Tag Archives: Ludwig van Beethoven

Valentina Lisitsa. Chopin Nocturne Op 27 # 2 D Flat Major: great compositions/performances


Valentina Lisitsa. Chopin Nocturne Op 27 # 2 D Flat Major

Mitsuko Uchida – W.A. Mozart Piano Concerto No.9 in E flat Major K. 271 “Jeunehomme”: great compositions/performances


Mitsuko Uchida – W.A. Mozart Piano Concerto No.9 in E flat Major K. 271 “Jeunehomme”

Prokofiev “War” Sonata #7 Valentina Lisitsa 1st mov. Allegro Inquieto: Great compositions/performaces


Prokofiev “War” Sonata #7 Valentina Lisitsa 1st mov. Allegro Inquieto

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV 467 “Elvira Madigan”: great compositions/performances


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, KV 467 “Elvira Madigan

Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56: great compositions/performances


Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Thriple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56

Weber – Jubel Ouvertüre – LSO / Monteux: make music part of your life series


Weber – Jubel Ouvertüre – LSO / Monteux

Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Beethoven | Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26 | Daniel Barenboim

Español: Sonata para Piano nº12 en La bemol Mayor, Op. 26

* 1st Movement (Andante con Variazioni)
* 2nd Movement (Scherzo, Allegro Molto)
* 3rd Movement (Marcia funebre sulla morte d’un Eroe)
* 4th Movement (Allegro)

Work: Piano Sonata No. 12 in A-flat major, Op. 26
Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
Soloist: Daniel Barenhoim

Beethoven – Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110, Daniel Barenboim, great compositions/performances


Piano Sonata No. 31 – Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven – WoO 7 – 12 minuets for orchestra: make music part of your life series


Ludwig van Beethoven – WoO 7 – 12 minuets for orchestra

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no. 8 in F Major, Op 93: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony no.8 in F Major,  Op 93

Preston-Friedman-Kreger Trio Plays Beethoven Trio in B-flat Major, WoO 39: great compositions/performances


Preston-Friedman-Kreger Trio Plays Beethoven Trio in B-flat Major, WoO 39

Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25, Rudolf Serkin/Philadelphia Orchestra- Eugene Ormandy: great compositions/perfornmances


Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25

Beethoven: Sonata cello & piano op. 102 nº 2. Rostropovich – Richter: great compositions/performances


Beethoven: Sonata cello & piano op. 102 nº 2. Rostropovich – Richter

Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22: great compositions/performances


Wieniawski-Violin Concerto No. 2 in d minor op. 22

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 15 in D major, op. 28, “Pastoral”- Daniel Barenboim: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 15 in D major, op. 28, “Pastoral”. Daniel Barenboim, piano

Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 1, in E minor, Op. 11 – Emil Gilels/Phylarmonia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy: Great compositons/performances


Chopin:  Piano Concerto No. 1,
in E minor,  Op. 11

iesLudwig van Beethoven – Fidelio Overture, Op. 72b: make music part of your life series


Ludwig van Beethoven – Fidelio Overture, Op. 72b

Ludwig van Beethoven – 12 Variations on “See the Conqu’ring Hero comes” WoO 45: make music part of your life


Ludwig van Beethoven – 12 Variations on “See the Conqu’ring Hero comes” WoO 45

Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952: great compositions/performances


Beethoven – String Quartet Op.59, No.2 “Rasumovsky” – Végh Quartet – 1952

Eliot Fisk and Chiara Morandi play “Sonata concertata” for guitar and violin by Paganin


Eliot Fisk and Chiara Morandi play “Sonata concertata” for guitar and violin by Paganini

Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92: make music part of your life series


Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 7 in A major, op. 92

Quintet in G minor Op. 49 by Enrique Granados: make music part ofyour life series


Quintet in G minor Op. 49 by Enrique Granados
I. Allegro

Maria Overman, Susanna Haley, violins
Gina Lee, viola
Anna Conway, violoncello
Heliqiong Sun, piano

Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72, Kurt Masur: great compositions/perform


Beethoven: Leonore Overture No. 3, Op. 72, Kurt Masur

Ludwig van Beethoven: Romance for Violin No.1 in G major, Op.40: great compositions/performances


Ludwig van Beethoven: Romance for Violin No.1 in G major, Op.40

Ivo Pogorelich plays Schumann Toccata Op. 7: make music part of your life series


Chopin – Etude Op.25 No.11 (‘Winter Wind’) – Sviatoslav Richter – Video: Unique musical moments


ChopinEtude Op.25 No.11 (‘Winter Wind‘) – Sviatoslav Rich

Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet: great compositions/performances


Mozart Quartet No 16 K 428 Hagen Quartet

Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Harding: make music part of your life series


Schumann – Symphony No 2 in C major, Op 61 – Harding

Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941: great compositions/performances


Brahms Rhapsody Op 119 No 4 in E Flat Major Rubinstein Rec 1941

Schumann: Études Symphoniques, Op. 13 (Emil Gilels, piano): great compositions/performances


Franz Schubert – Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815): make music part of your life series



***from  KuhlauDilfeng2  KuhlauDilfeng2

Franz SchubertSymphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

***Picture: Carlo Bossoli – Abendliches Vergnügen vor den Toren Konstantinopels

***Franz Schubert:  Symphony No.2 in B-flat major, D.125 (1815)

Mov.I: Largo – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 14:07
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegro vivace 22:20
Mov.IV: Presto vivace 25:32

***Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra
***Conductor: Michael Halász

In the opening movement, the initial theme of the Allegro vivace is based on the corresponding first theme of Ludwig van Beethoven’s overture to The Creatures of Prometheus.

The second movement is a theme with five variations in E flat major. Although there is some variation in the melody, the primary focus of the variations are on instrumentation and tone color. The first variation features violins and winds. The second variation passes the theme between the low strings and the woodwinds. The third variation is again violins and winds. The fourth variation is in C minor and features some acceleration with the use triplet-sixteenth notes. The fifth variation maintains the triplet-sixteenths, but they move into the background with the melody returning close to its original form as a kind of recapitulation. A coda concludes the movement.

The minuet is in C minor and mainly scored for the tutti and fortissimo. The contrasting Trio in E flat major is more thinly scored winds, violins and pizzicato bass. The melody of the trio is actually a variation of the theme used in the second movement forming a melodic and harmonic (E-flat/C minor) link is made between the inner two movements.

The finale is a galop in fast 2/4 time.

***From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

List of compositions by Franz Schubert by genre

Chopin Variations Op 2 (1-2) HQ, valentina Lisitsa: great compositions/performances



from   ValentinaLisitsa  ValentinaLisitsa

Chopin Variations Op 2 (1-2) HQ

Valentina Lisitsa, Black & Pink DVD.”La ci darem la mano”

Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker: make music part of your life series


Beethoven – Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55) Eroica Berliner Philharmoniker

Ludwig van Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55):
Berliner Philharmoniker

Symphony No. 3 in E flat major (Op. 55), is a landmark musical work marking the full arrival of the composer’s “middle-period,” a series of unprecedented large scale works of emotional depth and structural rigor.
The symphony is widely regarded as a mature expression of the classical style of the late eighteenth century that also exhibits defining features of the romantic style that would hold sway in the nineteenth century. The Third was begun immediately after the Second, completed in August 1804, and first performed 7 April 1805.
Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 3 horns in E flat, 2 trumpets in E flat and C, timpani in E flat and B flat, and strings.
Form
The piece consists of four movements:
1. Allegro con brio
2. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai in C minor
3. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
4. Finale: Allegro molto

Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale”: make music part of your life series



From: ChamberMusicTube ChamberMusicTube

Ludwig van BeethovenSymphony No. 6 in F major, op. 68 “Pastorale

From Wikipedia

The Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68, also known as the Pastoral Symphony (German Pastoral-Sinfonie[1]), is a symphony composed by Ludwig van Beethoven, and completed in 1808. One of Beethoven’s few works containing explicitly programmatic content,[2] the symphony was first performed in the Theater an der Wien on 22 December 1808[3] in a four hour concert.[4]

Form

The symphony has five movements, rather than the four typical of symphonies of the Classical era. Beethoven annotated the beginning of each movement as follows:

  1. Erwachen heiterer Empfindungen bei der Ankunft auf dem Lande (Awakening of cheerful feelings upon arrival in the countryside): Allegro ma non troppo

  2. Szene am Bach (Scene by the brook): Andante molto mosso

  3. Lustiges Zusammensein der Landleute (Merry gathering of country folk): Allegro

  4. Gewitter, Sturm (Thunder. Storm): Allegro

  5. Hirtengesang. Frohe und dankbare Gefühle nach dem Sturm (Shepherd’s song; cheerful and thankful feelings after the storm): Allegretto

Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 – Claudio Arrau – HD: great compositions/performances



FROM:

hellsan631    hellsan631

Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 – Claudio Arrau – HD

Includes all 3 movements. Taken from “Liszt: The Piano Concertos; 3 Etudes de Concert (1976)”

1. Il lamento  0:00 to 10:40

2. La leggierezza  10:50 to 16:16

3. Un sospiro  16:24 to 22:28

**Quality – AAC, audio bitrate: 320kbps
Video MP4 – 348kbps

***Perhaps the most Beautiful piece of music is the 3rd movement. There is another version of it on YouTube, but it is in extremely low audio quality. With this recording, you can sometimes hear the performer’s clothes move, or his breathing, only slightly.

***If I enjoy the rest of the CD enough, I will upload the other 2 piano concertos.

Credits:
Franz Liszt
Claudio Arrau (Piano)
Recorded in London England, November of 1976
Philips Classics

*Change to 720p Video to get the a 192 kbps Audio Stream (the highest you can get on YouTube)

Liszt: The Piano Concertos; 3 Etudes de Concert
Études de concert (3), for piano, S. 144 (LW A118)

MQ0001081958
MC0002358753
F 2049358
C 11442


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Three Concert Études (Trois études de concert), S.144, are a set of three piano études by Franz Liszt, composed between 1845–49 and published in Paris as Trois caprices poétiques with the three individual titles as they are known today.[1] As the title indicates, they are intended not only for the acquisition of a better technique, but also for concert performance. The Italian subtitles now associated with the studies – Il lamento (“The Lament”), La leggierezza (“Lightness”), Un sospiro (“A sigh”) – were not in early editions.[2]

Étude No. 1, Il lamento

Il lamento is the first of Liszt’s Three Concert Études. Written in A-flat major, it is among the composer’s longest pieces in this genre. It starts with a four-note lyrical melody which folds itself through the work, followed by a Chopin-like chromatic pattern which reappears again in the coda section. Although this piece opens and ends in A-flat major, it shifts throughout its three parts to many other keys including A, G, B, D-sharp, F-sharp and B.[1]

Étude No. 2, La leggierezza

La leggierezza (meaning “lightness”) is the second of the Three Concert Études. It is a monothematic piece in F minor with a very simple melodic line in each hand under an unusual Quasi allegretto tempo marking, usually ignored in favour of something a bit more frenetic.[3] It starts with a fast, but delicate sixteen chromatic-note arpeggio divided in thirds and sixths under an irregular rhythmic subdivision and cadenza so as to underline the light atmosphere of its title.[3] The technical difficulties involved are fast passages of minor thirds in the right hand and light, but quick leggiero chromatic scales.

Étude No. 3, Un sospiro

The third of the Three Concert Études is in D-flat major, and is usually known as Un sospiro (Italian for “A sigh”). However, it is likely that the title did not originate with Liszt. Although there is no evidence that he actively attempted to remove the subtitle, none of the editions or subsequent printings of the Three Concert Études published by Kistner during Liszt’s lifetime used them; he simply ignored such subtitles in later years, always referring to the piece by key.

The étude is a study in crossing hands, playing a simple melody with alternating hands, and arpeggios. It is also a study in the way hands should affect the melody with its many accentuations, or phrasing with alternating hands. The melody is quite dramatic, almost Impressionistic, radically changing in dynamics at times, and has inspired many listeners.

Un sospiro consists of a flowing background superimposed by a simple melody written in the third staff. This third staff—an additional treble staff—is written with the direction to the performer that notes with the stem up are for the right hand and notes with the stem down are for the left hand. The background alternates between the left and right hands in such a way that for most of the piece, while the left hand is playing the harmony, the right hand is playing the melody, and vice versa, with the left hand crossing over the right as it continues the melody for a short while before regressing again. There are also small cadenza sections requiring delicate fingerwork throughout the middle section of the piece.

Towards the end, after the main climax of the piece, both hands are needed to cross in an even more complex pattern. Since there are so many notes to be played rapidly and they are too far away from other clusters of notes that must be played as well, the hands are required to cross multiple times to reach dramatic notes near the end of the piece on the last page.

This étude, along with the other Three concert études, was written in dedication to Liszt’s uncle, Eduard Liszt (1817–1879), the youngest son of Liszt’s grandfather and the stepbrother of his own father. Eduard handled Liszt’s business affairs for more than thirty years until his death in 1879.

In film

Frederic Chopin – Krakowiak Op.14: great compositions/performances


Hopeful that this and all other posts and shared Links are received everywhere!

Frederick Chopin – Krakowiak Op.14

Grande rondò da concerto.

FROM:

Brahms-Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100: make music part of your life series


Brahms-Violin Sonata No. 2 in A Major Op. 100

FROM:
Kanaal van viool7

Isaac Stern: violin-Myra Hess: piano-Live-Edinburgh-1960

Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a: great compositions/performances


Gustavo Dudamel Johannes Brahms variations sur un thème de Joseph Haydn en si Majeur opus 56a

FROM:

Maxime Brisole

From Wikipedia

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

Les Variations sur un thème de Haydn, op. 56 (allemand : Variationen über ein Thema von Haydn) est une œuvre orchestrale en variations de Johannes Brahms, composée pendant l’été 1873. Cette œuvre est constituée d’un thème en si bémol majeur, de huit variations et d’un finale.

Le thème est extrait du choral Saint-Antoine de la Feldpartie en si bémol majeur, Hob. II/46 de Joseph Haydn. Brahms a écrit huit variations sur ce thème, plus un final. Le finale est une passacaille magnifique, dont le point culminant, une reformulation du choral, est un moment d’une grande transcendance, au point que Brahms, habituellement austère, se permet l’utilisation d’un triangle.

Deux versions existent : une version pour deux pianos, celle que Brahms a écrite en premier (mais désignée Op. 56b), et une version pour orchestre, dénommée op. 56a.

Cette dernière version est considérée comme « la première série de variations indépendantes pour orchestre dans l’histoire de la musique »1. L’orchestre contient un piccolo, deux flûtes deux hautbois, deux clarinettes, deux bassons, un contrebasson, quatre cors (2 en mi bémol, 2 en si bémol), 2 trompettes, des timbales, un triangle ainsi que la composition habituelle des cordes (premiers et seconds violons, altos, violoncelles et contrebasses).

 

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115: make music part of your life series


FROM:

Beethoven Namensfeier Overture in C major, Op.115

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827)

Work: Namensfeier ‘Name-Day Celebration‘ Overture in C major, Op.115

Movement: Maestoso – Allegro assai vivace

Herbert von Karajan
Berliner Philharmoniker Orchestra

Johann Nepomuk Hummel – Piano Concerto in A-minor, Op.85 (1816): make music part of your life series


Johann Nepomuk Hummel – Piano Concerto in A-minor, Op.85 (1816)

Johann Nepomuk Hummel (14 November 1778 — 17 October 1837) was an Austrian composer and virtuoso pianist.

Work: Piano Concerto in A-minor, Op.85 (1816)

Mov.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mov.II: Larghetto 16:19
Mov.III: Rondo: Allegro moderato 20:47

Pianist: Alessandro Commellato
Orchestra: Solamente Naturali
Conductor: Didier Talpain

© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (make music part of your life series)


© Beethoven’s 5th Piano E-flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor) – Daniel Barenboim (whole concert)

Beethoven’s 5th Piano concert (Emperor) -
Daniel Barenboim p
iano

Det kongelige kapel – Michael Schønvandt i Danmarks Radio Koncerthuset 2009
Ved prisoverrækkelsen af Sonningprisen 2009 på 600,000 DKK ~ 125.000 US$ The Sonning Prize Award! The copyright © owner to all content in this video with The Royal Orchestra & Daniel Barenboim conducted by Michael Schønwandt, is Danmarks Radio! Also listen to Barenboims version of Noctune op. 27 no 2 by Chopin: http://www.youtube.com//watch?v=7EcER…

Nocturne – Antonin Dvořák Nocturne In B, Op. 40, B 48 (make music part of your life series)


Antonin Dvořák: Nocturne In B, Op. 40, B 48
Bernhard Güller: Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra
Moonlight Classics

Bob van Asperen – Antonio Soler – Sonata 84 (make music part of your life series)


Bob van Asperen – Antonio Soler – Sonata 84

Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1, in G major, op. 40 

Igor Ozim, violin
Vienna Opera Orchestra
Moshe Atzmon

Beethoven’s reputation as a pianist often obscures the fact that he was a very capable violinist. Although not an accomplished master, he possessed a profound love for and understanding of the instrument, evident in his ten violin sonatas, the violin concerto, and numerous quintets, quartets, and other chamber works. The two Romances for violin stand out because they are single-movement works in concerto settings. The Romance in G major was published in 1803 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel in Leipzig; the date of its first performance is not known. Despite the lower opus number, it was composed at least five years after the Romance in F, Op. 50, which was published in 1805. He retained the early Classical orchestra he employed for his earlier Piano Concerto in B flat, Op. 19: one flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, and strings. Often described as a “preparation” for the Violin Concerto, Op. 61, of 1806, the Romance in G stands as a fine work in its own right, clearly demonstrating Beethoven’s mastery of the high-Classical style of Mozart and Haydn. Furthermore, Beethoven creates subtle connections between disparate sections of a work.

Cast in a two-episode rondo format (ABACA coda), the Romance in G is not imbued with sonata-form characteristics, as are many of Beethoven’s later rondo movements. The rondo theme (A) is in two parts, each performed first by the soloist then repeated by the orchestra. Descending sixteenth notes in the solo part mark the beginning of B, in which the orchestra is relegated to a purely accompanimental role, creating unity by including figures from the rondo. Section B spends a significant amount of time on the dominant (D major); however, this does not represent a modulation but a preparation for the return of the rondo in G major. Again, the soloist performs both segments of the A section alone, this time including a running eighth note accompaniment under each of the literally repeated themes. Beethoven set the second episode, C, in E minor. The minor mode, dotted rhythms, and staccato passages give the section a “gypsy” music tinge. The foray into a new key area ends with the return of the G major rondo theme, again played by the soloist, but with accompaniment by the orchestra. Beethoven forgoes the repetition of each of the two parts of the rondo and ends the work with a brief coda featuring a lengthy trill in the solo violin. The three fortissimo chords that close the piece seem oddly, possibly comically, out of place in this generally quiet work, but they do resemble the orchestral string parts at the end of each rondo section. [allmusic.com]

great compositions/performances: Artur Schnabel plays Beethoven Piano Sonata No.30, Op.109


Artur Schnabel plays Beethoven Piano Sonata No.30, Op.109

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109, composed in 1820, is the antepenultimate of his piano sonatas. In it, after the huge Hammerklavier sonata, Op. 106, Beethoven returns to a smaller scale and a more intimate character. It is dedicated to Maximiliane Brentano, the daughter of Beethoven’s long-standing friend Antonie Brentano, for whom Beethoven had already composed the short piano trio in B flat major WoO 39 in 1812. Musically, the work is characterised by a free and original approach to the traditional sonata form. Its focus is the third movement, a set of variations that interpret its theme in a wide variety of individual ways.[1]

The three movements of this sonata are:

  • Vivace ma non troppo / Adagio espressivo, E major, 2/4 time
  • Prestissimo, E minor, 6/8 time
  • Gesangvoll, mit innigster Empfindung. Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo, E major, 3/4 time.

A performance lasts about twenty minutes, of which the third movement takes more than half. Overall, the sonata is endowed with abundant melody and interesting, complex harmony.[14](pp192–3)

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