Tag Archives: Piano

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Johannes Brahms – Intermezzo Op. 117 No. 1 in E flat major


The 3 Intermezzi Op. 117 were composed in 1892 and are among the best-loved and most popular of Brahms‘ autumnal late piano output. On a smaller and more intimate scale than the surrounding sets of Op. 116, Op. 118 and Op. 119, the composer described these pieces as “lullabies to my sorrows”. Here we find Brahms at his most tender and introspective, with only one outburst (in the third Intermezzo) of the characteristic Brahmsian fieryness. The Intermezzi were inspired by a Scottish poem from Herder’s Volkslieder, and bear this inscription:

Schlaf sanft mein Kind, schlaf sanft und Schön!
Mich dauert’s sehr, dich weinen sehn.

Sleep softly my child, sleep softly and well!
It hurts my heart to see you weeping. 

Piano: Idil Biret

Picture: Winter, Close of Day by George Innes

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Schubert – Impromptu op. 142 No.3 B flat major


Uploaded on Feb 5, 2009/523,782Views

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Muzio Clementi – Minuetto Pastorale

Muzio Clementi (24 January 1752 — 10 March 1832) was a composer, pianist, pedagogue, conductor, music publisher, editor, and piano manufacturer. Born in Rome, he spent most of his life in England.

Work: Minuetto Pastorale

Orchestra: The Philharmonia

Conductor: Francesco d’Avalos

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Prokofiev in a Club! Sonata #7 Yellow Lounge Amsterdam Lisitsa



One day in a future the ‘traditional” concert halls will go the way of ‘traditional” movie theaters = disappear from use. I told you before – the BEST place to listen to the piano is directly under it. But try that in Concergebouw or Carnegie Hall _ they will call police on you ;) Not so in a club . Yellow Lounge Amsterdam March 19th 2014 – http://www.trouwamsterdam.nl An ultimate experience listening to Prokofiev . Never mind the tinny captured recording – it was Imperial after all and it RRRRrrrocked – just ask the willing “victims” :)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7'39'']
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18'40'']

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Schumann-Five Pieces in Folk Style Op. 102 (Fünf Stücke im Volkston)



Pablo Casals: cello-Leopold Mannes: piano-1952

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Great Compositions/Performances: Isaac Stern – Beethoven, Triple Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra Op.56



Ludwig Van Beethoven [ 1770 - 1827 ],
Concerto For Piano, Violin, Cello & Orchestra
In C Major Op.56 ‘Thriple Concerto’

I. Allegro
II. Largo – attacca
III. Rondo Alla Polacca Allegro tempo I.

Violin ; Isaac Stern [ 1920 - 2001 ]
Piano ; Emanuel Ax [ 1949 - ]
Cello ; Yo-Yo Ma [ 1955 - ]

Conducted By ; Michael Stern
London Symphony Orchestra
Narrated By ; Gregory Peck

From Album [ 1992, Sony Classical LD ]
Isaac Stern A Biography In Music
Live At Royal Festival Hall

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Great Compositions/Performances: JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano



I Allegro moderato
II Poco adagio
III Moderato innocente
Paolo Restani, piano
Orchestre Philharmonique de Nice
Marco Guidarini, conductor

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Chopin “Heroic” Polonaise op 53 A flat major Valentina Lisitsa



Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa plays Chopin “Heroic” Polonaise op 53 A flat major Valentina Lisitsa

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven – Violin Sonata No. 3 in Eb, op. 12 no. 3



I. Allegro con spirito [0:00]
II. Adagio con molta espressione [8:52]
III. Rondo: Allegro molto [14:19]

Hiro Kurosaki, violin
Linda Nicholson, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7



Robert Schumann 
Toccata in C Major, Op.7 
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano – Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles


Gabriel Fauré – Élégie pour violoncelle et piano
- Germaine Thyssens Valentin & Robert Salles

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Fauré in early middle age

The Élégie (Elegy), Op. 24, was written by the French composer Gabriel Fauré in 1880, and first published and performed in public in 1883. Originally for cello and piano, the piece was later orchestrated by Fauré. The work, in C minor, features a sad and sombre opening and climaxes with an intense, fast-paced central section, before the return of the elegiac opening theme.

Composition

In 1880, having completed his First Piano Quartet, Fauré began work on a cello sonata. It was his frequent practice to compose the slow movement of a work first, and he did so for the new sonata.[1] The completed movement was probably premiered at the salon of Camille Saint-Saëns in June 1880. The movement, like the quartet, is in the key of C minor. Whether the rest of the sonata would have been in that key is unknown: Fauré never completed it, and in January 1883 the slow movement was published as a stand-alone piece under the title Élégie.[1]

Jules Loeb, dedicatee and cellist at the premiere
Pablo Casals, who premiered the orchestral version

The first performance of the work under its new title was given at the Société Nationale de Musique in December 1883 by the composer and the cellist Jules Loeb to whom the piece is dedicated.[2][n 1] The Élégie was a great success from the outset,[1] and the conductor Édouard Colonne asked Fauré for a version for cello and orchestra. Fauré agreed, and that version was premiered at the Société Nationale in April 1901, with Pablo Casals as soloist and the composer as conductor.[2

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE: Gabriel Fauré – Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15


Published on Jan 21, 2013

Gabriel Fauré – Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15

Antoine Tamestit, viola / Trio Wanderer:
Raphaël Pidoux, violoncello
Vincent Coq, piano
Jean-Marc Phillips-Varjabédian, violin 

1. Allegro molto moderato 
2. Scherzo. Allegro vivo 
3. Adagio 
4. Finale. Allegro molto

Gabriel Fauré’s Piano Quartet No. 1, in C minor, Op. 15 is one of two chamber works written by him for the conventional piano quartet combination of piano, violin, viola and cello. Despite being in a minor key it is predominantly positive in tone, though with some hints in the slow movement of the emotional turmoil of Fauré’s life at the time of the composition.

In 1877, after wooing her for five years, Fauré had finally become engaged to Marieanne Viardot, daughter of the well-known singer Pauline Viardot. The engagement lasted for less than four months, and Marieanne broke it off, to Fauré’s considerable distress. It was in the later stages of their relationship that he began work on the quartet, in the summer of 1876. He completed it in 1879, and revised it in 1883, completely rewriting the finale. The first performance of the original version was given on 14 February 1880. In a study dated 2008, Kathryn Koscho notes that the original finale has not survived, and is believed to have been destroyed by Fauré in his last day

Fauré in 1875

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Emil Gilels, piano

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Samuel Barber : Souvenirs Op.28 – 1 Waltz


From Wikipedia,

Samuel Barber : Souvenirs Op.28 – 1 Waltz:
Duo Frösche
Primo : Mika Nishizawa
Secondo : Kenichi Nishizawa
official site
http://www.kenichinishizawa.net/

バーバー「スーヴェニール」I : ワルツ
デュオ・フレッシェ(西澤健一&美歌)


the free encyclopedia

Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of orchestraloperachoral, andpiano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that “Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim.”[1] His Adagio for Strings (1936) has earned a permanent place in the concert repertory of orchestras. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music twice: for his opera Vanessa (1956–57) and for the Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1962). Also widely performed is hisKnoxville: Summer of 1915 (1947), a setting for soprano and orchestra of a prose text by James Agee. At the time of his death, nearly all of his compositions had been recorded.[1]

Samuel Barber, photographed by 
Carl Van Vechten, 1944

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mendelssohn Cello Sonata no.2 Natalia Gutman & Viacheslav Poprugin



Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy sonata for cello and piano op.58 in D major
1.Allegro assai vivace 0:02
2.Allegretto scherzando 8:48
3.Adagio 13:42
4.Molto allegro e vivace 18:15

Natalia Gutman cello
Viacheslav Poprugin piano

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Johannes Brahms: Piano Concerto NO. 2 in B flat Op. 83 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Bramhs (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Valentina Lisitsa: Live from Sweden: Dress rehearsal Rachmaninoff Concerto #2 (NORRKÖPINGS SYMFONIORKESTER – Michael Francis conducting)


English: Pianist Valentina Lisitsa during an i...

English: Pianist Valentina Lisitsa during an interview in Leiden, Netherlands Deutsch: Pianistin Valentina Lisitsa während eines Interviews in Leiden, Holland (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

***Great Compositions/Performances:
     Valentina Lisitsa: Live from Sweden: Dress rehearsal Rachmaninoff Concerto #2 (NORRKÖPINGS SYMFONIORKESTER – Michael Francis conducting)

 

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How it WAS made! Valentina Lisitsa “Chasing Pianos” Music of Michael Nyman



Pre-order on Amazon:
http://po.st/ChasingPianosAmYT 
or iTunes 
http://po.st/ChasingPianosiTuYT

Insider tip #1 :)Be even more first than the first if you order from Holland – the release is March 7, a month ahead of everybody else:http://www.bol.com/nl/p/chasing-piano
insider’s tip #2 :) iTunes for almost twice as many songs that couldn’t fit on a disc :) http://po.st/ChasingPianosiTuYT

 

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Fritz Kreisler, Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Caprice viennois, Op. 2 (arr. for piano), Caprice Viennois, Op. 2



Fritz Kreisler
Balazs Szokolay, Szokolay, Balazs
Caprice viennois, Op. 2 (arr. for piano)
Romantic Piano Favourites, Vol. 3
8.550107
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Horowitz plays Wagner-Liszt Isolde’s Liebestod



Last but not least. It took the legendary pianist three separate days to record this piece to his satisfaction, and he died a mere four days after its completion on November 5, 1989. 

Horowitz did not record the other Liszt transcriptions of Wagner such as the Tanhauser Overture, though the biography by authored Harold Schonberg noted that he played an enormous amount of his own transcriptions of operatic music, including the Ride of the Valkyrie. However, Horowitz did not programme most of them once he arrived in the United States.

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Edvard Grieg – Humoresque op 6 no 1



Tempo di Valse. From Edvard Grieg – Anniversary Collection recorded by Norwegian Pianist Knut Erik Jensen

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Robert Schumann 1810-1856 – Symfoni no 3 – DRSO – Thomas Dausgaard



Robert Schumann 1810-1856 – Symfoni no 3 – Danmarks Radio SymfoniOrkestret – Thomas Dausgaard.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, three trombonestimpani andstrings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

 

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Vincent D’indy Symphony on a French mountain air for piano and orchestra



Pnina Salzman and the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra/ Mendi Rodan, conductor. See also her Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pnina-…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
For the asteroid named after the composer, see 11530 d’Indy.

Vincent d’Indy, ca. 1895

Vincent d’Indy (French pronunciation: ​[vɛ̃ˈsɑ̃ dɛ̃ˈdi]) (27 March 1851 – 2 December 1931) was a French composer and teacher.

Life

Paul Marie Théodore Vincent d’Indy was born in Paris into an aristocratic family of royalist and Catholic persuasion. He had piano lessons from an early age from his paternal grandmother, who passed him on to Antoine François Marmontel and Louis Diémer.[1] From the age of 14 he studied harmony with Albert Lavignac. At age 19, during the Franco-Prussian War, he enlisted in the National Guard, but returned to musical life as soon as the hostilities were over. The first of his works he heard performed was a Symphonie italienne, at an orchestral rehearsal under Jules Pasdeloup; the work was admired by Georges Bizet and Jules Massenet, with whom he had already become acquainted.[1] On the advice of Henri Duparc, he became a devoted student of César Franck at the Conservatoire de Paris. As a follower of Franck, d’Indy came to admire what he considered the standards of German symphonism.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Pnina Salzman (Hebrew: פנינה זלצמן) (February 24, 1922, Tel AvivMandate Palestine – December 16, 2006, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli classical pianist and piano pedagogue.

Salzman showed an early aptitude for the piano, and gave her first recital at the age of eight. The French pianist and teacher, Alfred Cortot, heard her play in 1932 while she was a student at Shulamit Conservatory and invited her to Paris to study. She graduated at the Ecole Normale de Musique then became a pupil of Magda Tagliaferroat the Conservatoire de Paris, where she was to win the Premier Prix de Piano in 1938, aged 16.

It was through the violinist Bronislaw Huberman that she first developed a lifelong association with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, which Huberman had founded.

In 1963 she became the first Israeli to be invited to play in the USSR and in 1994, the first Israeli pianist invited to play in China. Besides performing as a soloist, she was a member of the Israel Piano Quartet.

She was a Professor and the head of the piano department at Tel Aviv University and served on the jury of many piano competitions, including the Arthur Rubinstein,Vladimir Horowitz and Marguerite Long competitions. She taught piano to many students, including Dror ElimelechNimrod David PfefferElisha AbasIddo Bar-Shai andYossi Reshef.

Buy “Symphony on a French Mountain Air for Piano and Orchestra in G Major, Op. 25: II. Assez modéré, mais sans lenteur” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3iTuneseMusic

  • Artist
    Pnina Salzman

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Mozart – Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595 – Ovchinnikov




*****Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

*****Piano Concerto No 27 in B flat major, K 595

*****Emil Gilels, piano
*****USSR State Symphony Orchestra
*****Vyacheslav Ovchinnikov, conductor

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in E flat Major, WoO 36, No. 1 – Amadeus Quartet



Make Music Part of Your Life:  Beethoven / Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in E flat Major, WoO 36, No. 1 – Amadeus Quartet

From David Hertzberg: “In this 1970 recording, Christoph Eschenbach and members of the Amadeus Quartet — Norbert Brainin, violin; Peter Schidlof, viola; and Martin Lovett, cello — perform the Beethoven Piano quartet in E flat major, WoO 36, No. 1. I recorded this video from a cassette I purchased back in the early 1970s, issued on the Deutsche Grammophon label (serial number 3335 174-10). 

Allegro con spirito (6:53)

(Last year I uploaded this recording in three separate segments.)

More Beethoven:

Beethoven / Gilels / Szell, 1968: Piano Concerto in G major, Op. 58 – Complete - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXoxpW…

Leonid Hambro, 1970: “Happy Birthday Dear Ludwig” – Variations in The Style of Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-Uga3…

Fur Elise – Wilhelm Kempff: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9DSjo…

Fur Elise – Alicia de Larrocha: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFMUEe…

Beethoven / Artur Balsam, 1952: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61a – Movement 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKKCGw…

David Oistrakh: Romance No. 2 in F major for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 50: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gz4JEY…

Wilhelm Backhaus: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – London, 1950s, Karl Böhm: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRSTwj…

Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37 (Rondo) Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeW79S…

Emil Gilels, 1968: Piano Concerto in C major, Op. 15 (Rondo) Beethoven - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ojL4Kx…

Emil Gilels, 1983, Beethoven Klaviersonate Nr. 4 Es-dur, Op. 7 -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kEfGQ1…

Stephen Kovacevich, 1975: Piano Concerto in C minor, Op. 37, Movement 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYBM5z…

Beethoven / Istomin-Stern-Rose Trio: Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 – Archduke (Allegro), 1966: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQAswV…

Solomon, 1958: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 – Rondo -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_Vi8m…

Friedrich Gulda, 1954: Sonata No. 1 in F minor, Op. 2, No. 1 (1) -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RwDZs…

Christoph Eschenbach, 1970: Piano Quartet in C Major, WoO 36, No. 3 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBp3jh…

Artur Balsam: Piano (Violin) Concerto in D major, Op. 61 – Rondo, 1950s - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MD8ul2…

Stephen Kovacevich: Piano Sonata in C minor, Op. 13, Movement 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGamRs…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In European classical music, piano quartet denotes a chamber music composition for piano and three other instruments, or a musical ensemble comprising such instruments. Those other instruments are usually a string trio consisting of a violinviola and cello.

Piano quartets for that standard lineup were written by Wolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert SchumannLudwig van BeethovenJohannes BrahmsAntonín Dvořák andGabriel Fauré among others. In the 20th century, composers have also written for more varied groups, with Anton Webern‘s Quartet, opus 22 (1930), for example, being for piano, violin, clarinet and tenor saxophone, and Paul Hindemith‘s quartet (1938) as well as Olivier Messiaen‘s Quatuor pour la fin du temps (1940) both for piano, violin, cello and clarinet. An early example of this can be found in Franz Berwald‘s quartet for piano, horn, clarinet and bassoon (1819), his opus 1.[1]

A rare form of piano quartets consist of two pianos with two players at each piano. This type of ensemble is informally referred to as “8 hand piano”, or “2 piano 8 hands”. 8 hand piano was popular in the late 19th century before the advent of recordings as it was a mechanism to reproduce and study symphonic works. Music lovers could hear the major symphonic works all in the convenience of a parlour or music hall that had two pianos and four pianists. Many of the popular works of Wolfgang Amadeus MozartRobert SchumannJohannes BrahmsAntonín Dvořák were transcribed for two piano eight hands. The majority of 8 hand piano music consist of transcriptions, or arrangements.

 

Ludwig van Beethoven (Listeni/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈb.tvən/German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːt.hoːfən] ( listen); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 concertos for piano, 32 piano sonatas, and 16 string quartets. He also composed other chamber music, choral works (including the celebrated Missa Solemnis), and songs.

Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven and Christian Gottlob Neefe. During his first 22 years in Bonn, Beethoven intended to study with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and befriended Joseph Haydn. Beethoven moved to Vienna in 1792 and began studying with Haydn, quickly gaining a reputation as a virtuoso pianist. He lived in Vienna until his death. In about 1800 his hearing began to deteriorate, and by the last decade of his life he was almost totally deaf. 

The three piano quartets of WoO 36, written when the composer was 15, are among the most substantial of Beethoven‘s earliest compositions. They are so early, in fact, that the autograph score calls for “clavecin” instead of piano. The same manuscript gives “basso” instead of cello, with the pieces ordered C major, E flat major, and D major. The pieces were not printed until 1828 in Vienna, in the order E flat, D, and C. Material from the C major Trio was subsequently used in the Piano Sonatas, Op. 2, Nos. 1 and 3. These are the only works Beethoven composed for this ensemble, which he abandoned for the piano trio after moving to Vienna.

When he was a boy, Beethoven was musically influenced primarily by Christian Gottlob Neefe(1748-98), a composer and one of Beethoven‘s first music teachers, Abbé Franz Sterkel(1750-1817), one of the foremost pianists in Europe, and Mozart. Of these influences, Neefe’s was the most immediate and Mozart‘s the most profound. Each of the three quartets of WoO 36 draws on a specific violin sonata by Mozart, from the set published in 1781. The first ofBeethoven‘s quartets is modeled on Mozart‘s K. 379/373a, the second on K. 380/374f, and the third on K. 296. All three quartets of WoO 36 are in three movements.

The E flat major quartet is unusual in that its slow introductory movement jumps without pause into an Allegro con spirito in E flat minor. The E flat minor movement, in sonata form, features a tiny development, but contains some adventurous passages in the recapitulation. The final movement is a set of six variations in an ornamental style on a high-Classical-era theme with two eight-measure segments. Each of the segments is repeated, the first moving to the dominant and the second returning to the tonic. Beethoven follows this pattern in all of the variations, the fifth of which is in E flat minor. After the variations have run their course, the theme returns, only slightly rearranged, followed by a coda reminiscent of the first variation. Throughout the work, the piano dominates the proceedings.

Beethoven cast the D major quartet in a more traditional format, with a central slow movement enclosed by two fast ones. The opening Allegro is in sonata form and modulates to the dominant. Boasting a much larger development section than that of the E flat quartet, the movement touches on D minor before the recapitulation. The second movement, in F sharp minor, is in two parts and marked Andante con moto. The piano opens the concluding Rondo, a movement of youthful energy dominated by the keyboard part.

The quartet in C major is also in three movements, the second of which is in a relaxed F major. After a very brief development section, Beethoven begins the recapitulation on the subdominant, a procedure Schubert would use in several of his works. The second movement features some of the most compelling melodic passages of Beethoven‘s youth, although his tendency to double most of these robs them of some of their delicacy. Nearly all of the thematic material in the closing Rondo is concentrated in the piano part.

Despite the degree to which some aspects of the Piano Quartets, WoO 36, look forward to the mature Beethoven, they have little independent life as concert pieces that command interest for more than curiosity value

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Maurice Ravel – Valses Nobles et Sentimentales, I-V



Valses nobles et sentimentales, for piano (or orchestra) (1911)

I. Modéré
II. Assez lent
III. Modéré
IV. Assez animé
V. Presque lent
VI. Assez vif
VII. Moins vif
VIII. Epilogue: Lent

Philharmonia Slavonica
H. Adolph

Maurice Ravel could be slightly obsessive in the way he allowed certain musical interests to reappear throughout his compositions. Two such interests were dance and the past, and in Valses nobles et sentimentales one can hear how Ravel was able to effectively fuse these two curiosities together. While Le Tombeau de Couperin was inspired by the eighteenth century, the Valses was oriented toward the nineteenth century. Written out of homage to Schubert’s piano piece of the same name, the composer declared that the work’s title, “indicates clearly enough my intention of composing a chain of waltzes following the example of Schubert. The virtuoso element that was the basis of Gaspard de la nuit is here replaced by a writing of greater clarity, which has the effect of sharpening the harmony as well as the outline of the music.” Ravel achieved his goal of clarity, as the waltzes were written using intense precision, sophistication, and technical flawlessness. 

Valses nobles et sentimentales contains eight waltzes presented in the following order: Modéré, Assez lent, Modéré, Assez animé, Presque lent, Assez vif, Moins vif, and the Epilogue. Originally written for solo piano, the waltzes stimulate but do not disturb, while displaying different aspects of Ravel’s imagination including pride, tenderness, and sentiment. The work was dedicated to Louis Aubert and it was he who gave the first performance on May 9, 1911, at a concert held by the Société Musicale Indépendante, where Schubert’s piece of the same name was also premiered. As a little game, the composers’ names were withheld, leaving the audience to guess who had written each piece. Audience suggestions included Eric Satie, Zoltán Kodály, and even a correct answer from Debussy, whose ears could not be fooled by the identifiable quality he appreciated. Even though several of Ravel’s friends confessed their dislike, others claimed to be strongly drawn to the piece. Tristan Klingsor commented that he was one among several who, “were immediately seduced by the music, and yet he had taken a lot of risks, at least for the period….He had taken the use of unresolved dissonances to its furthest point. What we now find very piquant was extremely daring at the time. The first bars of the Valses seemed quite extraordinary. Then, since there was nothing there that was not well thought-out, the ear quickly grew to enjoy these pseudo-’wrong notes,’ and a glance at the score revealed that they had a proper harmonic justification.” 

As with Ma mère l’oye Ravel allowed only himself to alter Valses nobles et sentimentales through orchestration. He adapted the waltzes for the ballet Adélaïde ou Le langage des fleurs, for a performance by the troupe of Natasha Trouhanova, and it was premiered as an orchestral work on April 22, 1912, at the Théâtre du Châtelet. Some say that the ironic overtones of the Valses foreshadow the superb choreographic poem La Valse while confirming to audiences that dissonance was indeed an essential element of his musical style. [Allmusic.com]

Art by Antoine Blanchard

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: John Adams – Grand Pianola Music (1982)



performed by the CalArts Contemporary Music Ensemble, under the direction of Stephen Mosko
images
common people? not very much…
I published another video with the same music, directed by the author himself  here: 
http://youtu.be/-pycrSsBqUc

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Horowitz plays : Schubert’s Impromptu in G flat major D899 No.3 (in Vienna)


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Great compositions/Performances: “Impromptu, Op. 90 D899 No. 3 in G-Flat Major” by Franz Schubert



Great compositions/Performances:  “Impromptu, Op. 90 D899 No. 3 in G-Flat Major” by Franz Schubert performed by Alexandre Tharaud as heard in Michael Haneke‘s Palme d’Or winner “Amour

 

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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664, Op. 120 ( summer of 1819):
Movements
I. Allegro moderato, A major
II. Andante, D major
III. Allegro, A major

Well regarded among pianists, the “Little” A major sonata is so called to distinguish it from the hefty 1828 sonata in the same key. The manuscript, completed in July 1819, was dedicated to Josephine von Koller of Steyr in Upper Austria, whom he considered to be “very pretty” and “a good pianist.” The lyrical, buoyant, in spots typically poignant nature of this sonata fits the image of a young Schubert in love, living in a summery Austrian countryside, which he also considered to be “unimaginably lovely.”[1]

The A major sonata is straightforward, with a dulcet melodic opening. It was the first of Schubert’s piano sonatas where the sonata form as perfected by his idol, Beethoven, does not seem wrestled with; rather, it is a “joyous breakthrough,” a carefree triumph over strict rules of construction.[2]

The manuscript to this “little” sonata has been lost.[3]

Biography

Early life and education

Schubert was born in Himmelpfortgrund (now a part of Alsergrund), Vienna on January 31, 1797. His father, Franz Theodor Schubert, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother, Elisabeth Vietz, was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of Franz Theodor’s fourteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1783),[1] nine died in infancy; five survived. Their father was a well-known teacher, and his school in Lichtental, a part of Vienna’s 9th district, was well attended.[2] He was not a musician of fame or with formal training, but he taught his son some elements of music.[3]

 

The house in which Schubert was born, today Nussdorfer Strasse 54, in the 9th district of Vienna.

At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at his father’s school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin,[3] and his brother Ignaz gave him piano lessons.[4] At 7, Schubert began receiving lessons from Michael Holzer, the local church organist and choirmaster. Holzer’s lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[5] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner‘s apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he had the opportunity to practice on better instruments.[6] He also played the viola in the family string quartet, with brothers Ferdinand and Ignaz on violin and his father on the cello. Schubert wrote many of his early string quartets for this ensemble.[7]

Schubert first came to the attention of Antonio Salieri, then Vienna’s leading musical authority, in 1804, when his vocal talent was recognized.[7] In October 1808, he became a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial seminary) through a choir scholarship. At the Stadtkonvikt, Schubert was introduced to theovertures and symphonies of Mozart.[8] His exposure to these pieces and various lighter compositions, combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge.[9]One important musical influence came from the songs of Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, who was an importantLied composer of the time, which, his friend Joseph von Spaun reported, he “wanted to modernize”.[10]Schubert’s friendship with Spaun began at the Stadtkonvikt and endured through his lifetime. In those early days, the more well-to-do Spaun furnished the impoverished Schubert with manuscript paper.[9]

Meanwhile, his genius began to show in his compositions. Schubert was occasionally permitted to lead the Stadtkonvikt’s orchestra, and Salieri decided to begin training him privately in musical composition andtheory in these years.[11] It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal of chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D. 31) and Salve Regina (D. 27), an octet for wind instruments (D. 72/72a, said to commemorate the 1812 death of his mother),[12] a cantata for guitar and male voices (D. 110, in honor of his father’s birthday in 1813), and his first symphony (D. 82).[13]

Teacher at his father’s school

At the end of 1813, he left the Stadtkonvikt, and returned home for studies at the Normalhauptschule to train as a teacher. In 1814, he entered his father’s school as teacher of the youngest students. For over two years, the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success.[14] There were, however, other interests to compensate. He continued to receive private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s musical training than any of his other teachers. Salieri and Schubert would part ways in 1817.[11]

In 1814, Schubert met a young soprano named Therese Grob, the daughter of a local silk manufacturer. Several of his songs (Salve Regina and Tantum Ergo) were composed for her voice, and she also performed in the premiere of his first Mass (D. 105) in September[15] 1814.[14] Schubert intended to marry Grob, but was hindered by the harsh marriage consent law of 1815,[16] which required the ability to show the means to support a family.[17] In November 1816, after failing to gain a position at Laibach, Schubert sent Grob’s brother Heinrich a collection of songs, which were retained by her family into the 20th century.[18]

Schubert’s most prolific year was probably 1815. He composed over 20,000 bars of music, more than half of which was for orchestra, including nine church works, a symphony, and about 140 Lieder.[19] In that year, he was also introduced to Anselm Hüttenbrenner and Franz von Schober, who would become his lifelong friends. Another friend, Johann Mayrhofer, was introduced to him by Spaun in 1814.[20]

Supported by friends

 

Josef Abel(?) portrait of an anonymous young man with glasses (possibly Schubert)

Significant changes happened in 1816. Schober, a student of good family and some means, invited Schubert to room with him at his mother’s house. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made the unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach, and he had also decided not to resume teaching duties at his father’s school. By the end of the year, he became a guest in Schober’s lodgings. For a time, he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. “I compose every morning, and when one piece is done, I begin another.”[21] During this year, he focused on orchestral and choral works, although he also continued to write Lieder.[22] Much of this work was unpublished, but manuscripts and copies circulated among friends and admirers.[23]

In early 1817, Schober introduced Schubert to Johann Michael Vogl, a prominent baritone twenty years Schubert’s senior. Vogl, for whom Schubert went on to write a great many songs, became one of Schubert’s main proponents in Viennese musical circles. He also met Joseph Hüttenbrenner (brother to Anselm), who also played a role in promoting Schubert’s music.[24] These, and an increasing circle of friends and musicians, became responsible for promoting, collecting, and, after his death, preserving, his work.[25]

In late 1817, Schubert’s father gained a new position at a school in Rossau (not far from Lichtental). Schubert rejoined his father and reluctantly took up teaching duties there. In early 1818, he was rejected for membership in the prestigious Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, something that might have furthered his musical career.[26] However, he began to gain more notice in the press, and the first public performance of a secular work, an overture performed in February 1818, received praise from the press in Vienna and abroad.[27]

Schubert spent the summer of 1818 as music teacher to the family of Count Johann Karl Esterházy at their château in Zseliz (then in Hungary, now in Slovakia). His duties were relatively light (teaching piano and singing to the two daughters, Marie and Karoline), and the pay relatively good. As a result, he happily continued to compose during this time. It may have been at this time that he wrote one of his now world-famous compositions, the Marche militaire No. 1 in D major. On his return from Zseliz, he took up residence with his friend Mayrhofer.[26] The respite at Zseliz led to a succession of compositions for piano duet.[28]

The tight circle of friends that Schubert surrounded himself with was dealt a blow in early 1820. Schubert and four of his friends were arrested by the Austrian secret police, who were suspicious of any type of student gatherings. One of Schubert’s friends, Johann Senn, was put on trial, imprisoned for over a year, and then permanently banned from Vienna. The other four, including Schubert, were “severely reprimanded”, in part for “inveighing against [officials] with insulting and opprobrious language”.[29] While Schubert never saw Senn again, he did set some of his poems, “Selige Welt” and “Schwanengesang”, to music. The incident may have played a role in a falling-out with Mayrhofer, with whom he was living at the time.[30]

Musical maturity

The compositions of 1819 and 1820 show a marked advance in development and maturity of style[31]. The unfinished oratorio “Lazarus” (D. 689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D. 706), the Gesang der Geister (D. 705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D. 703), and the “Wanderer Fantasy” for piano (D. 760). Of most notable interest is the staging in 1820 of two of Schubert’s operas: Die Zwillingsbrüder (D. 647) appeared at the Theater am Kärntnertoron June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D. 644) appeared at the Theater an der Wien on August 21.[32]Hitherto, his larger compositions (apart from his masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position, addressing a wider public.[32] Publishers, however, remained distant, withAnton Diabelli hesitantly agreeing to print some of his works on commission.[33] The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meager pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. The situation improved somewhat in March 1821 when Vogl sang “Der Erlkönig” at a concert that was extremely well received.[34] That month, he composed a variation on a waltz by Anton Diabelli (D. 718), being one of the fifty composers who contributed to Vaterländischer Künstlerverein.

The production of the two operas turned Schubert’s attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage, where, for a variety of reasons, he was almost completely unsuccessful. In 1822, Alfonso und Estrella was refused, partly owing to its libretto.[35] Fierrabras (D. 796) was rejected in the fall of 1823, but this was largely due to the popularity of Rossini and the Italian operatic style, and the failure of Carl Maria von Weber‘s Euryanthe.[36] Die Verschworenen (D. 787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the grounds of its title),[37] and Rosamunde (D. 797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of the play for which Schubert had written incidental music. Of these works, the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierrabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822, he made the acquaintance of both Weber and Beethoven, but little came of it in either case. Beethoven is said to have acknowledged the younger man’s gifts on a few occasions, but some of this is likely legend and in any case he could not have known the real scope of Schubert’s music – especially not the instrumental works – as so little of it was printed or performed in the composer’s lifetime. On his deathbed, Beethoven is said to have looked into some of the younger man’s works and exclaimed, “Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!”[38] but what would have come of it if he had recovered we can never know.

 

Schubert in 1825 (watercolor by Wilhelm August Rieder)

…read more here

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Sviatoslav Richter plays Borodin “Au Convent” (from ‘Petite SUITE’)


 

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Great compositions/Interpretations:Debussy – Six Epigraphes Antiques – Piano Duet: Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye


Great compositions/Interpretations:Debussy – Six Epigraphes Antiques – Piano Duet: Valeria Szervánszky & Ronald Cavaye
Painting by Jenö Szervánszky

Antique Epigraphs is a ballet made on New York City Ballet by balletmaster Jerome Robbins to an orchestrated version of Debussy’s Six épigraphes antiques, L131, for piano, four hands, from 1914:…..

  • “Pour invoquer Pan, dieu du vent d’été”
  • “Pour un tombeau sans nom”
  • “Pour que la nuit soit propice”
  • “Pour la danseuse aux crotales”
  • “Pour l’égyptienne”
  • “Pour remercier la pluie au matin”

…..and his Syrinx, L129, a melody for unaccompanied flute from 1913. Six épigraphes antiques were originally written to accompany Pierre Louys‘ Chanson de Bilitis, prose poetry which was purported to be a translation of freshly discovered autobiographical verse by Sappho (it was not).[1][2] The premiere took place on February 2, 1984, at the New York State TheaterLincoln Center, with costumes by Florence Klotz and lighting by Jennifer Tipton.

 

 

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Claude Debussy (1862-1918): “La plus que lente” ( part of Henry and June Playlist WOW….What enchanting music one and all!)



The composer Claude Debussy needs little introduction. As a pianist, he was noted for his avoidance of the crisp, dry and articulated style which typified French pianism of the nineteenth century. His style of playing was simple, highly tone-conscious and completely uncluttered by over-expressive angst.

The recording is a piano roll recording made by Debussy for Welte in 1913 (just three years after the work was composed). The piano rolls for Welte are amongst the most accurate we have, conveying the original performed dynamics, attack and pedalling rather faithfully, and when a good roll is played on a properly conditioned piano, the problems of dubious rhythmic bumpiness which infect many roll playbacks can vanish. This rendition seems as fine as we could hope for.

This work, “La plus que lente“, is a very slow waltz of sorts, composed in 1910.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G



Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel‘s Piano Concerto in G

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Bach English Suite No 5 BWV 810 E minor Andras Schiff



Johann Sebastian Bach
András Schiff, Piano
English Suite No 5 in E minor, BWV 810
Prelude 0:00
Allemande 5:23
Courante 8:38
Sarabande 10:35
Passepied I, Passepied II 13:43
Gigue 16:56

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: .ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25



ERNEST ROZSA PLAYS 1995 HAYDN-TRIO “ZIGEUNER-TRIO” HOB 15/25
1995 in “Rathaus” City of Marl, Germany, Live Concert in the Concert Auditorium, Rainer Klaas, Piano, Catalin Ilea, Cello
Ernest Rozsa plays Massenet “Meditation” 1978 Roumanian State Radio Broadcast Tirgu-Mures Marosvasarhely Neumarkt

http://www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com
rozsavirtuoso@yahoo.de

1983 Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany, Miklos Bence was Solo-Contrabassist in the 
Philharmonia Hungarica e. V. BRD Germany
Biography: Ernest Rozsa was Professor on the Music Pedagocial Liceum in Tirgu-Mures, Roumania, from 1975-1982
He was Soloist of the State Philharmonic Orchestra Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1975-1981
He performed from 1973-1981 many concert as soloist with this orchestra in Roumania with Conductors like Szalman Lorant, C. Mandeal and others, the Violinconcertos by Brahms, Beethoven, Bartok (Nr. 2), Sibelius, Mozart, Tchaikowsky, Tchaikowsky-Trio, Shostakovitch. There was also Productions Recordings in the State Roumanian Radio-Broadcast of the City of Tirgu-Mures in Roumania from 1973 until 1981.
He was in the same orchestra also Associate Concertmaster in foreign countries tours.
Ernest Rozsa was Concertmaster of the “Philharmonia Hungarica in Marl, Germany”, one of the major orchestras in Germany until the year of 1999, when this orchestra has been finished by th German Government. 
He performed also by the WDR3 The German Broadcast Company for Classical Music together with his son, Ernoe Rozsa 
(www.ernoe-rozsa-violin.com) works by Bottesini Grand Duo Concertant (with Benze Miklos Contrabass), his son (at this time Ernoe Rozsa was 13 years old) Ernoe Rozsa recorded at this time Pugnani-Kreisler Introduction and Allegro, Pablo de Sarasate “Caprice Basque”, Dimitrescu “Dans Taranesc”.
Since 1999 Ernest Rozsa is retired and living in Germany.
His son, Ernoe Rozsa, is active violin soloist in Japan, Ernoe Rozsa recorded the original Versions of the Violinconcertos Nr. 3 E-Major and Nr. 4 d-minor by Niccolo Paganini by the Label of NAXOS, Hong Kong. Ernoe Rozsa performing his own cadenzas on both Paganini Violinconcertos. Ernest Rozsa was first violin teacher of his son Ernoe Rozsa, and later his son studied by Prof. Tibor Varga, Prof. Rosa Fain, Sir Georg Solti, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin. Ernoe Rozsa was also soloist in a series of concerts with Lord Yehudi Menuhin (conductor), Ernoe Rozsa played the Mozart Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-Major with the “Rhainland-Pfaelzische Philharomie Ludwigshafen-Mannheim”, Germany, and Lord Yehudi Menuhin was the conductor of this 5 concerts. The greatest concert was in the “Alte Oper Frankfurt” in 1990, in germany, where Ernoe Rozsa performed as soloist with Mozarts Violinconcerto Nr. 3 G-major and Lord Menuhin was conductor of this concerts.

 

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Sviatoslav Richter – Schumann – Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op 82



Robert Schumann
Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op 82

 

The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richte...

The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

1 Eintritt
2 Jäger auf der Lauer
3 Einsame Blumen
4 Verrufene Stelle
5 Freundliche Landschaft
6 Herberge 
7 Vogel als Prophet
8 Jagdlied
9 Abschied

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

Recorded live, 1956

 

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Ruggiero RICCI plays WIENIAWSKI Scherzo-Tarantelle Op.16 – 1980


Henryk Wieniawski ( July 10, 1835 Lublin, Cong...

Henryk Wieniawski ( July 10, 1835 Lublin, Congress Poland, Russian Empire – March 31, 1880 Moscow) was a Polish composer and violinist. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Henryk WIENIAWSKI: Scherzo-Tarantelle, in G minor Op.16 (1855)
Ruggiero RICCI, violin – Joanna Gruenberg, piano (rec: 1980)
________________________________________­__________
full CDhttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Great Composers/Compositions: Grieg – Holberg Suite, Op. 40 (”From Holberg’s Time”)



The Holberg Suite was originally composed for the piano and was adapted for string orchestra a year later. Not as famous as Peer Gynt, but seen by many critics as equal.
Berliner Philharmoniker / Herbert von Karajan
00:00 1. Praeludium
03:02 2. Sarabande 
07:18 3. Gavotte 
11:07 4. Air 
16:58 5. Rigaudon

 

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Great Composition/Performances: Fritz Kreisler plays Liebesfreud



Fritz Kreisler -Violin
Franz Rupp – Piano
(recorded 1938)

 

English: Fritz Kreisler (1875 – 1962), Austria...

English: Fritz Kreisler (1875 – 1962), Austria-born American violinist and composer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Rhapsody in Blue – George Gershwin



Rhapsody in Blue, de George Gershwin. Interpretada por el genial Leonard Bernstein, al piano y la dirección.

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Manuel de Falla – Suite populaire espagnole [Daniil Shafran, Nina Musinian]


 

A cello player in the partially destroyed Nati...

A cello player in the partially destroyed National Library, Sarajevo, during the war in 1992. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Suite populaire espagnole, arranged from “Siete Canciones populares españolas” (1914)

I. El Paño moruno [0:00]
II. Nana [2:05]
III. Cancion [4:49]
IV. Polo [6:06]
V. Asturiana

 

Español: Estatua de Manuel de Falla en la Aven...

Español: Estatua de Manuel de Falla en la Avenida de la Constitución de Granada (España). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

[7:25]
VI. Jota [9:57]

A suite for cello and piano, arranged by French cellist Maurice Maréchal (1892-1964) from a setting of popular songs by Spanish composer Manuel Falla (1876-1946).

Cellist: Daniil Shafran
Pianist: Nina Musinian

 

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Franz Anton Hoffmeister – Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)


Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Cover of Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Franz Anton Hoffmeister 
Work: Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)

Mov.I: Allegro brioso 00:00
Mov.II: Adagio 15:07
Mov.III: Allegretto 22:57

Pianist: Wilhelm Neuhaus
Orchestra: Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Conductor: Helmut Müller-Brühl (1933 – 2012)

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GREAT COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Mozart – Piano Concerto No. 23 in A, K. 488


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Photo credit: photoAtlas)

The Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K. 488) is a musical composition for piano and orchestra written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was finished, according to Mozart’s own catalogue, on March 2, 1786, around the time of the premiere of his opera, The Marriage of Figaro. It was one of three subscription concerts given that spring and was probably played by Mozart himself at one of these. The concerto is scored for piano solo and an orchestra consisting of one flute, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns and strings. In Mozart’s later works the wind instruments are equal to the stringed instruments, and this is also the case in this concerto. It has three movements:
1. Allegro in A major and common time.
2. Adagio in F-sharp minor and 6/8 time (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Andante).
3. Allegro assai in A and alla breve (in later editions, the tempo is listed as Presto). In Rondo form.
The first movement is mostly sunny and positive with the occasional melancholic touches typical of Mozart pieces in A major and is in sonata form. The piece begins with a double exposition, the first played by the orchestra, and the second when the piano joins in. The first exposition is static from a tonal point of view and is quite concise, the third theme is not yet revealed. The second exposition includes the soloist and is modulatory. It is also includes the third previously unheard third theme. The second exposition is ornamented as opposed to the first exposition which is not. The second theme has harmonic tension. This is expressed by dissonances that are played on the beat, and then solved by an interval of a second going downwards. This is also expressed in the use of chromatics in the melody and bass lines which is a cause for harmonic tension, as the listeners anticipate the arrival of the tonic.
The second, slow movement, in ternary form, is melancholic and somewhat operatic in tone. The piano begins alone with a theme characterized by unusually wide leaps. This is the only movement by Mozart in F sharp minor. The dynamics are soft throughout most of the piece. The middle of the movement contains a brighter section in A major announced by flute and clarinet that Mozart would later use to introduce the trio “Ah! taci ingiusto core!” in his opera Don Giovanni. The third movement is a vigorous and cheerful rondo, shaded by moves into other keys as is the opening movement (to C major from E minor and back during the secondary theme in this case, for instance) and with a central section whose opening in F sharp minor is interrupted by a clarinet tune in D major, an intrusion that reminds us, notes Girdlestone, that instrumental music at the time was informed by opera buffa and its sudden changes of point of view as well as of scene. 

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Great Performances: Carl. Maria von. Weber – Concerto No.1, in F minor, Op.73 (Sabine Meyer)



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Carl Maria von Weber wrote his Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73 (J. 114) for the clarinettist Heinrich Bärmann in 1811. The piece is considered a gem in the instrument’s repertoire. It is written for clarinet in B♭. The work consists of three movements in the form of fast, slow, fast.

Structure

  1. Allegro in F minor modulating into A-flat major and later returning to F minor with a meter of 3/4
  2. Adagio ma non troppo in C major transforming into C minor and E flat major and afterward reverting to C major with a meter of 4/4
  3. RondoAllegretto in F major with a meter of 2/4

Instrumentation

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 2 trumpetstimpanistrings, and solo clarinet

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826[1]) was a Germancomposerconductorpianistguitarist[2] and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romanticschool.

Weber’s operas Der FreischützEuryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. Der Freischütz came to be regarded as the first German “nationalist” opera,Euryanthe developed the Leitmotif technique to a hitherto-unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn‘s music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber’s lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures. This interest was first manifested in Weber’sincidental music for Schiller‘s translation of Gozzi‘s Turandot, for which he used a Chinese melody, making him the first Western composer to use an Asian tune that was not of the pseudo-Turkish kind popularized by Mozart and others.

A brilliant pianist himself, Weber composed four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor, which influenced composers such as ChopinLiszt and Mendelssohn. The Konzertstückprovided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt’s, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber’s shorter piano pieces, such as the Invitation to the Dance, were later orchestrated byBerlioz, while his Polacca Brillante was later set for piano and orchestra by Liszt.

Weber compositions for woodwind instruments occupy an important place in the musical repertoire. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet, a duo concertante, and variations on a theme (posthumously), are regularly performed today. His Concertino for Horn and Orchestra requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing—a technique known as “multiphonics“. His bassoon concerto and the Andante e Rondo ungarese (a reworking of a piece originally for viola and orchestra) are also popular with bassoonists.

Weber’s contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th-century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten ([Four] Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin.

Weber’s orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers – Berlioz referred to him several times in hisTreatise on Instrumentation while Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument.

His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as MarschnerMeyerbeer and Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Glinka. Homage has been paid to Weber by 20th-century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky,Mahler (who completed Weber’s unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber).

Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Shostakovich Plays Shostakovich – Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102



Dmitri Shostakovich
Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102

Dmitri Shostakovich, piano movements:

  1. Allegtro (A jolly main theme)
  2. Andante (The second movement is subdued and romantic)
  3. Allegro (The finale is a lively dance in duple time)

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
André Cluytens, conductor

From Wikipedia

Piano Concerto No. 2 in F major, Op. 102, by Dmitri Shostakovich was composed in 1957 for his son Maxim’s 19th birthday. Maxim premiered the piece during his graduation at the Moscow Conservatory. It is an uncharacteristically cheerful piece, much more so than most of Shostakovich’s works.
The work is scored for solo piano, three flutes (third doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four hornstimpanisnare drum andstrings.

 

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Frédéric Chopin: Nocturne op.9 no.1 in B-flat minor (by Vadim Chaimovich)



This is my 2009 studio recording of Chopin’s Nocturne op.9 no.1.
This nocturne is one of the most beautiful short pieces by the celebrated master of the “song of the night”, it has a rhythmic freedom that came to characterize Chopin’s later work…
Enjoy!

Frederic Chopin – Nocturne op. 9 no. 1 in B-flat Minor
Vadim Chaimovich, piano

 

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