Tag Archives: Music

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Voces8 performs ‘Maria’ from West Side Story



International award winning a cappella octet, Voces8 performs ‘Maria’ from West Side Story. The arrangement was written especially for Voces8 by Composer in Residence, Jim Clements and was recorded live in Spain in November 2007.

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“Blue Skies” performed by Nina Simone



“Blue Skies” performed by Nina Simone
Recording session: Live in Cologne at One World Music Festival, 7/22/1990

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Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures



Henry Purcell: Welcome to all the pleasures
(Welcome to all the pleasures (An Ode for St. Cecilia’s Day), for soloists, chorus & instruments, Z. 339)

Welcome to All the Pleasures is one of the Odes written for the celebration of St. Cecilia’s Day byHenry Purcell. The libretto is by Christopher Fishburn. Purcell had been writing Odes for the Royal Family since 1680, but in 1683 the Musical Society of London commissioned him to write an ode in honor of the public celebration of the feast of St. Cecilia. The “Musical Society” was a group of amateur and professional musicians that had organized a festival for the “great patroness of music.” It was the first year of their festival and Purcell was their first commissioned composer. Purcell composed the work for three solo voices, chorus, four-part strings, and continuo. Formally, he produces a concerto grosso effect when he balances the trio of voices (concertino) against the chorus and orchestra (ripieno).

The opening symphony has two movements; one maestoso and the second vivace. The maestoso is full of suspensions and canonic entrances and has a full texture. The vivace is contrapuntal throughout. The words “Welcome to all the Pleasures” are set on imitative entrances. When each voice proclaims “Welcome!,” an echo of invitations is produced. “Hail Great Assembly” breaks out in fugal style. The movement ends with an instrumental ritornello.

Here the Deities Approve is a countertenor solo written over a three measure ground bass. The vocal line is lyrical and plastic; the countertenor soars above the rest of the ensemble. There follows a string ritornello. Throughout this ode Purcell uses instruments at least as much as the voices. While joys Celestial sets joys on dotted rhythmic figures, and places the word “Celestial” on a falling, augmented dotted figure. The effect is joyful and celestial. Then there follows an instrumental ritornello based on the dotted rhythmic theme. Purcell imitates and varies this theme within a highly contrapuntal texture.

Then Lift up your Voices features a solo and chorus. Again the chorus begins with imitative entrances, but eventually comes together in homophony. Afterwards there is a solo harpsichord interlude, which can be played extemporaneously, making for a beautiful respite from the rest of the ode. Beauty, thou scene of love is a beautiful tenor solo. The solo is in two sections, the first of which is repeated. The ritornello takes over the solo line from the tenor voice as Purcell sets it in an inventive four-part contrapuntal style.

In a consort of voices has a diatonic, joyful melody in E major, and adds a bright feeling to the movement. The tenor voice has a solo based on the opening theme, and soon the chorus enters canonically. One of the most striking aspects of this movement is Purcell’s setting of the name “Cecilia,” which he repeats many times in all the voices and registers. He sets the music to the sound of the word. He ends the piece by having the singers drop out one by one, starting with the treble voices. Finally the bass is left alone to quietly sing the final “Ce-cil-ia.”

Liana Brook Guberman, Soprano
Jenny Green, Soprano
Alexandra Lushtak, Soprano
Christopher Sokolowski, Tenor
Christian Zaremba, Bass 
Hudson Valley Chamber Singers,
Hudson Valley Singers,
NYMO Ensemble,
Anastasia Dedik, Harpsichord
Eu, Harpsichord, organ, direction

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Franz Doppler – Duettino on Hungarian Themes, Op. 36 – Two Flutes & Piano



Franz Doppler – Duettino on Hungarian Themes, Op. 36 – Two Flutes & Piano
Uri Shoham and Yossi Arnheim, flutes, accompanied by Yoav Talmi, piano, perform Doppler’s Duettino on Hungarian Themes, Op. 36 in a live concert. At the time of this concert, Uri Shoham was Principal Flute and Yossi Arnheim was Assistant Principal of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra. After 46 years of playing First Flute with the IPO, Uri Shoham retired in 1997. Since then, Yossi Arnheim has served as Principal Flute of the IPO.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Johannes Brahms – Intermezzo Op. 117 No. 1 in E flat major


The 3 Intermezzi Op. 117 were composed in 1892 and are among the best-loved and most popular of Brahms‘ autumnal late piano output. On a smaller and more intimate scale than the surrounding sets of Op. 116, Op. 118 and Op. 119, the composer described these pieces as “lullabies to my sorrows”. Here we find Brahms at his most tender and introspective, with only one outburst (in the third Intermezzo) of the characteristic Brahmsian fieryness. The Intermezzi were inspired by a Scottish poem from Herder’s Volkslieder, and bear this inscription:

Schlaf sanft mein Kind, schlaf sanft und Schön!
Mich dauert’s sehr, dich weinen sehn.

Sleep softly my child, sleep softly and well!
It hurts my heart to see you weeping. 

Piano: Idil Biret

Picture: Winter, Close of Day by George Innes

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“O Joyful Day,” Anonymous Slavic 17th century motet trans. Mark Bailey



American Baroque Orchestra
Mark Bailey, artistic director

From a live 2013 performance entitled, “Music across the Nations,” this Slavic part-song or kant is arranged for two instrumental groupings that trade musical lines, and then play as a united ensemble for the final time. These part songs reveal the first significant wave of western music to influence regions such as Ukraine and Russia. They were sung para-liturgically, i.e. based on sacred themes but not designed in the church service per se. Because they were strophic and tuneful, part songs were very popular for many decades. They lend themselves quite well to instrumental ensembles and likely were played that way as well.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: G. Gershwin – Walking the Dog (Promenade)



Julian Milkis – Clarinet, Mikhail Kopelmanviolin, Päivyt Meller – violin, Ulla Soinne – viola, Seppo Kimanen – cello.
Recorded at Sibelius Academy of Music on November 24, 2012 by 
ABG World, Video and Audio Production.

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Foreigner – ‘I Want To Know What Love Is’ [Official Music Video]



Music video by Foreigner performing I Want To Know What Love Is.
Best quality available on YouTube

I do not own this material, I am just showing it to the rest of the world. 

Lyrics:

I gotta take a little time
A little time to think things over
I better read between the lines
In case I need it when I’m older
Aaaah woah-ah-aah

Now this mountain I must climb
Feels like a world upon my shoulders
And through the clouds I see love shine
It keeps me warm as life grows colder

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
Can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far
To change this lonely life

I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
I wanna feel what love is
I know you can show me
Aaaah woah-oh-ooh

I’m gonna take a little time
A little time to look around me, oooh ooh-ooh ooh-ooh oooh
I’ve got nowhere left to hide
It looks like love has finally found me

In my life there’s been heartache and pain
I don’t know if I can face it again
I can’t stop now, I’ve traveled so far
To change this lonely life

I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
I wanna feel what love is
I know you can show me
I wanna know what love is
I want you to show me
And I wanna feel, I want to feel what love is
And I know, I know you can show me

Let’s talk about love
(I wanna know what love is) the love that you feel inside
(I want you to show me) I’m feeling so much love
(I wanna feel what love is) no, you just cannot hide
(I know you can show me) yeah, woah-oh-ooh
I wanna know what love is, let’s talk about love
(I want you to show me) I wanna feel it too
(I wanna feel what love is) I wanna feel it too
And I know, and I know, I know you can show me
Show me what is real, woah (woah), yeah I know
(I wanna know what love is) hey I wanna know what love
(I want you to show me), I wanna know, I wanna know, want know
(I wanna feel what love is), hey I wanna feel, love
I know you can show me, yeah

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prokofiev in a Club! Sonata #7 Yellow Lounge Amsterdam Lisitsa



One day in a future the ‘traditional” concert halls will go the way of ‘traditional” movie theaters = disappear from use. I told you before – the BEST place to listen to the piano is directly under it. But try that in Concergebouw or Carnegie Hall _ they will call police on you ;) Not so in a club . Yellow Lounge Amsterdam March 19th 2014 – http://www.trouwamsterdam.nl An ultimate experience listening to Prokofiev . Never mind the tinny captured recording – it was Imperial after all and it RRRRrrrocked – just ask the willing “victims” :)

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Make Music Part of your Life Series: Georges Bizet Carmen PART 1 of 20 (Prelude + Sur la Place)



I have now completely uploaded my favourite opera!
Georges Bizet‘s Carmen (4 Acts) (Part 1 of 20) (Prelude + Sur la Place)

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rqflI0… (next part)

Composer: Georges Bizet 
Libretto: Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy

CARMEN: Maria Ewing (Soprano)
DON JOSE: Luis Lima (Tenor)
ESCAMILLO: Gino Quilico (Baritone)
MICAELA: Leontina Vaduva (Soprano)
ZUNIGA: Roderick Earle (Bass-Baritone)
MORALES: Christopher Booth-Jones (Baritone)
FRASQUITA: Judith Howarth (Soprano)
MERCEDES: Jean Rigby (Mezzo-Soprano)
LILLAS PASTIA: Daniel Pageon (Spoken role)
DANCAIRE: Burno Caproni (Bass-Baritone)
REMENDADO: Francis Egerton (Tenor)

Flamenco dancer: Juan Ortega
Stage Director: Nuria Espert
Conductor: Zubin Mehta
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
Covent Garden 1991

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DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7'39'']
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18'40'']

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Great Compositions/Performances: Angela Gheorghiu: “Quia respexit” (Magnificat) by Bach


[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YV3DwZBlx9c&list=PLjKj2KXwkeG2n_uBNAvnwcxv2FhR-eOwT]
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)

Magnificat en majeur, BWV 243 / in D major / in D-Dur

Aria : “Quia respexit humilitatem”

Angela Gheorghiu, soprano

Madrigal Chamber Choir Romania 
London Philharmonic Orchestra
Conducted by Ion Marin , Marin Constantin
1998

 

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Schumann-Five Pieces in Folk Style Op. 102 (Fünf Stücke im Volkston)



Pablo Casals: cello-Leopold Mannes: piano-1952

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Great Compositions/Performances: Vladimir Horowitz – Carmen Variations



Variations on a Theme from “Carmen” by Georges Bizet
Composed and performed by Vladimir Horowitz

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Mozart Violin Sonata K.301 Hilary Hahn & Natalie Zhu



W. A. Mozart Sonata for violin and piano in G major, K.301/293a (No.18)

Violin Sonata No. 18 in G Major (K 301) was composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in March 1778 in Mannheim, Germany and was first published in the same year as part of Mozart’s Opus 1 collection, which was dedicated to Maria Elisabeth, Electress of the Palatinate and are consequently known as the Palatine Sonatas.

The work consists of two movements:

- [Allegro con spirito]
- [Allegro]

Hilary Hahn (violin/violon)
Natalie Zhu (piano)
Official website : http://www.hilaryhahn.com/index.html 
Deutsche Grammophon :http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/art…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde”



Brandis Quartet, Thomas Brandis, violin. Peter Brem, violin. Wilfried Strehle, viola. Wolfgang Boettcher, cello. 
Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Menuetto, allegro
IV. Allegro moderato

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Johann Sebastian Bach: “Little” Fugue in G minor, BWV 578



Dario Ronchi plays the”Little” Fugue in G minor by Johann Sebastian Bach, transcribed for piano by I. Philipp.

 

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QUOTATION: Richard le Gallienne


War I abhor, and yet how sweet The sound along the marching street Of drum and fife, and I forget Wet eyes of widows, and forget Broken old mothers, and the whole Dark butchery without a soul.

Richard le Gallienne (1866-1947) Discuss

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano



I Allegro moderato
II Poco adagio
III Moderato innocente
Paolo Restani, piano
Orchestre Philharmonique de Nice
Marco Guidarini, conductor

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Morricone. Cinema Paradiso, Main & Love themes. Verona Arena Concerto.



Ennio Morricone: Cinema Paradiso, Main & Love themes
Verona Arena Concerto
28 September 2002
Roma Sinfonietta Orchestra
Ennio Morricone (director)
Gilda Buttà (piano)

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7



Robert Schumann 
Toccata in C Major, Op.7 
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano – Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles


Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano
- Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Fauré in early middle age

The Élégie (Elegy), Op. 24, was written by the French composer Gabriel Fauré in 1880, and first published and performed in public in 1883. Originally for cello and piano, the piece was later orchestrated by Fauré. The work, in C minor, features a sad and sombre opening and climaxes with an intense, fast-paced central section, before the return of the elegiac opening theme.

Composition

In 1880, having completed his First Piano Quartet, Fauré began work on a cello sonata. It was his frequent practice to compose the slow movement of a work first, and he did so for the new sonata.[1] The completed movement was probably premiered at the salon of Camille Saint-Saëns in June 1880. The movement, like the quartet, is in the key of C minor. Whether the rest of the sonata would have been in that key is unknown: Fauré never completed it, and in January 1883 the slow movement was published as a stand-alone piece under the title Élégie.[1]

Jules Loeb, dedicatee and cellist at the premiere
Pablo Casals, who premiered the orchestral version

The first performance of the work under its new title was given at the Société Nationale de Musique in December 1883 by the composer and the cellist Jules Loeb to whom the piece is dedicated.[2][n 1] The Élégie was a great success from the outset,[1] and the conductor Édouard Colonne asked Fauré for a version for cello and orchestra. Fauré agreed, and that version was premiered at the Société Nationale in April 1901, with Pablo Casals as soloist and the composer as conductor.[2

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Emil Gilels, piano

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Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 (Organ Solo Mass)



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Johannes Brahms: Piano Concerto NO. 2 in B flat Op. 83 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Bramhs (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

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Z.Francescatti – R.Casadesus: BEETHOVEN Sonata No.8 Op.30,3 (1961)



Ludwig van BEETHOVEN – The Sonatas for Violin & Piano
Violin Sonata No.8 in G major, Op.30/3
0:05 / I. Allegro assai [5'48'']
5:56 / II. Tempo di minuetto, molto moderato e grazioso [6'53'']
12:54 / III. Allegro vivace [3'22'']
Zino FRANCESCATTI, violin – Robert CASADESUS, piano 
(Rec. 1961 – vinyl CBS77426 (p) 1982)
audio restoring / vinyl remaster: Emilio Pessina, 2013
________________________________________­__________
10 Violin Sonatashttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

Buy “Mozart: 2g. Tema – 2g. Tema” on

Google PlayiTunesAmazon MP3 

Artist
Arthur Grumiaux

 

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Galina Vishnevskaya Sings Mikhail Glinka’s “The Lark”



The great Russian soprano in one of Glinka’s lovely compositions from the 1840′s.

 

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Romanian Spring Traditions – Martisor – MARCH 1(PRON. MARTZISHOR)


Romanian Spring Traditions – Martisor.

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: MARZAS


Marzas

On the last night of February and the first of March in Spain, young marceros, or March serenaders, wander through the streets singing songs to their girlfriends and asking for donations of food and sweets to celebrate the arrival of spring. The term marzas refers both to the traditional songs they sing and to the gifts they receive. Although the songs themselves vary, they always mention the month of March and the coming of spring, leading many to believe that the tradition has its roots in paganrituals celebrating the passing of winter. More… Discuss

 

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Fritz Kreisler, Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Caprice viennois, Op. 2 (arr. for piano), Caprice Viennois, Op. 2



Fritz Kreisler
Balazs Szokolay, Szokolay, Balazs
Caprice viennois, Op. 2 (arr. for piano)
Romantic Piano Favourites, Vol. 3
8.550107
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: V.A.Mozart – 12 Variations on a French folk song ”Ah, Vous dirai-je, Maman” .



V.A.Mozart – 12 Variations on a French folk songAh, Vous dirai-je, Maman” .
Composed during 1781-1782 K.265, in C-Dur
This theme is widely known as a children’s song ( such as ”Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”, ”Alphabet Song” and others).
Performed by Anastasia Kaminskagia during a piano recital in Athens on 26th of January 2013.
The lyrics ( French and English) are the following:

Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman
Ce qui cause mon tourment?
Papa veut que je raisonne
Comme une grande personne
Moi je dis que les bonbons
Valent mieux que la raison.

Ah! Shall I tell you, Mommy
What is tormenitg me?
Daddy wants me to reason
Like a grown-up person
Me, I say that sweets
Are worth more than reasoning.

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Ludwig van Beethoven: Bagatelle #4 Op 126/4



Two versions of Sviatoslav Richter Playing Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Bagatelle for piano in B minor, Op. 126 No. 4

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Make Music Part of your Life: W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor (Harnoncourt)



Make Music Part of your Life:  W. A. MozartSymphony No. 40 in G minor (Harnoncourt)

Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550 (1788):
1. Molto allegro
2. Andante
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio
4. Finale. Allegro assai

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Mozart – Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595 – Ovchinnikov




*****Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

*****Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595

*****Emil Gilels, piano
*****USSR State Symphony Orchestra
*****Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov, conductor

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Schubert, Die Nacht D.983c (Krummacher)



SCHUBERTIADE 2013
In memory of Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau

Pietà, passioni e gioia: Lieder e canti corali”

Rossella Giacchero: soprano; Federico Tibone, piano; Coro da Camera di Torino diretto da Dario Tabbia; Olivia Manescalchi, voce narrante e aiuto regia.
Contributi video a cura di Davide Livermore. Realizzazione video: Marco Fantozzi.

Progetto di Erik Battaglia e Valentina Valente.

Torino, Unione Musicale, Teatro Vittoria, 12 Marzo 2013

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: John Adams – Grand Pianola Music (1982)



performed by the CalArts Contemporary Music Ensemble, under the direction of Stephen Mosko
images
common people? not very much…
I published another video with the same music, directed by the author himself  here: 
http://youtu.be/-pycrSsBqUc

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Jean Sibelius Valse Triste from Kuolema for orchestra OP 44



Make Music Part of Your Life Series:
Jean Sibelius Valse Triste from Kuolema for orchestra OP 44

(Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Lorenza Borrani premier violine solo/Konzert meister. Conductor : Vladimir Ashkenazy Cité de la musique Paris)

 

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Maria Callas and Giacomo Lauri-Volpi sing the Miserere scene from Il Trovatore



Maria Callas and Giacomo Lauri-Volpi sing the Miserere scene from Il Trovatore. (Napoli, 1951)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Dmitri Shostakovich – The second waltz


Make Music Part of Your Life Series:
*****Dmitri Shostakovich – The second waltz*****

Tombstone of Shostakovich, showing his D-E♭-C-...

Tombstone of Shostakovich, showing his D-E♭-C-B motif. Novodevichy Cemetery, Moscow. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Elly Ney plays Beethoven Andante favori WoO 57 in F major


Beethoven: Andante favori WoO 57 in F major
Elly Ney playing the historical Graf piano witch Ludwig van Beethoven played during the last years of his life. 
Recorded 1965

 

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All That Jazz ” Everything Old Is New Again “


 

Cover of "All That Jazz"

Cover of All That Jazz

 

All That Jazz ” Everything Old Is New Again “

 

All That Jazz 
Erzsébet Földi & Ann Reinking
” Everything Old Is New Again ” Peter Allen

 

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part II (2/2)


A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world. Part II

Compositions name list:

00:00 - Amilcare Ponchielli – Dance of the Hours
05:20 - Bach – Tocata And Fugue In D Minor
12:03 - Beethoven – 5th Symphony (1st movement)
19:08 - Beethoven – 9th Symphony (Ode To Joy)
25:23 - Beethoven – Für Elise (piano version)
28:18 - Carl Orff – O Fortuna (Carmina Burana)
30:57 - Georges Bizet – Habanera
33:06 - Frederic Chopin – Funeral March
38:16 - Delibes – The Flower Duet (Lakmé)
42:49 - Edvard GriegIn the Hall of the Mountain King
45:17 - Franz Liszt – Hungarian Rhapsody No 2 (orchestra version)
55:48 - Georges Bizet – Les Toreadors
58:07 - Händel – Messiah – Hallelujah Chorus
1:02:08 - Mozart – Serenade No 13 (Allegro)
1:07:53 - Offenbach – Can Can
1:10:05 - Rossini – William Tell Overture
1:13:29 - Aram Khachaturian – Sabre Dance
1:15:53 - Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
1:24:19 - Tchaikovsky – Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy
1:26:48 - Vivaldi – Four Seasons (spring)

 

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 - Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 - Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 - Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 - Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 - Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 - Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 - Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 - Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 - Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 - Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 - Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 - Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 - Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 - Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 - Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 - Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 - Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 - Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 - Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Great Compostions/Performances: Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens


Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens

(2008 Annual Concert at Glenn Gould Studio Toronto Soloist:Emily Pei’En Fan Conductor: Tony Fan with Chinese Artists Society of Toronto Youth Orchestra)

Saint-Saens: Later years

In 1886 Saint-Saëns debuted two of his most renowned compositions: The Carnival of the Animals andSymphony No. 3, dedicated to Franz Liszt, who died that year. That same year, however, Vincent d’Indyand his allies had Saint-Saëns removed from the Société Nationale de Musique. Two years later, Saint-Saëns’s mother died, driving the mourning composer away from France to the Canary Islands under the alias “Sannois”. Over the next several years he travelled around the world, visiting exotic locations in Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Saint-Saëns chronicled his travels in many popular books using his nom de plume, Sannois.

In 1908, he had the distinction of being the first celebrated composer to write a musical score to a motion picture, The Assassination of the Duke of Guise (L’assassinat du duc de Guise), directed by Charles Le Bargy and André Calmettes, adapted by Henri Lavedan, featuring actors of the Comédie Française. It was 18 minutes long, a considerable run time for the day.

In 1915, Saint-Saëns traveled to San Francisco, California and guest conducted the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, one of two world’s fairs celebrating the completion of the Panama Canal.

Saint-Saëns continued to write on musical, scientific and historical topics, travelling frequently before spending his last years in AlgiersAlgeria. In recognition of his accomplishments, the government of France awarded him the Légion d’honneur.

Saint-Saëns died of pneumonia on 16 December 1921 at the Hôtel de l’Oasis in Algiers. His body was repatriated to Paris, honoured by state funeral at La Madeleine, and interred at Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.

Relationships with other composers

Saint-Saëns was either friend or enemy to some of Europe’s most distinguished musicians. He stayed close to Franz Liszt and maintained a fast friendship with his pupil Gabriel Fauré, who replaced him as organist and choirmaster when he retired. Additionally, he was a teacher and friend to Isidor Philipp, who headed the piano department at the Paris Conservatory for several decades and was a composer and editor of the music of many composers. But despite his strong advocacy of French music, Saint-Saëns openly despised many of his fellow-composers in France such as Franckd’Indy, and Massenet. Saint-Saëns also hated the music of Claude Debussy; he is reported to have told Pierre Lalo, music critic, and son of composer Édouard Lalo, “I have stayed in Paris to speak ill of Pelléas et Mélisande.” The personal animosity was mutual; Debussy quipped: “I have a horror of sentimentality, and I cannot forget that its name is Saint-Saëns.” On other occasions, however, Debussy acknowledged an admiration for Saint-Saëns’s musical talents.

Saint-Saëns had been an early champion of Richard Wagner‘s music in France, teaching his pieces during his tenure at the École Niedermeyer and premiering the March from Tannhäuser. He had stunned even Wagner himself when he sight-read the entire orchestral scores of LohengrinTristan und Isolde, andSiegfried, prompting Hans von Bülow to refer to him as, “the greatest musical mind” of the era. However, despite admitting appreciation for the power of Wagner’s work, Saint-Saëns defiantly stated that he was not an aficionado. In 1886, Saint-Saëns was punished for some particularly harsh and anti-German comments on the Paris production of Lohengrin by losing engagements and receiving negative reviews throughout Germany. Later, after World War I, Saint-Saëns angered both French and Germans with his inflammatory articles entitled Germanophilie, which ruthlessly attacked Wagner.[2]

Saint-Saëns edited Jean-Philippe Rameau‘s Pièces de clavecin, and published them in 1895 through Durand in Paris (re-printed by Dover in 1993).

On 29 May 1913, Saint-Saëns stormed out of the première of Igor Stravinsky‘s Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), allegedly infuriated over what he considered the misuse of the bassoon in the ballet’s opening bars.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261


Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Adagio in E major for violin and orchestra, K 261
Leonid Kogan, violin
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
Pavel Kogan, conductor
(Live recording, May 1981)

Buy “Adagio for Violin and Orchestra in E Major K 261″ on

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  • Artist
    Leonid Kogan, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Pavel Kogan

 

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Great compositions/Interpretations:Debussy – Six Epigraphes Antiques – Piano Duet: Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye


Great compositions/Interpretations:Debussy – Six Epigraphes Antiques – Piano Duet: Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye
Painting by Jenö Szervánszky

Antique Epigraphs is a ballet made on New York City Ballet by balletmaster Jerome Robbins to an orchestrated version of Debussy’s Six épigraphes antiques, L131, for piano, four hands, from 1914:…..

  • “Pour invoquer Pan, dieu du vent d’été”
  • “Pour un tombeau sans nom”
  • “Pour que la nuit soit propice”
  • “Pour la danseuse aux crotales”
  • “Pour l’égyptienne”
  • “Pour remercier la pluie au matin”

…..and his Syrinx, L129, a melody for unaccompanied flute from 1913. Six épigraphes antiques were originally written to accompany Pierre Louys‘ Chanson de Bilitis, prose poetry which was purported to be a translation of freshly discovered autobiographical verse by Sappho (it was not).[1][2] The premiere took place on February 2, 1984, at the New York State TheaterLincoln Center, with costumes by Florence Klotz and lighting by Jennifer Tipton.

 

 

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Claude Debussy (1862-1918): “La plus que lente” ( part of Henry and June Playlist WOW….What enchanting music one and all!)



The composer Claude Debussy needs little introduction. As a pianist, he was noted for his avoidance of the crisp, dry and articulated style which typified French pianism of the nineteenth century. His style of playing was simple, highly tone-conscious and completely uncluttered by over-expressive angst.

The recording is a piano roll recording made by Debussy for Welte in 1913 (just three years after the work was composed). The piano rolls for Welte are amongst the most accurate we have, conveying the original performed dynamics, attack and pedalling rather faithfully, and when a good roll is played on a properly conditioned piano, the problems of dubious rhythmic bumpiness which infect many roll playbacks can vanish. This rendition seems as fine as we could hope for.

This work, “La plus que lente“, is a very slow waltz of sorts, composed in 1910.

 

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Mylène Farmer performing Je M’Ennuie (Live From Stade De France). © 2010 Stuffed Monkey


Mylène Farmer – Je M’Ennuie (Stade De France DVD)

Music video by Mylène Farmer performing Je M’Ennuie (Live From Stade De France). © 2010 Stuffed Monkey

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