Tag Archives: Japan

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HARRY TRUMAN BECOMES 33RD PRESIDENT OF THE US (1945)


Harry Truman Becomes 33rd President of the US (1945)

Truman was the 33rd president of the US. He is remembered for authorizing the use of atomic bombs against Japan and for his opposition to Communism. A Democrat who largely accepted the New Deal tradition, he presided over victory in World War II and the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. His administration also oversaw the beginning of the Cold War and the desegregation of the US armed forces. What famous headline ran in the Chicago Tribune the day after Truman won his second term? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: HANA MATSURI


Hana Matsuri

Hana Matsuri is a celebration of the Buddha‘s birthday, observed in Buddhist temples throughout Japan, where it is known as Kambutsue. The highlight of the celebration is a ritual known as kambutsue (“ceremony of ‘baptizing’ the Buddha”), in which a tiny bronze statue of the Buddha, standing in an open lotus flower, is anointed with sweet tea. People use a small bamboo ladle to pour the tea, made of hydrangea leaves, over the head of the statue. The custom is supposed to date from the seventh century, when perfume was used, as well as tea. More… Discuss

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NEWS: UN COURT ORDERS JAPAN TO HALT ANTARCTIC WHALING


UN Court Orders Japan to Halt Antarctic Whaling

Despite signing a 1986 moratorium on whaling, Japan has continued to allow it, much to the consternation of conservation and animal rights groups as well as the international community. The country has justified its continued hunting of whales by claiming that it is being carried out for scientific purposes rather than for human consumption, a claim that has been met with widespread skepticism. On Monday, the UN’s International Court of Justice ordered Japan to put a stop to its Antarctic whaling program, ruling that the scientific output of the program did not justify the number of whales being killed. Japan has said it will abide by the ruling. More… Discuss

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NEWS: QUESTIONS RAISED ABOUT STEM CELL STUDY FINDINGS


Questions Raised About Stem Cell Study Findings

A Japanese scientist who published groundbreaking research on stem cells earlier this year is now calling for the study to be withdrawn. Scientists have as yet been unable to replicate the study’s finding that bathing mature cells in a weak acid solution could quickly and cheaply convert them into stem cells, and questions have been raised about the accuracy and legitimacy of the data and images included in the study. The RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan is now conducting an inquiry into the paper. More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: SUSHI


Sushi

Though it is one of the iconic dishes of Japanese cuisine, sushi originated in Southeast Asia. It later spread to China before being introduced to Japan, where the version we recognize today was developed. It is now popular all over the world. Outside Japan, “sushi” is often taken to mean “raw fish,” but it actually means “sour” and simply refers to a dish made with vinegared rice—it can include raw or cooked fish, vegetables, or egg. What popular sushi filling was introduced by NorwegiansMore… Discuss

 

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TODAY HOLIDAY: KASUGA MATSURI


Kasuga Matsuri

The Kasuga Shrine in Nara is one of the most beautiful and ancient in Japan. Every year on March 13, a festival is held there with elaborate ceremonies and performances that recall the shrine’s heyday. The hiki-uma horse ceremony, in which a sacred horse is led in procession through the streets, and the elegant Yamato-mai dance performed by Shinto women are reminiscent of the culture and customs of the Nara and Heian Eras. Construction of the Kasuga Shrine was started during the Nara period (710-784) and was completed in the first years of the Heian period (794-1185).More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: BONSAI


Bonsai

Bonsai, Japanese for “tray planting,” refers both to the art of cultivating dwarf trees and to trees grown by this method. Such trees are not naturally miniature—they are kept small with cultivation methods like pruning and tying branches with wire to “train” them. The art originated in China but has been developed primarily by the Japanese. Bonsai may live for a century or more and are passed from generation to generation as valued heirlooms. What harmed many of Japan’s bonsai trees in 1923? More…Discuss

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: HINA MATSURI


Hina Matsuri

Hina Matsuri is a festival for girls, celebrated in homes throughout Japan since the Edo Period (1600-1867). A set of 10 to 15 dolls (or hina), usually family heirlooms from various generations, is displayed on a stand covered with red cloth. Dressed in elaborate silk costumes, the dolls represent the emperor and empress, court ministers, and servants. In parts of Tottori Prefecture, girls make boats of straw, place a pair of paper dolls in them and set them afloat on the Mochigase River. The custom dates back to ancient times when dolls were used as talismans to exorcize evil. More…Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: JAPAN ATTACKS AUSTRALIA (1942)


Japan Attacks Australia (1942)

In aviation’s early days, the pearling port of Broome in Western Australia served as a refueling point for planes flying between the Dutch East Indies—now Indonesia—and inland Australia. Therefore, when Japan invaded Java during World War II, the Allied evacuation route for Dutch refugees included a stop in Broome. On March 3, 1942, Japanese fighter planes attacked Broome, destroying upwards of 20 Allied aircraft, some of which were loaded with refugees at the time. How many died? More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: GEISHA: “ART PERSON”


Geisha: “Art Person”

A geisha is a traditional Japanese artist-entertainer skilled at conversation, singing, and dancing. The geisha system likely originated in the 17th century to provide a class of well-trained entertainers separate from courtesans and prostitutes. Even though geisha are usually women, the first ones were actually men. The numbers of geisha have declined from some 80,000 in the 1920s to a few thousand today. Why did geisha often paint their teeth black as part of their formal make-up? More… Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE 228 MASSACRE (1947)


The 228 Massacre (1947)

Following Japan‘s defeat in World War II, Taiwan was placed under the administrative control of the Republic of China. The transition did not go smoothly. The Taiwanese had been content under Japanese rule and quickly grew to resent the heavy-handed tactics of the Kuomintang. On February 27, 1947, a dispute between a cigarette vendor and authorities escalated the next day into an anti-government uprising that was violently suppressed. How many Taiwanese are thought to have been massacred? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: JAPAN NATIONAL FOUNDATION DAY (660 BCE)


Japan National Foundation Day (660 BCE)

The Japanese holiday known as Kenkoku Kinen-no-Hi, or National Foundation Day, commemorates the accession to the throne of Jimmu Tenno, the legendary first human emperor of Japan—believed to be a direct descendant of the gods—and founder of the imperial dynasty. In 1872, when the holiday was originally proclaimed, it was called Empire Day. It only came to be known as National Foundation Day when it was brought back in 1966 after having been abandoned for about two decades for what reason? More… Discuss

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National Geographic: Sleeping Giant (Mount Fuji)


The most famous of Japan’s Volcanoes is Mt. Fuji and its activity is being constantly monitored. ACCESS 360: MT. FUJI AIRS TUE FEB 11 at 6P.

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE WASHINGTON NAVAL TREATY IS SIGNED (1922)


The Washington Naval Treaty Is Signed (1922)

Also known as the Five-Power Treaty, the Washington Naval Treaty was an agreement signed in the wake of World War I in an effort to prevent an arms race by limiting naval construction. Signed by five of the major Allied Powers—Great Britain, the US, Japan, France, and Italy—the treaty limited the tonnage of aircraft carriers and capital ships and imposed proportional limits on the number of warships each signatory nation could maintain. For how long did signatories adhere to these terms? More… Discuss

 

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Are you concerned: I know I am and You should be too!: Fukushima Wash-Up Fears in U.S. Belie Radiation Risks: Energy – Bloomberg


Fukushima Wash-Up Fears in U.S. Belie Radiation Risks: Energy – Bloomberg.

Think about it….it all started with Enola Gay-on to global nuclear arsenals- it went on with Atoms for Peace-through reactors meltdowns, or (Close to :) )
Now, can reverse the evil we brought to this Planet, and ourselves, the answer is no, not as much as we can leave this place for a clean one (hopefully)

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: TOKUGAWA IEYASU (1543)


Tokugawa Ieyasu (1543)

Along with Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi, Tokugawa was one of the three unifiers of war-torn, premodern Japan. The three warriors established military control over the whole country and succeeded one another in the dictatorship. Tokugawa’s time as shogun, or military dictator, ushered in a period of internal peace, urban growth, increased literacy, and resistance to Western influences. He died in 1616, but the Tokugawa shogunate did not die with him. For how long did his heirs rule Japan?More… Discuss

 

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“We Want To Fight For This Cause”: Nuclear Refugees From Fukushima Join Anti-Nuke Protests


Published on Jan 17, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org - On our final day of our special broadcast from Tokyo, we speak with a Japanese resident from the town that housed part of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant who is participating in weekly protests against the resumption of nuclear power in her country. “We couldn’t bring anything from our houses. We didn’t have a toothbrush, we didn’t have a blanket. We didn’t have towels. We had nothing. It was truly hell, and we thought it would be much better to die. But now, we are here, and we can’t really give up. We want to fight for this cause,” Yukiko Kameya said as she attended a demonstration outside Prime Minister Shinzo Abe‘s official residence. “We told the prime minister many times, every week here, that we are against the re-opening of the nuclear facilities, but it doesn’t seem that he gets it. He just does whatever he wants to do anyway.” 

Watch our entire special broadcast from Japan athttp://www.democracynow.org/topics/japan.

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Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video


Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Celsium-137 in salmon stockFukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video.

Related articles

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE SILVERTOWN EXPLOSION (1917)


 

 

The Silvertown Explosion (1917)

 

The Millennium Mills in the aftermath of the S...

The Millennium Mills in the aftermath of the Silvertown explosion (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

During World War I, a chemical factory in the highly populated area of Silvertown, England, was used to purify TNT in order to meet the urgent demand for explosive shells. Although a newer, safer plant was built elsewhere, production continued at the factory until a fire ignited 50 tons of TNT in 1917. The explosion killed 73 people, injured hundreds more, and destroyed the plant, many nearby buildings, and a gasholder—sparking an enormous fireball. To what is the low death toll attributed? More… Discuss

 

 

 

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE TWENTY-ONE DEMANDS (1915)


The Twenty-One Demands (1915)

Japan gained a large sphere of interest in northern China through its victories in the First Sino-Japanese War and the Russo-Japanese War, thus joining the ranks of the European imperialist powers scrambling to establish control over China. Japan used its 1914 declaration of war against Germany as grounds for invading German holdings in China. Then, ignoring the Chinese request to withdraw, Japan secretly presented the Chinese president with an ultimatum. What were some of the demands? More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: SUMINURI MATSURI


Suminuri Matsuri

Suminuri Matsuri is a New Year tradition observed for more than half a millennium in a district of Matsunoyama, Niigata Prefecture, Japan. People adorn their homes and streets for Oshogatsu (New Year’s Day) with decorations made of paper, tree branches and bamboo. After the holiday, they take down the decorations and burn them, keeping the ashes for the Suminuri Festival. People take the ashes outside and mix them with snow, then rub the concoction on each other’s faces for luckin the new year. More… Discuss

 

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ARTICLE: ETIQUETTE


Etiquette (Casiotone for the Painfully Alone a...

Etiquette (Casiotone for the Painfully Alone album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Etiquette

Many areas of public life are governed by codes of etiquette, which we often follow without having to think about them. However, every culture has its own distinct systems of etiquette, so it can be difficult to know how to behave in a new place, especially when conducting business. In Japan, for example, moments of silence are a normal part of conversation, in contrast with the small talk that is expected in some other cultures. What are some other examples of etiquette throughout the world? More… Discuss

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Aram Khachaturian:Masquerade Suite



Khachaturina:Masquerade Suite(Waltz/Nocturne/Mazurka/Romance/Gal­op)
The Japan Sinfonia cond.by Hisayoshi Inoue
2010/05/09/Daiichi-Seimei Hall,Tokyo

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: FUKUZAWA YUKICHI (1835)


Fukuzawa Yukichi (1835)

Japanese author, educator, and publisher Fukuzawa Yukichi grew up during a tumultuous time in Japan, as Western powers began infiltrating the country and the Japanese people‘s hostility toward the ruling shogunate grew. Fukuzawa—who was intrigued by the West—traveled to the US on a diplomatic mission in 1860 and afterward became involved in Japan’s Meiji Restoration, which restored the emperor to power and rapidly modernized the country. What is considered Fukuzawa’s most important contribution? More… Discuss

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Great Performances: Herbert von Karajan conducts Richard Strauss’s – Don Juan Overture Op. 20 ( – Osaka 1984)



Richard Strauss:  Don Juan, Symphonic Poem Op. 20
Herbert von Karajan conducting
Osaka, Japan 1984

 

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Today’s Holiday: BALL-CATCHING FESTIVAL


Ball-Catching Festival

This 500-year-old tradition, said to have its roots in the legend of a dragon god (Ryujin) offering two balls to the Empress Jingu (170–269), takes place each year in Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka City, Japan. Two teams of Japanese men, wearing only loincloths (fundoshi), compete for a ball that weighs about 18 pounds; these teams consist of the Land Team, made up of farmers who work the fields, and the Sea team, composed of fishermen. A Shinto priest awaits the winner to hand him the ball—the size of the harvest or of the catch during the new year is determined by which team wins. More… Discuss

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HIROHITO BECOMES EMPEROR OF JAPAN (1926)


Hirohito Becomes Emperor of Japan (1926)

Hirohito was the longest reigning Japanese monarch, ruling from 1926 to 1989. During his reign, militaristic Japan entered World War II and bombed Pearl Harbor. After the US dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945, Hirohito pushed for surrender. He then broke the precedent of imperial silence by making a national radio broadcast to announce Japan’s surrender. After World War II, Hirohito changed the importance of the monarchy when he renounced what? More… Discuss

 

Hopeful for a Gracious Future: Mozart – Missa Brevis in D minor KV 65 ( final competition )



Koriyama Fifth Junior High School ( The Vocal Ensemble Competition Japan 2013 )
Mozart Missa Brevis in d KV 65 
Kyrie・Gloria・Credo・Sanctus・Benedictus・Ag­nus Dei

 

Today in History: LAST RECORDED ERUPTION OF MOUNT FUJI BEGINS (1707)


Last Recorded Eruption of Mount Fuji Begins (1707)

Majestic Mount Fuji, located about 60 mi (100 km) from Tokyo, is the tallest mountain in Japan. The beauty of the snowcapped symmetrical cone, ringed by lakes and virgin forests, has inspired Japanese poets and painters throughout the centuries. Though the volcano is classified as active, its last major eruption began on December 16, 1707, and ended in early 1708. As a sacred mountain, Mount Fuji is a traditional pilgrimage site, but the Aokigahara forest at its base is a popular site for what? More…Discuss

 

Mozart – Overture The Abduction from the Seraglio (K.384) – Wiener Symphoniker – Fabio Luisi



Mozart – The Abduction From The Seraglio Overture
Die Entführung aus dem Serail
Wiener Symphoniker Japan Tour 2006
Conductor : Fabio Luisi

 

Article: THE HOUSE OF YI


The House of Yi

In the 13th century, Mongol forces from China invaded the nation that would become Korea. Peace came when Korea accepted Mongol suzerainty, but in 1392, Yi Songgye, a general who favored the Chinese Ming dynasty, seized the throne. He was the first of the House of Yi, or Joseon Dynasty, that ruled Korea until 1910. That year, Korea was formally annexed by Japan following the Sino-Japanese War, effectively ending the dynasty. Who are the living descendants of the House of Yi? More… Discuss

 

NEW Widget AT EuZicAsa: HAIKU TOPICS (ACCESS HERE)


HAIKU TOPICS (ACCESS HERE)

HAIKU TOPICS (ACCESS HERE)

Introducing Haiku Poets and Topics . . . . . WKD

Introducing Haiku Poets, Famous People, Places and Haiku Topics 
A project of the World Kigo Database. 

This is an educational site for reference purposes of haiku poets worldwide. 

Dr. Gabi Greve, Japan, Daruma Museum. 

 

Fukushima News 10/23/13: Fukushima Workers “We Hide Accidents”; Typhoon Threat Panics Tepco


Fukushima News 10/23/13: Fukushima Workers “We Hide Accidents”; Typhoon Threat Panics Tepco
Fukushima Workers Speak Out: We hide accidents at plant — CNN: Health is suffering — CBS: Radioactive materials “just pour right in” after cleanup (VIDEOS)
http://enenews.com/fukushima-workers-…

Fukushima plant struggles with typhoon threat
The operator of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is racing to secure storage space for tainted rainwater as another powerful typhoon approaches.
Tokyo Electric Power Company has begun moving the rainwater into underground pools once deemed too leaky. The water is the result of typhoons and downpours that have filled barriers around radioactive waste water tanks.
TEPCO has been storing the most contaminated rainwater in tanks and in the basement of a turbine building. But with Typhoon Francisco set to hit Japan’s mainland over the weekend, the tanks are full.
Japan’s nuclear regulator has approved moving the tainted water to 3 underground pools. The pools have a total capacity of about 9,000 tons.
TEPCO stopped using the pools after similar models leaked in April. The utility now says it no other option but to use them.
The utility also says it found 140,000 becquerels per liter of Beta-ray emitting radioactivity in an onsite ditch on Wednesday. The radioactivity has doubled since the previous day. TEPCO says it is transferring the contaminated water to a tank.

NRA chief to meet TEPCO head on nuclear safety
Officials from Japan’s Nuclear Regulation Authority have criticized a report submitted by Tokyo Electric Power Company on safety measures at its nuclear plants.
The NRA met on Wednesday after TEPCO submitted the report to the authority on Tuesday of last week.
The report outlines the measures TEPCO is taking to prevent radioactive water leaks and other problems at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant. In the report, TEPCO also says it is capable of safely managing 2 reactors at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa plant in Niigata Prefecture. The utility has plans to restart the reactors.

Japan pursuing new nuclear disposal technology
The Japanese government plans to develop new technology that would cut the environmental impact of highly radioactive waste from nuclear power plants.
The waste is believed to have an impact on the environment that lasts tens of thousands of years. The government’s current plan involves burying it deep underground. But officials have yet to choose a site due to safety concerns.

Fukushima readies for dangerous operation to remove 400 tons of spent fuel
http://rt.com/news/fukushima-operatio…

http://enenews.com/nuclear-expert-one…

Scientific Reports: It’s “remarkable” where plutonium from Fukushima reactor is suspected to have been found — “Even more unexpected” that it’s located outside main strip of contamination — Need to assess consequences for public of a release of plutonium-rich hot particles (PHOTO)
http://enenews.com/scientific-reports…

Tepco’s Typhoon measures to prevent contaminated water overflowing entirely messed up
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/10/te…

Tepco discharged “rainwater” of 2 tank area dams again / Not even a Typhoon weather
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/10/te…

Back-up tanks of 4,000 tonnes are already nearly full with two more Typhoons coming
http://fukushima-diary.com/2013/10/ba…

Japan Mulls Plan for One Operator to Run All Reactors: Energy
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-10…

How Accurate Are The Instruments in Nuclear Reactors?
http://www.globalresearch.ca/how-accu…

Candu looks overseas after Ontario nixes new nuclear plants
http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/candu…

The News That Matters about the Nuclear Industry
http://nuclear-news.net/

FukushimaDiary
http://fukushima-diary.com/category/d…

http://enenews.com/

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This Day in the Yesteryear: GERMANY, ITALY, AND JAPAN SIGN TRIPARTITE PACT (1940)


Germany, Italy, and Japan Sign Tripartite Pact (1940)

The World War II alliance of Germany, Italy, and Japan was fully realized in September 1940, with the signing of the Tripartite Pact. The agreement called for the Axis Powers to come to each other’s aid if attacked by a nation not already involved in the European War or the Sino-Japanese Conflict and to assist one another in their efforts to “establish and maintain a new order of things”—Germany and Italy in Europe and Japan in Greater East Asia. How did the treaty get the nickname “Roberto”? More…Discuss

 

Grieg Holberg Suite Op. 40



00:00  Praludium 
03:01   Sarabande 
08:27   Gavotte
12:31    Air
20:21   Rigaudon
Nagoya Streichersolisten Summer Concert 2012 directed By Kato Akira

We are the amateur string orchestra playing in Nagoya Japan.
Summer concerts are held once a year.
http://ngs.sakuraweb.com

 

Elegy ( Mendelssohn :Songs without Words,Op.85-4) take 3 : Beautiful – Thank You!



Message in a You Tube: “I’m an amateur player from Japan.
Elegy ( Mendelssohn : Songs without Words,Op.85-4)”

Beautiful Music, thank you kaz63piano!   Arigato!

Today’s Birthday: Tokugawa Yoshinobu (1837)


Tokugawa Yoshinobu (1837)

Tokugawa was the 15th and last shogun of the Tokugawa shogunate of Japan. The Tokugawa family held the shogunate and controlled Japan from 1603 to 1867. Beginning at the time of Yoshinobu’s birth, there were numerous peasant uprisings and samurai unrest. Undermined by increasing foreign incursions, the Tokugawa were overthrown by an attack of provincial forces from Choshu, Satsuma, and Tosa, who restored the Meiji emperor to power. Yoshinobu resigned in 1867. How did he spend his retirement? More… Discuss

Fears over China’s nuclear safety Finally Revealed – The Guardian UK (It’s not what you know, but who you know…)


 Fears Over China's Nuclear Safety FINALLY Revealed (What, and When did the MEdia know about this?
Fears Over China‘s Nuclear Safety FINALLY Revealed (What, and When did the Mass Media know about this?)

‘The Impenetrable transparency” or “who’s your uncle?”

“A Declaration of War on the Poor”: Cornel West and Tavis Smiley on the Debt Ceiling Agreement


Hiroshima - Ngasaki - Fukushima and much more via Democracy Now

Hiroshima - Nagasaki - Fukushima and much more via Democracy Now Click here to read more)

“Fat Man” Detonated over Nagasaki, Japan (1945)


“Fat Man” Detonated over Nagasaki, Japan (1945)

During WWII, Nagasaki became the target of the second atomic bomb ever detonated on a populated area. Three days after the US dropped a uranium bomb on Hiroshima, a more powerful plutonium device, code-named “Fat Man,” was dropped on Nagasaki. Approximately 40,000 people were killed outright, and a total of 75,000 were killed or wounded. More than a third of the city was devastated. The necessity of the attack is still debated. The “Fat Man” was supposedly named after a character in what film? More… Discuss

The Hiroshima Cover-Up-via-Democracy Now


The Hiroshima Cover-Up-via-Democracy Now

The Hiroshima Cover-Up-via-Democracy Now (click on the picture to read the article)

As the 66th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 approaches, we feature this article by Amy Goodman and David Goodman that was originally published on August 5, 2005 in The Baltimore Sun. (Source: http://www.democracynow.org/blog/2011/8/5/the_hiroshima_cover_up)

Japan nuclear reactor halted over pressure drop_via_France24 International


Japan nuclear reactor halted over pressure drop_via_France24 International

Japan nuclear reactor halted over pressure drop_via_France24 International (click here to read the story at France24 International)

MEPs to debate nuclear stress tests: doing only the passing tests = no failure= Way to go!


MEPs to debate nuclear stress tests European Parlament

MEPs to debate nuclear stress tests European Parliament: not test....No failure!

According to the article there is another Nostradamus, somewhere in Europe: He knows for certain that due to Europe’s geography a nuclear accident such as the one in Japan is not possible. If you’re interested to find out his name read the article. Anyway, some thinks that just the illusion of tests, partial test and virtual tests are enough to protect the population of the continent.

Nuclear Power and Our Future


 

Gemany nuclear Power Decision in Energy Policy


My take on this:

‘It appear that Germany‘s government learned 100% more from the Fukushima nuclear meltdown, that Japan‘s: An example of learning from others’ experiences, and acting without prejudice, enlightened, selflessly – that”s Germany of course. It goes on to show that some cannot give up their ways, no matter how destructive, even to themselves. It also shows the power of the citizen in making decisions, where decision making cannot be accomplished. I guess it helps to keep politicians accountable.
It is true that plans are just plans, that may never materialize, but al least the intension to commit to reason, to change, to search for a better, superior, civilized way, are their, for history.©’

Radioactive sea life off Japan: Greenpeace


GreenPeace_Radioactive-sea-of-japan_via-world-news-australia

Read more about the latest in the chain of man-made calamities by clicking the picture.

Article Of The Day – May 15, 2011: Kojiki – Shinto


Kojiki

Shinto, Japan‘s indigenous religion, cannot be traced to its beginnings because until the 5th century—when Chinese writing was introduced into Japan—the myths and rituals were transmitted orally. Although Shinto has no founder and no official scripture, its mythology and ancient beliefs and customs are collected in the Kojiki—”Record of Ancient Matters.” Prepared under imperial order in the early 8th century, it is the oldest extant chronicle in Japan. What myths does it include? More… Discuss

Chernobyl April 21, 2011, Via France 24: Read It And Think: Are you a prospective evacuee?



I have learned a lot from this courageous reporting. I wish more people would understand the fate of the Atoms for Peace, upon the very existence of our home. Can we consider ourselves prospective evacuees?
That is the selfish question that grew in my mind: could we and people we know, care for,  love, or perfect strangers, that could have become best friends, could we become evacuees? Like the tens of thousands of Japanese families, protected from returning to their radioactive homes by barbed wire, barricades and police guards.

(Leonard Cohen‘s “song of Isaac”: From his concert in Warsaw in 1985, an intense performance of Story of Isaac.)

Japan: Closer Look At The Nuclear Disaster Aftermass


It is hard to recognize how little regard was given to the possibility that the lives, and health of millions of people would be, at one time, rather earlier, that in the future, be shaken so badly by “Atoms For Peace”. Reading the article, you realize the vulnerability we have, as inhabitant of our planet. I hope you get some information from this story, I think everybody should. I think we should take things much more personally than we used to. What do you think?

Exposure to radiation: Cumulative over life time, but no amount is either safe, or healthy.


Be smart:  do what a doctor does, not what a doctor sais (that goes for a priest too…well at least sometime!)

Journey to Planet Earth: Lester Brown On PBS


A must see program: Plan B, what in the world is that? Find out by watching the following program:

It’s time to get defosillezed, and re-energized renewably.
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