Tag Archives: History

this day in the yesteryear: Medal of Honor Authorized by US Congress (1862)


Medal of Honor Authorized by US Congress (1862)

The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the US. It is presented by the president for “gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of…life above and beyond the call of duty” while engaged in an action against an enemy. Members of all branches of the US military are eligible to receive the medal, but each branch has its own special design. The Philadelphia Mint designed the medal, which was first awarded during the Civil War. How many soldiers have received the medal twice? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Ferdinand, Graf von Zeppelin (1838)


 

Italiano: Descrizione: Ferdinand Graf von Zepp...

Italiano: Descrizione: Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin Fonte: http://www.lib.utexas.edu/photodraw/portraits/zeppelin.jpg licenza: (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Ferdinand, Graf von Zeppelin (1838)

 

Zeppelin began working with balloons for human transport as an observer during the American Civil War. In 1891, he retired from the Prussian army to devote himself to building motor-driven airships. Zeppelin invented the first rigid airship in 1900, but the experiment exhausted his funds. Luckily, public opinion was so strongly in favor of his airship project that donations largely financed his future work. Whom did his granddaughter later threaten to sue for sullying her family’s name? More… Discuss

 

Princess Caraboo


Princess Caraboo

“Princess Caraboo” was a famous imposter in 19th-century England. Her real-name was Mary Baker, and she was a cobbler’s daughter. She invented a fictitious language and created an exotic persona, claiming to be Princess Caraboo from the island of Javasu. She alleged that she had been captured by pirates but managed to jump from their ship and swim to safety. For several weeks, Princess Caraboo enjoyed the hospitality and company of local society. How was her true identity finally uncovered? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Paul François Jean Nicolas, Vicomte de Barras (1755)


Paul François Jean Nicolas, Vicomte de Barras (1755)

Barras was a Provençal nobleman who became disenchanted with the royal regime and joined the French Revolution. When, after the fall of the monarchy, a war dictatorship replaced it, Barras played a key role in overthrowing Maximilien Robespierre and ending the Reign of Terror. Eventually given command of the army of the interior and the police, he suppressed a royalist uprising in 1795 by turning the troops over to a young officer in whose marriage he later played a role. Who was this officer? More… Discuss

quotation: An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come. Victor Hugo (1802-1885)


An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

today’s birthday: George Goethals (1858)


George Goethals (1858)

Goethals was a US army engineer who served as chief engineer of the Panama Canal. During the course of the project, yellow fever, labor troubles, unexpected construction complications, and crumbling substrata caused numerous setbacks and claimed thousands of lives. By taking personal interest in the men working on the canal, however, Goethals created an atmosphere of cooperation and completed the project ahead of schedule. The Goethals Bridge, named in his honor, links what two US states? More… Discuss

word: abjure


abjure 

Definition: (verb) To renounce under oath; forswear.
Synonyms: recant, retract, resile
Usage: For nearly 21 years after his resignation as Prime Minister in 1963, he abjured all titles, preferring to remain just plain “Mr.” Discuss.

this pressed: National Geographic Magazine: Sugar (an industry once run with slave labor… now enslaving through addiction everyone globally!)


Picture of sugar being sprinkled on a donut

Sugar : We were smitten 10,000 years ago on the island of New Guinea. Today the average American downs 22.7 teaspoons a day.

Rasputin


Rasputin

Rasputin was a notorious figure in the court of Czar Nicholas II due to his magnetic personality and relative success in treating the czarevitch’s hemophilia. His appointees filled high positions, and those who opposed him were dismissed. A semiliterate peasant, Rasputin gained a reputation as a holy man, preaching a doctrine of salvation that mixed religious fervor with sexual indulgence. In 1916, a group of right-wing patriots plotted to kill him. What happened when they tried to poison him? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Queen Victoria Ascends British Throne (1837)


Queen Victoria Ascends British Throne (1837)

Queen Victoria ruled the UK for more than 63 years, longer than any other British monarch. Her reign, known as the Victorian Era, coincided with the height of the Industrial Revolution and was marked by significant social, economic, and technological changes in the UK. Though the Irish Potato Famine adversely affected Victoria’s popularity, she was mostly well liked. She was a carrier of the hereditary illness later dubbed the “royal disease.” What is the disease called today? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: José Rizal (1861) (“thinkers are even more dangeroeus when whey write!”)


José Rizal (1861)

Rizal was a Philippine nationalist, author, poet, and physician. While living in Europe, he published novels railing against the evils of Spanish rule in the Philippines, earning him the ire of officials there. Upon his return in 1892, Rizal was arrested as a revolutionary agitator. When an armed rebellion broke out four years later, Rizal, who had advocated reform but not revolution, was shot for sedition. His martyrdom fueled the revolution. What did he do on the eve of his execution? More… Discuss

just a thought: “even the best theories don’t live through their application in practice!” (George-b ©always)


just a thought: “even the best theories don’t live through their application in practice!”

(George-b ©always)

reverse-1312286075_sisyphus_floor_moping

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word: felicitate


felicitate 

Definition: (verb) To offer congratulations to.
Synonyms: congratulate
Usage: I felicitate you on your memory, sir. Discuss.
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quotation: James Madison


I believe there are more instances of the abridgement of the freedom of the people by gradual and silent encroachments of those in power than by violent and sudden usurpations.

James Madison (1751-1836) Discuss

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QUOTATION: John F. Kennedy


And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.

John F. Kennedy (1917-1963) Discuss

 

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Noam Chomsky “Vietnam War Remembered” [FULL TALK + Q&A]


Noam ChomskyVietnam War Remembered” [FULL TALK + Q&A]

Published on May 2, 2014

MUST WATCH Talk by Prof. Noam Chomsky Remembering the Vietnam War.

Date – 2005

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WORD: Materfamilias


materfamilias 

Definition: (noun) A female head of a family or tribe.
Synonyms: matriarch
Usage: As materfamilias, my grandmother calls the shots on holidays like Thanksgiving, and no one dares question her. Discuss.
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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: MARGARET THATCHER BECOMES PRIME MINISTER OF THE UK (1979)


Margaret Thatcher Becomes Prime Minister of the UK (1979)

Thatcher was Great Britain’s first female prime minister and served longer than any other British prime minister in the 20th century. While in office, she initiated what became known as the “Thatcher Revolution,” a series of social and economic changes that dismantled many aspects of Britain’s postwar welfare state, establishing free-market economic policies and deregulating industries. Before embarking on her political career, she was a research chemist working with what popular dessert food? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: POLISH CONSTITUTION DAY


Polish Constitution Day

May 3, known in Poland as Swieto Trzeciego Maja, is a patriotic legal holiday honoring the nation’s first constitution, adopted in 1791. It introduced fundamental changes in the way Poland was governed, based on the ideas of the French Revolution, and represented an attempt to preserve the country’s independence. Although the May 3rd Constitution (as it was called) represented a great advance for the Polish people, it also aroused the anxieties of neighboring countries and eventually led to theSecond Partition two years later. More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENCE DAY


Zimbabwe Independence Day

Like much of Africa, the area that is now Zimbabwe was long controlled by Europeans. In 1922, the 34,000 European settlers chose to become a self-governing British colony, Southern Rhodesia; in 1923, Southern Rhodesia was annexed by the British Crown. A fight for independence took place in the 1970s. An independent constitution was written for Zimbabwe in London in 1979, and independence followed on April 18, 1980. Independence Day is celebrated in every city and district of the nation with political rallies, parades, traditional dances, singing, and fireworks. More…Discuss

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: “Nearer My God To Thee” I SALONISTI


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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: PAN AMERICAN DAY


Pan American Day

The International Union of American Republics (now called the Pan American Union)—general secretariat of the Organization of American States (OAS)—designated April 14 as Pan American Day in 1930. Although each member country holds its own celebration, it is at the Pan American Union building in Washington, D.C., that one of the largest observances takes place. Students from all over the Western Hemisphere travel to Washington where, against a backdrop of flags in the courtyard of the House of the Americas, they perform folk songs and dances. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE NOTRE-DAME AFFAIR (1950)


The Notre-Dame Affair (1950)

The Notre-Dame Affair was an anti-Catholic intervention performed by radical members of the Lettrist movement on Easter Sunday 1950. During a quiet moment in the Easter High Mass, Michel Mourre, disguised as a Dominican monk, climbed to the rostrum and declaimed a blasphemous anti-sermon on the death of God. Not surprisingly, his statements enraged the thousands of faithful present at the mass, who went after Mourre and his co-conspirators and may well have lynched them had it not been for whom?More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON DIES OF PNEUMONIA (1841)


William Henry Harrison Dies of Pneumonia (1841)

When at age 68 Harrison became the 9th president of the US, he was the oldest man yet to step into that role. Despite his age, he paid little heed to the cold, wet weather on the day of his inauguration and proceeded to deliver the longest inaugural speech in US history—without hat or overcoat. Pneumonia claimed his life a month later, making him the first American president to die in office and making his presidency the briefest ever. According to legend, he was the first victim of what curse? More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: THE LEANING TOWER OF PISA


The Leaning Tower of Pisa

In 1173, construction began on the final building of the cathedral complex in Pisa, Italy. The bell tower was designed to stand 185 feet (56 m) tall, but uneven settling of its foundation caused its 5.5-degree lean. Work was suspended several times, but the structure was still leaning upon completion in the 14th century. The tower’s tilt only worsened over time, prompting a recent strengthening project to prevent collapse. How did the tower narrowly escape destruction during World War II? More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: JOSEPH PRIESTLEY


Joseph Priestley

Priestley was an English theologian and scientist. He prepared for the Presbyterian ministry but gradually rejected orthodox Calvinism for Unitarianism. His History of the Corruptions of Christianity, published in 1782, was officially burned in 1785, and he immigrated to the US in 1794, befriending the nation’s founders. As a scientist, his manipulation of gases enabled him to discover new ones, including “dephlogisticated air,” a breakthrough whose magnitude escaped him. What gas was it? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: John Quincy Adams


Courage and perseverance have a magical talisman, before which difficulties disappear and obstacles vanish into air.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) Discuss

 

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A WordPress Photo Challenge: “Abandoned – Towns of Yesteryears – Ghost Towns of Today” (Access a Ghost Town Here) (A new Widget at euzicasa)


Towns of Yesteryears - Ghost Towns of Today

Towns of Yesteryears – Ghost Towns of Today (Access a ghost town here)

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Abandonment (photos and stories of now: Ghost Towns USA): Widget coming up!


GOLDBELT SPRING
 
NAME: Goldbelt Spring
COUNTY: Inyo
ROADS: 4WD
GRID: 1
CLIMATE: Hot summer, cool winter
BEST TIME TO VISIT: Anytime
COMMENTS: East/south from Teakettle Junction in Death Valley NP, thru Hidden Valley. Or east on Hunter Mountain Road, likely closed by snow in winter and late spring
REMAINS: Dumptruck, dugout, building remains

The famous Shorty Harris lead the first rush into the Goldbelt Mining District after he discovered gold a few miles south of the area’s namesake, Goldbelt Spring. There was talk of building a town site but, the ore didn’t amount to much so, the talk fizzled. Harris also discovered tungsten here in 1915. In the 1940′s, talc was discovered and mined in various locations. Although no large talc deposits were ever discovered here. There are only flattened buildings now left when only a few years ago there were three 50s era shacks, a dugout and an outhouse. The nearby Calmet Mine has an abandoned ore chute. The spring is marked by a dumptruck, resting forever at this site. As this is the only reliable spring in the area, it was used by the Tuhu band of Western Shoshoni indians, and later by miners (mostly talc and chrysotile asbestos) as a base camp. Before they were removed by the Park Service, non-indigenous feral burros frequented the site, evidenced by numerous skulls and bones that could once be found nearby. None of the local mines was particularly productive and none were major operations. Geologically, chrysotile occurs just north of Goldbelt on the east side of Ulida Flat in a zone of serpentinized dolomite which was altered in contact with quartz monzonite, probably of the Hunter Mountain Pluton. Submitted by: Bill Cook
Goldbelt dwelling, outhouse and dugout
Courtesy Bill Cook

Framed at Goldbelt
Courtesy Bill Cook


Downtown Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook


Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook


Dumptruck at Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook


Shingled outhouse Goldbelt Spring
Courtesy Bill Cook


View to downtown from the spring
Courtesy Bill Cook


Goldbelt leaning. It was gone by our next visit
Courtesy Bill Cook

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SVETLANA ALLILUYEVA (1926)


Svetlana Alliluyeva (1926)

The youngest child of Joseph Stalin, and his only daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva caused a furor when she defected to the West in the 1960s, leaving behind her two grown children in the process. After becoming a naturalized US citizen, she published two successful memoirs, married, took the name Lana Peters, had a daughter, and divorced. In 1984, she returned to the USSR and renounced her defection, but her resolve soon wavered. How long was it before she left again for the West? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: WILLIAM FREDERICK “BUFFALO BILL” CODY (1846)


William Frederick “Buffalo Bill” Cody (1846)

Cody’s father passed away when he was just a boy, leaving him to support the family. He worked as a wagoner, trapper, and prospector before joining the Pony Express at 14. After serving in the American Civil War, he became a buffalo hunter—hence the nickname “Buffalo Bill.” Writers chronicled his frontier exploits, making him a folk hero. He capitalized on his fame with “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show,” which toured the US and Europe for decades. How many buffalo did Bill claim to have killed? More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: THE MAMLUKS


The Mamluks

The Mamluks were members of a warrior caste that ruled Egypt from about 1250 to 1517. Islamic rulers created the caste by collecting non-Muslim slave boys, grooming them as cavalry soldiers, and converting them to Islam during training. The Mamluks initially served the Ayyubid sultans but grew powerful enough to challenge them and claim the sultanate. Though the Ottomans crushed the Mamluks and took Cairo in 1517, the word “mamluk” lives on in various cultures today. What meanings does it have? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: STEVE JOBS (1955)


Steve Jobs (1955)

Now a household name known the world over for his role in the technological revolution of recent decades at the helm of Apple Inc., Jobs was once a college dropout tinkering with computer parts in his parents’ garage. It was there that he and Stephen Wozniak founded Apple in 1976 and built their first computers. Jobs left Apple in 1985 but returned in 1996 and played a key role in reviving the financially ailing company, reconfirming his reputation as an industry visionary. What is a StevenoteMore… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: TECHNOPHOBIA


Technophobia

Technophobia—a fear of advanced technology—emerged alongside the mechanical innovations of the Industrial Revolution and became ever more pervasive as inventions ranging from the light bulb to the atomic bomb demonstrated technology’s astounding capabilities. Mild technophobia is quite common—many experience it when facing an unfamiliar computer system at a new job. More acute technophobes see technology as inherently dangerous. What well-known novel was one of the first to tackle technophobia? More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Alexander Hamilton


A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: UK CALLS OFF THE TODDLERS’ TRUCE (1957)


UK Calls Off the Toddlers’ Truce (1957)

Today we are used to turning on the television at any hour of the day or night and having access to countless channels broadcasting all manner of program, but this was not always the case. In television’s early days, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) was the UK’s sole public broadcaster; it started out with just one channel, and it cut its feed from 6PM to 7PM to accommodate parents putting their children to bed. What caused the BBC to eventually abandon the so-called Toddlers’ Truce?More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: John Adams – Common tones in simple time


Happy Birthday Mr. John Adams! 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Felix Mendelssohn – Songs without Words – Op.53, No.1



Felix MendelssohnSongs without Words – Op.53, No.1
András Schiff
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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SERBIA STATEHOOD DAY OF THE REPUBLIC


Serbia Statehood Day of the Republic

On February 15, 1804, Serbian patriot Djordje Petrovic Karadjordje led an uprising against the Turkish Ottoman Empire to gain independence. A second uprisingoccurred in 1815 and was successful; Serbia formally gained independence in 1829. In 2001, the Serbian Parliament declared February 15 a state holiday to commemorate the day that the first Serbian uprising began. A ceremony is held in Orasac to celebrate the uprising and first constitution (signed in 1835). The main celebrations include festive concerts, film and theater premiers, exhibitions, and many other events.More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Henry James “Live all you can – it’s a mistake not to…”


Live all you can – it’s a mistake not to. It doesn’t so much matter what you do in particular, so long as you have your life. If you haven’t had that, what have you had?

Henry James (1843-1916) Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: LADY JANE GREY, “THE NINE DAYS’ QUEEN,” BEHEADED (1554)


Lady Jane Grey, “The Nine Days’ Queen,” Beheaded (1554)

A tragic figure in English history, Lady Jane Grey was a pretty, intelligent young girl whose life was cut short due to the political machinations of those closest to her. When she was just 15, she was wed to the son of a duke. Her father-in-law then persuaded the dying King Edward VI, still a boy himself, to name Lady Jane his successor. She reigned for just nine days before stepping down. Though she was convicted of high treason, she might never have been executed had her father not done what? More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: THE BALLISTA


The Ballista

The ballista is an ancient missile launcher designed to hurl long arrows or heavy balls. The largest could accurately hurl 60-pound (27-kg) weights up to about 500 yards (450 m). The Greek version was basically a huge crossbow, while the Roman ballista was powered by torsion and used two separate arms joined at their ends by the cord that propelled the missile. Once the Roman Empire declined, so too did the ballista—it was too challenging and expensive to build. Which weapons took its place? More… Discuss

 

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Haïku – Destiny, by George -B


Haïku - Destiny, by George -B

First the body dies
then it’s moved six feet under
headstone falls over.

 

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Eddie Vedder – No More (video)


EDDIE VEDDER LYRICS

“No More”

I speak for a man who gave for this land
Took a bullet in the back for his pay
Spilled his blood in the dirt and the dust
He’s back to say:What he has seen is hard to believe
And it does no good to just pray
He asks of us to stand
And we must end this war todayWith his mind, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his heart, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his life he’s saying, “No more war!”With his eyes, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his body, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his voice, he’s saying, “No more war!”

Yeah, nothing’s too good for a veteran
Yeah, this is what they say
So nothing is what they will get
In this new American way

The lies we were told to get us to go
Were criminal … let us be straight
Let’s get to the point where our voices get heard
And I know what I’ll say

With our minds, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our hearts, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our lives, we’re saying, “No more war!”

With our eyes, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our voices, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our bodies, we’re saying, “No more war!”

No more innocents dying
No more terrorizing
No more eulogizing
No more
No more evangelizing
No more
No more presidents lying
No more war

With our minds, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our hearts, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our lives, we’re saying, “No more war!”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eddie Vedder (born Edward Louis Severson; December 23, 1964) is an American musician andsinger-songwriter[2] who is best known for being the lead vocalist and one of three guitarists of thealternative rock band Pearl Jam. Known for his powerful vocals, he has been ranked at #7 on a list of “Best Lead Singers of All Time”, compiled by Rolling Stone.[3] He is also involved in soundtrack work and contributes to albums by other artists. In 2007, Vedder released his first solo album as asoundtrack for the film Into the Wild (2007). His second album, Ukulele Songs, along with a live DVD titled Water on the Road, was released on 31 May 2011.[4]

Eddie Vedder
EddieVedder.jpg

Vedder on October 22, 2006
Background information
Birth name Edward Louis Severson III
Also known as Edward Mueller, Jerome Turner, Wes C. Addle
Born December 23, 1964 (age 49)
Evanston, Illinois, United States
Genres Alternative rockfolk rock,grungehard rock
Occupations Musiciansongwriter
Instruments Main: Vocals Occasional: guitar,harmonicatambourineOther: mandolinmandola,ukulelekeyboardsaccordion,bass guitardrums
Years active 1979–present
Labels Universal Republic Records
Republic Records,MonkeywrenchJ Records
Associated acts Pearl JamGlen HansardBad RadioTemple of the Dog,Hovercraft7 Worlds Collide, C Average, Jimmy FallonNeil Young
Notable instruments
Fender Telecaster
Schecter PT Model
Gibson SG
Gibson SG Jr.
Martin 0–18
Earnest Instruments Tululele, Custom Ukulele[1]

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IN THE YESTERYEAR: QUEEN VICTORIA CREATES THE VICTORIA CROSS (1856)


Queen Victoria Creates the Victoria Cross (1856)

Queen Victoria created the Victoria Cross—the highest British military award for valor—on January 29, 1856, in the late stages of the Crimean War. The impetus for a new medal arose during the war—one of the first with modern reporting—as correspondents documented many acts of bravery by British servicemen that went unrewarded. Thus, Victoria instituted her eponymous award for acts of devotion and valor in the presence of the enemy. From what was the Victoria Cross originally made? More…Discuss

 

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THE DIAMOND SUTRA


The Diamond Sutra

The Diamond Sutra is a Buddhist wisdom text. Written in the form of a dialogue between the Buddha Gautama and a questioning disciple, it emphasizes the fleeting nature of the material world and posits that enlightenment cannot be achieved through rational thought. A wood block-printed copy of the sutra held at the British Library is the earliest known printed text with a date—868 CE—predating the Gutenberg Bible by about 587 years. The copy, in scroll form, is roughly how many feet long? More… Discuss

British Library: Psalms in English verse (girdle book) )visit the library – widget)


Binding

Author John Croke (translator)
Title Psalms in English verse (girdle book)
Origin England, S. E. (London)
Date c. 1540
Language English
Script Gothic cursive
Decoration 1 miniature of Henry VIII, in colours and gold (f. 1v). Small initials plain in silver on red grounds or in gold on blue grounds.
Dimensions in mm 40 x 30 (30 x 20)
Official foliation ff. 104 (+ 1 original parchment double-leaf, glued together, at the beginning, and 1 at the end)
Form Parchment codex
Binding Pre-1600. Original worked gilt covers (metalwork) with clasp and girdle loops.
Provenance ? Anne Boleyn (born c. 1500, d. 1536), queen of England, second consort of Henry VIII: The volume corresponds with one described in George Wyat, Extracts from the Life of Queen Anne Boleigne: Written at the close of the XVIth century, and now first printed (London: [privately printed], 1817), p. 29; Wyat notes that it was traditionally said to have been given by Anne Boleyn, when on the scaffold, to one of her maids of honour, a lady of the family of Wyat. 
? George Wyat, 1817: see above, where he states that the described volume is in his possession.
Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville (b. 1776, d. 1839), 1st duke of Buckingham and Chandos, of Stowe House, near Buckingham: inscribed with the press-mark ‘Appendix in vol. 1 … no. 27′ (f. ), corresponding to his catalogue (O’Conor 1818-1819).
Richard Plantagenet Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville (b. 1797, d. 1861), 2nd duke of Buckingham and Chandos; sold in 1849 to Lord Ashburnham.
Bertram Ashburnham (b. 1797, d. 1878), 4th earl of Ashburnham, of Ashburnham Place, Sussex.
Bertram Ashburnham (b. 1840, d. 1913), 5th earl of Ashburnham: purchased by the British Museum from him together with 1084 other Stowe manuscripts in 1883.

King Henry VIII

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: PÍO BAROJA Y NESSI (1872)


Pío Baroja y Nessi (1872)

Considered the foremost Spanish novelist of his time, Baroja was part of the Generation of ’98, a group of writers who, in the face of defeat in the Spanish-American War, proclaimed a moral and cultural rebirth for Spain. He wrote almost 100 novels, including 11 trilogies and, perhaps his most ambitious project, a 22-volume cycle about a 19th-century insurgent. Baroja’s writings largely concern the intellectual and political climate of his homeland. What career did he give up to be a writer? More…Discuss

 

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: MANUELA SÁENZ (1797)


Manuela Sáenz (1797)

Until recently, Sáenz’s contributions to the South American independence movement were largely overlooked. For eight years, she dedicated herself to the cause—and to her lover, revolutionary leader Simón Bolívar, whom she once saved from an assassination attempt. For that, he nicknamed her Libertadora del Libertador, or Liberator of the Liberator. Bolívar’s death in 1830 left Sáenz vulnerable to his opponents, and she was exiled and left destitute. What honor was she accorded in 2010? More…Discuss