Tag Archives: Germany

this day in the yesteryear: Nuremberg Trials Begin (1945)


Nuremberg Trials Begin (1945)

The Nuremberg Trials, which took place in Germany between 1945 and 1949, were a series of trials prosecuting Nazi officials for their participation in World War II and the Holocaust. The first and most famous of these trials, the Trial of the Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal, involved 24 of the most important leaders of Nazi Germany, 12 of whom were sentenced to death for crimes against humanity and other offenses. How were the death sentences carried out? More… Discuss

let’s not forget: Smallpox (1908). Eradicated thanks to marvels of vaccinations — Lindsey Fitzharris (@DrLindseyFitz)


Saint of the Day for Saturday, November 15th, 2014: St. Albert the Great



October 29, 1875 in History Born:
Marie, queen consort of Ferdinand I of Romania, 1914-27

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Princess Marie of Edinburgh, more commonly known as Marie of Romania (Marie Alexandra Victoria; 29 October 1875 – 18 July 1938),[note 1] was the last Queen consort of Romania as the wife of King Ferdinand I.

Born into the British royal family, she was titled Princess Marie of Edinburgh at birth. Her parents were Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh and Grand Duchess Maria Alexandrovna of Russia. Marie’s early years were spent in Kent, Malta and Coburg. After refusing a proposal from her cousin, the future King George V, she was chosen as the future wife of Crown Prince Ferdinand of Romania, the heir apparent of King Carol I, in 1892. Marie was Crown Princess between 1893 and 1914, and became immediately popular with the Romanian people.

Marie visiting a military hospital, 1917

 

Marie had controlled her weak-willed husband even before his ascension in 1914, prompting a Canadian newspaper to state that “few royal consorts have wielded greater influence than did Queen Marie during the reign of her husband”.[2]

After the outbreak of World War I, Marie urged Ferdinand to ally himself with the Triple Entente and declare war on Germany, which he eventually did in 1916. During the early stages of fighting, Bucharest was occupied by the Central Powers and Marie, Ferdinand and their five children took refuge in Moldavia. There, she and her three daughters acted as nurses in military hospitals, caring for soldiers who were wounded or afflicted by cholera. On 1 December 1918, the province of Transylvania, following Bessarabia and Bukovina, united with the Old Kingdom. Marie, now Queen consort of Greater Romania, attended the Paris Peace Conference of 1919, where she campaigned for international recognition of the enlarged Romania. In 1922, she and Ferdinand were crowned in a specially-built cathedral in the ancient city of Alba Iulia, in an elaborate ceremony which mirrored their status as queen and king of a united state.

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

<<< 1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

1882 portrait by John Everett Millais commissioned by Queen Victoria and exhibited at the Royal Academy.[9]

As queen, she was very popular, both in Romania and abroad. In 1926, Marie and two of her children undertook a diplomatic tour of the United States. They were received enthusiastically by the people and visited several cities before returning to Romania. There, Marie found that Ferdinand was gravely ill and he died a few months later. Now queen dowager, Marie refused to be part of the regency council which reigned over the country under the minority of her grandson, King Michael. In 1930, Marie’s eldest son Carol, who had waived his rights to succession, deposed his son and usurped the throne, becoming King Carol II. He removed Marie from the political scene and strived to crush her popularity. As a result, Marie moved away from Bucharest and spent the rest of her life either in the countryside, or at her home by the Black Sea. In 1937, she became ill with cirrhosis and died the following year.

Following Romania’s transition to a Socialist Republic, the monarchy was excoriated by communist officials. Several biographies of the royal family described Marie either as a drunkard or as a promiscuous woman, referring to her many alleged affairs and to orgies she had supposedly organised before and during the war. In the years preceding the Romanian Revolution of 1989, Marie’s popularity recovered and she was offered as a model of patriotism to the population. Marie is primarily remembered for her work as a nurse, but is also known for her extensive writing, including her critically acclaimed autobiography.

Queen Mary of Romania 2.jpg

Marie wearing her regalia. Photograph by George Grantham Bain.
Queen consort of Romania
Reign 10 October 1914 – 20 July 1927
Coronation 15 October 1922
Spouse Ferdinand I, King of Romania
Issue
Full name
Marie Alexandra Victoria
House House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (by birth)
House of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (by marriage)
Father Prince Alfred, Duke of Edinburgh
Mother Maria Alexandrovna of Russia
Born 29 October 1875
Eastwell Park, Kent, England
Died 18 July 1938 (aged 62)
Pelișor Castle, Sinaia, Romania
Burial 24 July 1938[1]
Curtea de Argeș Cathedral
Signature

Read more >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>HERE

this pressed: German banknotes being used as wallpaper at the height of Weimar hyperinflation, 1923 — OnThisDay & Facts


“We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals” — Immanuel Kant— ✍ Bibliophilia


What I like most about elephants is that they don’t play mind games… (no, not those elephants though) —George-B

Bayreuth Festival


Bayreuth Festival

Bayreuth, Germany, is home to this annual festival devoted to the performance of operas by Richard Wagner. Wagner launched the festival in 1876 to showcase a variety of German music and did not intend for his compositions to be the focus. The event was plagued by financial problems in its early years, but survived through state intervention and the support of influential Wagnerians, including Ludwig II of Bavaria and Adolf Hitler. Who did Hitler beg—unsuccessfully—to lead the festival? More… Discuss

News: Norway Best Country for Older People


Norway Best Country for Older People

Growing old is never easy, but for some it is easier than others, and where they live has a lot to do with it. An index evaluating the quality of life of older adults in 96 countries around the globe has ranked Norway the best country in the world for older people, followed closely by Sweden, Switzerland, Canada, and Germany. Australia, Western Europe, and North America also rank high on the list. The index weighs factors such as income security, health, personal capability, and whether the elderly live in an “enabling environment.” More… Discuss

Story: Brandenburg Gate


Brandenburg Gate

The Brandenburg Gate is the last surviving town gate of Berlin, Germany. When completed in 1791, the lavish gate greeted visitors to the boulevard that led directly to the Prussian palace. Architect Carl G. Langhans modeled the gate after the Propylea, the gateway to the Acropolis in Athens. On top was the “Quadriga of Victory,” a statue of a chariot drawn by four horses. Heavily damaged in World War II, the gate was restored in 1957. Why was it closed in 1961, and when did it reopen? More… Discuss

Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn): make music part of your life series


Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

this day in the yesteryear: Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)


Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)

The Two Plus Four Agreement, also known as the Treaty on the Final Settlement With Respect to Germany, was the final peace treaty negotiated between West Germany and East Germany—the “Two”—and the four powers that occupied Germany at the end of World War II: France, the UK, the US, and the Soviet Union. The treaty paved the way for the German reunification, which took place less than a month later, on October 3. What rights did the four powers renounce under the treaty’s terms? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First V-2 Rocket Hits London (1944)


First V-2 Rocket Hits London (1944)

Developed by Germany during World War II, the Vergeltungswaffe 2 (V-2) rocket was the world’s first modern ballistic missile and the first known manmade object to enter outer space. Thousands were launched on Allied targets during the last year of the war, causing more than 9,000 deaths. One of the rocket’s first targets was London, which was hit just days after Hitler declared his plans to start V-2 attacks. To what did the British government initially attribute the resulting explosion? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: The Munich Massacre (1972)


The Munich Massacre (1972)

During the 1972 Summer Olympics in Munich, Germany, Palestinian terrorists from the group Black September infiltrated the Olympic Village and took a number of members of the Israeli Olympic team hostage. Two of the athletes were killed during the initial assault, and nine others lost their lives in the course of a failed rescue attempt, during which a German police officer and five of the eight kidnappers were killed as well. What went wrong during the rescue attempt at Fürstenfeldbruck airbase? More… Discuss

Triumph of Death (El triunfo de la muerte) Psalter. Germany (S., Augsburg?), 1st half of the 16th century: Bibliophilia (@Libroantiguo) August 22, 2014


today’s birthday: Mata Hari (1876)


Mata Hari (1876)

Born Margaretha Geertruida Zelle, this Dutch courtesan, dancer, and alleged spy went by the stage name Mata Hari. During World War I, she had intimate relationships with high-ranking Allied military officers and government officials. Though details are unclear, she apparently spied for Germany from 1916. In January 1917, French intelligence intercepted German messages about a spy they identified as Mata Hari, and she was executed by the French on espionage charges. What happened to her corpse?

Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12: make music part of your life series


Mendelssohn – String Quartet No. 1, Op. 12

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartoldy

String Quartet No.1, Op.12 (1829)

1. Adagio non troppo – Allegro non tardante
2. Canzonetta – Allegretto (7:42)
3. Andante espressivo (11:48)
4. Molto allegro e vivace (15:23)

Melos Quartet

Editor:
Julius Rietz (1812–1877)

Publisher Info.:
Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdys Werke, Serie 6.
Leipzig: Breitkopf & Härtel, 1875. Plate M.B. 22.

Reprinted:
Mineola: Dover Publications

this day in the yesteryear: Adolf Hitler Publishes First Volume of Mein Kampf (1925)


Adolf Hitler Publishes First Volume of Mein Kampf (1925)

Hitler dictated his manifesto, whose title means “my struggle,” while serving a prison term for treason. The book, filled with anti-Semitic outpourings, political ideology, and strategy for world domination, became the bible of National Socialism. By the end of WWII, about 10 million copies of the book had been sold or distributed in Germany—owing much to the fact that every newlywed couple and every soldier at the battlefront received a free copy. Where is it illegal to sell copies of the book? More… Discuss

make music part of your life sereis: Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)


Felix Mendelssohn – Piano Concerto in A Minor (13 year old Mendelssohn)

Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (German born, and generally known in English-speaking countries, as Felix Mendelssohn (3 February 1809 — 4 November 1847) was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early Romantic period.

Piano Concerto in A Minor (1822)

1. Allegro
2. Adagio (13:32)
3. Finale: Allegro ma non troppo (22:10)

***Cyprien Katsarsis piano and the Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra conducted by Janos Rolla

***Paintings and drawings by Felix Mendelssohn (except his images and his wife’s)

today’s holiday: Kiel Week


Kiel Week

Kiel Week is an international sailing regatta in Kiel, Germany, in the last week of June, at which the world’s leading yachters compete. Craft of all sorts—sail, motor, and muscle-powered—race on the waters of the Kiel Fjord. Kiel Week began in 1882 with 20 yachts; today there are well over 1,000 yachts competing in three classes of races—international, Olympic, and offshore regattas—as well as more than 1,000 events ranging from talks by international political leaders to art exhibits, theater, and music. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Neville Chamberlain Becomes Prime Minister of England (1937)


Neville Chamberlain Becomes Prime Minister of England (1937)

Chamberlain served as prime minister of the UK from 1937 to 1940. His political legacy is defined by his controversial policy of “appeasement” toward Adolf Hitler, exemplified by the Munich Pact that allowed Hitler to annex the Sudetenland in 1938. Once Hitler annexed the rest of Czechoslovakia and invaded Poland in 1939, Chamberlain led Britain to war. However, he was forced to resign eight months later, following the failed British campaign in Norway. How much longer did Chamberlain live? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JOACHIM VON RIBBENTROP (1893)


Joachim von Ribbentrop (1893)

Ribbentrop was Nazi Germany’s foreign minister from 1938 until 1945, during which time he helped negotiate the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact of 1939, which set the stage for Germany‘s attack on Poland that touched off World War II. He, like so many other Nazi officials, was an active participant in the “Final Solution” and various other atrocities and was one of the few who paid with his life at Nuremberg, where he was tried, convicted, and hanged for his war crimes. What were his last words? More…Discuss

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NEWS: BLOOD ON HANDKERCHIEF LIKELY NOT ROYAL


Blood on Handkerchief Likely Not Royal

A handkerchief long thought to be stained with the blood of guillotined French King Louis XVI is likely inauthentic. DNA analysis of the blood on the cloth suggests it most likely belonged to a brown-eyed, average-height person, whereas the king had blue eyes and was quite tall for his time. The genetics also point to French and Italian lineage, while many of Louis XVI’s ancestors came from Germany and Poland. Why then was the handkerchief stored in an elaborately decorated gourd bearing the inscription, “On January 21, Maximilien Bourdaloue dipped his handkerchief in the blood of Louis XVI after his decapitation”? One theory is that a fraudster created the fake relic for money. More… Discuss

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Fabulous Compositions: Antonín Dvořák – Humoresque No. 7, Op. 101



Conductor: Jiři Stárek
Orchestra: SWR Rundfunkorchester Kaiserslautern

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: “BRITISH BANG” ON GERMAN ARCHIPELAGO (1947)


“British Bang” on German Archipelago (1947)

Heligoland is a pair of small German islands located in the North Sea, comprising the main island and the smaller island of Düne. The main island is commonly divided into three geographic sections, the last of which came into being in 1947, when the British Royal Navy detonated 6,700 tonnes of explosives on the island, actually changing its shape. The so-called British Bang was one of the largest non-nuclear single detonations in history. Why did the British bomb the island? More… Discuss

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Valentina Lisitsa



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Lisitsa

Special for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont…

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: HELMUT KOHL (1930)


Helmut Kohl (1930)

Kohl was chancellor of West Germany from 1982 until 1990, when he became the first chancellor of a reunified Germany, serving in that capacity until 1998. The conservative chairman of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) led his party to two convincing victories in West Germany in the 1980s. During his administration, West Germany prospered and became increasingly influential in world affairs. Kohl’s reputation was severely tarnished by what financial scandal that came to light in 1999? More…Discuss

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MAX ERNST (1891)


Max Ernst (1891)

Having served in World War I, German-born French painter and sculptor Max Ernst at first gravitated toward the Dada movement, but the former student of psychology and philosophy eventually became one of the founders of surrealism. Apart from the medium of collage, for which he is well known, Ernst developed other devices to express his fantastic vision, like frottage, in which a drawing tool is rubbed over paper laid on a textured surface, and grattage, a technique consisting of what? More… Discuss

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o got tTHIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ADOPTED AS LAW IN THE US (1918)


Daylight Saving Time Adopted as Law in the US (1918)

Daylight saving time (DST) is the system of advancing clocks forward one hour near the start of spring to increase “usable” hours of daylight in the afternoon. Though Benjamin Franklin proposed the idea in 1784, DST was not widely adopted until World War I. It was first used in Western European countries like Germany and England, and Newfoundland became one of the first North American jurisdictions to adopt DST in 1917. The US followed suit a year later. Which two US states do not observe DST? More… Discuss

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live –



From Valentina:  “FSpecial for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont..

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ZARAH LEANDER (1907)


Zarah Leander (1907)

Leander was a Swedish actress and singer. As a contracted performer with Germany‘s principal film studio, Leander made a number of successful films that contributed to the Third Reich‘s propaganda. Though Leander did not take part in official Nazi party functions, her association with Nazism caused her to be shunned in Sweden after the war. She resumed acting but never regained the popularity she had enjoyed before. Why did Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels dub her an “Enemy of Germany”? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ANSCHLUSS: GERMAN TROOPS OCCUPY AUSTRIA (1938)


Anschluss: German Troops Occupy Austria (1938)

Though the union of Austria and Germany was forbidden by the Treaty of Saint-Germain in 1919, the Nazis annexed Austria in 1938. The German term Anschluss—”annexation“—is most frequently used in reference to this event. When the Nazis entered Austria to enforce the Anschluss, they encountered no military opposition and quickly took control. The US, USSR, and UK signed a declaration proclaiming the Anschluss null and void in 1943, yet Austria did not regain its sovereignty until what year? More…Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE GOSECK CIRCLE


The Goseck Circle

Hailed as “the German Stonehenge,” the Goseck circle is a Neolithic structure in Goseck, Germany. It is the oldest such structure known today, built about 7,000 years ago—and pre-dating Stonehenge by almost 2,000 years. Rediscovered during an aerial survey in 1991, the site consists of a circular ditch 246 feet (75 m) across surrounding two concentric palisade rings with gates in spots aligned with the sunrise and sunset on the winter solstice. When was the Goseck Circle re-opened to the public? More… Discuss

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: .ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25



ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25
1995 in “Rathaus” City of Marl, Germany, Live Concert in the Concert Auditorium, Rainer Klaas, Piano, Catalin Ilea, Cello
Ernest Rozsa plays Massenet “Meditation” 1978 Roumanian State Radio Broadcast Tirgu-Mures Marosvasarhely Neumarkt

http://www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com
rozsavirtuoso@yahoo.de

1983 Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany, Miklos Bence was Solo-Contrabassist in the 
Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany
Biography: Ernest Rozsa was Professor on the Music Pedagocial Liceum in Tirgu-Mures, Roumania, from 1975-1982
He was Soloist of the State Philharmonic Orchestra Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1975-1981
He performed from 1973-1981 many concert as soloist with this orchestra in Roumania with Conductors like Szalman Lorant, C. Mandeal and others, the Violinconcertos by Brahms, Beethoven, Bartok (Nr. 2), Sibelius, Mozart, Tchaikowsky, Tchaikowsky-Trio, Shostakovitch. There was also Productions Recordings in the State Roumanian Radio-Broadcast of the City of Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1973 until 1981.
He was in the same orchestra also Associate Concertmaster in foreign countries tours.
Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the “Philharmonia Hungarica in Marl, Germany”, one of the major orchestras in Germany until the year of 1999, when this orchestra has been finished by th German Government. 
He performed also by the WDR3 The German Broadcast Company for Classical Music together with his son, Ernoe Rozsa 
(www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com) works by Bottesini Grand Duo Concertant (with Benze Miklos Contrabass), his son (at this time Ernoe Rozsa was 13 years old) Ernoe Rozsa recorded at this time Pugnani-Kreisler Introduction and Allegro, Pablo de Sarasate “Caprice Basque”, Dimitrescu “Dans Taranesc”.
Since 1999 Ernest Rozsa is retired and living in Germany.
His son, Ernoe Rozsa, is active violin soloist in Japan, Ernoe Rozsa recorded the original Versions of the Violinconcertos Nr. 3 E-Major and Nr. 4 d-minor by Niccolo Paganini by the Label of NAXOS, Hong Kong. Ernoe Rozsa performing his own cadenzas on both Paganini Violinconcertos. Ernest Rozsa was first violin teacher of his son Ernoe Rozsa, and later his son studied by Prof. Tibor Varga, Prof. Rosa Fain, Sir Georg Solti, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin. Ernoe Rozsa was also soloist in a series of concerts with Lord Yehudi Menuhin (conductor), Ernoe Rozsa played the Mozart Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-Major with the “Rhainland-Pfaelzische Philharomie Ludwigshafen-Mannheim”, Germany, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin was the conductor of this 5 concerts. The greatest concert was in the “Alte Oper Frankfurt” in 1990, in germany, where Ernoe Rozsa performed as soloist with Mozarts Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-major and Lord Menuhin was conductor of this concerts.

 

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Great Performances: Carl. Maria von. Weber – Concerto No.1, in F minor, Op.73 (Sabine Meyer)



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Carl Maria von Weber wrote his Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73 (J. 114) for the clarinettist Heinrich Bärmann in 1811. The piece is considered a gem in the instrument’s repertoire. It is written for clarinet in B♭. The work consists of three movements in the form of fast, slow, fast.

Structure

  1. Allegro in F minor modulating into A-flat major and later returning to F minor with a meter of 3/4
  2. Adagio ma non troppo in C major transforming into C minor and E flat major and afterward reverting to C major with a meter of 4/4
  3. RondoAllegretto in F major with a meter of 2/4

Instrumentation

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 2 trumpetstimpanistrings, and solo clarinet

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826[1]) was a Germancomposerconductorpianistguitarist[2] and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romanticschool.

Weber’s operas Der FreischützEuryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. Der Freischütz came to be regarded as the first German “nationalist” opera,Euryanthe developed the Leitmotif technique to a hitherto-unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn‘s music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber’s lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures. This interest was first manifested in Weber’sincidental music for Schiller‘s translation of Gozzi‘s Turandot, for which he used a Chinese melody, making him the first Western composer to use an Asian tune that was not of the pseudo-Turkish kind popularized by Mozart and others.

A brilliant pianist himself, Weber composed four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor, which influenced composers such as ChopinLiszt and Mendelssohn. The Konzertstückprovided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt’s, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber’s shorter piano pieces, such as the Invitation to the Dance, were later orchestrated byBerlioz, while his Polacca Brillante was later set for piano and orchestra by Liszt.

Weber compositions for woodwind instruments occupy an important place in the musical repertoire. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet, a duo concertante, and variations on a theme (posthumously), are regularly performed today. His Concertino for Horn and Orchestra requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing—a technique known as “multiphonics“. His bassoon concerto and the Andante e Rondo ungarese (a reworking of a piece originally for viola and orchestra) are also popular with bassoonists.

Weber’s contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th-century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten ([Four] Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin.

Weber’s orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers – Berlioz referred to him several times in hisTreatise on Instrumentation while Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument.

His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as MarschnerMeyerbeer and Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Glinka. Homage has been paid to Weber by 20th-century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky,Mahler (who completed Weber’s unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber).

Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE TWENTY-ONE DEMANDS (1915)


The Twenty-One Demands (1915)

Japan gained a large sphere of interest in northern China through its victories in the First Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, thus joining the ranks of the European imperialist powers scrambling to establish control over China. Japan used its 1914 declaration of war against Germany as grounds for invading German holdings in China. Then, ignoring the Chinese request to withdraw, Japan secretly presented the Chinese president with an ultimatum. What were some of the demands? More… Discuss

 

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NEWS: COCAINE SMUGGLERS GO BANANAS


Cocaine Smugglers Go Bananas

Drug traffickers in Germany are having a very, very bad week. They managed to lose about 8.2 million dollars (6 million euros) worth of cocaine as a result of what appears to have been a “logistical error.” The drugs were smuggled into the country from Colombia in a shipment of bananas, but somehow the smugglers failed to retrieve their stash before the fruit was delivered to supermarkets. When employees at five Berlin shops went to unpack the banana cartons, they got an unexpected surprise in the form of 309 lb (140 kg) of cocaine. The drugs are now in the hands of the authorities.More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE GLAUBERG


The Glauberg

The presence of ancient ruins on the Glauberg plateau in Hesse, Germany, had long been attributed to the Romans, until the 1906 discovery of a torc—a metal necklace—which pointed to a Celtic influence. The Glauberg is one of a network of fortified sites found in parts of Germany. In 1988, a historian flying overhead discovered tumuli—mounds of earth protecting tombs—that were revealed to contain warriors’ remains and weapons. Perhaps the most significant discovery, though, was a statue of whom? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE SUBSEQUENT NUREMBERG TRIALS: DOCTORS’ TRIAL BEGINS (1946)


The Subsequent Nuremberg Trials: Doctors’ Trial Begins (1946)

The Doctors’ Trial was the first of 12 post-World War II trials collectively called the “Subsequent Nuremberg Trials,” which the US held in its occupation zone in Nuremberg, Germany. Of the 23 defendants, 20 were medical doctors, and they faced charges for war crimes that included experimenting on human subjects without their consent. The Nuremberg Code was thus established to protect the rights of humans participating in medical research. How many of the defendants received death sentencesMore… Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: JOHANN ECK (1486)


Johann Eck (1486)

Eck, a German Catholic theologian, was initially friendly with Martin Luther but did not hesitate to condemn Luther’s 95 Theses—which criticized papal policy—as heretical. Known for his dialectic skill, he publicly confronted Luther in 1519, and then went to Rome and returned with a papal bull condemning Luther. From then on, he was a leader in the struggle against the reforming party in Germany. How did the students of Leipzig, the site of Eck’s confrontation with Luther, react to the bull? More… Discuss

 

News: TROVE OF NAZI-LOOTED ART FOUND IN MUNCH MAN’S APARTMENT


Trove of Nazi-Looted Art Found in Munch Man’s Apartment

A cache of 1,500 works of art looted by the Nazis has been found in the apartment of a Munich, Germany, recluse being investigated for tax evasion. The man in question is the son of an art dealer who worked hand in hand with the Nazis during World War II. Valued at about one billion euros ($1.35 billion), this may well be one of the largest recoveries of Nazi-looted art, yet it represents only a small fraction of what was taken. Authorities discovered the trove in 2011, but news of the find is only emerging now. More… Discuss

 

GERMANY RECOGNIZES THIRD GENDER


Germany Recognizes Third Gender

Germany has become the first European country to legally recognize a third sex—indeterminate. Parents there may now leave the gender box blank on their children’s birth certificates, a move aimed to meet the needs of those babies born with both male and female or ambiguous sex characteristics or genetics. Until now, parents of intersexchildren had to make rapid decisions not just about which gender to put down on the birth certificates but also whether to take surgical steps to match the infants‘ physical appearances to the selected gender. Experts now believe that this sort of sex assignment early in life can have negative psychological consequences down the line. More…

 

J. S. Bach : Cantata — BWV 68 “Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt” (Karl Richter)



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750)
“Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt”
(God so loved the world)
BWV 68
Event:
Cantata for Whit Monday [2nd Day of Pentecost]
Readings: 
Epistle: Acts 10: 42-48; Gospel: John 3: 16-21
Composed:
Leipzig, 1725
1st performance: May 21, 1725 – Leipzig

Text:
Christiane Mariane von Ziegler (Mvts. 2-4); Salomo Liscow (Mvt. 1); John 3: 18 (Mvt. 5)
Scoring:
Soloists: Soprano, Bass; 4-part Chorus
Orchestra: 3 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 oboes, taille, horn, 2 violins, violoncello piccolo, viola, continuo
Mvt. 1: Chorus — Chorale (00:00)
Mvt. 2: Aria (05:31)
Mvt. 3: Recitative (09:41)
Mvt. 4: Aria (10:39)
Mvt. 5: Chorus (15:08)
Soprano: Edith Mathis
Bass: Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Oboe (I/II): Manfred Clement and Robert Eliscú
Englischhorn: Andreas Scwinn
Horn: Christoph Brandt
Violin: Ingo Sinnhoffer
Violincello: Fritz Kiskalt

Münchener Bach-Chor / Münchener Bach-Orchester
Conductor – Karl Richter

May 1974; Jan 1975, at Herkules-Saal, München, Germany.

 

Beethoven Sonata Op 106 “Hammerklavier” Part 1 Valentina Lisitsa



Recording in Hannover Germany
Beethoven Sonata Op 106 “Hammerklavier” Part 1 Valentina Lisitsa

 

Today’s Birthday: HANNAH ARENDT (1906)


Hannah Arendt (1906)

Jewish political philosopher Hannah Arendt fled Germany for France and then the US following Hitler’s rise to power in 1933. Her reputation as a scholar and writer was firmly established with the publication of The Origins of Totalitarianism, which linked Nazism and Communism to 19th-century imperialism and anti-Semitism. Her next major publication, The Human Condition, likewise received wide acclaim. What controversial concept did she put forth in her Eichmann in JerusalemMore… Discuss

 

Delius Caprice and Elegy Julian Lloyd Webber and Eric Fenby



Delius Caprice and Elegy performed by Julian Lloyd Webber and Eric Fenby with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. The recording won a Gramophone Award.

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: SIEMENS & HALSKE TELEGRAPH CONSTRUCTION COMPANY IS FOUNDED (1847)


Siemens & Halske Telegraph Construction Company Is Founded (1847)

Siemens AG is Europe’s largest engineering conglomerate. It was originally founded to build telegraph installations, but under Werner Siemens and his three brothers, it expanded to produce cables, telephones, electric power, and electric lighting. The company built the first long-distance telegraph line in Europe, followed by the monumental Indo-European telegraph line that stretched from Calcutta, India, to London, England. What scandal tainted the company’s reputation in the 1940s? More…Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: GERMANY, ITALY, AND JAPAN SIGN TRIPARTITE PACT (1940)


Germany, Italy, and Japan Sign Tripartite Pact (1940)

The World War II alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan was fully realized in September 1940, with the signing of the Tripartite Pact. The agreement called for the Axis Powers to come to each other’s aid if attacked by a nation not already involved in the European War or the Sino-Japanese Conflict and to assist one another in their efforts to “establish and maintain a new order of things”—Germany and Italy in Europe and Japan in Greater East Asia. How did the treaty get the nickname “Roberto”? More…Discuss

 

Valentina has uploaded a new video: Beethoven “Moonlight” Sonata op 27 # 2 Mov 3 Valentina Lisitsa



Recording in Beethovensaal, Hannover Germany, Dec 2009. Wilhelm Kempff recorded Beethoven cycle in the very same hall.
Buy Moonlight Sonata DVD http://www.amazon.co.uk/Live-Royal-Al…

Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall
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US Amazon - http://bit.ly/ValRAH

 

Today’s Birthday: WALTER ROBERT DORNBERGER (1895)


Walter Robert Dornberger (1895)

A German artillery officer during World War I, Dornberger was captured and spent two years in a French prisoner-of-war camp. After his release, he studied engineering, and, beginning in 1932, directed construction of the V-2 rocket, the forerunner of all post-war spacecraft. Along with other German scientists, Dornberger was brought to the US as part of Operation Paperclip and worked as an advisor on guided missiles for the US Air Force. He became a key consultant on what major American venture? More… Discuss

 

Bernstein Beethoven Leonore Overture Nº3



Leonore Overture Nº 3 in C major, Op. 72b

The Amnesty International Concert

Orchestra: Bavarian Broadcast Symphony Orchestra
Venue: Munich, Germany.
Date: 17/10/1976

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 – 1827)
Leonard Bernstein (1918 – 1990)