Tag Archives: London

Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures



Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures
(Welcome to all the pleasures (An Ode for St. Cecilia’s Day), for soloists, chorus & instruments, Z. 339)

Welcome to All the Pleasures is one of the Odes written for the celebration of St. Cecilia’s Day byHenry Purcell. The libretto is by Christopher Fishburn. Purcell had been writing Odes for the Royal Family since 1680, but in 1683 the Musical Society of London commissioned him to write an ode in honor of the public celebration of the feast of St. Cecilia. The “Musical Society” was a group of amateur and professional musicians that had organized a festival for the “great patroness of music.” It was the first year of their festival and Purcell was their first commissioned composer. Purcell composed the work for three solo voices, chorus, four-part strings, and continuo. Formally, he produces a concerto grosso effect when he balances the trio of voices (concertino) against the chorus and orchestra (ripieno).

The opening symphony has two movements; one maestoso and the second vivace. The maestoso is full of suspensions and canonic entrances and has a full texture. The vivace is contrapuntal throughout. The words “Welcome to all the Pleasures” are set on imitative entrances. When each voice proclaims “Welcome!,” an echo of invitations is produced. “Hail Great Assembly” breaks out in fugal style. The movement ends with an instrumental ritornello.

Here the Deities Approve is a countertenor solo written over a three measure ground bass. The vocal line is lyrical and plastic; the countertenor soars above the rest of the ensemble. There follows a string ritornello. Throughout this ode Purcell uses instruments at least as much as the voices. While joys Celestial sets joys on dotted rhythmic figures, and places the word “Celestial” on a falling, augmented dotted figure. The effect is joyful and celestial. Then there follows an instrumental ritornello based on the dotted rhythmic theme. Purcell imitates and varies this theme within a highly contrapuntal texture.

Then Lift up your Voices features a solo and chorus. Again the chorus begins with imitative entrances, but eventually comes together in homophony. Afterwards there is a solo harpsichord interlude, which can be played extemporaneously, making for a beautiful respite from the rest of the ode. Beauty, thou scene of love is a beautiful tenor solo. The solo is in two sections, the first of which is repeated. The ritornello takes over the solo line from the tenor voice as Purcell sets it in an inventive four-part contrapuntal style.

In a consort of voices has a diatonic, joyful melody in E major, and adds a bright feeling to the movement. The tenor voice has a solo based on the opening theme, and soon the chorus enters canonically. One of the most striking aspects of this movement is Purcell’s setting of the name “Cecilia,” which he repeats many times in all the voices and registers. He sets the music to the sound of the word. He ends the piece by having the singers drop out one by one, starting with the treble voices. Finally the bass is left alone to quietly sing the final “Ce-cil-ia.”

Liana Brook Guberman, Soprano
Jenny Green, Soprano
Alexandra Lushtak, Soprano
Christopher Sokolowski, Tenor
Christian Zaremba, Bass 
Hudson Valley Chamber Singers,
Hudson Valley Singers,
NYMO Ensemble,
Anastasia Dedik, Harpsichord
Eu, Harpsichord, organ, direction

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: BRIXTON RIOT (1981)


Brixton Riot (1981)

In the early 1980s, south London‘s Brixton neighborhood was plagued by severe social and economic problems, including high rates of unemployment and crime and poor housing conditions. In 1981, in an effort to reduce street crime, police began stopping and searching anyone they deemed suspicious—a policy that many residents of the predominantly black community found discriminatory and heavy-handed. Eventually, the angry residents rioted. How many people were injured during the clash? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: STOLEN MASTERPIECES FOUND IN UNLIKELY PLACE


Stolen Masterpieces Found in Unlikely Place

Nearly 40 years ago, an Italian factory worker bought two paintings at a lost-property auction for 45,000 lire (23.24 euros). He hung the works in his home, enjoying them but never knowing their true value until recently, when his son began probing their origins. The paintings in question are now believed to be a Paul Gauguin and a Pierre Bonnard that have a combined estimated value of between 10.6 million and 30.6 million euros. The works had been stolen from a London home in 1970 and then, for reasons that remain unknown, abandoned on a train in northern Italy. After no one stepped forward to claim the then-unidentified paintings, the state railway company put them up for auction. More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: KARL PEARSON (1857)


Karl Pearson (1857)

English scientist and professor of mathematics Karl Pearson was an instrumental figure in the development of mathematical statistics. In 1911, he became professor of eugenics at the University of London and director of the eugenics laboratory. A disciple of Francis Galton, Pearson applied statistical methods to the study of biological problems, especially evolution and heredity, in a science he called biometrics. Today, Pearson’s views on eugenics are considered deeply racist. Why? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: A. E. HOUSMAN (1859)


A. E. Housman (1859)

Housman studied at Oxford but left without a degree because he failed his final examinations. While working as a Patent Office clerk, Housman studied Latin texts and wrote journal articles that led to his appointment as a professor at University College, London, and later at Cambridge. He is remembered for the much-anthologized poem “When I was One-and-Twenty,” and his verse, based on Classical and traditional models, exerted a strong influence on later poets. Who was his famous brother?More… Discuss

When I Was One-and-Twenty

BY A. E. HOUSMAN

When I was one-and-twenty
       I heard a wise man say,
“Give crowns and pounds and guineas
       But not your heart away;
Give pearls away and rubies
       But keep your fancy free.”
But I was one-and-twenty,
       No use to talk to me.
When I was one-and-twenty
       I heard him say again,
“The heart out of the bosom
       Was never given in vain;
’Tis paid with sighs a plenty
       And sold for endless rue.”
And I am two-and-twenty,
       And oh, ’tis true, ’tis true.
Share this text …?
***Source: Father: An Anthology of Verse (EP Dutton & Company, 1931)***

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

SAINT OF THE DAY March 22: Saint of the Day ST. LEA


SAINT OF THE DAY

March 22 Saint of the Day

ST. LEA
March 22: A letter which St. Jerome wrote to St. Marcella provides the … Read More

March
22

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 – Berliner Philharmoniker, Ion Marin Conducting 2010



Berliner PhilharmonikerEdward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010
von der Berliner Waldbühne, Dirigent Ion Marin

For other uses, see Salut D’Amour (disambiguation).
Salut d'Amour by Elgar general cover 1899.JPG

Salut d’Amour, Op. 12, is a musical work composed by Edward Elgar in 1888, originally written for violin and piano.

History[edit]

Elgar finished the piece in July 1888, when he was engaged to be married to Caroline Alice Roberts, and he called it “Liebesgruss” (‘Love’s Greeting’) because of Miss Roberts’ fluency in German. When he returned home to London on 22 September from a holiday at the house of his friend Dr. Charles Buck, in Settle, he presented it to her as an engagement present. Alice, for her part, offered him a poem called “The Wind at Dawn” which she had written years before and which he soon set to music.[1]

The dedication was in French: “à Carice”. “Carice” was a combination of his wife’s names Caroline Alice, and was the name to be given to their daughter born two years later.

It was not published by Schott & Co. until a year later, and the first editions were for violin and piano, piano solo, cello and piano, and for small orchestra. Few copies were sold until Schott changed the title to “Salut d’Amour” with Liebesgruss as a sub-title, and the composer’s name as ‘Ed. Elgar’. The French title, Elgar realised, would help the work to be sold not only in France but in other European countries: Schott was a German publisher, with offices in MainzLondonParis and Brussels.

The first public performance was of the orchestral version, at a Crystal Palace concert on 11 November 1889, conducted by August Manns.

The work’s first recording was made in 1915 for The Gramophone Company with an orchestra conducted by the composer.

Woo Thou Sweet Music by Elgar song cover.jpg

“Salut d’amour” is one of Elgar’s best-known works and has inspired numerous arrangements for widely varying instrumental combinations. It was even arranged as a song “Woo thou, Sweet Music” with words by A. C. Bunten.[2]

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa: Live from Sweden: Dress rehearsal Rachmaninoff Concerto #2 (NORRKÖPINGS SYMFONIORKESTER – Michael Francis conducting)


English: Pianist Valentina Lisitsa during an i...

English: Pianist Valentina Lisitsa during an interview in Leiden, Netherlands Deutsch: Pianistin Valentina Lisitsa während eines Interviews in Leiden, Holland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

***Great Compositions/Performances:
     Valentina Lisitsa: Live from Sweden: Dress rehearsal Rachmaninoff Concerto #2 (NORRKÖPINGS SYMFONIORKESTER – Michael Francis conducting)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Joshua Bell – Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35

1 Allegro moderato
2 Canzonetta: Andante
3 Finale. Allegro vivacissimo

Joshua Bell, violin

National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America
Valery Gergiev, conductor

Live recording. London, Proms 2013

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Jack London


The proper function of man is to live, not to exist. I shall not waste my days in trying to prolong them. I shall use my time.

Jack London (1876-1916) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

WORD: SQUALL


squall 

Definition: (verb) Utter a sudden loud cry.
Synonyms: cryscreamyellshouthollerhollocall
Usage: The new mother breathed a sigh of relief as soon as she heard her newborn squalling. Discuss.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEWS: SUPERSONIC JET’S DESIGNERS ELIMINATE WINDOWS


Supersonic Jet’s Designers Eliminate Windows

When is a window seat not a window seat? When the plane’s cabin has no windows. An aerospace company is in the process of designing a new supersonic jet, and it is planning to eliminate cabin windows entirely. Such windows, while offering passengers breathtaking views, create drag and require additional structural support that adds weight to an aircraft. This poses a challenge when building a jet meant to fly from New York to London in under four hours. Thus, in place of windows, the craft will have display screens embedded in the cabin walls that are linked to cameras mounted on the aircraft’s exterior. More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major



Daniil Trifonov – Glazunov Piano Concerto No 2 in B major

Royal Albert Hall, August 13, 2013 at BBC Proms
London Symphony Orchestra
Valery Gergiev conductor

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13'29'']
13:42 / II. Andantino [4'34'']
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6'06'']
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: GEORGE PLANTAGENET, DUKE OF CLARENCE, SECRETLY EXECUTED (1478)


George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, Secretly Executed (1478)

Sibling rivalry and political intrigue are a dangerous combination. In the case of George Plantagenet, Duke of Clarence, mixing the two brought about his early demise. As a young man, Clarence joined in a rebellion against his brother, King Edward IV. He soon had a change of heart and reconciled with Edward, but a few years later, he became involved in another plot against him. Clarence was then sent to the Tower of London, where he was secretly executed, allegedly by being drowned in what? More… Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Happy Valentine’s Day! The Heart Asks Pleasure First Michael Nyman Valentina Lisitsa


Happy Valentine’s Day! The Heart Asks Pleasure First Michael Nyman Valentina Lisitsa

The big secret is out :-) Be the first to orderhttp://po.st/ChasingPianosAmYT

A “bonus” secret :-) If you have not subscribed yet to my website, hurry up to do it now. Only the subscribers will see a brand new “how it was made” video – ahead of anybody else – and participate in a live chat with me next week http://po.st/ValentinaNewsletter

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Grieg – Piano Concerto & Chopin: Piano Concerto – Arthur Rubinstein


Published on Mar 15, 2013

Magnificent two piano concerto`s Piano: Arthur Rubinstein, conducted: Andre Previn London Symphony Orchestra recorded 1975. Arthur Rubinstein was born in Łódź (January 28, 1887 — December 20, 1982), Congress Poland (part of the Russian Empire for the entire time Rubinstein resided there) on January 28, 1887, to a Jewish family. He was the youngest of seven children, and his father owned a small textile factory. Arthur Rubinstein. However, his United States impresario Sol Hurok insisted he be billed as Artur, and records were released in the West under both versions of his name. At the age of two, Rubinstein demonstrated perfect pitch and a fascination with the piano, watching his elder sister’s piano lessons. By the age of four, he was recognised as a child prodigy. His father had a predilection for the violin and offered Rubinstein a violin; but Rubinstein rejected it because he thought his instinct was for harmony and polyphony. The Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim, on hearing the four-year-old child play, was greatly impressed, told Arthur’s family, 1894, seven-year-old Arthur Rubinstein had his debut with pieces by Mozart, Schubert and Mendelssohn. At the age of ten, Rubinstein moved to Berlin to continue his studies, and gave his first performance with the Berlin Philharmonic in 1900, at the age of 13. Rubinstein made his New York debut at Carnegie Hall in 1906, and thereafter toured the United States, Austria, Italy, and Russia. In 1912, he made his London debut, and found a home there in the Edith Grove, Chelsea, musical salon of Paul and Muriel Draper, in company with Kochanski, Igor Stravinsky, Jacques Thibaud, Pablo Casals, Pierre Monteux and others. During World War I, Rubinstein stayed in London, giving recitals and accompanying the violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. In 1916 and 1917, he made his first tours in Spain and South America where he was wildly acclaimed. It was during those tours that he developed a lifelong enthusiasm for the music of Enrique Granados, Isaac Albéniz, Manuel de Falla, and Heitor Villa-Lobos. He was the dedicatee of Villa-Lobos’s Rudepoêma and Stravinsky’s Trois mouvements de Petrouchka. Rubinstein was disgusted by Germany’s conduct during the war, and never played there again. His last performance in Germany was in 1914. In 1921 Rubinstein gave two American tours, travelling to New York with Karol Szymanowski and his close friend Paul Kochanski. In 1932, the pianist, who stated he neglected his technique in his early years, relying instead on natural talent, withdrew from concert life for several months of intensive study and practice. Rubinstein toured the United States again in 1937, his career becoming centered there during the World War II years when he lived in Brentwood, California. He became a naturalized American citizen in 1946. A cast of the pianist’s hands, at the Łódź museum During his time in California, Rubinstein provided the piano soundtrack for several films, including Song of Love with Katherine Hepburn. He appeared, as himself, in films Carnegie Hall and Of Men and Music. Although best known as a recitalist and concerto soloist, Rubinstein was also considered an outstanding chamber musician, partnering with such luminaries as Henryk Szeryng, Jascha Heifetz, Pablo Casals, Gregor Piatigorsky, and the Guarneri Quartet. Rubinstein recorded much of the core piano repertoire, particularly that of the Romantic composers. At the time of his death, the New York Times in describing him wrote, “Chopin was his specialty . . . it was [as] a Chopinist that he was considered by many without peer”. With the exception of the Études, he recorded most of the works of Chopin. He was one of the earliest champions of the Spanish and South American composers and of French composers who, in the early twentieth century, were still considered “modern” such as Debussy and Ravel. In addition, Rubinstein was the first champion of the music of his compatriot Karol Szymanowski. Rubinstein, in conversation with Alexander Scriabin, named Brahms as his favorite composer, a response that enraged Scriabin. In 1975, a documentary named Artur Rubinstein, Love of Life was on; a TV special named Rubinstein at 90 represented he had been playing for people for eight decades. By the mid-1970s, Rubinstein’s eyesight had begun to deteriorate. He retired from the stage at age eighty-nine in May 1976, giving his last concert at London’s Wigmore Hall, where he had first played nearly seventy years before. Rubinstein, who was fluent in eight languages, held much of the repertoire, not simply that of the piano, in his formidable memory.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Make Music Part of Your Life – Series: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141


Antonín DvořákSymphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio-F major 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace poco meno mosso 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49
****The work, at approximately 40 minutes in length, is scored for an orchestra of 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A and B♭, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in D and F, 2 trumpets in C, D, and F, 3 trombonestimpani and strings***

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Title page of the score of Dvořák’s seventh symphony, with portrait of Hans von Bülow

Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141, by Antonín Dvořák (published as No. 2) was first performed in London on April 22, 1885 shortly after the piece was completed on March 17, 1885.

Composition history

Dvořák’s work on the symphony began on December 13, 1884. Dvořák heard and admired Brahms‘s new 3rd Symphony, and this prompted him to think of writing of a new symphony himself. So it was fortuitous that in that same year the Philharmonic Society of London invited him to write a new symphony and elected him as an honorary member. A month later, after his daily walk to the railway station in Prague, he said “the first subject of my new symphony flashed in to my mind on the arrival of the festive train bringing our countrymen from Pest”. The Czechs were in fact coming to the National Theatre in Prague, where there was to be a musical evening to support the political struggles of the Czech nation. He resolved that his new symphony would reflect this struggle. In doing so the symphony would also reveal something of his personal struggle in reconciling his simple and peaceful countryman’s feelings with his intense patriotism and his wish to see the Czech nation flourish.

Enhanced by Zemanta

WORD: LOUCHE


louche 

Definition: (adjective) Of questionable taste or morality.
Synonyms: shady
Usage: It did not surprise me that the owner of that louche nightclub downtown was arrested for selling illegal drugs to the patrons.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Compositions/Performances: Schubert – Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990))



Franz Schubert (1797-1828):
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (1822)
1. Allegro moderato00:00 
2. Andante con moto - 13:32
Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990).
Painting: Wanderer in the Storm, Karl Julius von Leypold

Enhanced by Zemanta

Evgeny Kissin plays Rondo a capriccio,op.129 (‘Rage over the lost penny’) in Bucharest


Evgeny Kissin plays ‘Rage over the lost penny‘ as an encore after his performance of Beethoven 5th concerto with London Symphony Orchestra and Sir Colin Davis on Festival Enescu at 21st of September 2007th in Bucharest, Romania.

Enhanced by Zemanta

YouTube Viral (Published on Feb 4, 2014/128,222 views): Jimi Hendrix on The Experience | Blank on Blank | PBS Digital Studios


Jimi Hendrix on The Experience | Blank on Blank | PBS Digital Studios

Published on Feb 4, 2014

“When things get too heavy just call me helium–the lightest known gas to man.” – Jimi Hendrix

The final interview. London, 9/11/1970
Interview by Keith Altham

Hear the full interview RocksBackPages.com

Subscribe for new episodes every other Tuesday (it’s free):
http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c…

Executive Producer: David Gerlach
Animator: Patrick Smith

GIFs and more @ blankonblank.org

Watch the previous episodes:

Barry White on Making Love
http://youtu.be/SmJIlqjYGkw

Maurice Sendak on Being a Kid
hhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KvtgqJ…

Grace Kelly on JFK
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5EOup…

Kurt Cobain on Identity
http://youtu.be/C1Z2BkZaOQc

Janis Joplin on Rejection
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdF4b1…

Farrah Fawcett on Stiletto Power
http://youtu.be/8Eskff0RUQ8

Beastie Boys on Being Stupid
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4mx2P

David Foster Wallace on Ambition
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5R8gd

Wilt Chamberlain on Tall Tales
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxLiVn

Larry King on Getting Seduced
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yD8Pz

Jim Morrison on Why Fat is Beautiful
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhszZ5

Follow us on Twiiter & Facebook @blankonblank

MUSIC by Jimi Hendrix
Trash Man 
Hush Now
Straight Ahead
Come on (Let The Good Times Roll)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Leonard Cohen – Famous Blue Raincoat [live]


O2 Arena, London, England
November 13, 2008

 

Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Cohen London 2009 live – If It Be Your Will


If it be your will,  Leonard Cohen(London 2009 – live) 

If it be your will 
That I speak no more 
And my voice be still 
As it was before 
I will speak no more 
I shall abide until 
I am spoken for 
If it be your will 
If it be your will 
That a voice be true 
From this broken hill 
I will sing to you 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 
From this broken hill 
All your praises they shall ring 
If it be your will 
To let me sing 

If it be your will 
If there is a choice 
Let the rivers fill 
Let the hills rejoice 
Let your mercy spill 
On all these burning hearts in hell 
If it be your will 
To make us well 

And draw us near 
And bind us tight 
All your children here 
In their rags of light 
In our rags of light 
All dressed to kill 
And end this night 
If it be your will 

If it be your will

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Adventurer Account, by George-B


Adventurer Account, by George-B

I have been walking Northbound
until there was no mere North to go to
and then I took the opposite direction,
found myself upside down hanging by
the branches of the Southern tree…
I was by exhausted,
hungry,
unshaven…
So I took a long rest
next day
I started west, and kept at it, for a while
and then I hit a bump in the road
at Greenwich
and had to heal my foot…
Then I considered continuing my walk
same direction


Late that year I draw a conclusion

and build a house of red bricks,
a picket fence
a kidney bean pool
a tennis court
a trail with 5 flights of stairs, wooden,
to the sandy beach. 

Enhanced by Zemanta

IN THE YESTERYEAR: QUEEN VICTORIA CREATES THE VICTORIA CROSS (1856)


Queen Victoria Creates the Victoria Cross (1856)

Queen Victoria created the Victoria Cross—the highest British military award for valor—on January 29, 1856, in the late stages of the Crimean War. The impetus for a new medal arose during the war—one of the first with modern reporting—as correspondents documented many acts of bravery by British servicemen that went unrewarded. Thus, Victoria instituted her eponymous award for acts of devotion and valor in the presence of the enemy. From what was the Victoria Cross originally made? More…Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Francis Bacon


Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupateth it.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Performances: Beethoven “Für Elise” Valentina Lisitsa Seoul Philharmonic (it’s like you’re listening to it…well, for the first time!)



Live in Seoul. Encore #4 Please come to London on June 19th of 2012 if you want to hear this piece live ! I am making my debut at Royal Albert Hall :-)
Валентина Лисица
Valentina Lisitsa Live at the Royal Albert Hall
US iTuneshttp://bit.ly/iTunesUSVal 
US Amazon - http://bit.ly/ValRAH

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Celtic inspired classical music by Henrik Hansen Wonderful playlist!



Sir Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924)
Irish Rhapsody No. 1 in D minor, Op. 78 Dedicated to Hans Richter.
Ulster Orchestra, conducted by Vernon Handley

The composer tells us that the main idea of the First Rhapsody “is founded on an episode in the battles of the Finns and the loves of Cuchullin and Emer”. The heroic Irish folk tales of the Fina led by Finn and of the love of Cuchullin and his wife Emer are among the roots of W.B. Yeats’ poetry, and in music have been particularly associated with Arnold Bax, who had little time for Stanford. But Bax was unjust because Stanford too responded to this vivid tradition, and Stanford was an Irishman, which Bax was not. Dedicated to the conductor Hans Richter (subsequently to be the dedictee of Elgar’s First Symphony), it was first heard at the Norwich festival of 1902, the year of Stanford’s knighthood. The first London performance followed at a Philharmonic Society concert at Queen’s Hall on 12 March 1903, and it was so frequently played afterwards that Stanford said he begun to regret its composition.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: GEORG FRIEDRICH HÄNDEL- Berenice , Minuet


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
George Frideric Handel
George Frideric Handel by Balthasar Denner.jpg

Berenice (HWV 38) is an opera in three acts by George Frideric Handel to an Italian libretto, written in Italy in 1709 and originally entitled Berenice, regina d’Egitto (Berenice, Queen of Egypt), byAntonio Salvi.

It was first performed at the Covent Garden Theatre in London on 18 May 1737. It was not successful and only given four times.

It is based upon the life of Cleopatra Berenice, daughter of Ptolemy IX (the main character in Handel’s opera Tolomeo) and is set in around 81 BC.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JOHN SINGER SARGENT (1856)


John Singer Sargent (1856)

The son of American expatriates, Sargent grew up in Europe and studied painting in Paris. His best known work is the Portrait of Madame X, which created a scandal at the 1884 Salon—critics found it erotic, and the sitter’s mother disapproved. Discouraged, Sargent moved permanently to London where he captured Edwardian high society in elegant portraits painted with his slashing brushstrokes. Though his portraits brought him acclaim, fellow artist James Whistler described them in what way?More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

Great Composers/Compositions: Beethoven’s Symphony No. 3 – Jansons/BRSO(2009Live)



Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
Symphony No.3 in E flat major, op.55 “Eroica
Mariss Jansons
Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks
Royal Albert Hall, London, 29 3/2009

The symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Allegro con brio (lasts 12–18 minutes)
  2. Marcia funebreAdagio assai in C minor (14–18 minutes)
  3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace (5–6 minutes)
  4. Finale: Allegro molto (10–14 minutes)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The title page of the Eroica Symphony, showing the erased dedication to Napoleon

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 55, also known as the Eroica(Italian for “heroic”), is a musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.[1][2]

The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.[3]

Dedication and premiere

Beethoven had originally conceived of dedicating the symphony to Napoleon Bonaparte. The biographerMaynard Solomon relates that Beethoven admired the ideals of the French Revolution, and viewed Napoleon as their embodiment. In the autumn the composer began to have second thoughts about that dedication. It would have deprived him of a fee that he would receive if he instead dedicated the symphony to Prince Franz Joseph Maximillian Lobkowitz. Nevertheless, he still gave the work the title ofBonaparte.

According to Beethoven’s pupil and assistant, Ferdinand Ries, when Napoleon proclaimed himselfEmperor of the French in May 1804, Beethoven became disgusted and went to the table where the completed score lay. He took hold of the title-page and tore it up in rage. This is the account of the scene as told by Ries:

In writing this symphony Beethoven had been thinking of Buonaparte, but Buonaparte while he was First Consul. At that time Beethoven had the highest esteem for him and compared him to the greatest consuls of ancient Rome. Not only I, but many of Beethoven’s closer friends, saw this symphony on his table, beautifully copied in manuscript, with the word “Buonaparte” inscribed at the very top of the title-page and “Ludwig van Beethoven” at the very bottom. … I was the first to tell him the news that Buonaparte had declared himself Emperor, whereupon he broke into a rage and exclaimed, “So he is no more than a common mortal! Now, too, he will tread under foot all the rights of man, indulge only his ambition; now he will think himself superior to all men, become a tyrant!” Beethoven went to the table, seized the top of the title-page, tore it in half and threw it on the floor. The page had to be recopied and it was only now that the symphony received the title “Sinfonia eroica.”[4]

QUOTATION: John Filson about curiosty…(no,not cats’)


Curiosity is natural to the soul of man, and interesting objects have a powerful influence on our affections.

John Filson (1747-1788) Discuss

 

British Library: Psalms in English verse (girdle book) )visit the library – widget)


Binding

Author John Croke (translator)
Title Psalms in English verse (girdle book)
Origin England, S. E. (London)
Date c. 1540
Language English
Script Gothic cursive
Decoration 1 miniature of Henry VIII, in colours and gold (f. 1v). Small initials plain in silver on red grounds or in gold on blue grounds.
Dimensions in mm 40 x 30 (30 x 20)
Official foliation ff. 104 (+ 1 original parchment double-leaf, glued together, at the beginning, and 1 at the end)
Form Parchment codex
Binding Pre-1600. Original worked gilt covers (metalwork) with clasp and girdle loops.
Provenance ? Anne Boleyn (born c. 1500, d. 1536), queen of England, second consort of Henry VIII: The volume corresponds with one described in George Wyat, Extracts from the Life of Queen Anne Boleigne: Written at the close of the XVIth century, and now first printed (London: [privately printed], 1817), p. 29; Wyat notes that it was traditionally said to have been given by Anne Boleyn, when on the scaffold, to one of her maids of honour, a lady of the family of Wyat. 
? George Wyat, 1817: see above, where he states that the described volume is in his possession.
Richard Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville (b. 1776, d. 1839), 1st duke of Buckingham and Chandos, of Stowe House, near Buckingham: inscribed with the press-mark ‘Appendix in vol. 1 … no. 27′ (f. ), corresponding to his catalogue (O’Conor 1818-1819).
Richard Plantagenet Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville (b. 1797, d. 1861), 2nd duke of Buckingham and Chandos; sold in 1849 to Lord Ashburnham.
Bertram Ashburnham (b. 1797, d. 1878), 4th earl of Ashburnham, of Ashburnham Place, Sussex.
Bertram Ashburnham (b. 1840, d. 1913), 5th earl of Ashburnham: purchased by the British Museum from him together with 1084 other Stowe manuscripts in 1883.

King Henry VIII

Antonin Dvorak – Slavonic Dance No. 10 in E minor, Op. 72, No. 2


 

Amy Winehouse – You Know I’m No Good



Amy Winehouse At The BBC – Out Now 
Buy It Now http://bit.ly/AmyWinehouseAtTheBBC
Also available on Amazon http://bit.ly/AWBBCAmazon

 

Amy Winehouse – Will You Still Love Me Tomorrow


 

QUOTATION: Bram Stoker about SCIENCE [Or: to be is to be explainable]


It is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all, and if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain.

Bram Stoker (1847-1912) Discuss

 

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Beethoven’s Symphony No 8 in F major – BBC Proms 2012 (Daniel Barenboim)



The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, under the baton of Daniel Barenboim continues its Beethoven cycle with the compact Eighth in F major.
At the BBC PROMS – 2012 – Royal Albert Hall – LONDON

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: CUTTY SARK IS LAUNCHED (1869)


Cutty Sark Is Launched (1869)

The tea trade in the 1860s and 70s was intensely competitive, with merchant ships racing to be the first to arrive in London with that year’s crop from China. It was for this purpose that the three-masted clipper Cutty Sarkwas originally built. She became one of the swiftest and most celebrated British clippers, but within a few years of her launch, steamships had largely supplanted clippers in the tea trade, so she began carrying other cargos. What is the origin and meaning of her name? More… Discuss

 

JAMES LAST cu GEORGHE ZAMFIR ciobanasul singuratic si Ciocarlia Live in London 1978


JAMES LAST cu GEORGHE ZAMFIR ciobanasul singuratic si Ciocarlia  (Live in London 1978)

 

Fabulous Compositions: Romanian Rhapsody No. 1 by George Enescu



The author of this beautiful video has chosen a ever so truthful account of  the country and the people of Romania, now and throughout the ages old history, for which am very thankful:

“Pentru mine, Enescu va rămâne una din veritabilele minuni ale lumii.
(…) Rădăcinile puternice şi nobleţea sufletului său sunt provenite din
propria lui ţară, o ţară de inegalată frumuseţe.” Yehudi Menuhin

Just a thought:  “Yehudi Menuhin’s quotation refers to the best known, and loved Romanian poet Mihai Eminescu:  Nevertheless, I believe that George Enescu achieved in his Romanian Rhapsodies a portrayal of the people of Romania that no one else ever was able to describe with so much humanity, in the language of music what Eminescu did by employing the romantic poetry of the  Romanian language.” George-B 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gaspars/…

Quotation: Francis Bacon on being born and dying


It is as natural to die, as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful, as the other.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

Great Performances: Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21



Eugene Ormandy conducting Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
I. Allegro non troppo
II. Scherzando
III. Intermezzo
IV. Andante
V. Rondo

 

Quotation: Oscar Wilde


Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast.

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) Discuss

 

ROSSINI: William Tell Overture



Gioacchino Rossini: William Tell Overture (1829)

London Philharmonic, Alfred Scholz

 

V’adoro, pupille (Händel)- Renée Fleming



V’adoro, pupille.
Giulio Cesare, HWV 17 (1723)
George Frideric Händel (1685- 1759)

Soprano: Renée Fleming
Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment
Harry Bicket

V’adoro, pupille,
saette d’amore,
le vostre faville
son grate nel sen.
Pietose vi brama
il mesto mio core,
ch’ogn’ora vi chiama
l’amato suo ben.

 

Word: GUTTERSNIPE


Definition: (noun) A child who spends most of his time in the streets especially in slum areas.
Synonyms: street urchin
Usage: In Shaw’s Pygmalion, an elocution expert plucks a guttersnipe from Covent Garden market and teaches her to talk like a lady. Discuss.

 

Today’s Birthday: THE KRAY TWINS (1933)


The Kray Twins (1933)

Partners in crime, twins Reginald and Ronald Kray were the foremost perpetrators of organized crime in London’s East End during the 1950s and 60s. The brothers managed to escape justice for some time, thanks in part to their intimidation of witnesses, political connections, and quasi-celebrity status as nightclub owners. Eventually, however, their luck ran out. In 1969, they were sentenced to life in prison for the murders of George Cornell and Jack McVitie. Why was Reginald eventually freed? More… Discuss