Tag Archives: Piano

Schumann: Études Symphoniques, Op. 13 (Emil Gilels, piano): great compositions/performances


Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier: great compositions/performances



From   glemoine14  glemoine14

Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791):Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E-flat major, “Kegelstatt”, K. 498 (1786)
Trio pour clarinette, alto et piano en Mi bémol majeur
I      Andante;
II    Menuetto;
III  Rondo: Allegretto

Portal: clarinet / clarinette
Pasquier: viola / alto
Pennetier: piano

today’s birthday: James Lick (1796)


James Lick (1796)

A piano maker by training, Lick spent many years in South America before returning to the US in 1848. He settled in San Francisco, where he soon abandoned the piano-making trade in favor of real estate. Shortly after his arrival, gold was discovered in the region, and Lick made a fortune in the housing boom that followed. The wealthiest man in California at the time of his death, he left most of his estate to social and scientific causes. Under what scientific instrument is he buried? More… Discuss

Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major: great compositions/performances


 FROM:

Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major

 

Bartok Roumanian Dances played by Rosemary Thomas (make music part of your life series)


Bartok Roumanian Dances played by Rosemary Thomas

Bartok Roumanian Dances Jocuri Poporale Romanesti by Bela Bartok
1. Jocul cu bata – Der Tanz mit dem Stabe
2. Braul
3. Pe Loc -Der Stampfe
4. Buciumeana -Tanz aus Butschum
5. Poarga ”romanesca“- Romanische “Polka”
6. Manuntelul- Schnell-Tanz

Recorded by Rosemary Thomas Welsh pianist with Roland CD 2 CD recorder and Yamaha piano on 9/01/2012 at home in Tredegar , Gwent U.K

 

Rosemary Thomas: Mendelssohn – Song Without Words – Sweet Remembrance Op. 19 No. 1 (make music part of your life series)


Rosemary Thomas: Mendelssohn – Song Without Words – Sweet Remembrance Op. 19 No. 1

 

Prokofiev – Piano sonata n°6 – Richter Locarno 1966 (great compositions/performances)


Prokofiev – Piano sonata n°6 – Richter Locarno 1966

Sergei Prokofiev:
Piano sonata n°6 op.82

I. Allegro moderato 0:00
II. Allegretto 8:55
III. Tempo di valzer lentissimo 12:45
IV. Vivace 19:07

Sviatoslav Richter
Live recording, Locarno, 18.IX.1966

make music part of your life series: Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier


Mozart: Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano, K.498 – Portal, Pasquier, Pennetier

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): Trio for Clarinet, Viola and Piano in E-flat major, “Kegelstatt”, K. 498 (1786)
Trio pour clarinette, alto et piano en Mi bémol majeur:
I     Andante;
II   Menuetto;
III Rondo: Allegretto

Portal: clarinet / clarinette
Pasquier: viola / alto
Pennetier: piano

 

make music part of your life series: Sergei Rachmaninoff – Études-Tableaux, Op. 39


Sergei RachmaninoffÉtudes-Tableaux, Op. 39

N. Lugansky, piano

Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the U...

Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and became an American citizen shortly before his death. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

No. 1, in C minor
No. 2, in A minor
No. 3, in F sharp minor
No. 4, in B minor
No. 5, in E flat minor
No. 6, in A minor
No. 7, in C minor
No. 8, in D minor
No. 9, in D major

 

 

make music part of your life series: Vittorio Monti – Csardas by Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet


make music part of your life series: Vittorio Monti – Csardas by Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet

Vittorio Monti : “Csardas”, “Czardas” for violin and piano
Clara Cernat, violin
Thierry Huillet, piano
Piano part : Thierry Huillet’s improvisations
Video directed by Nicolas KAUFFMANN
Sound engineer : Jérôme HALLAY

Links:

http://www.pianoviolon.com/

Official Website of Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet
http://www.musique21.com/
Official Website of Thierry Huillet
All CDs available on http://musique21.com/boutique-eng/
http://www.pianoviolon.com/

Official Website of Clara Cernat and Thierry Huillet
http://www.musique21.com/
Official Website of Thierry Huillet musique21

Vittorio Monti

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Vittorio Monti (6 January 1868 – 20 June 1922) was an Italian composer, violinist, mandolinist and conductor. His most famous work is his Csárdás, written around 1904 and played by almost every gypsy orchestra.

Monti was born in Naples, where he studied violin and composition at the Conservatorio di San Pietro a Majella. Around 1900 he received an assignment as the conductor for the Lamoureux Orchestra in Paris, where he wrote several ballets and operettas, for example, Noël de Pierrot. He also wrote a method for mandolin Petite Méthode pour Mandoline, 98049, in which he included some of his own works, Perle Brillante, Dans Una Gondola, and Au Petit Jour. There were also works by F. Paolo Tosti.[1]

fabulous musical moments: Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 – Amadeus Quartet


Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 – Amadeus Quartet

In this 1969 recording, Christoph Eschenbach and members of the Amadeus Quartet — Norbert Brainin, violin; Peter Schidlof, viola; and Martin Lovett, cello — perform the Beethoven Piano quartet in C major, WoO 36 No. 3. I recorded this video from a cassette I purchased back in the early 1970s, issued on the Deutsche Grammophon label (serial number 3335 174-10).

Allegro vivace (0:08)
Adagio con espressione (6:10)
Rondo: Allegro (12:57)

More Beethoven:

-Beethoven / Gilels / Szell, 1968: Piano Concerto in G major, Op. 58 – Complete – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXoxpW…
-Leonid Hambro, 1970: “Happy Birthday Dear Ludwig” – Variations in The Style of Beethoven – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-Uga3…
-Fur Elise – Wilhelm Kempff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9DSjo…
-Fur Elise – Alicia de Larrocha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFMUEe…
-Beethoven / Artur Balsam, 1952: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61a – Movement 1 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKKCGw…
-David Oistrakh: Romance No. 2 in F major for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 50: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz4JEY…-
-Wilhelm Backhaus: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – London, 1950s, Karl Böhm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRSTwj…
-Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37 (Rondo) Beethoven – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeW79S…
-Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C major, Op. 15 (Rondo) Beethoven – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojL4Kx…
-Emil Gilels, 1983, Beethoven Klaviersonate Nr. 4 Es-dur, Op. 7 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEfGQ1…
-Stephen Kovacevich, 1975: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37, Movement 3 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYBM5z…
-Beethoven / Istomin-Stern-Rose Trio: Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 – Archduke (Allegro), 1966: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQAswV…
-Solomon, 1958: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – Rondo – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_Vi8m…
-Friedrich Gulda, 1954: Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1 (1) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RwDZs…
-Christoph Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBp3jh…
-Artur Balsam: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61 – Rondo, 1950s – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD8ul2…

Fabulous musical moments: Kreisler plays Kreisler – Tambourin chinois


Kreisler plays Kreisler – Tambourin chinois

Fritz Kreisler playing his Tambourin Chinois, op. 3 in 1936. A virtuoso piece with a touch of Oriental ambience.
The pianist is Franz Rupp.

George Harrison and Eric Clapton – While my guitar gently weeps


George Harrison and Eric ClaptonWhile my guitar gently weeps

Concert conducted for The Princes Trust Concert 1987.
With the participation of: George Harrison: Guitar and voice
Eric Clapton: Guitar 
Jeff Lyne: Guitar
Phil Collins: drums
Ringo Starr: drums
Ray Cooper: Percusion
Mark King:  Bajo
Elton John : Piano
Jool Holland: Piano

great compsitions/performances: Sviatoslav Richter – Beethoven – Piano Sonata No 9 in E major, Op 14


Sviatoslav Richter – Beethoven – Piano Sonata No 9 in E major, Op 14

00:00 Allegro
06:39 Allegretto. Maggiore
12:53 Rondo. Allegro comodo

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

make music part of your life series: JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano


JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano

I Allegro moderato
II Poco adagio
III Moderato innocente
Paolo Restani, piano
Orchestre Philharmonique de Nice
Marco Guidarini, conductor

make music part of your life: Alfred Brendel, Plays Ludwig van Beethoven’s – Rondo in G major Op. 51 No. 2


Ludwig van Beethoven – Rondo in G major Op. 51 No. 2

Alfred Brendel, Piano

Fabulous performances: Valentina Lisitsa Plays Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto #2 in c Op.18


Valentina Lisitsa – Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto Nº 3 in D Minor, Op.30 (Part 1 of 5)

 Orquesta de la Ciudad de los Reyes
Director: Pablo Sabat
 
Auditorio del Colegio Santa Ursula
Lima – Peru, 10 Diciembre 2009

great compositions/performances: Franz Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780)


great compositions/performances:  Franz Schubert: 6 Moments Musical Op.94 (D780)

great compositions/performances - Shubert - 6 Moments Musicaux Op. 94, D790 Wilhelm Bachaus piano
great compositions/performances – Shubert – 6 Moments Musicaux Op. 94, D790 Wilhelm Bachaus piano (click to enlarge)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
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0:00
Performed by Raymond Smullyan

Problems playing this file? See media help.

Six moments musicaux, D 780 (Op. 94) is a collection of six short pieces for solo piano composed by Franz Schubert. The movements are as follows:

  1. Moderato in C major
  2. Andantino in A-flat major
  3. Allegro moderato in F minor
  4. Moderato in C-sharp minor
  5. Allegro vivace in F minor
  6. Allegretto in A-flat major

Along with the Impromptus, they are among the most frequently played of all Schubert’s piano music, and have been recorded many times. No. 3 in F minor has been arranged by Leopold Godowsky and others.

It has been said that Schubert was deeply influenced in writing these pieces by the Impromptus, Op. 7, of Jan Václav Voříšek (1822).[1][2]

They were published by Leidesdorf in Vienna in 1828, under the title “Six Momens [sic] musicals [sic]“. The correct French forms are now usually used – moments (instead of momens), and musicaux (instead of musicals). The sixth number was published in 1824 in a Christmas album under the title Les plaintes d’un troubadour.[2]

great compositions/performances: Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nº 15 en Re mayor Opus 28 Pastoral. Daniel Barenboim, piano


Beethoven, Sonata para piano Nr. 15 en Re mayor Opus 28 Pastoral. Daniel Barenboim, piano

greaat compositions/performances: Beethoven's Sonata for piano Nr. 15 in D major Op. 28 "Pastorale"Daniel Barenboim -piano

great compositions/performances: Beethoven’s Sonata for piano Nr. 15 in D major Op. 28 “Pastorale“Daniel Barenboim -piano

word: extemporaneous


extemporaneous 

Definition: (adjective) Carried out or performed with little or no preparation.
Synonyms: impromptu, off-the-cuff, offhand, unrehearsed, ad-lib
Usage: Though she had not practiced for some time, Mary’s extemporaneous piano recital wowed her dinner guests. Discuss.

great compositions/performances: Erik Satie – 3 Gymnopedies (Ciccolini) video from Rene Clair – Entr’acte (1924)


Erik Satie – 3 Gymnopedies

(piano:  Aldo Ciccolini)

Erik Satie – 3 Gymnopedies
piano: Aldo Ciccolini
1. lent et douloureux 0:00
2. lent et triste 3:05
3. lent et grave 5:30

video from Rene Clair – Entr’acte (1924)

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great compositions/performances: Horowitz: Scriabin Etude for piano in minor, Op. 2/1 & Etude for piano in D minor, Op. 8/12


Horowitz: Horowitz in Moscow
7. Alexander Scriabin: Etude for piano in C sharp minor, Op. 2/1
8. Alexander Scriabin: Etude for piano in D sharp minor, Op. 8/12

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make music part of life series: Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): “Bridal Procession” piano roll


Edvard Grieg (1843-1907): “Bridal Procession” piano roll

 

Tomb of Edvard Grieg near Troldhaugen in Norway.

Tomb of Edvard Grieg near Troldhaugen in Norway. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Edvard Grieg was much in demand as a soloist in the latter part of his life. His many short works for piano solo, as well as his famous concerto, led to his music being well known and loved across Europe. He left a number of piano rolls, but more importantly in 1903 he recorded a few records for the G&T company in Paris. These show his spirited and fresh approach to performing his own works. His style is flexible, charming, by turns sometimes capricious, but always controlled within the bounds of impeccable taste and musical understanding.

Some stimulating comparisons and distinctions can be made between Grieg’s own performances and those of Arthur de Greef (whose playing Grieg very much liked), as well recordings by other pianists from the first few decades of the 20th century.

I rather feel that Grieg’s own way with is own works is generally a much better way than we hear them performed now, and which was already being eroded by other younger pianists even when these records were made.

This recording is of a Welte piano roll made by Grieg in 1906. It makes for good comparison with his acoustic recording of 1903.

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make music part of your life series: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7


Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7

 

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Extra, Extra, Extra! great compositions/performances: Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa


Exploding Beethoven: Tempest Sonata Live from Paris Valentina Lisitsa

Watch at your own risk – I warned you :)
Live from Paris, Salle Gaveau , May 21, 2014.
Sonata Op 31 No.2 D Minor
Piano Pleyel 1892 provided by Regie Pianos
http://www.regiepianos.com/pianos_fic…

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make music part of your life series: Philippe Gaubert : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano


Philippe Gaubert : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano

Philippe Gaubert(1879-1941) : Divertissement Grec pour Deux Flûtes avec Accompagnement de Piano. / Keiji Katsumata, Fl.1st ; Tetsuo Kugai, Fl.2nd ; Mariko Kaneda, Piano
“Concert Salon de musique des raisins secs”
12 Aug. 2011, The Luteran Ichigaya Center, Tokyo
「第4回レーズン派の音楽館演奏会」~フィリップ・ゴーベール : 2本のフルートとピアノの為のギリシャ風嬉遊曲 /
勝俣敬二(fl)、陸井鉄男(fl)、金田真理子(Pf)
2011年8月12日、ルーテル市ヶ谷センター(東京)

Philippe Gaubert

Cover of Philippe Gaubert

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Philippe Gaubert (5 July 1879 – 8 July 1941) was a French musician who was a distinguished performer on the flute, a respected conductor, and a composer, primarily for the flute.

Gaubert was born in Cahors in Southwest France. He became one of the most prominent French musicians between the two World Wars. After a prominent career as a flautist with the Paris Opéra, he was appointed in 1919, at the age of forty, to three positions that placed him at the very center of French musical life:

In 1907 he participated in the first performance of Maurice Ravel‘s Introduction and Allegro for harp, flute, clarinet and string quartet. Among his recordings as conductor, one that he made of Franck‘s Symphony in D Minor (with the Conservatoire forces) is particularly notable.

Gaubert’s compositions are by no means especially innovative, but his work benefited from the examples of Franck, Ravel, and Debussy. Naïla, his opera in three acts, premiered at the Paris Opéra on 7 April 1927. Three of his ballets had their first performances at that venue, as well.

During 1941, Gaubert died of a stroke while in the French capital. His friend, the journalist Jean Bouzerand, convinced the town of Cahors to create a public garden named in his honor near the river Lot in the late 1930s. When Gaubert was still alive, Albert Roussel dedicated the movement ‘Monsieur de la Péjaudie’ in his piece ‘Joueurs de Flûte‘ to him.

Selected works

Chamber music
  • 3 Aquarelles, for flute, cello and piano
  • Ballade, for flute and piano
  • Ballade for viola and piano (1938)
  • Berceuse, for flute and piano
  • Cantabile et Scherzetto, for cornet and piano (1909)
  • Divertissement Grec, for 2 flutes and harp
  • 2 Esquisses, for flute and piano
  • Fantaisie for clarinet & piano
  • Fantaisie, for flute and piano
  • Gavotte en rondeau (after Lully’s Les ballets du roi), for flute and piano
  • Madrigal, for flute and piano
  • Morceau Symphonique, for trombone and piano
  • Médailles antiques, for flute, violin and piano
  • Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando, for flute and piano
  • Pièce Romantique, for flute, cello, and piano
  • Romance, for flute and piano (1905)
  • Romance, for flute and piano (1908)
  • Siciliene, for flute and piano
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.1
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.2
  • Sonata for Flute and Piano, No.3
  • Sonatine, for flute and piano
  • Suite, for flute and piano
  • Sur l’eau, for flute and piano
  • Tarantelle, for flute, oboe and piano
  • Nocturne et Allegro Scherzando for flute & piano
Vocal
  • Soir paien, for voice, flute and piano
  • Vocalise in form of Barcarolle, for voice and piano
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great compositions/performances:Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575


Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in B Major D575

Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in B Major D575:
Mvt.I: Allegro ma non troppo 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 08:04
Mvt.III: Scherzo. Allegretto 13:49
Mvt.IV: Allegro giusto 19:25

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

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make music part of your life series: Kayla Wong Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Part 4


Kayla Wong Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 2 Part 4

http://www.kaylawong.net

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GreatCompositions/Performances: Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]


Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]

- Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]
- http://www.entre88teclas.es/atdr/robe…

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann Kreisleriana op.16 – Phantasien für das Pianoforte – Enrica Ciccarelli


Schumann Kreisleriana op.16 – Phantasien für das Pianoforte – Enrica Ciccarelli

Robert Schumann Kreisleriana op.16 Phantasien für das Pianoforte – Enrica Ciccarelli

Download Enrica’s cd “Visioni”: http://www.amazon.it/dp/B00CXL39U2

Buy “visioni” on GooglePlay: https://play.google.com/store/music/a…

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PianistaEnric…

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/EnricaPianist

Website: http://www.enricaciccarelli.com

Sfem Classics on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/sfemclassic

Listen to all the extracts from “Visioni”: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?featu…

SFEM and Enrica Ciccarelli were originally brought together by a shared passion for music and uncompromising quality: this is the basis of their artistic marriage.

The resulting project, involving SFEM’s Team and italian Pianist Enrica Ciccarelli kicked off in 2011 and aims to reissue some of Enrica’s earlier recordings, as well as new ones, especially arranged for this series and coproduced by Musicassoluta.

Since May 2013, when the project was officially presented at La Scala Shop in Milan, the first two recordings are available in shops and on Amazon.

This is an extrat from “Visioni”.
The two sections of this cd are entirely different and yet connected.

Schumann’s Kreisleriana is the musical expression of a delirious world of madness and desperate obsessions, hallucinations and shattered emotions. Imprisoned by the sheer force of its own genius, the composer’s mind swings wildly between opposite extremes, at times feverish or resigned, dreamy or terrified, tormented by nightmarish visions.

Mussorgsky‘s Pictures at an Exhibition are not as frightening or intimidating and yet they are vivid images that come to life in music These images, though, are more firmly rooted in the real world. Hartmann’s drawings provided the inspiration for this collection: Mussorgsky shaped them into sound, conjuring up an exhibition of musical portraits. Visual perceptions occasion intimate reflections on life, death and art.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa


Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa Haskil Argerich Horowitz Bosendorfer

 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood“), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen

Movements
Title Key Play
1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen
Of Foreign Lands and Peoples
G major
 
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2. Kuriose Geschichte
A Curious Story
[8]
D major
 
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0:00
3. Hasche-Mann
Blind Man’s Bluff
B minor
 
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0:00
4. Bittendes Kind
Pleading Child
D major
 
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0:00
5. Glückes genug
Happy Enough
D major
 
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0:00
6. Wichtige Begebenheit
An Important Event
A major
 
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0:00
7. Träumerei
Dreaming
F major
 
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0:00
8. Am Kamin
At the Fireside
[9]
F major
 
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0:00
9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd
Knight of the Hobbyhorse
C major
 
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0:00
10. Fast zu ernst
Almost Too Serious
G-sharp minor
 
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0:00
11. Fürchtenmachen
Frightening
E minor
 
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12. Kind im Einschlummern
Child Falling Asleep
E minor
 
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0:00
13. Der Dichter spricht
The Poet Speaks
G major
 
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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES:Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


Schubert Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major – VALENTINA LISITSA

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120) / Klára Würtz, piano.


Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)
I. Allegro moderato
II. Andante
III. Allegro

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 4, in E-flat major, Op. 7


Beethoven Piano Sonata No. 4, in E-flat major, Op. 7

Ludwig van Beethoven
Piano Sonata No. 4, in E-flat major, Op. 7
Wilhelm Kempff (piano)
in 1951

0:00 1st mov. Allegro molto e con brio
8:41 2nd mov. Largo, con gran espressione
16:31 3rd mov. Allegro
21:50 4th mov. Rondo: Poco allegretto e grazioso

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Great Compositions/Performances: Chopin, Piano Concerto No. 1 in E minor, Op. 11



Martha Argerich, piano
Wiener KammerOrchester
Dir. Erwin Ortner
Vienna – May 16, 2010

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Make Music Part of your Life Series: Bach Busoni Chaconne D Minor BWV 1004 Valentina Lisitsa


Bach Busoni Chaconne D Minor BWV 1004 Valentina Lisitsa

Published on May 7, 2014

Recorded during pre-concert rehearsal at Torroella de Montgri April 17 2014 .
Your next best chance to hear it live :
Paris, May 21, 2014 , Salle Gaveau
http://www.sallegaveau.com/la-saison/…

Special thanks to http://www.jorquerapianos.com/ for one of the best pianos I ever encountered

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Great Compositions/Performances: Emil Gilels plays Ludwig van Beethoven’s – Piano Sonata #31 in A-Flat, Op. 110


Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Sonata #31 in A-Flat, Op. 110

Composed in 1821.

I. Moderato cantabile molto espressivo (@ 0:00)
II. Allegro molto (@ 7:29)
III. Adagio — Fuga (@ 9:49)

Performed by Emil Gilels.
Paintings by William Blake.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

The Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110, by Ludwig van Beethoven was composed in 1821. It is the central piano sonata in the group of three opp. 109–111 which he wrote between 1820 and 1822, and the thirty-first of his published piano sonatas.

The sonata is in three movements. The moderato first movement in sonata form, marked con amabilità, is followed by a fast scherzo. The finale comprises a slow recitative and arioso dolente, a fugue, a return of the arioso lament, and a second fugue that builds to an affirmative conclusion.

Composition

In the summer of 1819 Moritz Schlesinger, from the Schlesinger firm of music publishers based in Berlin, met Beethoven and asked to purchase some compositions. After some negotiation by letter, and despite the publisher’s qualms about Beethoven’s retaining the rights for publication in England and Scotland, Schlesinger agreed to purchase 25 songs for 60 ducats and three piano sonatas at 90 ducats (Beethoven had originally asked 120 ducats for the sonatas). In May 1820 Beethoven agreed, the songs (op. 108) already being available, and he undertook to deliver the sonatas within three months. These three sonatas are the ones now known as opp. 109–111.

Beethoven was prevented from completing all three of the promised sonatas on schedule by factors including an attack of jaundice; Op. 109 was completed and delivered in 1820, but correspondence shows that Op. 110 was still not ready by the middle of December 1821, and the completed autograph score bears the date December 25, 1821. Presumably the sonata was delivered shortly thereafter, since Beethoven was paid the 30 ducats for this sonata in January 1822.

Form

Alfred Brendel characterizes the main themes of the sonata as all derived from the hexachord – the first six notes of the diatonic scale – and the intervals of the third and fourth that divide it. He also points out that contrary motion is a feature of much of the work, particularly prominent in the scherzo second movement.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Sergei Rachmaninoff – Suite No. 2 for two pianos, Op. 17


Sergei RachmaninoffSuite No. 2 for two pianos, Op. 17

Pianos:  J. Thorson, J. Thurber

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Fabulous Musical Moments: Mozart Concerto No. 20 in D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart’s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel :-) 

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Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 7 in F for Three Pianos, K. 242 (Lodron)


Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 7 in F for Three Pianos, K. 242 (Lodron)

In 1776, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed three piano concertos, one of which was the Concerto in F for Three Pianos and Orchestra, No. 7, K. 242. He originally finished K. 242 for three pianos in February 1776. However, when he eventually recomposed it for himself and another pianist in 1780 in Salzburg, he rearranged it for two pianos, and that is how the piece is often performed today. The concerto is often nicknamed “Lodron” because it was commissioned by Countess Antonia Lodron to be played with her two daughters Aloysia and Giuseppa.
It has three movements:
1. Allegro
2. Adagio
3. Rondo: Tempo di Minuetto
Girdlestone, in his Mozart and his Piano Concertos, describes the concerto and compares one of the themes of its slow movement to similar themes that turn up in later concertos – especially No. 25 (K. 503) – in more developed forms.
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

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Great Compositions/Performances: Liszt Ballade 2 Bonn Beethoven-Haus Lisitsa on 97 keys



Finally a chance to use all 97 keys, live , on video :-)
In the original score , the decending broken octaves passage ( so-called martellato, around 8:00“) is reduced in left hand to a single line at the bottom , when Liszt-times piano run out of keys to decsend. The effect of using the missing lower octave – particulalry in live setting – is simply stupendous. There is nothing that can match sound of roaring Imperial extra-low notes! It has to be heard live – or at least in analogue recording ( that I am going to make very soon , a “Liszt project ” ) . This is the piano I am going to use :-) Bosy rules !!!!

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3


Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3

Frank Pelleg (1910-1968) is joined by Peter Rybar (1913-2002, violin), Heinz Wigand (viola), and Antonio Tusa (cello) — all members of the Winterthur String Quartet — in this 1954 recording of the first movement of the Mendelssohn piano quartet in B minor, Op. 3. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued on the Concert Hall Society label, serial number E4KP 1420, Concert Hall release H-5.

Movement 1: Allegro molto
Movement 2: Andante
Movement 3: Allegro molto
Movement 4: Finale – Allegro vivace

(Note: Late last year I had uploaded this performance in four separate segments.)

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More from Mendelssohn:

Arthur Grumiaux, 1974: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Complete – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LURD7h…

Mendelssohn / Igor Oistrakh: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Movement 1, early 1950s: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Igqdql…
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Details about this LP are available at the Library of Congress website here: http://lccn.loc.gov/r54000657

More information about Pelleg here: http://www.doremi.com/pelleg.html

Rybar’s obituary is available for review here:http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2002/o…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Johannes Brahms – Intermezzo Op. 117 No. 1 in E flat major


The 3 Intermezzi Op. 117 were composed in 1892 and are among the best-loved and most popular of Brahms‘ autumnal late piano output. On a smaller and more intimate scale than the surrounding sets of Op. 116, Op. 118 and Op. 119, the composer described these pieces as “lullabies to my sorrows”. Here we find Brahms at his most tender and introspective, with only one outburst (in the third Intermezzo) of the characteristic Brahmsian fieryness. The Intermezzi were inspired by a Scottish poem from Herder’s Volkslieder, and bear this inscription:

Schlaf sanft mein Kind, schlaf sanft und Schön!
Mich dauert’s sehr, dich weinen sehn.

Sleep softly my child, sleep softly and well!
It hurts my heart to see you weeping. 

Piano: Idil Biret

Picture: Winter, Close of Day by George Innes

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Schubert – Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


Uploaded on Feb 5, 2009/523,782Views

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale

Muzio Clementi (24 January 1752 — 10 March 1832) was a composer, pianist, pedagogue, conductor, music publisher, editor, and piano manufacturer. Born in Rome, he spent most of his life in England.

Work: Minuetto Pastorale

Orchestra: The Philharmonia

Conductor: Francesco d’Avalos

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prokofiev in a Club! Sonata #7 Yellow Lounge Amsterdam Lisitsa



One day in a future the ‘traditional” concert halls will go the way of ‘traditional” movie theaters = disappear from use. I told you before – the BEST place to listen to the piano is directly under it. But try that in Concergebouw or Carnegie Hall _ they will call police on you ;) Not so in a club . Yellow Lounge Amsterdam March 19th 2014 – http://www.trouwamsterdam.nl An ultimate experience listening to Prokofiev . Never mind the tinny captured recording – it was Imperial after all and it RRRRrrrocked – just ask the willing “victims” :)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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