Tag Archives: Orchestra

Gabriel Faure’s Requiem op. 48: make music part of your life series


From James Keige

Gabriel Faure’s Requiem op. 48 

Faure Requiem Op.48 / Durufle Requiem Op.9
Gabriel Fauré (Composer),
Robert Shaw (Conductor),
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra & Chorus (Orchestra), Judith Blegen (Soprano),
James Morris (Baritone)

1. Introït et Kyrie (D minor) 0:00
2. Offertoire (B minor) 6:24
3. Sanctus (E-flat major) 14:36
4. Pie Jesu (B-flat major) 18:07
5. Agnus Dei et Lux Aeterna (F major) 21:48
6. Libera Me (D minor) 27:55
7. In Paradisum (D major) 32:16

(Format: Audio CD)

It’s hot in LA…what can I say: GLAZUNOV: The Seasons – ‘Summer’ – Philharmonia Orchestra – Yevgeny Svetlanov: great compositions/performances


GLAZUNOV: The Seasons – ‘Summer’ – Philharmonia Orchestra – Yevgeny Svetlanov

Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov (1865-1936 : Russia)

The Seasons (Ballet, Op.67)

Scene III. Summer

Scene Three depicts the height of summer in a wheatfield.
The Spirit of Corn (Kschessinska’s role) dances in the heat of
the day. Naiads carrying blue veils symbolize the coolness of
streams. Satyrs invade the field and attempt to carry off the
spirit of Corn who is protected by Zephyr and the flowers.
From booklet notes

I: Waltz 00:06
II: Barcarole 02:18
III: Variation 05:15
IV: Coda 06:38

Philharmonia Orchestra
Yevgeny Svetlanov, conductor

CDC-7 47847 2
1986 © Angel Records
ADD

Links:
Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexande…
Yevgeny Svetlanov
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yevgeny_…
Philharmonia Orchestra
http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/
Philharmonia Orchestra Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/philharmonia…
Philharmonia Orchestra YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/user/Philharmo…

Serge Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf. Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. (make music part of your life series)


http://www.cbcmusic.ca
The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra‘s music director Bramwell Tovey does double duty as conductor and narrator in this delightfully entertaining performance. It’s the final work on a program that introduces listeners young and old to the various instruments and sections of the orchestra. Also featured are popular favourites from Star Wars, the Nutcracker Suite and Pictures at an Exhibition.

make music part of your life series: Maurice Ravel – Ma Mère l’Oye (Mother Goose)


Maurice RavelMa Mère l’Oye (Mother Goose)

A picture by Gustave Doré of Mother Goose read...

A picture by Gustave Doré of Mother Goose reading written (literary) fairy tales (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Symphony Orchestra of the Liszt School Of Music, conducted by Prof. Nicolás Pasquet, plays Maurice Ravel’s “Ma Mère l’Oye” (Mother Goose), originally composed as a piano duet for 2 children, later transformed into a solo piano piece, then orchestrated and finally transformed into a ballet. Our Symphony Orchestra plays the Orchestra Version, which consists of 5 parts:

I. Pavane de la belle au bois dormant
Pavane of Sleeping Beauty

II. Petit Poucet
Little Tom Thumb / Hop o’ My Thumb

III. Laideronnette, impératrice des pagodes
Little Ugly Girl, Empress of the Pagodas

IV. Les entretiens de la belle et de la bête
Conversation of Beauty and the Beast

V. Le jardin féerique
The Fairy Garden

The Concert took place at the Neue Weimarhalle on December 8th, 2011

make music part of your life series: Gioacchino Rossini – Silken Ladder Overture


Gioacchino Rossini – Silken Ladder Overture

In this 1978 recording, Claudio Abbado conducts the London Symphony Orchestra. RCA is the official owner of this recording.

Photo: http://pixabay.com/en/marian-column-p…

This recording is no longer available on CD, but you can find alternate recordings of this specific overture on ArkivMusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/D…

make music part of your life series: SAMOHI (Philharmonic Orchestra) Procession of the Nobles from “Mlada” Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov


SAMOHI (Philharmonic Orchestra) Procession of the Nobles from “MladaNikolai Rimsky-Korsakov

make music part of your life series: Antonín Dvořák -Scherzo Capriccioso, Op. 66


Antonín Dvořák:
Scherzo Capriccioso, Op. 6

make music part of your life series - Antonin Dvorak - Scherzo Capriccioso op. 66 Royal Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Paavo Jarvi

make music part of your life series – Antonin Dvorak – Scherzo Capriccioso op. 66 Royal Philharmonic Orchestra cond. Paavo Jarvi

 

Ion Voicu – Felmake music part of your life series: Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64


Ion Voicu – Felix Mendelssohn – Concerto In E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 64

 

who’s who: Sayaka Shoji (庄司 紗矢香 Shōji Sayaka), Classical Violonist


Sayaka Shoji

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Sayaka Shoji in Strasbourg, February 2014.

Sayaka Shoji (庄司 紗矢香 Shōji Sayaka?, born 30 January 1983) is a Japanese classical violinist. She is the first Japanese and youngest winner (after Lenuta Ciulei) at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999.

She was born into an artistic family (her mother is a painter, grandmother is a poet) and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz.

Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic.

Since then many prominent orchestras have invited Shoji, including the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia and WDR Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Lorin Maazel, Yuri Temirkanov, Myung-whun Chung and Semyon Bychkov.

Discography

The Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, Conducted by Zubin Mehta
July 2000, Deutsche Grammophon
  • Louvre Recital
Itamar Golan, Piano
September 2001, Deutsche Grammophon
Itamar Golan, Piano
December 2003, Deutsche Grammophon
Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Conducted by Myung-Whun Chung
October 2005, Deutsche Grammophon
  • Beethoven Sonata 2&9
Gianluca Cascioli, Piano
2010 Deutsche Grammophon
  • Bach & Reger Solo Works
2011 Mirare

Sayaka Shoji records with Deutsche Grammophon and performs on the 1729 “Recamier” Stradivarius on loan from Ryuzo Ueno, Honorary Chairman, Ueno Fine Chemicals Industry, Ltd.

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devotional music: Dvorak Psalm 149 op 79 Boston Ozawa


Dvorak Psalm 149 op 79 Boston Ozawa

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make music part of your life series: Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann


Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann

Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67

1 Allegro con brio
2 Andante con moto
3 Allegro
4 Allegro

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

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Great Compositions/Performances: O. Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III. (1932) Dedicated to all my friends who take time to visit and appreciate my posts! Thank You!


O. Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III. Complete

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Ottorino Respighi (Italian: [ottoˈriːno resˈpiːɡi]; 9 July 1879 – 18 April 1936) was an Italian composer, musicologist and conductor. He is best known for his orchestral music, particularly the three Roman tone poems: Fountains of Rome (Fontane di Roma), Pines of Rome (I pini di Roma), and Roman Festivals (Feste romane). His musicological interest in 16th-, 17th- and 18th-century music led him to compose pieces based on the music of these periods. He also wrote a number of operas, the most famous of which is La fiamma.

Suite No. 1 (1917)

Suite No. 1 was composed in 1917. It was based on Renaissance lute pieces by Simone Molinaro, Vincenzo Galilei (father of Galileo Galilei) and additional anonymous composers.
  1. Balletto, “Il Conte Orlando”
  2. Gagliarda
  3. Villanella
  4. Passo mezzo e mascherada

Suite No. 2 (1923)

Suite No. 2 was composed in 1923. It was based on pieces for lute, archlute, and viol by Fabritio Caroso, Jean-Baptiste Besard, Bernardo Gianoncelli, and an anonymous composer. It also includes an aria attributed to Marin Mersenne.
  1. Laura soave
  2. Danza rustica
  3. Campanae parisienses & Aria
  4. Bergamasc

Suite No. 3 (1932)

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.
  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: E.Grieg:2 Elegiac Melodies, for string orchestra, Op.34-2 Last Spring


E.Grieg:2 Elegiac Melodies, for string orchestra, Op.34-2 Last Spring

 

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite, Op. 39


Antonín DvořákCzech Suite, Op. 39

Janácek Philharmonic Orchestra, Theodore Kuchar

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Die Geschöpfe des Prometheus Overture Op.43 by Immerseel, Anima Eterna (2009)


Beethoven Die Geschöpfe des Prometheus Overture Op.43 by Immerseel, Anima Eterna (2009)

Ludwig van Beethoven:
Die Geschöpfe des Prometheus Overture Op.43
(The Creatures of Prometheus Overture Op.43)

Anima Eterna
Jos van Immerseel, Conductor

22nd September 2009
Live at Au Concert Nobel, Bruxelles

http://www.youtube.com/user/animaeter…
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7GbYV…
(Beethoven Symphony No.5, Mov.4 by Immerseel, Anima Eterna)

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Respighi – The Birds


Respighi – The Birds

Ottorino Respighi

Ottorino Respighi (Photo credit: lorenzog.)

Atlanta Symphony OrchestraLouis Lane conductor
For information and analysis of this work, visit http://muswrite.blogspot.com/2012/03/…
For information and analysis of other works, visit Musical Musings at : http://muswrite.blogspot.com/

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Great Compositions/Performances: Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta


Rimsky Korsakov Capriccio Espagnol Op 34 Berliner Phil Dir Zubin Mehta

 

Capriccio espagnol, Op. 34, is the common Western title for an orchestral work based on Spanish folk melodies and written by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1887. Rimsky-Korsakov originally intended to write the work for a solo violin with orchestra, but later decided that a purely orchestral work would do better justice to the lively melodies. The Russian title is Каприччио на испанские темы (literally, Capriccio on Spanish Themes). The Capriccio consists of five movements and is scored for 2 flutes, piccolo, 2 oboes (one doubling English horn), 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp and strings.[

Structure

The work has five movements, divided into two parts comprising the first three and the latter two movements respectively..

  1. The first movement, Alborada, is a festive and exciting dance, typically from traditional asturian music to celebrate the rising of the sun. It features the clarinet with two solos, and later features a solo violin with a solo similar to the clarinet’s.
  2. The second movement, Variazioni, begins with a melody in the horn section. Variations of this melody are then repeated by other instruments and sections of the orchestra.
  3. The third movement, Alborada, presents the same asturian dance as the first movement. The two movements are nearly identical, in fact, except that this movement has a different instrumentation and key.
  4. The fourth movement, Scena e canto gitano (“Scene and gypsy song”) opens with five cadenzas — first by the horns and trumpets, then solo violin, flute, clarinet, and harp — played over rolls on various percussion instruments. It is then followed by a dance in triple time leading attacca into the final movement.
  5. The fifth and final movement, Fandango asturiano, is also an energetic dance from the Asturias region of northern Spain. The piece ends with an even more rousing statement of the Alborada theme.

A complete performance of the Capriccio takes around 16 minutes

Use in film

  • Capriccio Espagnol, Op.34 is played during the opening credits and as the Spanish Carnaval background music during Josef von Sternberg‘s film The Devil Is a Woman (1935), credited on screen as ‘Music based on Rimsky-Korsakoff’s “Spanish Caprice” and Old Spanish Melodies’.
  • Excerpts were heard in the fictional 1947 biopic of Rimsky-Korsakov, Song of Scheherazade.
  • A recording by “Philharmonia Slavonica” featured in the film Brokeback Mountain (2006). The “Philharmonia Slavonica” is pseudonymous group that appears on a number of recordings of the bargain-record producer Alfred Scholz. The performances attributed to them are often by the Austrian Radio (ORF) Orchestra.
  • A recording by the Moscow Radio Symphony in the film Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (1988)

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010


Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010

Berliner Philharmoniker – Edward Elgar Salut d’amour op. 12 2010

von der Berliner Waldbühne, Dirigent Ion Marin

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Camille Saint-Saëns – Danse Macabre



Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns.

The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed.

According to the ancient superstition, “Death” appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by a solo violin with its E-string tuned to an E-flat in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year.

The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight, accompanied by soft chords from the string section. This then leads to the eerie E flat and A chords (also known as a tritone or the “Devil’s chord“) played by a solo violin, representing death on his fiddle. After which the main theme is heard on a solo flute and is followed by a descending scale on the solo violin. The rest of the orchestra, particularly the lower instruments of the string section, then joins in on the descending scale. The main theme and the scale is then heard throughout the various sections of the orchestra until it breaks to the solo violin and the harp playing the scale. The piece becomes more energetic and climaxes at this point; the full orchestra playing with strong dynamics.Towards the end of the piece, there is another violin solo, now modulating, which is then joined by the rest of the orchestra. The final section, a pianissimo, represents the dawn breaking and the skeletons returning to their graves.

The piece makes particular use of the xylophone in a particular theme to imitate the sounds of rattling bones. Saint-Saëns uses a similar motif in the Fossils part of his Carnival of the Animals.
[from Wikipedia]

Artwork:Remedios Varo,”Les Feuilles Mortes”.
Played by:National Philharmonic Orchestra,
conductor:Leopold Stokowski.

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Dmitry Shostakovich, Festive Overture, Op. 96 (arr. for wind ensemble)



Dmitry Shostakovich
President’s Own United States Marine Band, The, President’s Own United States Marine Band, The
Festive Overture, Op. 96 (arr. for wind ensemble)
President’s Own United States Marine Band: The Bicentennial Collection
75442261012
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants


Georges Bizet - Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants

La Folle Journée de Varsovie 2013, Szalone Dni Muzyki w Warszawie,
The Grand Theatre in Warsaw, Poland, September 28
Symphony Orchestra of the Tadeusz Szeligowski Music School in Lublin, Poland
Iwona Borcuch – conductor

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Frederick Delius – Florida Suite



Lloyd-Jones, David. English Northern Philharmonia
Evans, Irene; Francis, Sarah; Glanville, Susannah; Lees, Susan; Pearce, Sue; Thomas, Shirley
Frederick Delius – Florida Suite
1. Daybreak – Dance 00:11:43
2. By the River 00:07:09
3. Sunset – Near the Plantation 00:10:10
4. At Night 00:08:09

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven: Symphony No.8 – Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.8 in F, Op.93
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Allegro vivace e con brio
9:05 II. Allegro scherzando
12:57 III. Tempo di Menuetto
17:36 IV. Allegro vivace

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DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7'39'']
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18'40'']

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Carl Maria von Weber – Symphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50



John Georgiadis. Queensland Orchestra
Carl Maria von WeberSymphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50
I. Allegro con Fuoco 00:07:56
II. Andante 00:06:20
III. Scherzo and Trio 00:04:06
IV. Finale: Presto 00:06:47

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Great Compositions/Performances: Richard Wagner – Siegfried Idyll (Conductor: Sergiu Celibidache & Münchner Philharmoniker)



Great Compositions/Performances:  Richard WagnerSiegfried Idyll
Conductor: Sergiu Celibidache & Münchner Philharmoniker

Apart from the operas, Wagner composed a small number of pieces; this stems from his reluctance to conceive music which didn’t belong to the sacredness of the drama, fundamental expression of his thought.
The “Siegfried Idyll” is a symphonic poem for chamber orchestra, composed by Richard Wagner (1813-1883) as a birthday present to his second wife, Cosima, after the birth of their son Siegfried in 1869. It was first performed on Christmas morning, 25 December 1870, by a small ensemble on the stairs of their villa at Tribschen.
Wagner’s opera “Siegfried”, which was premiered in 1876, incorporates music from the Idyll. It was once thought that the Idyll borrowed musical ideas intended for the opera, but it is now known that the opposite is the case: Wagner adapted melodic material from an unfinished chamber piece in the Idyll and later incorporated it into the love scene between Siegfried and Brunhilde in the opera.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite I. Complete



Great Compositions/Performances:  
Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite I. 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa Conducting

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite in D major, B. 93, Op. 39 – II. Polka



Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (Katowice), Antoni Wit. Paint, A Village In Winter by Adrianus Eversen

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Max Bruch – Cancona für Violoncello und Orchester op. 55



Max Bruch (1838-1920) – Cancona für Violoncello und Orchester B-Dur op. 55

Julius Berger – Violoncello
Nationales Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Polen
Antoni Wit – Dirigent

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Make Music Part of Your Life: P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3 in D major, Op. 29 (Fedoseyev)



Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskySymphony No. 3 ["Polish"] in D major, Op. 29 (1875)
1. Introduzione e Allegro
2. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice
3. Andante elegiaco
4. Scherzo. Allegro vivo
5. Finale. Allegro con fuoco

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Handel Concerto Grosso No.5 Op.6 in D major HWV 323, SCO



Handel Concerto Grosso No.5 Op.6 in D major HWV 323, Complete
http://www.facebook.com/groups/133188…

1. Maestoso
2. Allegro
3. Presto
4. Largo
5. Allegro
6. Menuet. Un poco larghetto

Bohdan Warchal 1st violin
Peter Hamar 2nd violin
Juraj Alexander Violoncello

Slovak Chamber Orchestra
Bohdan Warchal Conductor

Slovak Chamber Orchestra
Established in 1960 by Professor Bohdan Warchal, the Slovak Chamber Orchestra has since developed into one of the most popular ensembles in the field of Slovak classical music, and one of the principal interpreters of Slovak art music abroad. Over the years the Slovak Chamber Orchestra has introduced itself on the most important concert stages and music festivals in Europe, North and South America, Asia and Australia. It has co-operated with many prominent world-renowned soloists, and inspired the work of several Slovak composers, resulting in premiere performances of their new compositions. The ensemble has recorded more than 100 music titles originating in different periods, for domestic as well as foreign record companies.

Bohdan Warchal
(27 January 1930, Orlová, Czechoslovakia 30 December 2000, Bratislava, Slovakia) was a Slovak violinist, a member of the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra and founder, chief conductor and soloist of the Slovak Chamber Orchestra.

* 19571964 – concertmaster of the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
* 1964 – artistic leader of the Slovak Chamber Orchestra
* 19591963 – external pedagogue at the State Conservatory Bratislava
* 1980 – pedagogue at the Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava
* 1995 – moved from the Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra to the Prague Chamber Orchestra
* 1997 – became the leader of the Slovak Chamber Orchestra again
Related articles

 

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Corigliano: Suite from “The Red Violin” / Rachlevsky • Chamber Orchestra Kremlin



Corigliano: Suite from “The Red Violin” / Misha Rachlevsky • Chamber Orchestra Kremlin

Recorded at the Chamber Hall of the Moscow International House of Music, with Mr. Corigliano in the audience, March 2003. Russian premiere. With author’s permission, Misha Rachlevsky amended the Suite with other episodes from the film’s score, giving every violinist of the orchestra a chance to shine.

Our website: http://KremlinOnTour.com/

 

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Vincent D’indy Symphony on a French mountain air for piano and orchestra



Pnina Salzman and the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra/ Mendi Rodan, conductor. See also her Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pnina-…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
For the asteroid named after the composer, see 11530 d’Indy.

Vincent d’Indy, ca. 1895

Vincent d’Indy (French pronunciation: ​[vɛ̃ˈsɑ̃ dɛ̃ˈdi]) (27 March 1851 – 2 December 1931) was a French composer and teacher.

Life

Paul Marie Théodore Vincent d’Indy was born in Paris into an aristocratic family of royalist and Catholic persuasion. He had piano lessons from an early age from his paternal grandmother, who passed him on to Antoine François Marmontel and Louis Diémer.[1] From the age of 14 he studied harmony with Albert Lavignac. At age 19, during the Franco-Prussian War, he enlisted in the National Guard, but returned to musical life as soon as the hostilities were over. The first of his works he heard performed was a Symphonie italienne, at an orchestral rehearsal under Jules Pasdeloup; the work was admired by Georges Bizet and Jules Massenet, with whom he had already become acquainted.[1] On the advice of Henri Duparc, he became a devoted student of César Franck at the Conservatoire de Paris. As a follower of Franck, d’Indy came to admire what he considered the standards of German symphonism.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Pnina Salzman (Hebrew: פנינה זלצמן) (February 24, 1922, Tel AvivMandate Palestine – December 16, 2006, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli classical pianist and piano pedagogue.

Salzman showed an early aptitude for the piano, and gave her first recital at the age of eight. The French pianist and teacher, Alfred Cortot, heard her play in 1932 while she was a student at Shulamit Conservatory and invited her to Paris to study. She graduated at the Ecole Normale de Musique then became a pupil of Magda Tagliaferroat the Conservatoire de Paris, where she was to win the Premier Prix de Piano in 1938, aged 16.

It was through the violinist Bronislaw Huberman that she first developed a lifelong association with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, which Huberman had founded.

In 1963 she became the first Israeli to be invited to play in the USSR and in 1994, the first Israeli pianist invited to play in China. Besides performing as a soloist, she was a member of the Israel Piano Quartet.

She was a Professor and the head of the piano department at Tel Aviv University and served on the jury of many piano competitions, including the Arthur Rubinstein,Vladimir Horowitz and Marguerite Long competitions. She taught piano to many students, including Dror ElimelechNimrod David PfefferElisha AbasIddo Bar-Shai andYossi Reshef.

Buy “Symphony on a French Mountain Air for Piano and Orchestra in G Major, Op. 25: II. Assez modéré, mais sans lenteur” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3iTuneseMusic

  • Artist
    Pnina Salzman

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Mozart – Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595 – Ovchinnikov




*****Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

*****Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595

*****Emil Gilels, piano
*****USSR State Symphony Orchestra
*****Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov, conductor

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: The Berlin Celebration Concert – Beethoven, Symphony No 9 Bernstein 1989

Published on Mar 30, 2013

Conducted by Leonard Bernstein, THE BERLIN CELEBRATION CONCERT is an historic performance marking the fall of the Berlin Wall. Performed on Christmas Day 1989 in the former East Berlin, the concert unites an international cast of celebrated musicians and vocalists for a moving performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony.

Symphonieorchester des Bayerisches Rundfunks and members of Staatskapelle Dresden, Orchestra of the Leningrad Kirov Theatre, London Symphony Orchestra, New York Philharmonic and Orchestre de Paris.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edvard Grieg. “Peer Gynt” Suite No. 1, Op. 46



Edvard Grieg. “Peer Gynt” Suite No. 1, Op. 46
1. Morning Mood 
2. The Death of Åse
3. Anitra’s Dance
4. In the Hall of the Mountain King

Novosibirsk Philharmonic Orchestra, Artistic Director and Chief Conductor
Gintaras Rinkevicius

Was recorded by “Culture”-TV channel on 15 October 2012 at the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall (Moscow)

Эдвард Григ. Сюита “Пер Гюнт” №1, Op. 46
1. Утро
2. Смерть Озе
3. Танец Анитры
4. В пещере горного короля

Новосибирский академический симфонический оркестр, художественный руководитель и главный дирижёр Гинтарас Ринкявичус

Запись телеканала “Культура” с концерта 15 октября 2012 года в Концертном зале имени Чайковского (Москва)

 

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Make Music Part of your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI at SAINT-SAËNS Havanaise Op.83 – P.Cao, 1972



Camille SAINT-SAËNS: Havanaise, in E Major Op.83 (1887)
Ruggiero RICCI – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor (Recorded: Hamburg 1972)
________________________________________­__________
SAINT-SAENS, WORKS FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…
1) Violin Concerto No.2 in C Major Op.58 (1858)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
2) Violin Concerto No.1 in A Major Op.20 -Allegro (1859)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
3) Introduction and Rondo capriccioso, in A Minor Op.28 (1863)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
4) Romance, in C Major Op.48 (1874)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Reinhard Peters, conductor
5) Violin Concerto No.3 in B minor Op.61 (1880)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
6) Violin Concerto No.4 in G major Op.62 ‘Inachevé’ (Morceau de concert) (1880)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Reinhard Peters, conductor
7) Havanaise, in E Major Op.83 (1887)
Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Pierre Cao, conductor
8) Caprice Andalous, in G Major Op.122 (1904)
Philharmonia Hungarica – Pierre Cao, conductor
(Ruggiero Ricci, violin / Hamburg, 1972 – (c)&(p) 1990 by VOX)
________________________________________­__________

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Nicolai Glinka – Russlan and Ludmilla Overture – Performance by Yevgeny Mravinsky conducting the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra.



Performance by Yevgeny Mravinsky conducting the Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra.
*****violinthief: “Though most of my uploads are of singing, I am actually an orchestral musician. Here is a recording of one of my favorite conductor/orchestra combinations. The string playing here is second to none.”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mikhail Glinka
Mikhail Glinka 1840.jpg

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Great Compositions/Performances: OTTORINO RESPIGHI – TRILOGIA ROMANA



PINI DI ROMA – FONTANE DI ROMA (Orchestre symphonique de Montréal dir. Charles Dutoit) – FESTE ROMANE (The Philadelphia Orchestra dir. Riccardo Muti)

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Astor Piazzolla – Libertango


Aram Gharabekian conducts the National Chamber Orchestra of Armenia – the orchestral version of the Astor Piazzolla Libertango at the Zvartnots Monument-Complex Gala Concert in 2006 in Armenia.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life -Series: Nikolaj Rimski-Korsakov – Symphony No.1 in E minor, Op. 1


Nikolaj Rimski-KorsakovSymphony No.1 in E minor, Op. 1

Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schubert – Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990))



Franz Schubert (1797-1828):
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (1822)
1. Allegro moderato00:00 
2. Andante con moto - 13:32
Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990).
Painting: Wanderer in the Storm, Karl Julius von Leypold

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

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Great Compostions/Performances: Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens


Rhapsodie D’Auvergne for Piano and Orchestra By Saint-Saens

(2008 Annual Concert at Glenn Gould Studio Toronto Soloist:Emily Pei’En Fan Conductor: Tony Fan with Chinese Artists Society of Toronto Youth Orchestra)

Saint-Saens: Later years

In 1886 Saint-Saëns debuted two of his most renowned compositions: The Carnival of the Animals andSymphony No. 3, dedicated to Franz Liszt, who died that year. That same year, however, Vincent d’Indyand his allies had Saint-Saëns removed from the Société Nationale de Musique. Two years later, Saint-Saëns’s mother died, driving the mourning composer away from France to the Canary Islands under the alias “Sannois”. Over the next several years he travelled around the world, visiting exotic locations in Europe, North Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America. Saint-Saëns chronicled his travels in many popular books using his nom de plume, Sannois.

In 1908, he had the distinction of being the first celebrated composer to write a musical score to a motion picture, The Assassination of the Duke of Guise (L’assassinat du duc de Guise), directed by Charles Le Bargy and André Calmettes, adapted by Henri Lavedan, featuring actors of the Comédie Française. It was 18 minutes long, a considerable run time for the day.

In 1915, Saint-Saëns traveled to San Francisco, California and guest conducted the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, one of two world’s fairs celebrating the completion of the Panama Canal.

Saint-Saëns continued to write on musical, scientific and historical topics, travelling frequently before spending his last years in AlgiersAlgeria. In recognition of his accomplishments, the government of France awarded him the Légion d’honneur.

Saint-Saëns died of pneumonia on 16 December 1921 at the Hôtel de l’Oasis in Algiers. His body was repatriated to Paris, honoured by state funeral at La Madeleine, and interred at Cimetière du Montparnasse in Paris.

Relationships with other composers

Saint-Saëns was either friend or enemy to some of Europe’s most distinguished musicians. He stayed close to Franz Liszt and maintained a fast friendship with his pupil Gabriel Fauré, who replaced him as organist and choirmaster when he retired. Additionally, he was a teacher and friend to Isidor Philipp, who headed the piano department at the Paris Conservatory for several decades and was a composer and editor of the music of many composers. But despite his strong advocacy of French music, Saint-Saëns openly despised many of his fellow-composers in France such as Franckd’Indy, and Massenet. Saint-Saëns also hated the music of Claude Debussy; he is reported to have told Pierre Lalo, music critic, and son of composer Édouard Lalo, “I have stayed in Paris to speak ill of Pelléas et Mélisande.” The personal animosity was mutual; Debussy quipped: “I have a horror of sentimentality, and I cannot forget that its name is Saint-Saëns.” On other occasions, however, Debussy acknowledged an admiration for Saint-Saëns’s musical talents.

Saint-Saëns had been an early champion of Richard Wagner‘s music in France, teaching his pieces during his tenure at the École Niedermeyer and premiering the March from Tannhäuser. He had stunned even Wagner himself when he sight-read the entire orchestral scores of LohengrinTristan und Isolde, andSiegfried, prompting Hans von Bülow to refer to him as, “the greatest musical mind” of the era. However, despite admitting appreciation for the power of Wagner’s work, Saint-Saëns defiantly stated that he was not an aficionado. In 1886, Saint-Saëns was punished for some particularly harsh and anti-German comments on the Paris production of Lohengrin by losing engagements and receiving negative reviews throughout Germany. Later, after World War I, Saint-Saëns angered both French and Germans with his inflammatory articles entitled Germanophilie, which ruthlessly attacked Wagner.[2]

Saint-Saëns edited Jean-Philippe Rameau‘s Pièces de clavecin, and published them in 1895 through Durand in Paris (re-printed by Dover in 1993).

On 29 May 1913, Saint-Saëns stormed out of the première of Igor Stravinsky‘s Le sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring), allegedly infuriated over what he considered the misuse of the bassoon in the ballet’s opening bars.

 

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Romanian Folk Dances – Bela Bartok (orchestral version)



Tom Van den Eynde conducting the Chamber Orchestra Mechelen in the Romanian Folk Dances of Bela Bartok (Jocul Cu Bâta, Brâul, Pe Loc, Buciumeana, Poarga Româneascâ & Mâruntel). 
Live recording 2 october 2011 Culturel Center Mechelen.

The belgian born conductor Tom Van den Eynde (1980) studied classical guitar, violin, piano, harmony and counterpoint at the Conservatory of Mechelen. When he was fifteen he started taking private conducting lessons with Silveer Van den broeck. 
At the age of eighteen, he went to the Netherlands (Maastricht & Rotterdam) to continue his musical studies : orchestral conducting with Sir Jan Stulen and classical guitar with Cees Dirkx. After three years, he finished his guitar studies as a teaching and performing musician. 

In June 2000, he conducted the Dutch première of Previns « Concerto for guitar and orchestra ». In September 2000, he also assisted his present teacher Jan Stulen in « Le jongleur the Notre-Dame », a church opera of Peter Maxwell Davies which was broadcasted by the Dutch radio and television. 

Tom joined in July 2001 the Wiener Meisterkurse with Sir Salvador Mas Conde. There he was one of the few applicants to conduct the Plovdiv Philharmonic Orchestra (Bulgaria) at the final concert in Vienna. 

One year later, he conducted the Orquestra Sinfónica del Vallès in Barcelona during the International Conducting Course Igualada with maestro Antoni Ros Marba (July 2002). 

In August 2002, Tom made his debut with the Brabant Orchestra (Eindhoven, the Netherlands) conducting the Franck Symphony during the final concert of a masterclass with maestro Marc Soustrot. A year later, he conducted this orchestra for a second time in a Beethoven program. 

Tom also have been conducting the Dutch Promenade Orchestra (Amsterdam) in concert for several times. 

From 1998 till 2003, Tom was serving as assistant-conductor of the Flemish Symphony Orchestra. In November 2003, he finished his conducting studies at the Conservatory of Maastricht by conducting the University Orchestra of Louvain (Belgium) in “Harold in Italy” (Berlioz) and Symphony n°9 “From the New World” (Dvorak). 

In april 2004 he founded the Mechels Chamber Orchestra. It is a semi-professional orchestra of 35 musicians. In a short time, Tom raised this orchestra into a high level. Many international soloists as André De Groote (piano), Luc Tooten (cello), Marc Tooten (viola), Olsi Leka (cello), Jean-Luc Votano (clarinet), etc, have been working together with the orchestra and praised the orchestra for their enthousiasm and precise playing. 

In august 2007 Tom made his first CD recording in Slovak Republic. Together with guitarist Wim Brioen and recording engineer Jaroslav Stranavksi (Brilliant Classics), he made a recording of three excellent flemish guitar concerto’s. For this opportunity, Tom conducted the Slovak State Chamber Orchestra of Zilina.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: George Enescu – Romanian Rhapsody n° 2 in D major, Op. 11 (Orchestre de Montbéliard, Paul Staïcu)



The first Romanian Rhapsody composed at 19 years (together with a second one, both bearing the opus number 11) gained a worldwide fame for its lovely folk tunes (in fact, all Enescu’s works are imbued with such folk lightmotifs) and vivid Romanian rhythms, becoming definitely the best known of all his compositions. Here the Rhapsody No.2 is performed with an infectious empathy by the Romanian conductor Paul Staïcu along with his outstanding musicians of Montbéliard Philharmonic Orchestra.  The performance reveals a mighty symphonist with a keen sense of colours and orchestral textures, a rigorous and honest one devoted to principles and truth, extracting the sap of his composition from folk melodies of his people.  The reputed conductor Paul Staïcu has signed a series of recordings devoted to the complete orchestral oeuvres of his fellow compatriot.  The celebrated Romanian Rhapsody in D major op.11 , more reflexive than its pair no.1, the second Romanian Rhapsody is also a youthful work (written in 1900, when the composer was 19) with persistent folk aromas and picturesque suggestions, aiming at fructifying the popular Romanian musical treasure and meditative side of its sentimentality. The rhapsodic character compounds its appeal and favours its reception by audiences. It is a composition putting grave questions and depicting outrageous realities, filtered through a sensitive conscience. It conveys the sufferance of a moral man facing the immorality of a corrupt and pointless world, reflecting on duties and faiths, on life’s sense and destiny. The torturing mood is magisterially recreated by the inspired baton of Paul Staïcu, the main themes flow unceasingly with a desolating vigour and reach finally a concluding climax affirming an undefeated hope in the majesty of mankind.

  

The Romanian Athenaeum, at about the time of the Rhapsodies’ premiere there in 1903

The two Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, for orchestra, are George Enescu‘s best-known compositions. They were both written in 1901, and first performed together in 1903. The two rhapsodies, and particularly the first, have long held a permanent place in the repertory of every major orchestra. They employ elements of lăutărească music, vivid Romanian rhythms, and an air of spontaneity. They exhibit exotic modal coloring, with some scales having ‘mobile’ thirds, sixths or sevenths, creating a shifting major/minor atmosphere, one of the characteristics of Romanian lăutărească music.[1][not in citation given] They also incorporate some material found in the later drafts of his Poème roumaine, Op. 1.[2]

File:Ateneul Român stage.jpg

The stage of the Athenaeum in Bucharest

The two Romanian Rhapsodies were composed in Paris, and premiered together in a concert at the Romanian Athenaeumin Bucharest which also included the world premiere of Enescu’s First Suite for Orchestra, Op. 9 (1903). The composer conducted all three of his own works, which were preceded on the programme by Berlioz’s Overture to Les francs-jugesand Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, both conducted by Eduard Wachmann. The concert took place on 23 February 1903[3](according to the Julian calendar in use in Romania at that time; 8 March 1903 Gregorian).[4] The Second Rhapsody was played first, and Enescu maintained this order of performance throughout his life.[5]

Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[14][7] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[15][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1] though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru.[10] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[16] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[17]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.[18]

 

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Carl Nielsen – Hanedansen (Dance of the Cockerels) from the opera Maskarade



A short ballet from Act III of the comic opera Maskarade by Danish composer Carl Nielsen (1865-1931). The opera libretto was written by Vilhelm Andersen, based on the comedy by Ludvig Holberg.

Conductor: Ulf Schirmer
Danish National Radio Symphony Orchestra

 

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Beethoven “12 Contredances”



12 Contredances for small Orchestra WoO 14 
by Ludwig van Beethoven
Chamber Orchestra Berlin
Helmut Koch, conductor
1970

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: GEORGE WALKER: “Lyric for Strings” (Original Version)


One of Walker’s best-known early works was “Lyric” for String Orchestra. It was originally the 2nd movement, ‘Molto Adagio,’ of his String Quartet No. 1 (1946), and is performed here in that original version.
The Son Sonora String Quartet: Ashley Horne and Airi Yoshioka, violins;
Liu-Wien Ting, viola; Leo Grinhauz, cello
from Albany TROY1082 (2009)
http://www.albanyrecords.com

Chamber works from this Pulitzer Prize winning composer.
Continuing Albany Records’ series of music by Pulitzer Prize-winning composer George Walker, this recording focuses on his chamber music. The music ranges from his first string quartet composed in 1946 to the piano sonata composed in 1985. Walker is the recipient of six honorary doctoral degrees and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and was inducted into the American Classical Music Hall of Fame in 2000.
Contents:
George Walker, composer
String Quartet No. 1
Son Sonora String Quartet
George Walker, composer
String Quartet No. 2
Son Sonora String Quartet
George Walker, composer
Piano Sonata No. 4
Frederick Moyer, piano
George Walker, composer
Songs
James Martin, baritone, George Walker, piano 
Review:
“The piano sonata is a stunning, spacious work. Walker is at his finest in the songs. Each one is a gem. …James Martin’s warm baritone, concise diction, and wide variety of colors are a perfect match for these songs.” (American Record Guide)
“From this CD one would conclude that [George Walker] is versatile, technically adept, and extremely skillful at changing styles…” (Fanfare)

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Franz Anton Hoffmeister – Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)


Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Cover of Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Franz Anton Hoffmeister 
Work: Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)

Mov.I: Allegro brioso 00:00
Mov.II: Adagio 15:07
Mov.III: Allegretto 22:57

Pianist: Wilhelm Neuhaus
Orchestra: Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Conductor: Helmut Müller-Brühl (1933 – 2012)

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