Tag Archives: Paris

Fryderyk Chopin, Scherzo E-dur Op.54 nr 4, Barbara Hesse-Bukowska,1954: great compositions/performances



From:  Czarmuzyki Ewa Chamiec

Fryderyk Chopin, Scherzo E-dur Op.54 nr 4, Barbara Hesse-Bukowska,1954

(Fryderyk Chopin, Scherzo E-dur Op.54 nr 4, Barbara Hesse-Bukowska –1954! — Archiwum Polskiego Radia.)

today’s birthday: Salvador Luria (1912)


Salvador Luria (1912)

Luria was an Italian biologist who began his career in Paris studying the effects of radiation on bacteriophages—viruses that infect bacteria. After immigrating to the US during World War II, he started using bacteriophages to study such fundamental life processes as self-replication and mutation, along with Alfred Hershey and Max Delbrück. For their efforts, the three biologists shared the 1969 Nobel Prize in physiology. What famous scientific breakthrough came from one of Luria’s students? More… Discuss

this pressed at EUZICASA: from Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne – préhistoire


 

Encyclopédie Larousse en ligne – préhistoire.

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)


A la découverte de l'encyclopédie Larousse

A la découverte de l’encyclopédie Larousse (access here)

today’s holiday: Meyboom


Meyboom

One of the oldest folk traditions in Belgium, Meyboom is an amalgamation of Belgian folklore, patron-saint celebration, and traditional neighborhood rivalry. The event is marked with a procession of giant puppets and the planting of a meyboom (may tree) on the corner of Rue des Sables and Rue du Marais in Brussels. Before the planting, a procession of trumpeters and costumed giants accompanies the tree from the Place des Sablons to its final destination. According to custom, if the meyboom is not planted by 5:00 p.m., the city’s good fortune will go to the people of Leuven. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mata Hari (1876)


Mata Hari (1876)

Born Margaretha Geertruida Zelle, this Dutch courtesan, dancer, and alleged spy went by the stage name Mata Hari. During World War I, she had intimate relationships with high-ranking Allied military officers and government officials. Though details are unclear, she apparently spied for Germany from 1916. In January 1917, French intelligence intercepted German messages about a spy they identified as Mata Hari, and she was executed by the French on espionage charges. What happened to her corpse?

Lucienne Boyer – Mon coeur est un violon, 1945: make music part of your life series


 from

Marlene Dietrich “Je m’ennuie” 1933


Marlene Dietrich “Je m’ennuie” 1933

LilyMarleneDietrich

Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992) enregistrée le 15 juillet 1933 à Paris.

De ce que fut mon enfance,
Je n’ai plus de souvenirs.
C’est peut-être que la chance
Ne m’offrit pas de plaisirs.
Et chaque jour qui se lève
Ne m’apporte aucun espoir.
Je n’ai même pas de rêve
Quand luit l’etoile du soir.

Moi, je m’ennuie,
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Je n’y peux rien..
Le plaisir passe,
Il me dépasse.
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien.
Partout je traîne,
Comme une chaîne,
Ma lourde peine,
Sans autre bien.
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Moi, je m’ennuie…

Par de longs vagabondages,
J’ai voulu griser mon coeur,
Et souvent, sur mon passage,
J’ai vu naître des malheurs.
Sur chaque nouvelle route,
A l’amour j’ai dû mentir ;
Et le soir, lorsque j’écoute
La plainte du vent mourir…

Moi, je m’ennuie…
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Je n’y peux rien..
Le plaisir passe,
Il me dépasse.
En moi sa trace
Ne laisse rien.
Partout je traîne,
Comme une chaîne,
Ma lourde peine,
Sans autre bien.
C’est dans ma vie
Une manie.
Moi, je m’ennuie…

The Doors – L.A Woman Album (make music part o your life series)


LA Woman is the sixth studio album by the American rock band The Doors, released in April 1971. Was the last album recorded by singer Jim Morrison who died París.En three months in 2003, Rolling Stone placed it at number 362 on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all tiempos.Es an album almost exclusively of blues, a style which in previous work had not been more than an influence, although increasingly marked and already dominant in the previous “Morrison Hotel“.
00:00  The Changeling
04:21   Love Her Madly
07:43  Been Down So Long
12:23   Cars Hiss by My Window
16:36   LA Woman
24:28   L’America
29:08  Hyacinth House
32:20  Crawling King Snake
37:20  The WASP (Texas Radio and the Big Beat)
41:40  Riders On The Storm
48:53  Orange County Suite
54:38  (You Need Meat) Don’t Go No Further

this day in the yesteryear: Henry IV of France Converts to Catholicism (1593)


Henry IV of France Converts to Catholicism (1593)

Henry IV was the first of the Bourbon kings of France, reigning from 1589 until his death. A Protestant, Henry was involved in the Wars of Religion before his accession to the throne. He then converted to Catholicism, allegedly explaining his pragmatic philosophy with the statement, “Paris is well worth a mass.” Five years later, he signed the Edict of Nantes, granting religious and civil liberties to Protestants, and ruled as one of the most popular French kings. Who assassinated him in 1610? More… Discuss

Claude Debussy: L’Isle joyeuse L 106 (make music part of your life series)


Claude Debussy: L’Isle joyeuse

L 106

Created with http://www.mp32tube.comL’isle joyeuse, L. 106 (The Island of Pleasure) is an extended solo piano piece by Claude Debussy composed in 1904. According to Jim Samson (1977), the central relationship in the work is that between material based on the whole-tone scale, the lydian mode

make music part of your life series: Fantasy for Cello & Orchestra by Jules Massenet


Fantasy for Cello & Orchestra by Jules Massenet

I. Animé
II. Modéré [09:14]
III. Animé [12:11]

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Jules Massenet

Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (French: [ʒyl emil fʁedeʁik masnɛ]; 12 May 1842 – 13 August 1912) was a French composer best known for his operas. His compositions were very popular in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and he ranks as one of the greatest melodists of his era. Soon after his death, Massenet’s style went out of fashion, and many of his operas fell into almost total oblivion. Apart from Manon and Werther, his works were rarely performed. However, since the mid-1970s, many operas of his such as Thaïs and Esclarmonde have undergone periodic revivals.

Biography

Massenet was born in Montaud, then an outlying hamlet and now a part of the city of Saint-Étienne, in the Loire. When he was six, his family moved to Paris due to his father’s ill-health. There his mother (Adélaïde Massenet, née Royer; her husband’s second wife) started taking piano pupils. She also taught Jules so well that at the age of 11 he became a pupil of Adolphe-François Laurent (piano), Henri Reber (harmony) and Ambroise Thomas (counterpoint) at the Conservatoire de Paris.[

La prise de la Bastille (Sketch Guru – my art collection)


Prise de la Bastille (MyArtCollection)

Prise de la Bastille (MyArtCollection) 

I sketch this painting with Sketch Guru on my Android phone :-) http://bit.ly/sketchguru

After that, I turned to Fast Stone Image Editor to resize, adjust colors and crop…

 

today’s holiday: Bastille Day (prise de la Bastille)


Bastille Day

Prise de la Bastille Jean-Pierre Houël (1735-1813) – Bibliothèque nationale de France

The Bastille was a 14th-century fortress that became a notorious state prison in Paris. An angry mob assaulted the Bastille—which had come to symbolize the French monarchy‘s oppression of the people—on July 14, 1789, freeing the political prisoners held there and launching the French Revolution. July 14 has been celebrated since that time in France as Fête Nationale, as well as in French territories in the Pacific, with parades, fireworks and dancing in the streets. In Tahiti and the rest of French Polynesia, it is called Tiurai or Heiva, and is celebrated for most of the month. More… Discuss

 

Flashmob – Bolero de Ravel na Pinacoteca de São Paulo, Brasil, Conservatoire de Paris, GURI & EMESP


Flashmob – Bolero de Ravel na Pinacoteca de São Paulo, Brasil, Conservatoire de Paris, GURI & EMESP

Project of Marine Gandon, Ghislain Roffat & Pierre-Olivier Schmitt

During three weeks, between August and September of 2013, musicians of the Conservatoire de Paris (CNSMDP) were in Sao Paulo for pedagogical activities with teachers and students of Tom Jobim EMESP and Guri. The exchange is the result of a partnership between the Santa Marcelina Cultura and the prestigious french Institution. One of the results of the project was the execution of Ravel’s Bolero in the shape of a flashmob, at the Pinacoteca do Estado, on 14th September.

Durante três semanas, entre agosto e setembro de 2013, músicos do Conservatório de Paris estiveram em São Paulo para atividades pedagógicas com professores e alunos da EMESP Tom Jobim e do Guri. O intercâmbio é fruto de parceria entre a Santa Marcelina Cultura e a prestigiada instituição francesa. Como um dos resultados deste intercâmbio, surgiu o flashmob Bolero de Ravel na Pinacoteca do Estado de São Paulo.

make music part of your life series: Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.


Promenade. (Walking the dog). George Gershwin.

 

Bacchus on make music part of your life series: Composer Joseph Horovitz – Blue Ridge – Societat “Unión Musical” de Crevillent


Bacchus on Blue Ridge (Joseph Horovitz) – Societat “Unión Musical” de Crevillent

Bacchus on Blue Ridge (Joseph Horovitz) - Societat "Unión Musical" de Crevillent

Bacchus on Blue Ridge (Joseph Horovitz) – Societat “Unión Musical” de Crevillent

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
This article is about the British composer and conductor. For the American cultural historian, see Joseph Horowitz.

Joseph Horovitz (born 26 May 1926 in Vienna, Austria) is a British composer and conductor.

Biography

Horovitz’s Jewish family emigrated to England in 1938 to escape the Nazis. He studied music and modern languages at New College, Oxford, and later attended the Royal College of Music in London, studying composition with Gordon Jacob. He then undertook a year of further study with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. His musical career began in 1950, when he became music director at the Bristol Old Vic. He was subsequently active as a conductor of ballet and opera, and toured Europe and the United States.

Horovitz married Anna in 1956, shortly after coaching at the bi-centenary celebration for Mozart and Glyndeborne. They honeymooned in Majorca, staying in Paguera and visiting Valldemossa. He later used these two names for two clarinet pieces, based on Spanish folk-tunes he had heard there.

Horovitz has been Professor of Composition at the Royal College of Music since 1961, and a Council Member of the Composers’ Guild of Great Britain since 1970. Between 1969 and 1996 he belonged to the board of the Performing Rights Society. His works include 16 ballets, including Alice in Wonderland (1953), 2 one-act operas (The Dumb Wife, libretto Peter Shaffer; Gentlemen’s Island, libretto Gordon Snell), and concertos for violin, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, euphonium, tuba and percussion, as well as a popular and often performed jazz concerto for harpsichord or piano.

A large number of his works have been written for wind orchestra and brass band. In 1959, he was awarded the Commonwealth Medal, and since then he has received many other awards for his compositions. His music for television has included Lillie, Rumpole of the Bailey, The Search for the Nile, The Fight Against Slavery, Wessex Tales and Partners in Crime.

Works

Orchestral Works

  • 1948 Concertante for Clarinet and Strings
  • 1963 Trumpet Concerto
  • 1971 Sinfonietta for Light Orchestra
  • 1972 Horizon Overture
  • 1973 Valse
  • 1976 Bassoon Concerto
  • 1977 Jubilee Toy Symphony
  • 1993 Oboe Concerto

Works for Wind Orchestra and Brass Band

  • 1964 Three Pieces From Music Hall Suite for brass band
  • 1970 Sinfonietta for brass band
    • 1. Allegro
    • 2. Lento moderato
    • 3. Con brio
  • 1972 Euphonium Concerto for euphonium and wind orchestra1975 The Dong with a Luminous Nose for brass band
    • 1. Moderato
    • 2. Lento
    • 3. Con moto
  • 1977 Samson for baritone, mixed chorus and brass band
  • 1983 Ballet for Band for brass band
  • 1984 Bacchus on Blue Ridge: Divertimento for wind orchestra
    • 1. Moderato
    • 2. Blues
    • 3. Vivo
  • 1985 Concertino Classico for 2 cornets (or trumpets) and brass band
    • 1. Con brio
    • 2. Larghetto
    • 3. Allegro rustico
  • 1991 Fete Galante for wind orchestra
    • 1. Pavane
    • 2. Menuet
    • 3. Bourée des masques
  • 1992 Dance SuiteAd Astra
    • 1. Allegro
    • 2. Andantino
    • 3. Vivace
  • Commedia Dell’Arte
  • Lillie Theme
  • Theme and Co-Operation for brass band
  • Tuba Concerto for tuba und brass bandWind-Harp
    • 1. Allegro
    • 2. Andante
    • 3. Con Moto

Film scores

Other works

  • 1952 Les Femmes d’Alger: Ballet in one act
  • 1953 The Dumb Wife: Comic opera in one act
  • 1953 Alice in Wonderland: Ballet in two acts
  • 1958 Concerto for Dancers: Ballet in one act
  • 1958 Gentleman’s Island (libretto by Gordon Snell) in English or German for tenor, baritone and chamber orchestra
  • 1961 Horrortorio (words by Alistair Sampson from a scenario by Maurice Richardson) for soloists, chorus and orchestra. It was performed at the Hoffnung Astronautical Musical Festival
  • 1962 Fantasia on a Theme of Couperin for wind nonet
  • 1965 Let’s Make a Ballet: Ballet in one act
  • 1970 Captain Noah and his Floating Zoo: Cantata (text by Michael Flanders) for mixed chorus with piano, double bass and percussion
  • 1970 Lady Macbeth Scena for mezzo-soprano and piano
  • 1975 Summer Sunday: a comical-tragical-ecological Pastoral for mixed choir and piano
  • 1980 Miss Carter Wore Pink: Ballet in one act

Chamber Music

  • 1964 Music Hall Suite for brass quintet1976 Brass Polka for brass quartet
    • 1. Soubrette Song
    • 2. Trick-cyclists
    • 3. Adagio-team
    • 4. Soft shoe shuffle
    • 5. Les Girls
  • 1969 String Quartet No. 5
  • Sonatina, op. 3 for oboe and piano
  • Quartet for oboe and strings, op. 18
  • Ghetto Song for solo guitar
  • 1981 Sonatina For Clarinet and Piano
    • 1. Allegro calmato
    • 2. Lento quasi Andante
    • 3. Con brio

 

this day in the yesteryear: Battle of Waterloo: Napoleon’s Last Battle (1815)


Battle of Waterloo: Napoleon’s Last Battle (1815)

After returning from exile at Elba, Napoleon reinstalled himself on the throne of France. As he traveled to Paris to take power, a coalition of European powers organized against him. On June 18, Napoleon began a direct offensive against British forces, but the British held the line until Prussian troops arrived, marking a turning point in the battle. Routed, the French retreated, and Napoleon left the field and signed his second abdication. To what continent did he allegedly try to escape? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Bloomsday


Bloomsday

James Joyce‘s novel Ulysses describes the events of a single day in Dublin: June 16, 1904. First published in Paris in 1922, Ulysses caused an uproar when it finally did appear in Ireland. But since 1954, Bloomsday—named after the novel’s main character, Leopold Bloom—has been a Joycean feast day, observed with a number of events throughout Dublin that commemorate its illustrious author and the lives of his characters. There is a ritual pilgrimage along the path followed by Bloom, public readings from the novel, costume parties, and parades. More…

this day in the yesteryear: France’s Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle Founded (1793)


The Museum of Natural History in the Garden of...

The Museum of Natural History in the Garden of Plants ( Jardin des plantes ), in Paris (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

France’s Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle Founded (1793)

The Jardin des Plantes, the main botanical garden in France, is situated near the left bank of the river Seine in Paris and is home to the Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, France’s museum of natural history, as well as an elaborate rose garden, numerous hothouses, and a zoo. The museum is now a center for research and education. Although it was founded during the French Revolution, the museum was born out of a medicinal plant garden created by what French monarch in 1635? More… Discuss

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Love Poses Hazard on Paris Bridge


Français : Pont des Arts

Français : Pont des Arts (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Love Poses Hazard on Paris Bridge

Paris is widely regarded as the romance capital of the world, and perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than its Pont des Arts footbridge spanning the Seine. The bridge has, in recent years, become a pilgrimage site for couples from all over the world, who have taken to leaving padlocks inscribed with their initials on the bridge’s fencing and tossing away the keys into the waters below to symbolize their enduring love for one another. Romantic as the gesture is, it has also proved to be quite destructive. Recently, a metal grill laden with “love locks” collapsed onto the bridge’s walkway. No one was hurt, but the incident highlights the danger of this seemingly innocuous practice. More… Discuss

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historic musical moments: Amédée-Ernest Chausson – Poeme for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 25 ( State Symphony Orchestra – Kyrill Kondrashin, David Oistrakh – violin)


Amédée-Ernest Chausson – Poeme for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 25

State Symphony Orchestra – Kyrill Kondrashin, David Oistrakh – violin
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ernest Chausson, cabinet card photo by P. Frois, Biarritz (France), ca. 1885, Bibliothèque nationale de France
Amédée-Ernest Chausson (French: [ʃosɔ̃]; 20 January 1855 – 10 June 1899) was a French romantic composer who died just as his career was beginning to flourish.

Life

Ernest Chausson was born in Paris into a prosperous bourgeois family. His father made his fortune assisting Baron Haussmann in the redevelopment of Paris in the 1850s. To please his father, Chausson studied law and was appointed a barrister for the Court of Appeals, but had little or no interest in the profession. He frequented the Paris salons, where he met celebrities such as Henri Fantin-Latour, Odilon Redon, and Vincent d’Indy.

Before deciding on a musical career, he dabbled in writing and drawing.

Chausson page-turning for Debussy, Luzancy, 1893

In October 1879, at the age of 25, he began attending the composition classes of the opera composer Jules Massenet at the Paris Conservatoire; Massenet came to regard him as ‘an exceptional person and a true artist’. Chausson had already composed some piano pieces and songs. Nevertheless, the earliest manuscripts that have been preserved are those corrected by Massenet. At the Paris Conservatoire, Chausson also studied with César Franck. Chausson interrupted his studies in 1881, after a failed attempt to win the Prix de Rome. [1] During 1882 and 1883, Chausson, who enjoyed travel, visited Bayreuth to hear the operas of Wagner. On the first of these journeys, Chausson went with d’Indy for the premiere of Wagner’s Parsifal, and on the second trip he went with his new spouse Jeanne Escudier (1862-1936), with whom he was to have five children.

From 1886 until his death in 1899, Chausson was secretary of the Société Nationale de Musique. In his own home (22 Boulevard de Courcelles, near Parc Monceau), he received a great many eminent artists, including the composers Henri Duparc, Gabriel Fauré, Claude Debussy, and Isaac Albéniz, the poet Mallarmé, the Russian novelist Turgenev, and the impressionist painter Monet. Chausson also assembled an important collection of paintings

Death

Chausson’s tomb, Père Lachaise, Paris

When only 44 years old,

Chausson died while staying at one of his country retreats, the Château de Mioussets, in Limay, Yvelines. Riding his bicycle downhill, Chausson hit a brick wall and died instantly. The exact circumstances remain unclear; although apparently a freak accident, there has been the suggestion of suicide, as Chausson had been suffering from depression for some time. This suicide theory was propounded by Debussy’s biographer Edward Lockspeiser,[1] but has been firmly rejected more recently by Chausson’s own biographer Ralph Scott Grover.[2]

Chausson was buried in Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, his funeral attended by many leading figures of the arts, including Duparc, Fauré, Albeniz, Redon, Edgar Degas, Auguste Rodin, Henri de Régnier, Pierre Louÿs, and Debussy, although his friendship with Debussy had ended abruptly five years earlier following his disapproval of Debussy’s promiscuity.[3][4]

Eponymy

A small park, Square Ernest Chausson, in the 17th arrondissement of Paris is named in his honour.

Music

Ernest Chausson, photograph by Guy & Mockel, Paris, ca. 1897, Bibliothèque nationale de France.

The creative work of Chausson is commonly divided into three periods. In the first, which was dominated by Massenet, the composer exhibits primarily fluid and elegant melodies. The second period, dating from 1886, is marked by a more dramatic character, deriving partly from Chausson’s contacts with the artistic milieux in which he moved. From his father’s death in 1894 dates the beginning of his third period, during which he was especially influenced by his reading of the symbolist poets and Russian literature, particularly Turgenev, Dostoyevsky, and Tolstoy.

Chausson’s work is deeply individual, but it does reflect some technical influences of both Wagner and his other musical hero Franck. Stylistic traces of Massenet and even Brahms can be detected sometimes. In general, Chausson’s compositional idiom bridges the gap between the ripe Romanticism of Massenet and Franck and the more introverted Impressionism of Debussy.

Several delicate and admirable songs came from Chausson’s pen. He completed one opera, Le roi Arthus (King Arthur). His orchestral output was small, but significant. It includes the symphonic poem Viviane; the Symphony in B-flat, his sole symphony; Poème for violin and orchestra, an important piece in the violin repertoire; and the dramatic, and haunting, song-cycle Poème de l’amour et de la mer.

Chausson is believed to be the first composer to use the celesta. He employed that instrument in December 1888 in his incidental music, written for a small orchestra, for La tempête, a French translation by Maurice Bouchor of Shakespeare‘s The Tempest.[5]

Not at all prolific, Chausson left behind only 39 opus-numbered pieces. Musical creation for him always proved to be a long, painful struggle. However, the quality and originality of his compositions are consistently high, and they continue to make occasional appearances on programs of leading singers, chamber music ensembles and orchestras.

“There are moments when I feel myself driven by a kind of feverish instinct, as if I had the presentiment of being unable to attain my goal, or of attaining it too late.” Ernest Chausson

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great compositions/performances: Erik Satie – 3 Gymnopedies (Ciccolini) video from Rene Clair – Entr’acte (1924)


Erik Satie – 3 Gymnopedies

(piano:  Aldo Ciccolini)

Erik Satie – 3 Gymnopedies
piano: Aldo Ciccolini
1. lent et douloureux 0:00
2. lent et triste 3:05
3. lent et grave 5:30

video from Rene Clair – Entr’acte (1924)

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Yo-Yo Ma


Yo-Yo Ma

World-famous American cellist Yo-Yo Ma was born in France to Chinese parents in 1955. A musical prodigy, he gave a public recital in Paris at age six and his first performance at Carnegie Hall at age nine. He later attended the prestigious Julliard School of Music and ascended rapidly to the highest rank of international soloists, winning the Avery Fisher Prize in 1978. What became of a centuries-old cello valued at $2.5 million that Ma accidentally left in a New York City taxi in 1999? More… Discuss

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make music part of life series: Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): “Bridal Procession” piano roll


Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): “Bridal Procession” piano roll

 

Tomb of Edvard Grieg near Troldhaugen in Norway.

Tomb of Edvard Grieg near Troldhaugen in Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Edvard Grieg was much in demand as a soloist in the latter part of his life. His many short works for piano solo, as well as his famous concerto, led to his music being well known and loved across Europe. He left a number of piano rolls, but more importantly in 1903 he recorded a few records for the G&T company in Paris. These show his spirited and fresh approach to performing his own works. His style is flexible, charming, by turns sometimes capricious, but always controlled within the bounds of impeccable taste and musical understanding.

Some stimulating comparisons and distinctions can be made between Grieg’s own performances and those of Arthur de Greef (whose playing Grieg very much liked), as well recordings by other pianists from the first few decades of the 20th century.

I rather feel that Grieg’s own way with is own works is generally a much better way than we hear them performed now, and which was already being eroded by other younger pianists even when these records were made.

This recording is of a Welte piano roll made by Grieg in 1906. It makes for good comparison with his acoustic recording of 1903.

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this day in the yesteryear: D-Day: The Allies Land on Normandy Beaches (1944)


D-Day: The Allies Land on Normandy Beaches (1944)

The Battle of Normandy during World War II was fought between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allied armies. More than 156,000 troops crossed the English Channel during the initial invasion, which remains the largest amphibious landing in history. The campaign continued for more than two months and concluded with the liberation of Paris. Of the Allies’ five landing points, Omaha Beach proved to be the most deadly. How many troops were killed there that day? More… Discuss

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great compositions/performances: Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21


Isaac Stern – Edouard Lalo – Symphonie Espagnole, Op.21

Eugene Ormandy conducting Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra
I. Allegro non troppo
II. Scherzando
III. Intermezzo
IV. Andante
V. Rondo

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The Mona Lisa


The Mona Lisa

One of the most famous paintings in history, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa can be seen at the Louvre museum in Paris, where it is on permanent display. The work’s name was not chosen by the artist; rather, it was derived from a posthumously published biography of da Vinci, which identifies the subject as Lisa, wife of a wealthy Florentine businessman. Still, her identity remains the subject of debate, and theories regarding the owner of the enigmatic smile abound. What are some of them? More… Discuss

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Extra, Extra, Extra! great compositions/performances: Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa


Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa

Watch at your own risk – I warned you :)
Live from Paris, Salle Gaveau , May 21, 2014.
Sonata Op 31 No.2 D Minor
Piano Pleyel 1892 provided by Regie Pianos
http://www.regiepianos.com/pianos_fic…

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make music part of your life series: Philippe Gaubert : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano


Philippe Gaubert : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano

Philippe Gaubert(1879-1941) : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano. / Keiji Katsumata, Fl.1st ; Tetsuo Kugai, Fl.2nd ; Mariko Kaneda, Piano
“Concert Salon de musique des raisins secs”
12 Aug. 2011, The Luteran Ichigaya Center, Tokyo
「第4回レーズン派の音楽館演奏会」~フィリップ・ゴーベール : 2本のフルートとピアノの為のギリシャ風嬉遊曲 /
勝俣敬二(fl)、陸井鉄男(fl)、金田真理子(Pf)
2011年8月12日、ルーテル市ヶ谷センター(東京)

Philippe Gaubert

Cover of Philippe Gaubert

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philippe Gaubert (5 July 1879 – 8 July 1941) was a French musician who was a distinguished performer on the flute, a respected conductor, and a composer, primarily for the flute.

Gaubert was born in Cahors in Southwest France. He became one of the most prominent French musicians between the two World Wars. After a prominent career as a flautist with the Paris Opéra, he was appointed in 1919, at the age of forty, to three positions that placed him at the very center of French musical life:

In 1907 he participated in the first performance of Maurice Ravel‘s Introduction and Allegro for harp, flute, clarinet and string quartet. Among his recordings as conductor, one that he made of Franck‘s Symphony in D Minor (with the Conservatoire forces) is particularly notable.

Gaubert’s compositions are by no means especially innovative, but his work benefited from the examples of Franck, Ravel, and Debussy. Naïla, his opera in three acts, premiered at the Paris Opéra on 7 April 1927. Three of his ballets had their first performances at that venue, as well.

During 1941, Gaubert died of a stroke while in the French capital. His friend, the journalist Jean Bouzerand, convinced the town of Cahors to create a public garden named in his honor near the river Lot in the late 1930s. When Gaubert was still alive, Albert Roussel dedicated the movement ‘Monsieur de la Péjaudie’ in his piece ‘Joueurs de Flûte‘ to him.

Selected works

Chamber music
  • 3 Aquarelles, for flute, cello and piano
  • Ballade, for flute and piano
  • Ballade for viola and piano (1938)
  • Berceuse, for flute and piano
  • Cantabile et Scherzetto, for cornet and piano (1909)
  • Divertissement Grec, for 2 flutes and harp
  • 2 Esquisses, for flute and piano
  • Fantaisie for clarinet & piano
  • Fantaisie, for flute and piano
  • Gavotte en rondeau (after Lully’s Les ballets du roi), for flute and piano
  • Madrigal, for flute and piano
  • Morceau Symphonique, for trombone and piano
  • Médailles antiques, for flute, violin and piano
  • Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando, for flute and piano
  • Pièce Romantique, for flute, cello, and piano
  • Romance, for flute and piano (1905)
  • Romance, for flute and piano (1908)
  • Siciliene, for flute and piano
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.1
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.2
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.3
  • Sonatine, for flute and piano
  • Suite, for flute and piano
  • Sur l’eau, for flute and piano
  • Tarantelle, for flute, oboe and piano
  • Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando for flute & piano
Vocal
  • Soir paien, for voice, flute and piano
  • Vocalise in form of Barcarolle, for voice and piano
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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Janos Starker plays Brahms Cello sonata no 1 in E minor op 38


Cello : Janos Starker
Piano :Gyorgy Sebok
recorded in Paris 1959
I Allegro non troppo 0:00
II Allegretto quasi menuetto 13:35
III Allegro 19:09

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 17 “Tempest” Valentina Lisitsa 3. Allegretto


Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 17 “Tempest” Valentina Lisitsa 3. Allegretto

Recorded during pre-concert rehearsal at Torroella de Montgri April 17 2014 .
Your next best chance to hear it live :
Paris, May 21, 2014 , Salle Gaveau
http://www.sallegaveau.com/la-saison/…

Special thanks to http://www.jorquerapianos.com/ for one of the best pianos I ever encountered

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: George Gershwin – An American in Paris ( This was performed in 1959 by the New York Philharmonic, conducted by Leonard Bernstein.)


George GershwinAn American in Paris ( This was performed in 1959 by the New York Philharmonic, conducted by Leonard Bernstein.)

An American in Paris is a symphonic tone poem by the American composer George Gershwin, written in 1928. Inspired by the time Gershwin had spent in Paris, it evokes the sights and energy of the French capital in the 1920s. It is one of Gershwin’s best-known compositions.
Gershwin composed the piece on commission from the New York Philharmonic. He also did the orchestration (he did not orchestrate his musicals). Gershwin scored An American in Paris for the standard instruments of the symphony orchestra plus celesta, saxophones, and automobile horns. Gershwin brought back some Parisian taxi horns for the New York premiere of the composition, which took place on December 13, 1928 in Carnegie Hall, with Walter Damrosch conducting the New York Philharmonic.
Gershwin collaborated on the original program notes with the critic and composer Deems Taylor, noting that: “My purpose here is to portray the impression of an American visitor in Paris as he strolls about the city and listens to various street noises and absorbs the French atmosphere.” When the tone poem moves into the blues, “our American friend … has succumbed to a spasm of homesickness.” But, “nostalgia is not a fatal disease.” The American visitor “once again is an alert spectator of Parisian life” and “the street noises and French atmosphere are triumphant.”

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QUOTATION: Honore de Balzac


It is easier to be a lover than a husband for the simple reason that it is more difficult to be witty every day than to say pretty things from time to time.

Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Juan Crisostomo Arriaga – Symphony in D Major


Juan Arriaga – Symphony in D Major
00:00 I. Adagio – Allegro vivace
09:00 II. Andante
18:23 III. Minuetto
23:02 IV. Allegro con moto

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga y Balzola
Juan de Arriaga.jpg

Juan Crisóstomo Arriaga
Born January 27, 1806
Bilbao, Spain
Died January 17, 1826 (aged 19)
Paris, France
Occupation Composer
Parents Juan Simón de Arriaga

Juan Crisóstomo Jacobo Antonio de Arriaga y Balzola (January 27, 1806 – January 17, 1826) was a Spanish composer. He was nicknamed “the Spanish Mozart” after he died, because, like Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, he was both a child prodigy and an accomplished composer who died young. They also shared the same first and second baptismal names; and they shared the same birthday, January 27 (fifty years apart).

 

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Make Music Part of your Life Series: Bach Busoni Chaconne D Minor BWV 1004 Valentina Lisitsa


Bach Busoni Chaconne D Minor BWV 1004 Valentina Lisitsa

Published on May 7, 2014

Recorded during pre-concert rehearsal at Torroella de Montgri April 17 2014 .
Your next best chance to hear it live :
Paris, May 21, 2014 , Salle Gaveau
http://www.sallegaveau.com/la-saison/…

Special thanks to http://www.jorquerapianos.com/ for one of the best pianos I ever encountered

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ARTICLE: Monte Carlo


ARTICLE

Monte Carlo

Monte Carlo, a principality of Monaco, is a resort town located on the French Riviera. It is known as a playground for the rich and famous, thanks to its breathtaking scenery, fine villas, luxurious hotels, and world-famous casino—which has long been a source of intrigue. Joseph Jagger first broke the bank after discovering a bias in one of the roulette wheels in 1873, and the casino has since been featured in several James Bond films. What famous sporting events are held in Monte Carlo? More… Discuss

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: Coco Chanel Introduces Chanel No. 5 (1921)


Coco Chanel Introduces Chanel No. 5 (1921)

Chanel No. 5—one of the best-known perfumes in the world—was the first fragrance from Parisian couturier Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel. It is rumored that five was Chanel’s lucky number, and that she liked option number five best when given numbered sample scents during the development of her iconic perfume. Created at a time when “respectable” women favored the pure scents of garden flowers, No. 5 provocatively blended jasmine and a glandular secretion harvested from what cat-like animal? More… Discuss

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: THEODOR HERZL (1860)


Theodor Herzl (1860)

Herzl was the founder of modern Zionism. A journalist, he was sent to Paris to report on the Dreyfus Affair and was appalled by the vicious anti-Semitism he observed. Concluding that Jewish assimilation in Europe was impossible and that the only solution to the Jewish problem was the establishment of a Jewish national state, Herzl organized the first Zionist World Congress. At the time of his death, Herzl’s organization was considering establishing a Jewish homeland in what region of the world? More… Discuss

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JOYEUSES PAQUES!


horreur j’ai râté le début, il y a pas la musique gggrrrrrr !!!
Je vous prie de bien vouloir m’en excuser, je sais pas ce qu’il s’est passé, je l’ai fait vite ce matin parce que après pas le temps.
Ben voilà je voulais juste vous faire plaisir, pffff !!!!

Une petite Vidéo pour vous souhaiter, petits et grands de très bonne fêtes de Pâques
Soyez sage sur le chocolat et bonne chasse aux oeufs 
Prenez soin de vous
Bisous
AGNES

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants


Georges Bizet – Petite suite d’orchestre. Jeux d’enfants

La Folle Journée de Varsovie 2013, Szalone Dni Muzyki w Warszawie,
The Grand Theatre in Warsaw, Poland, September 28
Symphony Orchestra of the Tadeusz Szeligowski Music School in Lublin, Poland
Iwona Borcuch – conductor

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Great Compositions/Performances: Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11, Sergiu Celibidache conducting



Georges Enesco: Roumanian Rhapsody #1 in A Op 11
George Enescu – Rapsodia Romana nr.1
Sergiu Celibidache conducting
This is THE perfect one ! No other conductor/orchestra makes me feel it and live it like this.

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QUOTATION: W. Somerset Maugham


The common idea that success spoils people by making them vain, egotistic, and self-complacent is erroneous; on the contrary, it makes them, for the most part, humble, tolerant, and kind. Failure makes people cruel and bitter.

W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano – Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles


Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano
– Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Fauré in early middle age

The Élégie (Elegy), Op. 24, was written by the French composer Gabriel Fauré in 1880, and first published and performed in public in 1883. Originally for cello and piano, the piece was later orchestrated by Fauré. The work, in C minor, features a sad and sombre opening and climaxes with an intense, fast-paced central section, before the return of the elegiac opening theme.

Composition

In 1880, having completed his First Piano Quartet, Fauré began work on a cello sonata. It was his frequent practice to compose the slow movement of a work first, and he did so for the new sonata.[1] The completed movement was probably premiered at the salon of Camille Saint-Saëns in June 1880. The movement, like the quartet, is in the key of C minor. Whether the rest of the sonata would have been in that key is unknown: Fauré never completed it, and in January 1883 the slow movement was published as a stand-alone piece under the title Élégie.[1]

Jules Loeb, dedicatee and cellist at the premiere
Pablo Casals, who premiered the orchestral version

The first performance of the work under its new title was given at the Société Nationale de Musique in December 1883 by the composer and the cellist Jules Loeb to whom the piece is dedicated.[2][n 1] The Élégie was a great success from the outset,[1] and the conductor Édouard Colonne asked Fauré for a version for cello and orchestra. Fauré agreed, and that version was premiered at the Société Nationale in April 1901, with Pablo Casals as soloist and the composer as conductor.[2

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Vincent D’indy Symphony on a French mountain air for piano and orchestra



Pnina Salzman and the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra/ Mendi Rodan, conductor. See also her Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pnina-…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
For the asteroid named after the composer, see 11530 d’Indy.

Vincent d’Indy, ca. 1895

Vincent d’Indy (French pronunciation: ​[vɛ̃ˈsɑ̃ dɛ̃ˈdi]) (27 March 1851 – 2 December 1931) was a French composer and teacher.

Life

Paul Marie Théodore Vincent d’Indy was born in Paris into an aristocratic family of royalist and Catholic persuasion. He had piano lessons from an early age from his paternal grandmother, who passed him on to Antoine François Marmontel and Louis Diémer.[1] From the age of 14 he studied harmony with Albert Lavignac. At age 19, during the Franco-Prussian War, he enlisted in the National Guard, but returned to musical life as soon as the hostilities were over. The first of his works he heard performed was a Symphonie italienne, at an orchestral rehearsal under Jules Pasdeloup; the work was admired by Georges Bizet and Jules Massenet, with whom he had already become acquainted.[1] On the advice of Henri Duparc, he became a devoted student of César Franck at the Conservatoire de Paris. As a follower of Franck, d’Indy came to admire what he considered the standards of German symphonism.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Pnina Salzman (Hebrew: פנינה זלצמן) (February 24, 1922, Tel AvivMandate Palestine – December 16, 2006, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli classical pianist and piano pedagogue.

Salzman showed an early aptitude for the piano, and gave her first recital at the age of eight. The French pianist and teacher, Alfred Cortot, heard her play in 1932 while she was a student at Shulamit Conservatory and invited her to Paris to study. She graduated at the Ecole Normale de Musique then became a pupil of Magda Tagliaferroat the Conservatoire de Paris, where she was to win the Premier Prix de Piano in 1938, aged 16.

It was through the violinist Bronislaw Huberman that she first developed a lifelong association with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, which Huberman had founded.

In 1963 she became the first Israeli to be invited to play in the USSR and in 1994, the first Israeli pianist invited to play in China. Besides performing as a soloist, she was a member of the Israel Piano Quartet.

She was a Professor and the head of the piano department at Tel Aviv University and served on the jury of many piano competitions, including the Arthur Rubinstein,Vladimir Horowitz and Marguerite Long competitions. She taught piano to many students, including Dror ElimelechNimrod David PfefferElisha AbasIddo Bar-Shai andYossi Reshef.

Buy “Symphony on a French Mountain Air for Piano and Orchestra in G Major, Op. 25: II. Assez modéré, mais sans lenteur” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3iTuneseMusic

  • Artist
    Pnina Salzman

 

 

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ARTICLE: PETER ABELARD


Peter Abelard

Abelard was a 12th-century French philosopher and teacher whose career was derailed by a scandalous relationship with a tutee named Heloise. After a son and a secret marriage, Abelard sent Heloise to a convent to protect her from her disapproving family. In response, her uncle had Abelard castrated. Heloise became an abbess, while Abelard sought refuge as a monk. After his first theological work was burned as heretical, he established a monastery and resumed teaching. What were his last words? More… Discuss

 

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THE CHÂTEAU


The Château

Though the French word château is translated into English as “castle,” there are certain nuances that differentiate it from its English counterpart. For example, stately residences both fortified and unfortified may be châteaus, but only if they are in the countryside. Thus, the Louvre was once a château but lost the designation once urban sprawl made it a part of Paris, whereas opulent—yet rural—Versailles Palace is considered a château. What term is used for equivalent urban structures? More… Discuss

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Jean Sibelius Valse Triste from Kuolema for orchestra OP 44



Make Music Part of Your Life Series:
Jean Sibelius Valse Triste from Kuolema for orchestra OP 44

(Chamber Orchestra of Europe. Lorenza Borrani premier violine solo/Konzert meister. Conductor : Vladimir Ashkenazy Cité de la musique Paris)

 

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HERZ Henri-CAVATINE DE LA CENERENTOLA – Op.60-plays Milan JELEN.wmv


Henri Herz (Vienna, 6 January 1803 — Paris, 5 January 1888) was a pianist and composer, Austrian by birth, and French by domicile.

Herz was born Heinrich Herz in Vienna. He was Jewish by birth, although he asked the musical journalist Fétis not to mention this in the latter’s musical encyclopaedia,[1] perhaps a reflection of endemic anti-semitism in nineteenth-century French cultural circles.

As a child Herz studied with his father and in Coblenz with the organist Daniel Hünten. In 1816 he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Victor Dourlen and Anton Reicha. His brother Jacques Herz (1794-1880) was a fellow-pupil at the Conservatoire, and also became a noted pianist and teacher
A celebrated pianist, Herz traveled worldwide, including tours in Europe, Russia, South America, and in the United States of America in 1846-50, where he concertised all the way to San Francisco, California, where his performances were compared to the more extravagant manner of Leopold de Meyer, concertising in the United States during the same period (1845-47)..[2] He wrote a book about his experiences abroad, Mes voyages en Amérique (Paris: Achille Faure, 1866).[3]
Herz taught at the Conservatoire (1842-74). (Of his pupils, only Marie-Aimée Roger-Miclos (1860-1950) recorded, in the early 1900s, for Dischi Fonotipia.)
In 1842 he built the Salle des Concerts Herz on the rue de la Victoire. This was used for performances by Berlioz and Offenbach.[4] In 1851 he founded his own piano factory in Paris
Herz composed many pieces including eight piano concertos. Among his many musical works, he was involved with the composition of Hexaméron (the fourth variation on Bellini’s theme is his). Many however found his piano style showy and shallow, and Robert Schumann was amongst those who criticized it.

 

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