Tag Archives: Literature

quotation: A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud. Ralph Waldo Emerson


A friend is a person with whom I may be sincere. Before him, I may think aloud.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

quotation: We often despise what is most useful to us. Aesop


We often despise what is most useful to us.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

word: irascible


irascible 

Definition: (adjective) Prone to outbursts of temper; easily angered.
Synonyms: hotheaded, quick-tempered, choleric, short
Usage: He was a singularly irascible man; any little thing would disturb his temper. Discuss.

quotation: It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious. Oscar Wilde


It is absurd to divide people into good and bad. People are either charming or tedious.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

quotation: Mark Twain (on friendship)


The proper office of a friend is to side with you when you are in the wrong. Nearly anybody will side with you when you are in the right.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

The Danger, poetic thought by George-B (©Always) (the smudge and other poems)


The Danger, poetic thought by George-B (©Always)

The Danger lurking in plain sight,
disguised
as benevolent face…
It holds a book,
of broken promises,
some secrets to be kept…
How more can one deceive,
another one with,
But selling all there is,
and getting bloated at it…
The epics of persona selling,
is just as old as slave trade,
yes, it is…

quotation: No enemy is worse than bad advice. Sophocles


No enemy is worse than bad advice.

Sophocles (496 BC-406 BC) Discuss

facebook, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems)


facebook, poetic thought by George-B

To like or not to like:
That is today’s question:
Facebook plays with my feelings of liking and disliking,
but you know that,
it’s all over the news…the betrayal of trust of confidence,
of the most basic relationship…among people:
Fairness, not taking advantage of each other,
as a tool to make yourself rich (and make another poor)
But then you knew there is nothing sincere about facebook, that some made into faithbook: big mistake, big, big mistake)

need: to return ethics to the world!

quotation: One story is good, till another is told. Aesop (620 BC-560 BC)


One story is good, till another is told.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

today’s birthday: Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804)


Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804)

Hawthorne was one of the great masters of American fiction. His novels and tales are penetrating explorations of moral and spiritual conflicts, and his masterpiece, The Scarlet Letter, is often considered the first American psychological novel. Hawthorne also helped to establish the American short story as a significant art form with his haunting tales of human loneliness, frustration, hypocrisy, eccentricity, and frailty. What future US president did Hawthorne befriend in college? More… Discuss

quotation: The value of a dollar is social, as it is created by society. Ralph Waldo Emerson


quotation:  The value of a dollar is social, as it is created by society.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

quotation: Vices are their own punishment. Aesop


Vices are their own punishment.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

The wheel, poetic thought by George-B (The smudge and other poems)


The wheel, poetic thought by George-B
(The smudge and other poems)

In the quest
To define the wheel
The scientist gave it the circle
The artist gave it any shape
The wood cutter cut a section of a tree…
And rolled downhill…
there came Pythagoras, and
he gave the wheel it’s formula

It’s alright, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems Page)


It’s alright, poetic thought by George-B (the smudge and other poems Page)

Before me, before I was,
There were two ideas of me, two thoughts
In two minds…and it was alright…
Then one day they came together in one,
New string of DNA, and it was all right…
I was then immersed in the ocean bubble, until
I grew wings, and it was alright…
One day, early morning, I thought
I could leave the ocean
for the rigors of land crawling,
but I did not crawl…
not for a while…and it was alright…
Then
Everything became prosaic, and prose,
and the poetry was lost to
the mundane passage of time,
and nothing could replace that anymore…
not ever…and it’s all right…

quotation: An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come. Victor Hugo (1802-1885)


An invasion of armies can be resisted, but not an idea whose time has come.

Victor Hugo (1802-1885) Discuss

word: graybeard


graybeard 

Definition: (noun) A man who is very old.
Synonyms: old man, Methuselah
Usage: “So, fellow-pilgrims,” said he, “here we are, seven wise men, and one fair damsel—who, doubtless, is as wise as any graybeard of the company.” Discuss.

Sediments, poetic thought by George-B (my poetry collection)


Sediments,  poetic thought by George-B

Grudge
Hurt
Long time
Has passed

Empathy
Warmth
It touched
Under the surface
Long time
Has passed

Memories
Existing
Descending
The spiral
Eccentric

Future
If any
Remembers
The time
When it will be
In the making

(©Always, George-B)

quotation: Oscar Wilde – If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life. Oscar Wilde


If you are not too long, I will wait here for you all my life.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

quotation: Henry Fielding


LOVE: A word properly applied to our delight in particular kinds of food; sometimes metaphorically spoken of the favorite objects of all our appetites.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

quotation: The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half. Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881)


The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss

quotation: Never trust the advice of a man in difficulties. Aesop (620 BC-560 BC)


Never trust the advice of a man in difficulties.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

quotation: “Death is not the end. There remains the litigation over the estate.” Ambrose Bierce


Death is not the end. There remains the litigation over the estate.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

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make music part of your life series: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7


Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7

 

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quotation: …when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. Arthur Conan Doyle


…when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) Discuss

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make music part of your life series: S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72



make music part of your life series:  S.Riсhter plays P.Tchaikovsky L’espiegle, Op.72

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quotation: Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian. Herman Melville


Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian.

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

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quotation: “The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.” William Shakespeare


The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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quotation: “You see, but you do not observe.” Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)


You see, but you do not observe.

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) Discuss

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quotation: What is most truly valuable is often underrated. Aesop (620 BC-560 BC)


What is most truly valuable is often underrated.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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Persephone


Persephone

In Greek mythology, Persephone is the goddess of fertility and, having been taken captive by Hades and made his wife, queen of the underworld. Though Hades eventually allowed her to return to Earth, he first tricked her into eating pomegranate seeds—the food of the dead—thus tethering her to the underworld and making it necessary for her to return to him for several months each year. What changes are said to come over the Earth each time she leaves for or returns from the underworld? More… Discuss

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Haiku: Ant, Poetic thought by George-B


Haiku: Ant, Poetic thought by George-B

Innocent in fall
Water droplet rushes down
Engulfing the ant

ant

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QUOTATION: “Abstain and enjoy”. Aesop (620 BC-560 BC)


Abstain and enjoy.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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Expectation, poetic thought by George B (my poetry collection)


Expectation, poetic thought by George B

It happen once before, creation,
when all there wasn’t turned into being
But then it all fell into complacency
And we became accustomed to just this -
We call being…

Being interrupted,
takes one to before creation,
when nothing was, yet,
everything had an equal chance to become…
fifty- fifty chance,
either – or
neither–nor,
it is that simple,
being, not being,
it’s expected…

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QUOTATION: James Fenimore Cooper – A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it.


A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it.

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction. Aesop


Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BCDiscuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare – “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”


The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Aesop


In quarreling about the shadow we often lose the substance.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Thomas Hardy


Poetry is emotion put into measure. The emotion must come by nature, but the measure can be acquired by art.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Washington Irving


A sharp tongue is the only edge tool that grows keener with constant use.

Washington Irving (1783-1859) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Aesop – “Wit has always an answer ready.”


Wit has always an answer ready.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Rudyard Kipling


Borrow trouble for yourself, if that’s your nature, but don’t lend it to your neighbors.

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Aesop


Distrust interested advice.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BCDiscuss

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ARTICLE: JOHN DONNE


John Donne

The greatest of the metaphysical poets, Donne wrote original, witty, erudite, and often obscure verse characterized by a brilliant use of paradox, hyperbole, and imagery and distinguished by a remarkable blend of passion and reason. Neglected for some 200 years, he was rediscovered by 20th-century critics. Author of the famous phrase “for whom the bell tolls,” a reference to the tolling of church bells upon someone’s death, Donne commissioned what macabre painting shortly before his own passing? More… Discuss

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QUOTATION: Men often bear little grievances with less courage than they do large misfortunes. Aesop


Men often bear little grievances with less courage than they do large misfortunes.

Aesop (620 BC-560 BC) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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QUOTATION: Herman Melville


Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored…

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

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QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

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QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

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