the midst of all this creative composing, Schubert found teaching in a classroom to be too boring and in 1816 at age 19 he gave up teaching at the schoolhouse of his father and moved to Vienna where he devoted himself to composition, focusing on orchestral and choral works. During this creative activity, Schubert’s health deteriorated. He died at the age of thirty-one after a brief unconfirmed illness. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was written in June 1828, and may well have been intended to form a two-movement sonata along the lines of Beethoven’s E minor Sonata

It is lovingly modeled on the lyrical finale of Beethoven’s sonata: his theme follows a similar harmonic pattern, and even the keyboard layout of its opening bars, with the melody’s initial phrase followed by a more assertive answer in octaves, echoes Beethoven’s. 

Schubert mirrors Beethoven’s procedure, too, by transferring the final reprise of the Rondo theme to the sonorous tenor register, with a continuous pattern of semiquavers unfolding above it. 

But Schubert’s composition is far from a slavish imitation, and it can more than hold its own against Beethoven’s. Particularly beautiful is the manner in which one of the important subsidiary themes returns towards the end, surmounted by a shimmering pianissimo accompaniment in repeated chords from the primo player. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was published in December 1828, less than a month after Schubert died.

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings
Performed by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra
Pinchas Zukerman, Conductor

 

Great Performances: Schubert _ The Poet of Romantic Music_ Symphony.9 Sawallisch/Wiener Philharmoniker


The Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944, known as the Great (published in 1840 as “Symphony No. 7 in C Major”,[1] listed as No. 8 in the Neue Schubert-Ausgabe[2]), is the final symphony completed by Franz Schubert. Originally called The Great C major to distinguish it from his Symphony No. 6, the Little C major,[3] the subtitle is now usually taken as a reference to the symphony’s majesty. A typical performance takes around 55 minutes, though it can be played in as little as 45 minutes by employing a faster tempo and not repeating sections as indicated in the score.
For a long time, the symphony was believed to be a work of Schubert’s last year, 1828. It was true that, in the last months of his life, he did start drafting a symphony – but this was the work in D major now accepted as Symphony No. 10, which has been realized for performance by Brian Newbould.[4] In fact, we now know that the ‘Great’ was largely composed in sketch in the summer of 1825: that, indeed it was the work to which Schubert was referring in a letter of March 1824 when he said he was preparing himself to write ‘a grand symphony’. By the spring or summer of 1826 it was completely scored, and in October, Schubert, who was quite unable to pay for a performance, sent it to the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde with a dedication. In response they made him a small payment, arranged for the copying of the orchestral parts, and at some point in the latter half of 1827 gave the work an unofficial play-through (the exact date and the conductor are unknown) – though it was considered too long and difficult for the amateur orchestra of the conservatory.[5]
File:Schubert's Letter on 944.jpg

Mozart – Piano Sonata No. 16 in C, K. 545 (Facile)



The Piano Sonata No. 16 in C major, K. 545, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was described by Mozart himself in his own thematic catalogue as “for beginners,” and it is sometimes known by the nickname Sonata facile or Sonata semplice. Mozart added the work to his catalogue on June 26, 1788, the same date as his Symphony No. 39. The exact circumstances of the work’s composition are not known, however. Although the piece is well-known today, it was not published in Mozart’s lifetime and first appeared in print in 1805. A typical performance takes about 14 minutes. The work has three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Andante
3. Rondo
The first movement is written in sonata form and is in the key of C major. The familiar opening theme is accompanied by an Alberti bass, played in the left hand.
A bridge passage composed of scales follows, arriving at a cadence in G major, the key in which the second theme is then played. A codetta follows to conclude the exposition, then the exposition is repeated. The development starts in G minor and modulates through several keys. The recapitulation begins, unusually, in the subdominant key of F major. According to Charles Rosen, the practice of beginning a recapitulation in the subdominant was “rare at the time [the sonata] was written,” though the practice was later taken up by Franz Schubert. The second movement is in the key of G major, the dominant key of C major. The music modulates in the middle of this movement to the parallel minor (G minor) and its relative major (B-flat major). The movement then modulates to the tonic, and, after the main theme and development is heard again, ends.
The third movement is in rondo form and is in the tonic key, C major. The first theme is lively and sets the mood of the piece. The second theme is in G major and contains an Alberti bass in the left hand. The first theme appears again and is followed by a third theme. The third theme is in a minor key and modulates through many different keys before modulating into C major. The first theme appears again followed by a coda and finally ends in C major.
The finale was transcribed to F major and collected with a solo piano arrangement of the second movement of the violin sonata in F major to form the Piano Sonata in F major, K. 547a.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Fabulous Performamces: “Liszt Project” Recording Old-Fashioned Way:-) Analog Tape to Vinyl LP. Lisitsa



Recording of Liszt album in all analog ( or analogue if you will :-)) 1/4 inch Studer tape , no edits allowed !!!! 6 tapes , each one 40 minutes long is what it takes to get approximately 53 minutes of final result. I always knew that Liszt was dangerous :-) One tape was gone for sound tests , and another wasted on takes that had a squeeky pedal ( or was it a boot )? Anywya, here is more technical stuff…
Digital back-up ( lol) on Sequoia digital platform .
Interviews with the producer Michael Fine, sound engineers Wolf Dieter Karwatky and Wim Makkee. Liszt Ballade #2, Hungarian Rhapsody #12, Verdi – Liszt Aida, Schubert – Liszt songs (Ave Maria, Gute Nacht, Der Erlkonig, Der Muller und der Bach, Das Madchen Klage), Rondo Fantastique “El Contrabandista”.

 

Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in B major, D 960 (Op. posth.) and D 575 (Op. posth. 147)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in B flat major, D 960 (Op. posth.)
I. Motto moderato
II. Andante sostenuto
III. Scherzo, allegro vivace con delicatezza
IV. Allegro, ma non troppo

Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in B major, D 575 (Op. posth. 147)

I. Allegro, ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Scherzo, allegretto
IV. Allegro giusto

L. Bernstein – Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in D major/D minor “Reformation” Op.107



Mendelssohn Symphony No.5 in D major/D minor “Reformation” Op.107 Complete

1. Andante — Allegro con fuoco
2. Allegro vivace
3. Andante
4. Andante con moto — Allegro maestoso

NY Philharmonic Orchestra
Leonard Bernstein Conductor

 

Great Performances: ANTONIN DVORÁK – SINFONIE NO. 8 IN G-DUR OP. 88 – WIENER PHILHARMONIKER – HERBERT VON KARAJAN



I. Allegro con brio[0:06]
II. Adagio – [9:57]
III. Allegretto grazioso, molto vivace – [21:28]
IV. Allegro ma non troppo – [27:05]
Wiener Philharmoniker - 
Herbert von Karajan, Leitung -
Großer Musikvereinssaal Wien -
Januar/Februar 1985

 

Great Performances: Schubert Symphony No 3 D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


 

Schubert Symphony No 1in D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


 

The Symphony No. 1 in D major, D. 82, was composed by Franz Schubert in 1813, when he was just 16 years old. Despite his youth, No. 1 is an impressive piece of orchestral music for both its time and size. The first movement opens with a stately Adagio introduction, reminiscent of the Haydn‘s 104 in its format. The short Adagio sets off a lively Allegro vivace.

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

Schubert – “Ständchen” D957



FRANZ SCHUBERT (1797-1828)
*arrangement

Schwanengesang” D957

Lieder: “Ständchen” (Serenade) orginally for tenor and piano, arranged for cello and piano in D minor 

Performed by Anne Gastinel, cello
Claire Désert, piano

 

Schubert – 4 Impromptus, D. 899 / Op. 90 (Maria João Pires)



00:00 - No. 1 in C minor, Allegro molto moderato
 11:05  – No. 2 in E-flat major, Allegro
 15:50 -  No. 3 in G-flat major, Andante
 21:40 -  No. 4 in A-flat major, Allegretto

Piano:  Maria João Pires, 1996
**************************************************************
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Franz Schubert‘s Impromptus are a series of eight pieces for solo piano composed in 1827. They were published in two sets of four impromptus each: the first set was published in the composer’s lifetime as Op. 90, and the second set was published posthumously as Op. posth. 142. They are now catalogued as D. 899 and D. 935 respectively. They are considered to be among the most important examples of this popular early 19th-century genre.[1]

Three other unnamed piano compositions (D. 946), written in May 1828, a few months before the composer’s death, are alternatively indicated as Impromptus orKlavierstücke (“piano pieces”).

The Impromptus are often considered companion pieces to the Six moments musicaux, and they are often recorded and published together.

It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7 (1822) of Jan Václav Voříšek and by the music of Voříšek’s teacherVáclav Tomášek.[2][3]

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>More HERE<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

Schubert Symphony No 3 D major Maazel Bavarian RSO


Franz Schubert‘s Symphony No. 3 in D major, D. 200, was written between 24 May and 19 July 1815, a few months after his eighteenth birthday. The length of thissymphony is approximately 21–23 minutes. It is in four movements:

The Allegro con brio, which follows a broad introduction in a form which reminds us of the French Overture in two parts, the first slow and dramatic, the second more lyrical, is remarkable for its charm and the interplay of solo clarinet with syncopated strings, which developed pp from within the bounds of the style of chamber music to the larger sphere of the symphonic form. This is an extremely dramatic movement in sonata form. It owes much, as Michael Trapp points out in the liner notes of Günter Wand‘s recording, to the influence of Rossini, whose music was quite popular at the time, particularly evident in the overture-like structure.

A delightful Allegretto in ternary form follows, full of grace and humor.

 

Schubert / A. Brendel, 1961: Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (Op. 15) – The Wanderer –



Wanderer Fantasy” is the popular name for Opus 15 (D 760) in C major by Franz Schubert, written in November 1822. It is a fantasy for solo piano in four movements, which sometimes even in the classical sonata form seem to stand up and form a sonata in their arrangement (which is in the typical order fast-slow-scherzo-fast clear). on the other hand, there is a close relationship between the individual sets, so that the imagination is interpreted as a major Sonata process. Accordingly would be the first sentence of the exposure, the second is a free implementation, the third one (albeit highly varied) recapitulation and the fourth would make the virtuoso coda.

 

Schubert String Quartet No 14 D minor Death and the Maiden Alban Berg Quartet



Schubert String Quartet No 14 D minor Death and the Maiden

I. Allegro
II. Andante con moto -11:37 
III. Presto – 22:18
IV. Prestissimo 25:50
Composition Year 1826
Genre Categories QuartetsFor 2 violins, viola, cello

The String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, known as Death and the Maiden, by Franz Schubert, is one of the pillars of the chamber music repertoire. Composed in 1824, after the composer suffered through a serious illness and realized that he was dying, it is Schubert’s testament to death. The quartet is named for the theme of the second movement, which Schubert took from a song he wrote in 1817 of the same title; but the theme of death is palpable in all four movements of the quartet.

The quartet was first played in 1826 in a private home, and was not published until 1831, three years after Schubert’s death. Yet, passed over in his lifetime, the quartet has become a staple of the quartet repertoire. It is D. 810 in Otto Erich Deutsch‘s thematic catalog of Schubert’s works.

Original manuscript of Death and the Maiden quartet, from The Mary Flagler Cary Music Collection, Morgan Library, NY

Original manuscript of Lied Death and the Maiden

1823 and 1824 were hard years for Schubert. For much of 1823 he was sick, some scholars believe with an outburst of tertiary stage syphilis, and in May had to be hospitalized.[1] He was broke: he had entered into a disastrous deal with Diabelli to publish a batch of works, and received almost no payment; and his latest attempt at opera, Fierabras, was a flop. In a letter to a friend, he wrote,

“Think of a man whose health can never be restored, and who from sheer despair makes matters worse instead of better. Think, I say, of a man whose brightest hopes have come to nothing, to whom love and friendship are but torture, and whose enthusiasm for the beautiful is fast vanishing; and ask yourself if such a man is not truly unhappy.”[2]
English: Oil painting of Franz Schubert, after...

English: Oil painting of Franz Schubert, after an 1825 watercolor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Franz Schubert in 1825 (painting by Wilhelm August Rieder)

Yet, despite his bad health, poverty and depression, Schubert continued to turn out the tuneful, light and gemütlichmusic that made him the toast of Viennese society: the song cycle Die schöne Müllerin, the octet for string quartet, contrabass, clarinet, horn and bassoon, more than 20 songs, and numerous light pieces for piano.[3

Alban Berg Quartet

 
 
Alban Berg Quartett
Origin ViennaAustria
Genres Classical
Occupations Chamber ensemble
Years active 1971–2008
Labels TeldecEMI
 
Members Günter Pichler (violin)
Gerhard Schulz (violin)
Isabel Charisius (viola)
Valentin Erben (violoncello)
 
Past members Klaus Maetzl (2nd violin, 1971-1978)
Hatto Beyerle (viola, 1971-1981)
Thomas Kakuska (viola, 1981-2005)

The Alban Berg Quartett was a string quartet founded in Vienna, Austria in 1970, named after the famous composer Alban Berg.

Franz Schubert String Quintet in C major D956 op posth 163 Villa Musica Ensemble



Franz Schubert:
String Quintet in C major, D. 956, op. posth. 163:
00:00     I. Allegro ma non troppo
19:54     II. Adagio
34:54   III. Scherzo. Presto – Trio. Andante sostenuto
45:42   IV. Allegretto

[Villa Musica Ensemble]

Photography: Wu Kai Sha, Hong Kong, by Lifeguard.

 

Schubert – Quintet in A major “The Trout”: Barenboim – Perlman- Zukerman – du Pré – Mehta



Schubert – Quintet in A major “The Trout”:
Barenboim – Perlman – Zukerman – du Pré – Mehta 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Trout Quintet is the popular name for the Piano Quintet in A major by Franz Schubert. In Otto Erich Deutsch‘s catalogue of Schubert’s works, it is D. 667. The work was composed in 1819,[1] when Schubert was only 22 years old; it was not published, however, until 1829, a year after his death.[2] Continue reading

Franz Liszt – 14 Schubert Lieder



Oxana Yablonskaya, piano
Franz Liszt – 14 Schubert Lieder
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 2. Auf dem Wasser zu singen00:04:59
Schubert – Winterreise, S561/R246: No. 6. Wasserflut 00:02:30
Schubert – Mullerlieder, S565/R249: No. 2. Der Muller under der Bach00:07:10
Schubert – Schwanengesang, S560/R245: No. 8. Ihr Bild 00:02:34
Schubert – Schwanengesang, S560/R245: No. 7. Standchen (Leise flehen meine Lieder00:07:06 
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 9. Standchen (Horch, horch! Der Lerch’) 00:02:47
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 1. Sei mir gegrusset 00:06:06
Schubert – 6 Melodies, S563/R248: No. 4. Trockne Blumen 00:04:15
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 7: Fruhlingsglaube 00:05:00
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 3. Du bist die Ruh 00:06:08
Schubert – Schwanengesang, S560/R245: No. 12. Der Doppelganger00:04:41
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 8: Gretchen am Spinnrade00:04:28
Schubert – 12 Lieder, S558/R243: No. 11. Der Wanderer 00:07:16
Schubert – Schwanengesang, S560/R245: No. 3. Aufenthalt 00:03:51

 

Valentina Lisitsa: Gute Nacht (from Winterreise) Schubert Liszt



From Valentin: 
“As a stranger I arrived
As a stranger I shall leave”
Those are the opening words on a heartbreaking journey of gloom, grief and utter loneliness.

One of Schubert‘s friends described the day Schuber performed his newly written song cycleWinterreise” ( Winter Jorney) :
“Schubert was gloomy and depressed, and when asked the reason replied,
“Come to Schober’s today and I will play you a cycle of terrifying songs; they have affected me more than has ever been the case with any other songs.” He then, with a voice full of feeling, sang the entire Winterreise for us. We were altogether dumbfounded by the sombre mood of these songs, and Schober said that one song only, “Der Lindenbaum”, had pleased him. Thereupon Schubert leaped up and replied: “These songs please me more than all the rest, and in time they will please you as well.” 

Good Night (Wilhelm Müller)
English translation with German text below :

As a stranger I arrived
As a stranger I shall leave

I remember a perfect day in May
How bright the flowers, how cool the breeze
The maiden had a friendly smile
The mother had kind words

But now the world is dreary
With a winter path before me
I can’t choose the season
To depart from this place
I won’t delay or ponder
I must begin my journey now

The bright moon lights my path
It will guide me on my road
I see the snow-covered meadow
I see where deer have trod

A voice within says — go now
Why linger and delay?
Leave the dogs to bay at the moon
Before her father’s gate

For love is a thing of changes
God has made it so
Ever-changing from old to new
God has made it so

So love delights in changes
Good night, my love, good night
Love is a thing of changes
Good night, my love, good night

I’ll not disturb your sleep
But I’ll write over your door
A simple farewell message
Good night, my love, good night

These are the last words spoken
Soon I’ll be out of sight
A simple farewell message
Goodnight, my love, good night

Gute Nacht

Fremd bin ich eingezogen, 
Fremd zieh’ ich wieder aus.  Continue reading

F.MENDELSSOHN BARTHOLDY- PIANO QUARTET in F minor Op.2- Adagio



Please watch in (1080) HD !
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809-1847 ) Piano Quartet in F minor op.2 – Adagio.
The Schubert Ensemble of London:
William Howard : Piano .
Simon Blendis : Violin.
Douglas Paterson : Viola.
Jane Salmon : Cello.
Recording 1998, St,George”s Brandon Hill, Bristol.
———————————-
Photography / Artwork and Video :
PETER SCHNEIDER.
2012 .

 

Sviatoslav Richter – Haydn – Piano Sonata No 32 in B minor, Hob XVI-32


 

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Scherzo in D minor



V. Polyansky – Russian State SO

 

Beethoven String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) – American String Quartet



Beethoven String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) performed by the American String Quartet (live). Filmed live in The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in New York for WQXR‘s Beethoven String Quartet Marathon on November 18, 2012.

 

Dvorak – Piano Quintet No.2 in A, Op.81



[Verbier 2013]
Yuri Bashmet
Vilde Frang
Daniil Trifonov
Renaud Capuçon
Gautier Capuçon

 
 Antonín Dvořák‘s Piano Quintet No. 2 in A major, Op. 81, B. 155, is a quintet for piano, 2 violinsviola, and cello. It was composed between August 18 and October 8 of 1887, and was premiered in Prague on January 6, 1888. The quintet is acknowledged as one of the masterpieces in the form, along with those of Schubert,SchumannBrahms and Shostakovich.[1]

The music has four movements:

  1. Allegro, ma non tanto
  2. DumkaAndante con moto
  3. Scherzo (Furiant): molto vivace
  4. Finale: Allegro.

 

 

Franz Schubert Symphonies No.4 and No.8, Avi Ostrowsky



Franz Schubert Orchestre Symphonique de Helsingborg, Avi Ostrowsky

Symphony No.4 in C minor D 417 Tragic 0:00

  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. MenuettoAllegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

Symphony No.8 in B minor D 759 Unfinished 34:40

  1. I. Allegro moderato
  2. II. Andante con moto

Symphonique de Helsingborg, 
Avi Ostrowsky Conductor

 

 

Franz Schubert – SERENADE



Una delle più belle melodie di Franz Schubert!!!

Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in E minor, D 566



Frank van de Laar, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in E minor, D 566 
I. Moderato
II. Allegretto
III. Scherzo, allegro vivace
IV. Rondo, allegretto

Franz Schubert – Piano Trio No. 2 in E flat major, D 929 (Op. 100)



Israel Piano Trio:
Alexander Volkov, piano.
Menahem Breuer, violin.
Marcel Bergman, cello.

Franz Schubert – Piano Trio No. 2 in E flat major, D 929 (Op. 100)
I. Allegro
II. Andante con moto
III. Scherzo, allegro moderato
IV. Allegro moderato

Franz Schubert: Rondo for Violin & Orchestra in A major, D 438 (Carmencita Lozada: violin-Academic Instrumental Ensemble Mainz-Herbert Eimert: conductor-March 3-1975)



Franz Schubert: Rondo for Violin & Orchestra in A major,  D 438 (Carmencita Lozada: violin – Academic Instrumental Ensemble Mainz -Herbert Eimert: conductor – March 3 – 1975)