Tag Archives: Ludwig van Beethoven

Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5, No. 1 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5, No. 1 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)

00:00 - Adagio sostenuto – Allegro
17:59 - Rondo. Allegro vivace

Paul Tortelier, cello
Eric Heidsieck, piano

recorded: 1972

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Schubert – Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


Uploaded on Feb 5, 2009/523,782Views

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor, Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Valentina Lisitsa



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live – Lisitsa

Special for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont…

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture / Leonard Bernstein



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven: Fidelio – Overture / Leonard Bernstein

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

 

Fidelio, Playbill of the Worldpremiere, Vienna, Kärntnertortheater, 23 May 1814

Fidelio (Leonore, oder Der Triumph der ehelichen Liebe: Leonore, or The Triumph of Married Love)[1] (Op. 72) is a Germanopera with spoken dialogue in two acts by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is his only opera. The German libretto was prepared by Joseph Sonnleithner from the French of Jean-Nicolas Bouilly, which had been used for the 1798 opera Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal by Pierre Gaveaux, and the 1804 opera Leonora by Ferdinando Paer (a score of which was owned by Beethoven).

The opera tells how Leonore, disguised as a prison guard named “Fidelio”, rescues her husband Florestan from death in apolitical prison.

Background

The theatrical mask contemplated by a putto on the Beethoven monument by Kaspar von Zumbusch(Vienna, 1880) commemorates Beethoven’s sole opera in the city where it made its debut

Bouilly’s scenario fits Beethoven’s aesthetic and political outlook: a story of personal sacrifice, heroism and eventual triumph (the usual topics of Beethoven’s “middle period”) with its underlying struggle for liberty and justice mirroring contemporary political movements in Europe.

As elsewhere in Beethoven’s vocal music, the principal parts of Leonore and Florestan, in particular, require great vocal skill and endurance in order to project the necessary intensity, and top performances in these roles attract admiration.[citation needed]

Some notable moments in the opera include the “Prisoners’ Chorus”, an ode to freedom sung by a chorus of political prisoners, Florestan’s vision of Leonore come as an angel to rescue him, and the scene in which the rescue finally takes place. The finale celebrates Leonore’s bravery with alternating contributions of soloists and chorus.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven: Symphony No.8 – Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.8 in F, Op.93
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Allegro vivace e con brio
9:05 II. Allegro scherzando
12:57 III. Tempo di Menuetto
17:36 IV. Allegro vivace

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Great Compositions/Performances: Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Triple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56



Ludwig Van Beethoven [ 1770 - 1827 ],
Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra
In C Major Op.56 ‘Thriple Concerto’

I. Allegro
II. Largo – attacca
III. Rondo Alla Polacca Allegro tempo I.

Violin ; Isaac Stern [ 1920 - 2001 ]
Piano ; Emanuel Ax [ 1949 - ]
Cello ; Yo-Yo Ma [ 1955 - ]

Conducted By ; Michael Stern
London Symphony Orchestra
Narrated By ; Gregory Peck

From Album [ 1992, Sony Classical LD ]
Isaac Stern A Biography In Music
Live At Royal Festival Hall

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Beethoven’s Sonata No. 8 in C minor Op. 13 “Pathétique” Live –



From Valentina:  “FSpecial for my German fans! List of info for upcoming concerts in Deutschland in the next couple of weeks below . Munchen (Mar24), Stuttgart(Mar27), Heidelberg(Apr 7)
Do come ! For Beethoven and more :-)))
http://www.muenchenmusik.de/veranstal…
http://www.sks-russ.de/veranstaltunge…
http://heidelberger-fruehling.de/cont..

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: GARY OLDMAN (1958)


Gary Oldman (1958)

Oldman is an English actor known for playing eccentric characters and for his ability to master accents. He first appeared on screen in the 1982 film Remembrance and has since played a variety of characters including Dracula, Beethoven, and Sex Pistols bassist Sid Vicious. In 1997, he wrote, directed, and produced Nil By Mouth, an award-winning film reportedly based on his life. Recently, he has received acclaim for his portrayal of which character in the Harry Potter film seriesMore… Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven – Violin Sonata No. 3 in Eb, op. 12 no. 3



I. Allegro con spirito [0:00]
II. Adagio con molta espressione [8:52]
III. Rondo: Allegro molto [14:19]

Hiro Kurosaki, violin
Linda Nicholson, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Emil Gilels, piano

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mendelssohn Cello Sonata no.2 Natalia Gutman & Viacheslav Poprugin



Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy sonata for cello and piano op.58 in D major
1.Allegro assai vivace 0:02
2.Allegretto scherzando 8:48
3.Adagio 13:42
4.Molto allegro e vivace 18:15

Natalia Gutman cello
Viacheslav Poprugin piano

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Johannes Brahms: Piano Concerto NO. 2 in B flat Op. 83 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Bramhs (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

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Z.Francescatti – R.Casadesus: BEETHOVEN Sonata No.8 Op.30,3 (1961)



Ludwig van BEETHOVEN – The Sonatas for Violin & Piano
Violin Sonata No.8 in G major, Op.30/3
0:05 / I. Allegro assai [5'48'']
5:56 / II. Tempo di minuetto, molto moderato e grazioso [6'53'']
12:54 / III. Allegro vivace [3'22'']
Zino FRANCESCATTI, violin – Robert CASADESUS, piano 
(Rec. 1961 – vinyl CBS77426 (p) 1982)
audio restoring / vinyl remaster: Emilio Pessina, 2013
________________________________________­__________
10 Violin Sonatashttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

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Eggner Trio – Schubert Nocturne – Schubertiade Schwarzenberg



Schubertiade Schwarzenberg 2009,
Fr.Schubert: Adagio Es-Dur, op.post.148, D897, Notturno

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Ludwig van Beethoven: Bagatelle #4 Op 126/4



Two versions of Sviatoslav Richter Playing Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Bagatelle for piano in B minor, Op. 126 No. 4

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Make Music Part of your Life: W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor (Harnoncourt)



Make Music Part of your Life:  W. A. MozartSymphony No. 40 in G minor (Harnoncourt)

Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550 (1788):
1. Molto allegro
2. Andante
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio
4. Finale. Allegro assai

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Dinu Lipatti – Chopin Nocturne Op. 27, No.2 in D flat Major



Dinu Lipatti – Chopin Nocturne No2 op 27 in D flat Major
More information about Dinu Lipatti (and Clara Haskil, another great piano player) you can find on http://www.lipatti-haskil-foundation….

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Arrau Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54



Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

1.- Allegro Affettuoso
2.- Intermezzo: Andantino Grazioso
3.- Allegro Vivace

Film footage recorded in 1963

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Claudio Arrau (1903-1991)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven Variations on “Rule Britannia”


Beethoven Variations on “Rule Britannia

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989

Published on Mar 30, 2013

Conducted by Leonard Bernstein, THE BERLIN CELEBRATION CONCERT is an historic performance marking the fall of the Berlin Wall. Performed on Christmas Day 1989 in the former East Berlin, the concert unites an international cast of celebrated musicians and vocalists for a moving performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

Symphonieorchester des Bayerisches Rundfunks and members of Staatskapelle Dresden, Orchestra of the Leningrad Kirov Theatre, London Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic and Orchestre de Paris.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Itzhak Perlman Bach Violin Sonata No.1 BWV 1001


Buy “Sonatas and Partitas, Sonata No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001: Adagio” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3iTunes

Artist

 

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Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664, Op. 120 ( summer of 1819):
Movements
I. Allegro moderato, A major
II. Andante, D major
III. Allegro, A major

Well regarded among pianists, the “Little” A major sonata is so called to distinguish it from the hefty 1828 sonata in the same key. The manuscript, completed in July 1819, was dedicated to Josephine von Koller of Steyr in Upper Austria, whom he considered to be “very pretty” and “a good pianist.” The lyrical, buoyant, in spots typically poignant nature of this sonata fits the image of a young Schubert in love, living in a summery Austrian countryside, which he also considered to be “unimaginably lovely.”[1]

The A major sonata is straightforward, with a dulcet melodic opening. It was the first of Schubert’s piano sonatas where the sonata form as perfected by his idol, Beethoven, does not seem wrestled with; rather, it is a “joyous breakthrough,” a carefree triumph over strict rules of construction.[2]

The manuscript to this “little” sonata has been lost.[3]

Biography

Early life and education

Schubert was born in Himmelpfortgrund (now a part of Alsergrund), Vienna on January 31, 1797. His father, Franz Theodor Schubert, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother, Elisabeth Vietz, was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of Franz Theodor’s fourteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1783),[1] nine died in infancy; five survived. Their father was a well-known teacher, and his school in Lichtental, a part of Vienna’s 9th district, was well attended.[2] He was not a musician of fame or with formal training, but he taught his son some elements of music.[3]

 

The house in which Schubert was born, today Nussdorfer Strasse 54, in the 9th district of Vienna.

At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at his father’s school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin,[3] and his brother Ignaz gave him piano lessons.[4] At 7, Schubert began receiving lessons from Michael Holzer, the local church organist and choirmaster. Holzer’s lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[5] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner‘s apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he had the opportunity to practice on better instruments.[6] He also played the viola in the family string quartet, with brothers Ferdinand and Ignaz on violin and his father on the cello. Schubert wrote many of his early string quartets for this ensemble.[7]

Schubert first came to the attention of Antonio Salieri, then Vienna’s leading musical authority, in 1804, when his vocal talent was recognized.[7] In October 1808, he became a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial seminary) through a choir scholarship. At the Stadtkonvikt, Schubert was introduced to theovertures and symphonies of Mozart.[8] His exposure to these pieces and various lighter compositions, combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge.[9]One important musical influence came from the songs of Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, who was an importantLied composer of the time, which, his friend Joseph von Spaun reported, he “wanted to modernize”.[10]Schubert’s friendship with Spaun began at the Stadtkonvikt and endured through his lifetime. In those early days, the more well-to-do Spaun furnished the impoverished Schubert with manuscript paper.[9]

Meanwhile, his genius began to show in his compositions. Schubert was occasionally permitted to lead the Stadtkonvikt’s orchestra, and Salieri decided to begin training him privately in musical composition andtheory in these years.[11] It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal of chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D. 31) and Salve Regina (D. 27), an octet for wind instruments (D. 72/72a, said to commemorate the 1812 death of his mother),[12] a cantata for guitar and male voices (D. 110, in honor of his father’s birthday in 1813), and his first symphony (D. 82).[13]

Teacher at his father’s school

At the end of 1813, he left the Stadtkonvikt, and returned home for studies at the Normalhauptschule to train as a teacher. In 1814, he entered his father’s school as teacher of the youngest students. For over two years, the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success.[14] There were, however, other interests to compensate. He continued to receive private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s musical training than any of his other teachers. Salieri and Schubert would part ways in 1817.[11]

In 1814, Schubert met a young soprano named Therese Grob, the daughter of a local silk manufacturer. Several of his songs (Salve Regina and Tantum Ergo) were composed for her voice, and she also performed in the premiere of his first Mass (D. 105) in September[15] 1814.[14] Schubert intended to marry Grob, but was hindered by the harsh marriage consent law of 1815,[16] which required the ability to show the means to support a family.[17] In November 1816, after failing to gain a position at Laibach, Schubert sent Grob’s brother Heinrich a collection of songs, which were retained by her family into the 20th century.[18]

Schubert’s most prolific year was probably 1815. He composed over 20,000 bars of music, more than half of which was for orchestra, including nine church works, a symphony, and about 140 Lieder.[19] In that year, he was also introduced to Anselm Hüttenbrenner and Franz von Schober, who would become his lifelong friends. Another friend, Johann Mayrhofer, was introduced to him by Spaun in 1814.[20]

Supported by friends

 

Josef Abel(?) portrait of an anonymous young man with glasses (possibly Schubert)

Significant changes happened in 1816. Schober, a student of good family and some means, invited Schubert to room with him at his mother’s house. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made the unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach, and he had also decided not to resume teaching duties at his father’s school. By the end of the year, he became a guest in Schober’s lodgings. For a time, he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. “I compose every morning, and when one piece is done, I begin another.”[21] During this year, he focused on orchestral and choral works, although he also continued to write Lieder.[22] Much of this work was unpublished, but manuscripts and copies circulated among friends and admirers.[23]

In early 1817, Schober introduced Schubert to Johann Michael Vogl, a prominent baritone twenty years Schubert’s senior. Vogl, for whom Schubert went on to write a great many songs, became one of Schubert’s main proponents in Viennese musical circles. He also met Joseph Hüttenbrenner (brother to Anselm), who also played a role in promoting Schubert’s music.[24] These, and an increasing circle of friends and musicians, became responsible for promoting, collecting, and, after his death, preserving, his work.[25]

In late 1817, Schubert’s father gained a new position at a school in Rossau (not far from Lichtental). Schubert rejoined his father and reluctantly took up teaching duties there. In early 1818, he was rejected for membership in the prestigious Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, something that might have furthered his musical career.[26] However, he began to gain more notice in the press, and the first public performance of a secular work, an overture performed in February 1818, received praise from the press in Vienna and abroad.[27]

Schubert spent the summer of 1818 as music teacher to the family of Count Johann Karl Esterházy at their château in Zseliz (then in Hungary, now in Slovakia). His duties were relatively light (teaching piano and singing to the two daughters, Marie and Karoline), and the pay relatively good. As a result, he happily continued to compose during this time. It may have been at this time that he wrote one of his now world-famous compositions, the Marche militaire No. 1 in D major. On his return from Zseliz, he took up residence with his friend Mayrhofer.[26] The respite at Zseliz led to a succession of compositions for piano duet.[28]

The tight circle of friends that Schubert surrounded himself with was dealt a blow in early 1820. Schubert and four of his friends were arrested by the Austrian secret police, who were suspicious of any type of student gatherings. One of Schubert’s friends, Johann Senn, was put on trial, imprisoned for over a year, and then permanently banned from Vienna. The other four, including Schubert, were “severely reprimanded”, in part for “inveighing against [officials] with insulting and opprobrious language”.[29] While Schubert never saw Senn again, he did set some of his poems, “Selige Welt” and “Schwanengesang”, to music. The incident may have played a role in a falling-out with Mayrhofer, with whom he was living at the time.[30]

Musical maturity

The compositions of 1819 and 1820 show a marked advance in development and maturity of style[31]. The unfinished oratorio “Lazarus” (D. 689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D. 706), the Gesang der Geister (D. 705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D. 703), and the “Wanderer Fantasy” for piano (D. 760). Of most notable interest is the staging in 1820 of two of Schubert’s operas: Die Zwillingsbrüder (D. 647) appeared at the Theater am Kärntnertoron June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D. 644) appeared at the Theater an der Wien on August 21.[32]Hitherto, his larger compositions (apart from his masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position, addressing a wider public.[32] Publishers, however, remained distant, withAnton Diabelli hesitantly agreeing to print some of his works on commission.[33] The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meager pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. The situation improved somewhat in March 1821 when Vogl sang “Der Erlkönig” at a concert that was extremely well received.[34] That month, he composed a variation on a waltz by Anton Diabelli (D. 718), being one of the fifty composers who contributed to Vaterländischer Künstlerverein.

The production of the two operas turned Schubert’s attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage, where, for a variety of reasons, he was almost completely unsuccessful. In 1822, Alfonso und Estrella was refused, partly owing to its libretto.[35] Fierrabras (D. 796) was rejected in the fall of 1823, but this was largely due to the popularity of Rossini and the Italian operatic style, and the failure of Carl Maria von Weber‘s Euryanthe.[36] Die Verschworenen (D. 787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the grounds of its title),[37] and Rosamunde (D. 797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of the play for which Schubert had written incidental music. Of these works, the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierrabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822, he made the acquaintance of both Weber and Beethoven, but little came of it in either case. Beethoven is said to have acknowledged the younger man’s gifts on a few occasions, but some of this is likely legend and in any case he could not have known the real scope of Schubert’s music – especially not the instrumental works – as so little of it was printed or performed in the composer’s lifetime. On his deathbed, Beethoven is said to have looked into some of the younger man’s works and exclaimed, “Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!”[38] but what would have come of it if he had recovered we can never know.

 

Schubert in 1825 (watercolor by Wilhelm August Rieder)

…read more here

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Elly Ney plays Beethoven Andante favori WoO 57 in F major


Beethoven: Andante favori WoO 57 in F major
Elly Ney playing the historical Graf piano witch Ludwig van Beethoven played during the last years of his life. 
Recorded 1965

 

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Evgeny Kissin plays Rondo a capriccio,op.129 (‘Rage over the lost penny’) in Bucharest


Evgeny Kissin plays ‘Rage over the lost penny‘ as an encore after his performance of Beethoven 5th concerto with London Symphony Orchestra and Sir Colin Davis on Festival Enescu at 21st of September 2007th in Bucharest, Romania.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 - Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 - Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 - Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 - Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 - Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 - Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 - Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 - Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 - Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 - Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 - Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 - Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 - Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 - Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 - Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 - Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 - Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 - Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 - Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 - Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

 

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Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40


Ludwig van Beethoven – Romance for Violin & Orchestra No. 1 in G major, Op. 40

Emmy Verhey, Violin. Brabant Orchestra, Eduardo Marturet

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Bach English Suite No 5 BWV 810 E minor Andras Schiff



Johann Sebastian Bach
András Schiff, Piano
English Suite No 5 in E minor, BWV 810
Prelude 0:00
Allemande 5:23
Courante 8:38
Sarabande 10:35
Passepied I, Passepied II 13:43
Gigue 16:56

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic



Great presentation of the Great Wiener Philharmoniker conducted by Herbert von Karajan, playing the 9th Symphony of Antonin Dvorak “From the new world”. 

Gran presentación de la Filarmónica de Viena conducida por Herbert von Karajan, interpretando la novena sinfonía de Antonin Dvorak “Sinfonía del Nuevo Mundo”.

(C) Telemonde 1992, UMG and all their respective owners. No commercial use of this material.

(0:37) 1st mvt (Adagio, Allegro Molto)
(10:42) 2nd mvt (Largo)
(23:30) 3rd mvt (Scherzo, Molto Vivace)
(32:07) 4rth mvt (Allegro con fuoco)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Claudio Arrau Liszt Transcendental Etudes No. 11 Harmonies du soir



Claudio Arrau Liszt Transcendental Etudes No. 11 Harmonies du soir
In D-flat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 

Franz Liszt

Cover of Franz Liszt

The first three bars of the Transcendental Étude No. 11

Transcendental Étude No. 11 in D-flat, “Harmonies du Soir” is the eleventhétude of the set of twelve Transcendental Études by Franz Liszt. This étude is a study in harmonies, broken chords played in quick succession, full octave jumps,chromatic harmonies, chord variations, interlocking hands, bravura, massive chords, especially proper pedaling, and performance as a whole.

This piece is considered one of the most artistic of the études, along with No. 12 “Chasse-neige”.

Origin

“Harmonies du Soir” was rooted from the seventh of the Études in Twelve Exercises, which was a study in alternating hands. However, the similarities in melody are apparent.

Content

 

Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The piece begins with an introduction containing slow broken octaves in the left hand and chords in the right hand. After a group of arpeggios, the main theme is introduced in the left hand, a beautiful descent followed by a chromatic ascent with harmonies changing with each note. It is accompanied in the right hand by bass notes (crossing over) and octaves which seem to “sing along” with the left hand. Eventually, after a build up with large chords in the right hand and octaves deep in the bass in the left hand, this theme is played again this time with harp like arpeggios in both hands. The piece continues in this manner for a while until the second theme, a chordal section marked Poco piu mosso is introduced. It begins pianississimo but then grows to an appassionato climax. The music then seems to fade out, followed by an entire new section of the piece, marked Piu lento con intimo sentimento. This section’s song like melody is accompanied by arpeggiation in both hands (bringing out the main melody is a surprising technical feat, due to the wide spacing of the arpeggios in each hand). After a recitative passage, the music goes somewhere unexpected. The second theme is brought back, this time fortissimo and marked triomfante with chords in both hands. The most technically difficult part of the entire piece consists of multiple pages of chordal jumps and repetition, requiring a large amount of stamina. The music eventually dies down, and after an arpeggiated variation of the first theme, the music dies out
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Great Compositions/Performances: Ruggiero RICCI plays WIENIAWSKI Scherzo-Tarantelle Op.16 – 1980


Henryk Wieniawski ( July 10, 1835 Lublin, Cong...

Henryk Wieniawski ( July 10, 1835 Lublin, Congress Poland, Russian Empire – March 31, 1880 Moscow) was a Polish composer and violinist. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Henryk WIENIAWSKI: Scherzo-Tarantelle, in G minor Op.16 (1855)
Ruggiero RICCI, violin – Joanna Gruenberg, piano (rec: 1980)
________________________________________­__________
full CDhttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Beethoven “12 Contredances”



12 Contredances for small Orchestra WoO 14 
by Ludwig van Beethoven
Chamber Orchestra Berlin
Helmut Koch, conductor
1970

 

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Manuel de Falla – Suite populaire espagnole [Daniil Shafran, Nina Musinian]


 

A cello player in the partially destroyed Nati...

A cello player in the partially destroyed National Library, Sarajevo, during the war in 1992. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Suite populaire espagnole, arranged from “Siete Canciones populares españolas” (1914)

I. El Paño moruno [0:00]
II. Nana [2:05]
III. Cancion [4:49]
IV. Polo [6:06]
V. Asturiana

 

Español: Estatua de Manuel de Falla en la Aven...

Español: Estatua de Manuel de Falla en la Avenida de la Constitución de Granada (España). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

[7:25]
VI. Jota [9:57]

A suite for cello and piano, arranged by French cellist Maurice Maréchal (1892-1964) from a setting of popular songs by Spanish composer Manuel Falla (1876-1946).

Cellist: Daniil Shafran
Pianist: Nina Musinian

 

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Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

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Great Composers/Compositions: Igor Bukhvalov – Symphony no. 8 in F-Dur, Op. 93 by Ludwig van Beethoven



Igor Bukhvalov conducts Belarusian National Philharmonic performing Symphony #8 in F-Dur ,Op. 93 By Ludwig van Beethoven:

The Eighth Symphony consists of four movements:

 

  1. Allegro vivace e con brio
  2. Allegretto scherzando
  3. Tempo di Menuetto
  4. Allegro vivace
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 The Symphony No. 8 in F MajorOp. 93 is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1812. Beethoven fondly referred to it as “my little Symphony in F,” distinguishing it from his Sixth Symphony, a longer work also in F.[1]

The Eighth Symphony is generally light-hearted, though not lightweight, and in many places cheerfully loud, with many accented notes. Various passages in the symphony are heard by some listeners to be musical jokes.[2] As with various other Beethoven works such as the Opus 27 piano sonatas, the symphony deviates from Classical tradition in making the last movement the weightiest of the four.
The work was begun in the summer of 1812, immediately after the completion of the Seventh Symphony.[3]At the time Beethoven was 41 years old. As Antony Hopkins has noted, the cheerful mood of the work betrays nothing of the grossly unpleasant events that were taking place in Beethoven’s life at the time, which involved his interference in his brother Johann’s love life.[4] The work took Beethoven only four months to complete,[3] and is, unlike many of his works, without dedication.
The premiere took place on 24 February 1814, at a concert in the RedoutensaalVienna, at which theSeventh Symphony (which had been premiered two months earlier) was also played.[5] Beethoven was growing increasingly deaf at the time, but nevertheless led the premiere. Reportedly, “the orchestra largely ignored his ungainly gestures and followed the principal violinist instead.”[6]

 

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Fabulous Composesrs/Compositions: String Quintet in E Major Op. 11 #5, ‘Minuet’, by Boccherini


 

Luigi Boccherini playing the chello

Luigi Boccherini playing the chello (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The String Quintet in E major, Op. 11, No. 5 by Luigi Boccherini was written in 1771 and published in 1775. It is one of his most popular works. The quintet is famous for its minuet third movement, often referred to as “The Celebrated Minuet”, which is most-often played as a standalone piece outside of the context of the full quintet. It ia one of the most recognized composition from the Baroque Period.

Images – Versailles Gardens in France and Generalife Gardens in Spain

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Felix Mendelssohn, Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12, I. Adagio – Allegro moderato



Felix Mendelssohn
Romain Descharmes, Tianwa Yang, Descharmes, Romain, Gallois, Patrick, Sinfonia Finlandia Jyvaskyla, Yang, Tianwa
Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12
Mendelssohn: Violin Concertos – Violin Sonata in F minor
8.572662
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Wilhelm Kempff PlaysBeethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 16 Op. 31 in G major



Piano: Wilhelm Kempff

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 16 in G major, Op. 31 No. 1, was composed between 1801 and 1802.
The sonata consists of three movements. A typical performance lasts about 20 minutes.

  1. Allegro vivace
  2. Adagio grazioso
  3. Rondo, allegretto – presto

Although it was numbered as the first piece in the trio of piano sonatas which were published as Opus 31 in 1803, Beethoven actually finished it after the Op. 31 No. 2, the Tempest Sonata. [From Wikipedia]

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Best Classical Music YouTube Collection: Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


Make this the best post of 2014: RATE, LIKE, COMMENT! Above all ENJOY!

Published on Mar 29, 2013 - 751,382 view to date

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 - Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 - Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 - Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 - Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 - Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 - Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 - Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 - Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 - Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 - Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 - Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 - Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 - Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 - Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 - Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 - Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 - Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 - Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 - Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 - Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

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Antonín Dvořák – From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68


Published on Sep 23, 2012

Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano

Antonín Dvořák – From the Bohemian Forest, Op. 68

  • In the Spinning Room,  Allegro molto [D major] 
  • By the Black Lake,  Lento [F sharp minor/major] 
  • Walpurgis Night,  Molto vivace [B falt major] 
  • In Wait,  Allegro comodo [F major
  • Silent Woods,  Lento e molto cantabile [D flat major
  • From Troubled Times,  Allegro con fuoco [A minor]

 

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Schumann, Albumblatt op. 124 Nr. 16 (Schlummerlied), Wolfgang Weller 2012.



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856)
Albumblätter op. 124 Nr. 16 “Schlummerlied”
Wolfgang Weller

Tempo Giusto

This recording is part of the ongoing Schumann-Project:
ROBERT SCHUMANN / COMPLETE PIANO WORKS / WOLFGANG WELLER

 

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Claudio Arrau


Claudio Arrau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Claudio Arrau in 1974, by Allan Warren

Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991)[1] was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especiallyBeethovenSchubertChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century.

 

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Mozart – Quintet for Piano and Winds in E flat, K. 452



The Quintet in E flat major for Piano and Winds, K. 452, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on March 30, 1784 and premiered two days later at the Imperial and Royal National Court Theater in Vienna. Shortly after the premiere, Mozart wrote to his father that “I myself consider it to be the best thing I have written in my life.” It is scored for piano, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon. There are three movements:
1. Largo – Allegro moderato
2. Larghetto
3. Allegretto
This structure closely resembles that of a typical sonata. The first movement is a sprightly sonata form Allegro, with themes being passed from instrument to instrument, usually with the piano introducing a theme and accompanying while the oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon play variations on it. The Larghetto movement is typical of the 2nd movement of other Mozart pieces: soft and gentle, yet still engaging. The Allegretto movement is a “sonata-rondo” of the kind Mozart used as the finale of many of the piano concertos he was writing at this period, and contains a written-out cadenza-like section toward the end.
This piece was the inspiration for the Quintet in E flat for Piano and Winds, Op. 16, by Ludwig van Beethoven, who composed this tribute in 1796. Both compositions use the same scoring. 
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
—————————————-­———————————

 

FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.

 

Fabulous Performers: VICTOR MERZHANOV Plays – Beethoven’s Sonata no. 10 in G Major, op. 14, no. 2



VICTOR MERZHANOV, piano

Ludwig van Beethoven. Piano Sonata no. 10 in G Major, op. 14, no. 2
1. Allegro 
2. Andante variations 06:21
3. Scherzo: Allegro assai 11:09
Recorded in 1954.

 
 The Piano Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 14, No. 2, composed in 1798–1799, is an early-period work by Ludwig van Beethoven, dedicated to Baroness Josefa von Braun. A typical performance lasts 15 minutes. While it is not as well known as some of the more original sonatas of Beethoven’s youth, such as the ‘Pathetique’ or ‘Moonlight’ sonatas, Tovey[1] described it as an ‘exquisite little work.’

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Victor Merzhanov
Merzhanov-11-2010.jpg

Victor Merzhanov at Moscow Conservatory (2010)
Background information
Birth name Victor Karpovich Merzhanov
Born August 15, 1919
TambovRussia
Died December 20, 2012 (aged 93)
MoscowRussia
Genres Classical
Occupations PianistPedagogue
Instruments Piano

Victor Karpovich Merzhanov (Russian: Ви́ктор Ка́рпович Мержа́нов) (August 15, 1919 – December 20, 2012) was a Russian pianist

Merzhanov was born in Tambov and studied at Tambov Musical College with Solomon Starikov and Alexander Poltoratsky. Between 1936-1941 he studied at the Moscow Conservatory in the classes ofSamuil Feinberg (piano) and Alexander Goedicke (organ), graduating with distinction.

 

He achieved international recognition as a pianist in 1945 when he won the first prize (shared withSviatoslav Richter) at the Third All-Soviet-Union Piano Competition. In 1949, he was placed tenth at theInternational Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw. Merzhanov became a Moscow Philharmony soloist in 1946.

 

Merzhanov was a Professor at the Moscow Conservatory from 1947 until his death. Among his students are prize-winners of international competitions: Vladimir Bunin, Oleg Volkov, Igor Girfanov, Yuri DidenkoMikhail OlenevHideyo HaradaNazzareno CarusiTatiana ShebanovaRuslan SviridovIrina KhovanskayaAnna YarovayaAnahit NersesyanElena Ulyanova and many others. His name is inscribed on the Moscow Conservatory’s marble wall along with those of Alexander Scriabin andSergei Rachmaninoff. He was also a professor at the Tambov Rachmaninov Institute.

 

During his 60-year stage career, Merzhanov gave more than 2,000 recitals and concerts in Russia, Europe, the United States, China, and other countries, with such conductors as Lorin MaazelKurt SanderlingKirill Kondrashin, Nikolai Anosov, Aleksandr GaukGennady RozhdestvenskyYuri Temirkanov and Yevgeny Svetlanov.

 

His recordings (on major labels in the United States, Italy, Japan and the USSR) show his repertoire, including works from the Baroque period to contemporary music, from works by Bach and Beethoven to those by Prokofiev and Shostakovich.

 

 

Fabulous Performers: Liszt, Hungarian Rhapsody No.6, Martha Argerich 1966



A turbulent interpretation of one of Liszt’s many rhapsodies. Interesting to note her getting carried away in the final (and maniacal!) octaves nearing the end. Looks like even Martha can get the better of Martha…

Filmed in Munich, 1966.

 

C. Saint – Saens Morceau de concert op. 94 | Peter Müseler, Horn



Conducted by Juri Lebedev | Summer Concert 2007 at Belvedere School of Music Weimar/Germany | Musikgymnasium Schloß Belvedere

 

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Beethoven’s Symphony No 8 in F major – BBC Proms 2012 (Daniel Barenboim)



The West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, under the baton of Daniel Barenboim continues its Beethoven cycle with the compact Eighth in F major.
At the BBC PROMS – 2012 – Royal Albert Hall – LONDON