Tag Archives: New York City

Lucienne Boyer – Mon coeur est un violon, 1945: make music part of your life series


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today’s holiday: ‘Ksan Celebrations


‘Ksan Celebrations

On Friday evenings in July and August, dances and accompanying songs are performed by the ‘Ksan, or Gitxsan, Indians in a longhouse in the Indian Village in Hazelton, British Columbia, Canada. The dances are said to go back to pre-history; they were revived in 1958, and the ‘Ksan dancers have since performed in New York City, San Francisco, Seattle, Kansas City, Missouri, and even Australia. Performers must be Git ‘Ksan, meaning “People of the ‘Ksan” (named after the nearby Skeena River). More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Blackout Engulfs New York City (1977)


Blackout Engulfs New York City (1977)

The New York City blackout of 1977 came at a low point in New York history, when the city was facing a financial crisis and being terrorized by the “Son of Sam” murderer. The blackout lasted only one night, but when it was over, a record 3,776 people had been arrested, and looting, vandalism, and arson had caused an estimated $300 million worth of damage. The chain of events that sparked the blackout began when the power failed in Westchester County. What caused this initial power failure? More… Discuss

myStory: Regina Spektor


Russian-born Jewish singer-songwriter Regina Spektor reflects on her immigration to New York in 1989–from the fantasies she and her cousin had about moving to the tropics to the realities of adjusting to life in the Bronx, where their new Jewish community became an extension of her family.

Regina came to the United States through HIAS, an organization that rescues, resettles, and reunites vulnerable refugees. Her interview is part of HIAS’ myStory project; view more videos at http://www.myStory.hias.org.

make music part of your life series: Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.


Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.

 

quotation: Edith Wharton – “…habit is necessary;…”


quotation: 

Habit is necessary; it is the habit of having habits, of turning a trail into a rut, that must be incessantly fought against if one is to remain alive.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children


Video Calls Benefit Some Hospitalized Children

“Virtual visits” with loved ones help reduce stress for some—but not all—hospitalized children. Having access to video chat technology reduced stress levels for kids who lived an average of 35 miles from the hospital and were only hospitalized for about five days. However, pediatric patients whose hospital stays were longer or whose families lived farther away saw no real stress-reducing benefit from the technology. More… Discuss

The wheel, poetic thought by George-B (The smudge and other poems)


The wheel, poetic thought by George-B
(The smudge and other poems)

In the quest
To define the wheel
The scientist gave it the circle
The artist gave it any shape
The wood cutter cut a section of a tree…
And rolled downhill…
there came Pythagoras, and
he gave the wheel it’s formula

today’s holiday: Anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion


Anniversary of the Stonewall Rebellion

The Stonewall Inn was a gay bar in New York City’s Greenwich Village that was raided by the police on June 28, 1969. As the outraged crowd threw stones and bottles, more police arrived and subdued what had turned into a riot. Today, the event is regarded as a turning point in the history of the gay rights movement. It is commemorated in New York, Philadelphia, and other U.S. cities with parades, memorial services for those who have died of AIDS, and other activities to draw attention to the ways in which homosexuals have been discriminated against. More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Singer-songwriter Val Ghent at Cornelia Street Cafe Night of the Killer Keyboarders


Singer-songwriter Val Ghent @ Cornelia Street Cafe Night of the Killer Keyboarders

Day to Day Dream.http://www.valghent.com/ “Present Day Funk Sister” Valerie Ghent With Her Brothers Clayton Bryant, Tinker Barfield & Robin Macatangay. valghent.com

this day in the yesteryear: First Baseball Game Played with Modern Rules (1846)


First Baseball Game Played with Modern Rules (1846)

The foundations of modern baseball were laid with the 1845 formulation of the “Knickerbocker Rules,” which formalized the game. According to these rules, a runner could not be sent out of play by getting hit with a thrown ball. Instead, fielders were required to tag or force the runner, as is done today. It is widely thought that the first competitive game under the new rules was played at Elysian Fields in Hoboken, New Jersey. What author of the rules is considered the “father of baseball”? More… Discuss

quotation: Edith Wharton: “Mrs. Ballinger is one of the ladies who pursue Culture in bands, as though it were dangerous to meet it alone.”


Mrs. Ballinger is one of the ladies who pursue Culture in bands, as though it were dangerous to meet it alone.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

“At the antipodes of bloggers everywhere! “

word: pervade


pervade

Definition: (verb) Spread or diffuse through.
Synonyms: imbue, permeate, riddle, penetrate
Usage: Yet amid all these varieties and incongruities, there is a common meaning or spirit which pervades his writings. Discuss.

make music part of your life series: Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic, Feb 10, 2013


Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic, Feb 10, 2013

Lullaby for String Quartet, George Gershwin, Members of the LA Philharmonic: Mischa Lefkowitz, Violin, Minyoung Chang, Violin, Michael Larco, Viola, Jason Lippmann, Cello, Baxter Concert Series, Whittier, California, February 10, 2013

today’s birthday: Frank Lloyd Wright (1867): Widely considered the greatest American architect


Frank Lloyd Wright (1867)

Widely considered the greatest American architect, Wright championed the use of open planning as well http://img.weburbanist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/movie-houses-north-by-northwest-vandamm.jpgas “organic architecture,” a design philosophy that promotes harmony between building and environment. His masterpieces include New York City’s iconic Guggenheim Museum and “Fallingwater,” a breathtaking Pennsylvania house that is cantilevered over a waterfall, with its balconies and terraces seemingly suspended in midair. How many people were murdered at Wright’s home, Taliesin, in 1914? More… Discuss

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Yo-Yo Ma


Yo-Yo Ma

World-famous American cellist Yo-Yo Ma was born in France to Chinese parents in 1955. A musical prodigy, he gave a public recital in Paris at age six and his first performance at Carnegie Hall at age nine. He later attended the prestigious Julliard School of Music and ascended rapidly to the highest rank of international soloists, winning the Avery Fisher Prize in 1978. What became of a centuries-old cello valued at $2.5 million that Ma accidentally left in a New York City taxi in 1999? More… Discuss

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Sjomannadagurtoday’s holiday:


Sjomannadagur

Sjomannadagur is a day honoring the role that fishing and fishermen have played in Icelandic history, celebrated in the coastal towns and cities of Iceland. Sailors take the day off, and the Seaman’s Union sponsors many events, such as competitions in rowing and swimming, tugs-of-war and sea rescue competitions. Celebrations begin with a church service and a trip to the local cemetery to honor sailors lost at sea. Afterward there are children’s parades, dances, outdoor cookouts, and bonfires in the evening. The proceeds from the day’s events go to the national fund that supports old seamen’s homes. More… Discuss

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http://anisionogueira.com/: no reblogging without express permission! – all posts are copyright by George Bost -View on euzicasa


http://anisionogueira.com/:no reblogging without express permission! - all posts are copyright by George Bost-view on euzicasa.

http://anisionogueira.com/: no reblogging without express permission! – all posts are copyright by George Bost -View on euzicasa.

Scarlatti / Anthony di Bonaventura, 2001: Sonata in C major, K. 487

From “Domenico Scarlatti: 14 Sonatas,” issued by Centaur (CRC 2787). The late Anthony di Bonaventura, professor of music at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts, recorded this work in 2001 at St. Peter Episcopal Church in New York City.

Many of the most distinguished composers of our time — Gyorgy Ligeti, Luciano Berio, Alberto Ginastera, Milko Keleman, and Vincent Perischetti — have written works especially for Professor di Bonaventura, and he has performed world premiers of each of the composers’ compositions.

The first image in the video above is by the Italian urban landscape painter Bernardo Bellotto (1720 — 1780) entitled “View of Verona and the River Adige from the Ponte Nuovo” (1747-48).

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: National Maritime Day


National Maritime Day

It was President Franklin D. Roosevelt who first proclaimed May 22 as National Maritime Day in 1933. Since that time, observations of this day have grown in popularity, particularly in American port cities. Ships are opened to the public, maritime art and essay contests are held, and parades and band concerts are common. Environmentalists sometimes take advantage of the attention focused on the country’s maritime heritage on this day to draw attention to pollution and deterioration of maritime environments, particularly in large commercial ports like New York City. More… Discuss

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Integrity at Its Finest


Integrity at Its Finest

Sometimes, people are good, and it warms the cockles of our hearts. Imagine, if you will, finding $41,000 cash in a used couch you purchased for $20 from a thrift shop. If you kept the money, no one would be the wiser, and it would make balancing your checkbook a lot less stressful. But would it eat away at your conscience? For three young three New Yorkers who recently found themselves in precisely this position, the answer to that question was “yes.” So, instead of reveling in their newfound wealth, they tracked down the previous owner—an elderly widow, as it turned out—to return what was her life savings. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: GRANT’S TOMB DEDICATED (1897)


Grant’s Tomb Dedicated (1897)

The remains of American Civil War general and US President Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia Dent Grant, lie interred in Grant’s Tomb. The granite and marble structure, designed by architect John Duncan, was completed in 1897 and dedicated on what would have been Grant’s 75th birthday. The tomb complex is located in New York City’s scenic Riverside Park. A major restoration by the National Park Service was completed by its centennial. What did Duncan use as a general model for his design? More… Discuss

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ARTICLE: THE KITTY GENOVESE MURDER


The Kitty Genovese Murder

The brutal rape and murder of 28-year-old Catherine “Kitty” Genovese in New York City in 1964 shocked and outraged the nation. Her stabbing death was witnessed in parts by perhaps as many as 38 of her neighbors, but none tried to help her until after the attack ended. Many of them later told police that they were unaware that a homicide was in progress. Subsequent psychological research, spurred by reports sensationalizing the event, prompted investigation into the phenomenon now known as what? More…Discuss

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NEWS: MEASLES CASES ON THE RISE IN THE US


Measles Cases on the Rise in the US

Public vaccination initiatives in the US—like the Vaccines for Children program, which provides freevaccinations to low-income children—have prevented some 323 million illnesses, 21 million hospitalizations, and 732,000 deaths among those born during the past 20 years. Vaccines for Children was established in 1994 as a direct response to a nationwide measles resurgence that caused tens of thousands of illnesses and over 100 deaths; yet, as the organization approaches its 20th anniversary, the very disease it was meant to stamp out is seeing yet another resurgence. In just the first four months of this year, 129 measles cases were reported, a number greater than any similar period since 1996. More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: HARRIET QUIMBY FLIES OVER ENGLISH CHANNEL (1912)


Harriet Quimby Flies over English Channel (1912)

In 1911, Harriet Quimby earned the first pilot’s license issued to a woman in the United States. Less than a year later, Quimby became the first woman to fly across the English Channel. She continued piloting aircrafts until her tragic death in 1912, when she was tossed from her airplane after it unexpectedly pitched forward. Despite the importance of her flight over the English Channel, the feat barely made the newspapers at the time because it was eclipsed by what major event? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: RMS TITANIC SINKS (1912)


 

RMS Titanic

RMS Titanic (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

RMS Titanic Sinks (1912)

The Titanic was a massive ocean liner that was thought to be virtually unsinkable. The ship was on its maiden voyage and carrying more than 2,200 passengers and crew when it struck an iceberg on April 14, 1912, and sank early the next morning. More than 1,500 lives were lost in the disaster. In 1985, a team led by Robert Ballard and Jean-Louis Michel located theTitanic’s wreck on the ocean floor and made a discovery that shed light on how the ship sank. What was it? More… Discuss

45 survivor accounts. The final moments of RMS Titanic.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: G. Gershwin – Walking the Dog (Promenade)



Julian Milkis – Clarinet, Mikhail Kopelmanviolin, Päivyt Meller – violin, Ulla Soinne – viola, Seppo Kimanen – cello.
Recorded at Sibelius Academy of Music on November 24, 2012 by 
ABG World, Video and Audio Production.

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: ETHEL AND JULIUS ROSENBERG CONVICTED OF ESPIONAGE (1951)


Ethel and Julius Rosenberg Convicted of Espionage (1951)

In 1951, the Rosenbergs were prosecuted for conspiracy to transmit classified military information to the Soviet Union. During the Rosenbergs’ trial, the government charged that they had persuaded Ethel’s brother, an employee at the Los Alamos atomic bomb project, to provide them with top-secret data on nuclear weapons. They were convicted and executed via the electric chair, becoming the first US civilians to suffer the death penalty for espionage. What happened to their children? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ARTURO TOSCANINI (1867)


Arturo Toscanini (1867)

Internationally recognized as one of the world’s great conductors, Toscanini first took the baton as a substitute conductor in Brazil. Toscanini’s artistry is preserved in recordings, notably of the symphonies of Beethoven and works by Brahms, Wagner, Verdi, and others. A tempestuous personality greatly respected by his performers, he also served as musical director of La Scala, Milan, and of the Metropolitan Opera, New York City. Before becoming a conductor, Toscanini studied what instrument?More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: THE MONT BLANC TUNNEL FIRE (1999)


The Mont Blanc Tunnel Fire (1999)

The Mont Blanc Tunnel was completed in 1965 and became a major trans-Alpine transport route linking France and Italy. On March 24, 1999, passing motorists alerted a driver that his truck was smoking. His cargo of flour and margarine had caught fire in the tunnel. The fire burned for 53 hours and reached temperatures over 1,832°F (1,000°C), trapping drivers and thwarting rescue efforts. The blaze claimed 39 lives. How many people were saved by a man on a motorcycle before he died in the inferno? More…Discuss

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: WORLD DAY FOR WATER


World Day for Water

In 1992, the United Nations declared March 22 World Day for Water. Programs associated with the day draw attention to the ways in which proper water resourcemanagement contributes to a nation’s economic and social vitalityMore… Discuss

 

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Filomena Moretti – Grande Sonata di Nicolò Paganini (1° mov.)



XXIII Convegno Chitarristico, Modena 30 ottobre 2010, Accademia Nazionale di Scienze Lettere e Arti.
Filomena Moretti – Tra rêverie e virtuosismo: poetica ottocentesca della chitarra – Grande Sonata di Nicolò Paganini (I movimento).
Riprese video: Alberto Boni.
http://www.chitarrainitalia.it

 

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY


International Women’s Day

This day commemorating women is one of the most widely observed holidays of recent origin. It has its roots in the March 8, 1857, revolt of women in New York City, protesting conditions in the textile and garment industries, although it wasn’t proclaimed a holiday until 1910. In Great Britain and the United States, International Women’s Day is marked by special exhibitions, films, etc., in praise of women. In the former U.S.S.R., women received honors for distinguished service in industry, aviation, military service, and other fields. More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: RALPH WALDO ELLISON (1914)


Ralph Waldo Ellison (1914)

Ellison moved to New York City in 1936 to study art but took up writing after meeting authors Langston Hughes and Richard Wright. Ellison spent seven years writing what would be his only completed novel, Invisible Man, about a nameless black man struggling to live in a hostile society. The work brought Ellison eminence as a writer and remains one of the central texts of the African-American experience. What is the title of his second, uncompleted novel, published posthumously in 1999? More… Discuss

 

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Corigliano: Suite from “The Red Violin” / Rachlevsky • Chamber Orchestra Kremlin



Corigliano: Suite from “The Red Violin” / Misha Rachlevsky • Chamber Orchestra Kremlin

Recorded at the Chamber Hall of the Moscow International House of Music, with Mr. Corigliano in the audience, March 2003. Russian premiere. With author’s permission, Misha Rachlevsky amended the Suite with other episodes from the film’s score, giving every violinist of the orchestra a chance to shine.

Our website: http://KremlinOnTour.com/

 

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A Closer Look – ProPublica: Three Golden Ages of Journalism?


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A Closer Look – ProPublica.

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ELIZABETH BLACKWELL (1821)


Elizabeth Blackwell (1821)

Blackwell chose to pursue a medical education at a time when doctors were almost exclusively male. Consequently, she was rejected by many medical schools before one in New York accepted her. In 1849, she became the first woman in the US to receive a medical degree, but her struggle did not end there. Barred from practice in most hospitals, she, her sister, and another female doctor founded their own practice and later a women’s medical college. How did a joke gone wrong give Blackwell her start?More… Discuss

 

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QUOTATION: Edith Wharton


There’s no such thing as old age, there is only sorrow.

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) Discuss

 

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Great Performances: Léo Ferré “Avec le temps”


Great Performances:  Léo FerréAvec le temps

Cover of "Avec Le Temps"

Cover of Avec Le Temps

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Rhapsody in Blue – George Gershwin



Rhapsody in Blue, de George Gershwin. Interpretada por el genial Leonard Bernstein, al piano y la dirección.

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: JACK HENRY ABBOTT (1944)


Jack Henry Abbott (1944)

While imprisoned in the 1970s—for various crimes, including the murder of a fellow inmate—Abbott began a correspondence with author Norman Mailer, hoping to help him write about prison life more authentically. Mailer was so impressed with Abbott’s writing that he helped him compile his letters into the acclaimed book In the Belly of the Beast and advocated for Abbott’s parole. However, just weeks after his release, Abbott fatally stabbed a man and was rearrested. Why had he done it? More… Discuss

 

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Fabulous Music: Regina Spektor: Far (Full Album 2009)



Cover of "Far (Special Edition CD/DVD)"

Cover of Far (Special Edition CD/DVD)

Regina Spektor: Far (Full Album 2009)

Blue Lips 0:00
Dance Anthem of the 80’s 3:34
Eet 7:17
Folding Chair 10:18
Genius Next Door 13:53
Human of the Year 19:00
Laughing With 23:08
Machine 26:26
Man of a Thousand Faces 30:21
One More Time With Feeling 33:32
The Calculation 37:33
Two Birds 40:42
Wallet 44:01
“Far” is available on Amazon and iTunes.

  • Regina Spektor
    Singer-songwriter

 

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Vienna New Years Concert 2010, Die Fledermaus Overture, Johann Strauss



From the New Years Day concert 2010 in Vienna. Johann StraussDie Fledermaus Overture. Upscaled to 720p.

Recorded from the BBC on 01 January 2010.

 

Leonard Cohen Chelsea Hotel #2 Live


LEONARD COHEN LYRICS

Chelsea Hotel #2″

I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel, 
you were talking so brave and so sweet, 
giving me head on the unmade bed, 
while the limousines wait in the street. 
Those were the reasons and that was New York
we were running for the money and the flesh. 
And that was called love for the workers in song 
probably still is for those of them left. 
Ah but you got away, didn’t you babe, 
you just turned your back on the crowd, 
you got away, I never once heard you say, 
I need you, I don’t need you, 
I need you, I don’t need you 
and all of that jiving around. I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel 
you were famous, your heart was a legend. 
You told me again you preferred handsome men 
but for me you would make an exception. 
And clenching your fist for the ones like us 
who are oppressed by the figures of beauty, 
you fixed yourself, you said, “Well never mind, 
we are ugly but we have the music.” 

And then you got away, didn’t you babe… 

I don’t mean to suggest that I loved you the best, 
I can’t keep track of each fallen robin. 
I remember you well in the Chelsea Hotel, 
that’s all, I don’t even think of you that often.

National Geographic: What “Lady Liberty” and Ellis Island Mean Today



Ellis Island, the U.S. gateway to immigration from distant lands, recently reopened to visitors, following significant damage from Hurricane Sandy. A visit there today, and to the nearby Statue of Liberty, can be emotional, even for those born in the U.S.

 

THE 1908 NEW YORK TO PARIS RACE


The 1908 New York to Paris Race

On February 12, 1908, six cars representing four nations—Germany, France, Italy, and the US—embarked on an automobile race from New York City to Paris. The challenge was daunting enough given the newness of the automobile and the unpaved nature—or nonexistence—of many roads, but the months-long journey also had to be re-routed at times due to impassable conditions. Only three cars managed to complete the race. The Germans reached Paris first, but the US team was declared the winner. Why? More…Discuss

 

ROSSINI: William Tell Overture



Gioacchino Rossini: William Tell Overture (1829)

London Philharmonic, Alfred Scholz

 

Fabulous Compositions: Aram Khachaturian – Spartacus – Adagio



Aram KhachaturianSpartacusAdagio
Performed by Vienna Philharmonic

 

Antonín Dvořák – Water Goblin, Op. 107



Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

DANGER ON THE ROADS


Danger on the Roads

Spending hours at the wheel can make anyone sleepy, but for truck drivers, whose livelihoods depend on how quickly they can get to their destinations, taking a break is often not seen as an option. Instead, many truckers opt for alcohol or other mind-altering substances, like marijuana, amphetamines, and cocaine, to keep them on the road. An analysis of 36 studies shows that this is going on all over the world in varying degrees. Substance use seems to be linked to poor working conditions, suggesting that taking steps to improve working conditions for truckers could reduce this dangerous practice. More… Discuss