Tag Archives: New York City

this day in the yesteryear: Verrazano-Narrows Bridge Opens (1964)


Verrazano-Narrows Bridge Opens (1964)

The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge connects the boroughs of Staten Island and Brooklyn in New York City. From the time of its completion until 1981, it was the largest suspension bridge in the world, with a span of 4,260 feet (1,298 m). Designed by engineer Othmar Ammann, a noted authority on bridges, it furnished a critical link in the regional highway system and is widely known today as the starting point for the New York City Marathon. Who was Giovanni da Verrazano, the bridge’s namesake? More… Discuss

Saint of the Day for Thursday, November 20th, 2014: St. Edmund Rich


Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13: Great compositions/performances


Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

today’s birthday: Georgia O’Keeffe (1887)


Georgia O’Keeffe (1887) https://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/entity/%2Fm%2F01t807?projectId=art-project

Regarded by critics as one of the most original and important American artists, O’Keeffe is known chiefly for her large,

Visit Georgia O'Keeffe_Mountain at Bear Lake - Taos _1930_ At the White House

Visit Georgia O’Keeffe_Mountain at Bear Lake – Taos _1930_ At the White House (click here to access the Google Art Project)

semi-abstract studies of flowers, bones, and other imagery. Immaculate, sculptural, organic forms painted in strong, clear colors predominate in O’Keeffe’s works, and her pristine abstract designs carry strong elements of sexual symbolism. Her work was first exhibited in 1916 at the 291 Gallery of Alfred Stieglitz, whom she later married. What is “O’Keeffe’s Ghost”? More… Discuss

Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare, de Ion Creanga


Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare_ Ion Creanga (click to access here)

Prostia_omeneasca_Povestea Drobului de Sare_ Ion Creanga (click to access here)

word: ubiquitous


ubiquitous 

Definition: (adjective) Being or seeming to be everywhere at the same time.
Synonyms: omnipresent
Usage: She is the most ubiquitous media personality around. Discuss

today’s holiday/celebration: American Indian Heritage Month


American Indian Heritage Month

The first general American Indian Day was observed on the second Saturday in May 1916, but since 1995, the month of November has been observed as American Indian Heritage Month. Although the largest Native American populations can be found in Oklahoma, Arizona, California, New Mexico, and North Carolina, many other states have come up with ways to draw attention to their unique contribution to American culture. Most celebrations focus on educational and promotional events, displays of Native American art and dance, and agricultural fairs. More… Discuss

E. E. Cummings


E. E. Cummings

Cummings was an American writer and painter whose poetry was noted for its eccentricities of typography, language, and punctuation. His publishers often mirrored his atypical style by writing his name in lower case, though Cummings did not endorse this and typically used capital letters in his signature. Many of his poems exude a childlike playfulness and seek to convey a joyful awareness of sex and love. Cummings’s celebrated work, The Enormous Room, recounts his experiences where? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: New York City Marathon


New York City Marathon

The New York City Marathon began in 1970 as a race four times around Central Park. In 1976, Fred Lebow and the New York Road Runners Club, the world’s largest running club and the race’s sponsor, decided to invite top runners from all over the world, and to run the course through all five New York boroughs. About 30,000 runners compete in the race, and over a million New Yorkers turn out to watch. The runners say that the crowds are enthusiastic and friendly, and city dwellers look upon it as a time to forget racial and ethnic differences and cheer the runners on. More… Discuss

Biologist Illuminates Glowing Underwater World | National Geographic Magazine


Biologist Illuminates Glowing Underwater World

Piano Trio No. 4 in e minor, Op. 90 (Dumky) – Antonin Dvorak: make music part of your life series


Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 3 for Strings in C major: make music part of your life series


Gioachino Rossini – Sonata No. 3 for Strings in C major

Leonard Cohen – In My Secret Life lyrics plus: make music part of your life series (“…Looked through the paper. Makes you want to cry. Nobody cares if the people Live or die…”)


“In My Secret Life”

I saw you this morning.
You were moving so fast.
Can’t seem to loosen my grip
On the past.
And I miss you so much.
There’s no one in sight.
And we’re still making love
In My Secret Life.

I smile when I’m angry.
I cheat and I lie.
I do what I have to do
To get by.
But I know what is wrong,
And I know what is right.
And I’d die for the truth
In My Secret Life.

Hold on, hold on, my brother.
My sister, hold on tight.
I finally got my orders.
I’ll be marching through the morning,
Marching through the night,
Moving cross the borders
Of My Secret Life.

Looked through the paper.
Makes you want to cry.
Nobody cares if the people
Live or die.
And the dealer wants you thinking
That it’s either black or white.
Thank G-d it’s not that simple
In My Secret Life.

I bite my lip.
I buy what I’m told:
From the latest hit,
To the wisdom of old.
But I’m always alone.
And my heart is like ice.
And it’s crowded and cold
In My Secret Life.

Maurice Ravel – Valses nobles et sentimentales (Fritz Reiner, Chicago Symphony Orchestra): make music part of your life series


word: churl


churl 

Definition: (noun) A rude, boorish person.
Synonyms: boor, barbarian, peasant
Usage: He is a drunken, brawling, perilous churl, as you may find to your cost. Discuss.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum


The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim is a modern art museum located in New York City. It is named for its benefactor, art collector Solomon Guggenheim. Founded in the 1930s, it is known for its remarkable circular building designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The structure resembles a white ribbon spiraling upward and outward in a smooth coil of white concrete. It has no separate floors but instead uses a spiral ramp, realizing Wright’s ideal of a continuous space. Why has Wright’s design been criticized? More… Discuss

Frank Lloyd Wright, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York City, 1942-1959

this pressed: Graffiti rearing its ugly head again in NYC


Graffiti rearing its ugly head again in NYC

Graffiti, a “broken windows” indicator about the quality of life in any city, is starting a slow, ugly creep around the Big Apple — with new tags appearing nightly.

via Graffiti rearing its ugly head again in NYC.

Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25, Rudolf Serkin/Philadelphia Orchestra- Eugene Ormandy: great compositions/perfornmances


Mendelssohn-Piano Concerto No. 1 in g minor Op. 25

story: Arboretum


Arboretum

Fontana - Arboretum Trsteno

Fontana – Arboretum Trsteno (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants that are cultivated for scientific, educational, and ornamental purposes. The plants are labeled with their common and scientific names, and they are arranged in cultural or habitat groups, such as tropical, desert, and aquatic. One of the world’s oldest arboretums is the Trsteno Arboretum, near Dubrovnik in Croatia. What arboretum in England helped inspire the design for New York City’s Central Park? More… Discuss

 

today’s birthday: Thomas Nast (1840)


Thomas Nast (1840)

Nast was a US caricaturist and cartoonist who defined the genre of the American political cartoon. During the American Civil War, Harper’s Weekly published the first of Nast’s serious political cartoons, which earned praise from President Lincoln. His stylized, clever, and forceful cartoons were instrumental in breaking up the corrupt New York City political machine of William Tweed. Nast popularized the use of what symbols in his depictions of the US Democratic and Republican parties? More… Discuss

quotation: Alexander Hamilton


Men often oppose a thing merely because they have had no agency in planning it, or because it may have been planned by those whom they dislike.

Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804) Discuss

quotation: “Familiarity breeds contempt…”: Mark Twain


Familiarity breeds contempt. How accurate that is. The reason we hold truth in such respect is because we have so little opportunity to get familiar with it.

Mark Twain (1835-1910)

George Gershwin – I got rhythm: variations for piano and orchestra: make music part of your life series


George Gershwin – I got rhythm: variations for piano and orchestra

Wayne Marshall – Aalborg Symphony

todady’s holiday: Patriot Day


Patriot Day

Patriot Day in the United States commemorates the anniversary of the terrorist attacks that took place on September 11, 2001, in New York City, Washington, DC, and in the skies above Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Each year, the president proclaims a day of national observance in memory of the more than 2,700 people who lost their lives in the attacks. Throughout the nation, flags are flown at half-staff, and a moment of silence is observed at 8:46 AM, Eastern time, the exact moment the first plane flew into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: 9/11 Terrorist Attacks (2001)


9/11 Terrorist Attacks (2001)

On September 11, 2001, 19 Al-Qaeda terrorists hijacked four commercial airplanes. They crashed two planes into the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York City and flew a third into the Pentagon building in Virginia. Passengers on the fourth flight attempted to retake control of the aircraft, but it crashed in a Pennsylvania field. The devastating terrorist attacks of 9/11 were responsible for 2,996 deaths and countless more injuries. What were the environmental consequences of 9/11? More… Discuss

quote: There is no sadder sight than a young pessimist, except an old optimist. Mark Twain


There is no sadder sight than a young pessimist, except an old optimist.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

Central Park, New York City, 1933 pic.twitter.com/Ttl7BOvPbm — Historical Pics


Just a thought: “ageless: something older than everything alive”


Just a thought: “ageless: something older than everything alive”

today’s holiday: Labor Day


Labor Day

The first Labor Day observance in 1882 was confined to New York City. Oregon, in 1887, was the first state to make it a legal holiday, and, in 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed a bill making it a national holiday. The holiday’s association with trade unions has declined, but it remains important as the end of the summer season for schoolchildren and as an opportunity for friends and families to get together for picnics and sporting events. Labor Day is observed on the first Monday in September throughout the US, in Canada, and in Puerto Rico. More… Discuss

LABOR DAY (from Wikipedia)


LABOR DAY

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre, which occurred in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Thus, in 1887, it was established as an official holiday in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.[1]

The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. In many other countries (more than 80 worldwide), “Labour Day” is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers’ Day, which occurs on May 1.

History

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York.[2] Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882,[3] after witnessing the annual labour festival held in Toronto, Canada.[4] Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.[3]

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike.[5] The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the past several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent Communist, Syndicalist and Anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day.[6] All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

Labor Day
Labor Day New York 1882.jpg

Labor Day Parade, Union Square, New York, 1882
Observed by United States
Type Federal Holiday (federal government, DC and U.S. Territories); and State Holiday (in all 50 U.S. States)
Celebrations Parades, barbecues
Date First Monday in September
2013 date September 2
2014 date September 1
2015 date September 7
2016 date September 5
Frequency annual
Related to Labour Day

this day in the yesteryear: 42nd Street Opens on Broadway (1980)


42nd Street Opens on Broadway (1980)

42nd Street tells the story of an up-and-coming chorus girl from Allentown, Pennsylvania, pursuing a Broadway career during the Great Depression. This hugely successful stage musical premiered on August 25, 1980, at New York City’s Winter Garden Theatre. Known for its elaborate tap dances and songs like “We’re in the Money,” it won Tony Awards for Best Choreography and Best Musical and saw a Broadway revival in 2001. What tragedy marred 42 Street’s opening night? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Jimi Hendrix Headlines Woodstock (1969) (with rare video)


Jimi Hendrix Headlines Woodstock (1969)

today’s birthday: James Baldwin (1924)


James Baldwin (1924)

Baldwin was a groundbreaking African-American author best known for his novel Go Tell It on the Mountain. He wrote about social taboos such as racism and homosexuality at a time when mainstream literature largely ignored them. He grew up in poverty in the New York City district of Harlem and became a preacher while in his teens. In 1947, he left the US to live in Europe, and upon his return in 1957, he joined the civil rights movement. What famous author taught Baldwin in his youth? More… Discuss

Lucienne Boyer – Mon coeur est un violon, 1945: make music part of your life series


 from

today’s holiday: ‘Ksan Celebrations


‘Ksan Celebrations

On Friday evenings in July and August, dances and accompanying songs are performed by the ‘Ksan, or Gitxsan, Indians in a longhouse in the Indian Village in Hazelton, British Columbia, Canada. The dances are said to go back to pre-history; they were revived in 1958, and the ‘Ksan dancers have since performed in New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, Kansas City, Missouri, and even Australia. Performers must be Git ‘Ksan, meaning “People of the ‘Ksan” (named after the nearby Skeena River). More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Blackout Engulfs New York City (1977)


Blackout Engulfs New York City (1977)

The New York City blackout of 1977 came at a low point in New York history, when the city was facing a financial crisis and being terrorized by the “Son of Sam” murderer. The blackout lasted only one night, but when it was over, a record 3,776 people had been arrested, and looting, vandalism, and arson had caused an estimated $300 million worth of damage. The chain of events that sparked the blackout began when the power failed in Westchester County. What caused this initial power failure? More… Discuss

myStory: Regina Spektor


Russian-born Jewish singer-songwriter Regina Spektor reflects on her immigration to New York in 1989–from the fantasies she and her cousin had about moving to the tropics to the realities of adjusting to life in the Bronx, where their new Jewish community became an extension of her family.

Regina came to the United States through HIAS, an organization that rescues, resettles, and reunites vulnerable refugees. Her interview is part of HIAS’ myStory project; view more videos at http://www.myStory.hias.org.

make music part of your life series: Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.


Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.

 

quotation: Edith Wharton – “…habit is necessary;…”


quotation: 

Habit is necessary; it is the habit of having habits, of turning a trail into a rut, that must be incessantly fought against if one is to remain alive.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children


Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children

“Virtual visits” with loved ones help reduce stress for some—but not all—hospitalized children. Having access to video chat technology reduced stress levels for kids who lived an average of 35 miles from the hospital and were only hospitalized for about five days. However, pediatric patients whose hospital stays were longer or whose families lived farther away saw no real stress-reducing benefit from the technology. More… Discuss

The wheel, poetic thought by George-B (The smudge and other poems)


The wheel, poetic thought by George-B
(The smudge and other poems)

In the quest
To define the wheel
The scientist gave it the circle
The artist gave it any shape
The wood cutter cut a section of a tree…
And rolled downhill…
there came Pythagoras, and
he gave the wheel it’s formula

today’s holiday: Anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion


Anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion

The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village that was raided by the police on June 28, 1969. As the outraged crowd threw stones and bottles, more police arrived and subdued what had turned into a riot. Today, the event is regarded as a turning point in the history of the gay rights movement. It is commemorated in New York, Philadelphia, and other U.S. cities with parades, memorial services for those who have died of AIDS, and other activities to draw attention to the ways in which homosexuals have been discriminated against. More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Singer-songwriter Val Ghent at Cornelia Street Cafe Night of the Killer Keyboarders


Singer-songwriter Val Ghent @ Cornelia Street Cafe Night of the Killer Keyboarders

Day to Day Dream.http://www.valghent.com/ “Present Day Funk Sister” Valerie Ghent With Her Brothers Clayton Bryant, Tinker Barfield & Robin Macatangay. valghent.com

this day in the yesteryear: First Baseball Game Played with Modern Rules (1846)


First Baseball Game Played with Modern Rules (1846)

The foundations of modern baseball were laid with the 1845 formulation of the “Knickerbocker Rules,” which formalized the game. According to these rules, a runner could not be sent out of play by getting hit with a thrown ball. Instead, fielders were required to tag or force the runner, as is done today. It is widely thought that the first competitive game under the new rules was played at Elysian Fields in Hoboken, New Jersey. What author of the rules is considered the “father of baseball”? More… Discuss

quotation: Edith Wharton: “Mrs. Ballinger is one of the ladies who pursue Culture in bands, as though it were dangerous to meet it alone.”


Mrs. Ballinger is one of the ladies who pursue Culture in bands, as though it were dangerous to meet it alone.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

“At the antipodes of bloggers everywhere! “

word: pervade


pervade

Definition: (verb) Spread or diffuse through.
Synonyms: imbue, permeate, riddle, penetrate
Usage: Yet amid all these varieties and incongruities, there is a common meaning or spirit which pervades his writings. Discuss.

make music part of your life series: Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic, Feb 10, 2013


Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic, Feb 10, 2013

Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic: Mischa Lefkowitz, Violin, Minyoung Chang, Violin, Michael Larco, Viola, Jason Lippmann, Cello, Baxter Concert Series, Whittier, California, February 10, 2013

today’s birthday: Frank Lloyd Wright (1867): Widely considered the greatest American architect


Frank Lloyd Wright (1867)

Widely considered the greatest American architect, Wright championed the use of open planning as well http://img.weburbanist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/movie-houses-north-by-northwest-vandamm.jpgas “organic architecture,” a design philosophy that promotes harmony between building and environment. His masterpieces include New York City’s iconic Guggenheim Museum and “Fallingwater,” a breathtaking Pennsylvania house that is cantilevered over a waterfall, with its balconies and terraces seemingly suspended in midair. How many people were murdered at Wright’s home, Taliesin, in 1914? More… Discuss

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Yo-Yo Ma


Yo-Yo Ma

World-famous American cellist Yo-Yo Ma was born in France to Chinese parents in 1955. A musical prodigy, he gave a public recital in Paris at age six and his first performance at Carnegie Hall at age nine. He later attended the prestigious Julliard School of Music and ascended rapidly to the highest rank of international soloists, winning the Avery Fisher Prize in 1978. What became of a centuries-old cello valued at $2.5 million that Ma accidentally left in a New York City taxi in 1999? More… Discuss

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Sjomannadagurtoday’s holiday:


Sjomannadagur

Sjomannadagur is a day honoring the role that fishing and fishermen have played in Icelandic history, celebrated in the coastal towns and cities of Iceland. Sailors take the day off, and the Seaman’s Union sponsors many events, such as competitions in rowing and swimming, tugs-of-war and sea rescue competitions. Celebrations begin with a church service and a trip to the local cemetery to honor sailors lost at sea. Afterward there are children’s parades, dances, outdoor cookouts, and bonfires in the evening. The proceeds from the day’s events go to the national fund that supports old seamen’s homes. More… Discuss

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