Tag Archives: robert schumann

make music part of your life series: Robert Schumann Symphonic Studies (Etudes Symphoniques) op.13 (complete) Mehmet Okonsar,piano


Robert Schumann Symphonic Studies (Etudes Symphoniques) op.13 (complete)
Mehmet Okonsar, piano: 

” Happy to get you here!

In this channel, as an independent musician, I present all my recordings, the videos are actual recordings from the CD-recording sessions. I hope that you enjoy these.

Please write remarks when you. Also I’d be happy you share them.

I present all my work under the Creative Commons CC_BY license. That suggests you may share, duplicate, propagate all of them unreservedly and also create other works based upon on all of them as long as you credit me.
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About the WORK:
ETUDES SYMPHONIQUES op.13
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[from Wikipedia, read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphoni...]
The first edition in 1837 carried an annotation that the tune was “the composition of an amateur”: this referred to the origin of the theme, which had been sent to Schumann by Baron von Fricken, guardian of Ernestine von Fricken, the Estrella of his Carnaval Op. 9. The baron, an amateur musician, had used the melody in a Theme with Variations for flute. Schumann had been engaged to Ernestine in 1834, only to break abruptly with her the year after. An autobiographical element is thus interwoven in the genesis of the Etudes Symphoniques (as in that of many other masterpieces of Schumann’s). * Theme – Andante * Etude I (Variation 1) – Un poco più vivo * Etude II (Variation 2) – Andante * Etude III – Vivace * Etude IV (Variation 3) – Allegro marcato * Etude V (Variation 4) – Scherzando * Etude VI (Variation 5) – Agitato * Etude VII (Variation 6) – Allegro molto * Etude VIII (Variation 7) – Sempre marcatissimo * Etude IX – Presto possible * Etude X (Variation 8) – Allegro con energia * Etude XI (Variation 9) – Andante espressivo * Etude XII (Finale) – Allegro brillante (based on Marschner’s theme).

Other titles had been considered in September 1834: Variations pathétiques and Etuden im Orchestercharakter von Florestan und Eusebius. In this latter case the Études would have been signed by two imaginary figures in whom Schumann personified two essential, opposite and complementary aspects of his own personality and his own poetic world. ‘Florestan and Eusebius’ then signed the Davidsbündlertänze, Op. 6; but only in the 1835 version of the Études symphoniques were the pieces divided so as to emphasize the alternation of more lyrical, melancholy and introvert pages (Eusebius) with those of a more excitable and dynamic nature (Florestan). In the 1837 version Florestan prevails.

Fifteen years later, in a second edition (Leipzig 1852), the 1837 title Etudes Symphoniques became Etudes en forme de variations, two studies (Nos. 3 and 9) that did not correspond to the new title (not being exactly variations) were eliminated, and some revisions were made in the piano writing.

The entire work was dedicated to Schumann’s English friend, the pianist and composer William Sterndale Bennett. Bennett played the piece frequently in England to great acclaim, but Schumann thought it was unsuitable for public performance and advised his wife Clara not to play it.
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About the Artist:

Mehmet Okonsar is a pianist-composer-conductor and musicologist. Besides his international concert carrier he is a prolific writer. Founder of the first classical music-musicology dedicated blog-site:”inventor-musicae” (http://www.inventor-musicae.com) as well as the first classical-music video portal : http://www.classicalvideos.net. Okonsar homepage: http://www.okonsar.com.

 

great compositions/performances: Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)


Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring” Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

Fabulous musical moments Schumann - Symphony No 1 in B flat major "Spring",  Op. 38 - VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

great compositions/performances:  Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

great compositions/performances:  Schumann – Symphony No 1 in B flat major “Spring”, Op. 38 – VPO, Furtwängler, 1951 (Remastered 2012)

 

make music part of your life series: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7


Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7

 

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great compositions/performances: Clara Haskil plays Schumann Waldszenen


Clara Haskil plays Schumann Waldszenen

Robert Schumann (1810-1856):
Waldszenen (Forest Scenes) opus 82 (1848/49)
1. Eintritt (Entrance) at 0:17
2. Jäger auf der Lauer (Hunter in Ambush) 01:59
3. Einsame Blumen (Lonely Flowers) 03:12
4. Verrufene Stelle (Haunted Spot) 05:16
5. Freundliche Landschaft (Pleasant Landscape) 07:42
6. Herberge (Wayside Inn) 08:40
7. Vogel als Prophet (Bird as Prophet) 10:24
8. Jagdlied (Hunting Song) 13:26
9. Abschied (Farewell) 15:43

Clara Haskil (1895-1960), piano
Recorded in 1947

Artwork: paintings of various German Romantic painters.

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GreatCompositions/Performances: Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]


Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]

- Schumann: Études Symphoniques Op. 13 [Emil Gilels, piano]
- http://www.entre88teclas.es/atdr/robe…

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann Kreisleriana op.16 – Phantasien für das Pianoforte – Enrica Ciccarelli


Schumann Kreisleriana op.16 – Phantasien für das Pianoforte – Enrica Ciccarelli

Robert Schumann Kreisleriana op.16 Phantasien für das Pianoforte – Enrica Ciccarelli

Download Enrica’s cd “Visioni”: http://www.amazon.it/dp/B00CXL39U2

Buy “visioni” on GooglePlay: https://play.google.com/store/music/a…

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PianistaEnric…

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/EnricaPianist

Website: http://www.enricaciccarelli.com

Sfem Classics on Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/sfemclassic

Listen to all the extracts from “Visioni”: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?featu…

SFEM and Enrica Ciccarelli were originally brought together by a shared passion for music and uncompromising quality: this is the basis of their artistic marriage.

The resulting project, involving SFEM’s Team and italian Pianist Enrica Ciccarelli kicked off in 2011 and aims to reissue some of Enrica’s earlier recordings, as well as new ones, especially arranged for this series and coproduced by Musicassoluta.

Since May 2013, when the project was officially presented at La Scala Shop in Milan, the first two recordings are available in shops and on Amazon.

This is an extrat from “Visioni”.
The two sections of this cd are entirely different and yet connected.

Schumann’s Kreisleriana is the musical expression of a delirious world of madness and desperate obsessions, hallucinations and shattered emotions. Imprisoned by the sheer force of its own genius, the composer’s mind swings wildly between opposite extremes, at times feverish or resigned, dreamy or terrified, tormented by nightmarish visions.

Mussorgsky‘s Pictures at an Exhibition are not as frightening or intimidating and yet they are vivid images that come to life in music These images, though, are more firmly rooted in the real world. Hartmann’s drawings provided the inspiration for this collection: Mussorgsky shaped them into sound, conjuring up an exhibition of musical portraits. Visual perceptions occasion intimate reflections on life, death and art.

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa


Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa Haskil Argerich Horowitz Bosendorfer

 

First edition title page

Kinderszenen (German pronunciation: [ˈkɪndɐˌst͡seːnən]; original spelling Kinderscenen, “Scenes from Childhood“), Opus 15, by Robert Schumann, is a set of thirteen pieces of music for piano written in 1838. In this work, Schumann provides us with his adult reminiscences of childhood. Schumann had originally written 30 movements for this work, but chose 13 for the final version.[1] Robert Polansky has discussed the unused movements.[2]

Nr. 7, Träumerei, is one of Schumann’s best known pieces; it was the title of a 1944 German biographical film on Robert Schumann.[3] Träumerei is also the opening and closing musical theme in the 1947 Hollywood film Song of Love, starring Katharine Hepburn as Clara Wieck Schumann.[4]

Schumann had originally labeled this work Leichte Stücke (Easy Pieces). Likewise, the section titles were only added after the completion of the music, and Schumann described the titles as “nothing more than delicate hints for execution and interpretation”.[5] Timothy Taylor has discussed Schumann’s choice of titles for this work in the context of the changing situation of music in 19th century culture and economics.[6]

In 1974, Eric Sams noted that there was no known complete manuscript of Kinderszenen

Movements
Title Key Play
1. Von fremden Ländern und Menschen
Of Foreign Lands and Peoples
G major
 
Menu
 
0:00
2. Kuriose Geschichte
A Curious Story
[8]
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
3. Hasche-Mann
Blind Man’s Bluff
B minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
4. Bittendes Kind
Pleading Child
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
5. Glückes genug
Happy Enough
D major
 
Menu
 
0:00
6. Wichtige Begebenheit
An Important Event
A major
 
Menu
 
0:00
7. Träumerei
Dreaming
F major
 
Menu
 
0:00
8. Am Kamin
At the Fireside
[9]
F major
 
Menu
 
0:00
9. Ritter vom Steckenpferd
Knight of the Hobbyhorse
C major
 
Menu
 
0:00
10. Fast zu ernst
Almost Too Serious
G-sharp minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
11. Fürchtenmachen
Frightening
E minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
12. Kind im Einschlummern
Child Falling Asleep
E minor
 
Menu
 
0:00
13. Der Dichter spricht
The Poet Speaks
G major
 
Menu
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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: ROBERT SCHUMANN – INTRODUCTION UND ALLEGRO APPASSIONATO OP. 92 – SVIATOSLAV RICHTER


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnnxxrEvQ6I

ROBERT SCHUMANN – INTRODUCTION UND ALLEGRO APPASSIONATO OP. 92 – SVIATOSLAV RICHTER

Robert Schumann

Introduction und Allegro appassionato
[Konzertstück für Klavier und Orchester G Dur op. 92]

Sviatoslav Richter, Klavier

Sinfonie-Orchester der Nationalen Philharmonie Warschau -
Stanislaw Wislocki, Leitung

1959

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Sviatoslav Richter PLAYS Schumann – Etudes symphoniques op 13 – Richter studio


Schumann – Etudes symphoniques op 13 – Richter studio

Robert Schumann
Etudes symphoniques op.13
Sviatoslav Richter
Studio recording, Salzburg, 1-3, 6, 7,14,15 & 24.IX.1971

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Chopin – Variations on “Là ci darem la mano” from Mozart’s Don Giovanni


ChopinVariations on “Là ci darem la mano” from Mozart‘s Don Giovanni

Frédéric Chopin’s Variations on “Là ci darem la mano” for piano and orchestra, Op. 2, was written in 1827, when he was aged only 17. “Là ci darem la mano” is a duet sung by Don Giovanni and Zerlina, from Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni. It was one of the earliest manifestations of Chopin’s incipient genius. It inspired Robert Schumann‘s famous exclamation, Hats off, gentlemen! A genius!

The work was premiered on 11 August 1829 at the Vienna Kärntnertortheater, with Chopin as the soloist. It received very positive audience and critical acclaim.

The work is in B-flat major throughout, except for the Adagio of Variation 5, which is in the minor key.

- Introduction: Largo – Poco piu mosso 0:00
- Thema: Allegretto 5:20
- Variation 1: Brillante 6:53
- Variation 2: Veloce, ma accuratamente 7:52
- Variation 3: Sempre sostenuto 8:54
- Variation 4: Con bravura 10:20
- Variation 5: Alla Polacca 11:24

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi


Clara Schumann: Piano Concerto Op. 7 – Francesco Nicolosi

Parts/Movements

  1. Allegro maestoso
  2. Romanze. Andante non troppo, con grazia
  3. Finale. Allegro non troppo
Clara Schumann
Clara Schumann 1878.jpg

Portrait by Franz von Lenbach, 1878
Born Clara Josephine Wieck
13 September 1819
Leipzig
Died 20 May 1896 (aged 76)
Frankfurt, German Empire
Cause of death
Stroke
Nationality German
Occupation Pianist, composer
Spouse(s) Robert Schumann (m. 1840; wid. 1856)
Children Eight

Clara Schumann (née Clara Josephine Wieck; 13 September 1819 – 20 May 1896) was a German musician and composer, considered one of the most distinguished pianists of the Romantic era. She exerted her influence over a 61-year concert career, changing the format and repertoire of the piano recital and the tastes of the listening public. Her husband was the composer Robert Schumann. Together they encouraged Johannes Brahms, and she was the first pianist to give public performances of some of Brahms’s works, notably the Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel.[1]

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Legendary Performances: Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 – Furtwängler, BPO, 1953 (Remastered 2012)


 

Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 – Furtwängler, BPO, 1953 (Remastered 2012)

 

Wilhelm Furtwängler conducts the Symphonies of Robert Schumann
Legendary Recordings LR002
Download this CD here- http://www.abbajustlikethat.comyr.com…
Robert Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 (Revised 1851 version)
1. First Movement – Ziemlich langsam – Lebhaft 11:51
2. Second Movement – Romanze: Ziemlich langsam 05:20
3. Third Movement – Scherzo: Lebhaft 05:55
4. Fourth Movement – Langsam; Lebhaft 8:01
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler
Studio Recording, Berlin, May 14, 1953

Restoration notes -

Portrait of Wilhelm Furtwängler by Emil Orlik

Portrait of Wilhelm Furtwängler by Emil Orlik (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Widely considered to be the greatest recording of Schumann’s 4th symphony ever made, it is quite fortunate then that the original audio was quite good to begin with. I focused on reducing the harsh edge on the violins, trying to make them sound more natural, and giving a more rounded sound to the orchestra. The result is fantastic.

Audio Restored and Remastered by Rudolf Ondrich, 12-13 October 2012.

 

 

 

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JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39: JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39 Performed by Dinu Lipatti, Nadia Boulanger



JOHANNES BRAHMS – 7 WALTZES OP. 39
Performed by Dinu Lipatti, Nadia Boulanger

1. Waltz for Four Hands in C-Sharp Major, No. 6, Op. 39 00:00
2. Waltz for Four Hands in A-Flat Major, No. 15, Op. 39 00:58
3. Waltz for Four Hands in E Major, No. 2, Op. 39 2:04
4. Waltz for Four Hands in B Major, No. 1, Op. 39 3:19
5. Waltz for Four Hands in G-Sharp Minor, No. 14, Op. 39 4:07
6. Waltz for Four Hands in G Major, No. 10, Op. 39 5:15
7. Waltz for Four Hands in E Major, No. 5, Op. 39 5:47

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Schumann – Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op. 52



Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op. 52. 

The Hanover Band, on period instruments. Conducted by Roy Goodman. Composed by R. Schumann (1810-56). 

I. Overture (0:00)
II. Scherzo (6:20)
III. Finale (10:48)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Liszt: Liebeslied S 566 (Schumann: Widmung)




Franz Liszt: Liebeslied S 566 (Schumann: Widmung)

Lang Lang

Berlin, April 28, 2011
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: ROBERT SCHUMANN – Overture, Scherzo und Finale, Op.52



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: ROBERT SCHUMANN – Overture, Scherzo und Finale, Op.52:

GILBERTO SEREMBE, conductor
O.R.T. – Orchestra Regionale Toscana
Firenze, Teatro della Compagnia, 9 June 1995
http://www.italianconductingacademy.com

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Lipatti & Ansermet – Schumann Concerto in A minor Op. 54



1. Allegro affettuoso
2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (15:32)
3. Allegro vivace (20:26)

Dinu Lipatti, piano
Ernest Ansermet conducting the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
live – Geneva, February 22, 1950

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Horowitz plays Schumann Toccata in C Major, Op.7



Robert Schumann 
Toccata in C Major, Op.7 
Vladimir Horowitz: piano

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Emil Gilels, piano

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Schumann – Symphony No. 2 in C Op.61 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)
Related articles

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Robert Schumann 1810-1856 – Symfoni no 3 – DRSO – Thomas Dausgaard



Robert Schumann 1810-1856 – Symfoni no 3 – Danmarks Radio SymfoniOrkestret – Thomas Dausgaard.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, three trombonestimpani andstrings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Arrau Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54



Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

1.- Allegro Affettuoso
2.- Intermezzo: Andantino Grazioso
3.- Allegro Vivace

Film footage recorded in 1963

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Claudio Arrau (1903-1991)

 

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Sviatoslav Richter – Schumann – Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op 82



Robert Schumann
Waldszenen (Forest Scenes), Op 82

 

The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richte...

The image of Russian pianist Sviatoslav Richter (1915-1997) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

1 Eintritt
2 Jäger auf der Lauer
3 Einsame Blumen
4 Verrufene Stelle
5 Freundliche Landschaft
6 Herberge 
7 Vogel als Prophet
8 Jagdlied
9 Abschied

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

Recorded live, 1956

 

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich



Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft (Lively)
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (Scherzo) (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (not fast) (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (Solemn) (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft (Lively)

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, threetrombonestimpani and strings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

Biographical context

Throughout his life, Schumann explored a diversity of musical genres, including chambervocal, and symphonic music. Although Schumann wrote an incomplete G minor symphony as early as 1832-33 (of which the first movement was performed on two occasions to an unenthusiastic reception),[3]he only began seriously composing for the symphonic genre after receiving his wife’s encouragement in 1839.[4] Schumann gained quick success as a symphonic composer following his orchestral debut with his warmly-received First Symphony, which was composed in 1841 and premiered in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. By the end of his career Schumann had composed a total of four symphonies. Also in 1841 he finished the work which was later to be published as his Fourth Symphony. In 1845 he composed his C major Symphony, which was published in 1846 asNo. 2, and, in 1850, his Third Symphony. Therefore, the published numbering of the symphonies is not chronological. The reasoning for the “incorrect” numerical sequencing of the symphonies is because his Fourth Symphony was originally completed in 1841, but it was not well received at its Leipzig premiere. The lukewarm reception caused Schumann to withdraw the score and revise it ten years later in Düsseldorf. This final version was published in 1851 after the “Rhenish” Symphony was published

Genesis

The same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt to them as if they were on a pilgrimage.[5] As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity.[6]

 

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 – Furtwängler, BPO, 1953 (Remastered 2012)



Wilhelm Furtwängler conducts the Symphonies of Robert Schumann
Legendary Recordings LR002
Download this CD here - http://www.abbajustlikethat.comyr.com…
Robert Schumann – Symphony No. 4 in D minor Op. 120 (Revised 1851 version)
1. First Movement – Ziemlich langsam – Lebhaft 11:51
2. Second Movement – Romanze: Ziemlich langsam 05:20
3. Third Movement – Scherzo: Lebhaft 05:55
4. Fourth Movement – Langsam; Lebhaft 8:01
Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Wilhelm Furtwängler
Studio Recording, Berlin, May 14, 1953

Restoration notes -

Wilhelm Furtwängler (timbre Berlin-Ouest / Bri...

Wilhelm Furtwängler (timbre Berlin-Ouest / Briefmarke Westberlin) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Widely considered to be the greatest recording of Schumann’s 4th symphony ever made, it is quite fortunate then that the original audio was quite good to begin with. I focused on reducing the harsh edge on the violins, trying to make them sound more natural, and giving a more rounded sound to the orchestra. The result is fantastic.

Audio Restored and Remastered by Rudolf Ondrich, 12-13 October 2012.”

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schumann – Symphony n°2 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Published on Mar 6, 2013
Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  

The Symphony in C major by German composer Robert Schumann was published in 1847 as his Symphony No. 2, Op. 61, although it was the third symphony he had completed, counting the B-flat major symphony published as No. 1 in 1841, and the original version of his D minor symphony of 1841 (later revised and published as No. 4).

Schumann began to sketch the symphony on December 12, 1845, and had a robust draft of the entire work by December 28. He spent most of the next year orchestrating, beginning February 12, 1846.[1] His depression and poor health, including ringing in his ears, prevented him finishing the work until October 19. Publication followed in 1847.

The uplifting tone of the symphony is remarkable in the face of Schumann’s health problems—the work can be seen as a Beethovenian triumph over fate/pessimism. It is written in the traditional four-movement form, and as often in the nineteenth century the Scherzo precedes the Adagio. All four movements are in C major, except the first part of the slow movement (in C minor); the work is thus homotonal:

  1. Sostenuto assai — Allegro, ma non troppo
  2. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
  3. Adagio espressivo
  4. Allegro molto vivace
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Schumann, Albumblatt op. 124 Nr. 16 (Schlummerlied), Wolfgang Weller 2012.



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856)
Albumblätter op. 124 Nr. 16 “Schlummerlied”
Wolfgang Weller

Tempo Giusto

This recording is part of the ongoing Schumann-Project:
ROBERT SCHUMANN / COMPLETE PIANO WORKS / WOLFGANG WELLER

 

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Claudio Arrau


Claudio Arrau

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Claudio Arrau in 1974, by Allan Warren

Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991)[1] was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning from the baroque to 20th-century composers, especiallyBeethovenSchubertChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century.

 

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Felix Mendelssohn – Six Anthems for eight voices a capella opus 79 – New Year



Maulbronn Chamber Choir
The night shines as the day
Conductor: Jürgen Budday

A concert recording from the church of the
UNESCO World Heritage Site Maulbronn Monastery.
Released & created by Andreas Otto Grimminger & Josef-Stefan Kindler
in cooperation with Jürgen Budday.
Juli 2010.

F. Mendelssohn: Sechs Sprüche zum Kirchenjahr.
In durchweg opulenten 8stimmigen Sätzen durchmisst Mendelssohn die Feste des Kirchenjahres vom Advent bis zu Himmelfahrt. Dabei reicht die klangliche Palette je nach Charakter des jeweiligen Festes vom dumpfen Adagio bis hin zum strahlenden, jubelnden Allegro. Inhaltlich repräsentiert insbesondere der Text der Passionszeit das Thema des Konzertes: Die “Übeltaten”, das Elend und die Sünde stehen für die negativen Seiten des Lebens, die durch Christus in der Herrlichkeit Gottes aufgehoben werden.

 

Great Performances: Schumann: Violin Concerto / Frank Peter Zimmermann



WDR Sinfonieorchester – Kölner Philharmonie
Frank Peter Zimmermann
Robert Schumann: Violinkonzert
conducted by: Jukka Pekka Saraste (Chefdirigent)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Robert Schumann‘s Violin Concerto in D minorWoO 23 was his only violin concerto and one of his last significant compositions, and one that remained unknown to all but a very small circle for more than 80 years after it was written.

The work is in three movements:

  1. In kräftigem, nicht zu schnellem Tempo (D minor)
  2. Langsam (B-flat major)
  3. Lebhaft, doch nicht schnell (D major)

The concerto is in the traditional three-movement quick-slow-quick form. It belongs less to the poetic and passionate style of Schumann’s early masterpieces than to the more objective, classical manner of his later music, as ushered in by the ‘Rhenish’ Symphony of 1850. Certainly the opening movement, which is in sonata form, is conceived more on symphonic than concertante lines. Its powerful opening subject dominates the proceedings, and although the violin’s role is extremely taxing, its subordination to a ‘symphonic’ scheme is emphasized by the fact that there is no cadenza. The second movement, in B flat, has the character of an intensely lyrical intermezzo, and passes without pause into a vigorous and dance-like sonata-rondo finale in the parallel major, D major. An unusual feature of the third movement is its strong polonaise rhythm.

Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Franz Liszt: Liebeslied S 566 “Widmung” by Robert Schumann Rare Transcription


Franz Liszt: Liebeslied S 566 “Widmung” by Robert Schumann Rare Transcription
Pianist Pablo Cintron performs a rare version of Franz Liszt Transciption Robert Schumann’s “Widmung” (“Dedication”) opens his song-cycle Myrthen (‘Myrtles’), which was appropriately named after the blossoms traditionally associated with marriage festivals, as it was his wedding present to his bride, Clara Wieck. He began composing songs as a means of proving his financial stability as a future husband, and in “Widmung”, as was the case with all his compositions of this genre, he deeply expressed his most heart-felt emotions; passion and devotion, fears and longing, frustration and suffering from their separation, and the hopes and dreams of their life together. He began the cycle in the early part of 1840, finishing it in April, well ahead of his self-established September deadline. When complete, “Widmung” and its accompanying poems were lavishly bound with a red velvet inscription, which affectionately read “To my beloved bride.” The song-cycle also contained the composition “Zum Schluss” (“‘In Conclusion’”), that together with “Widmung” made up the two Lieder der Braut (‘The Bride’s Songs), which form the most passionate outpouring in Myrthen. 

“Widmung” was one of five songs in Myrthen with texts from the poems of Friedrich Rückert. When Schumann became captivated by Rückert’s mastery of the rhythmic and technical aspects of poetry, he temporarily turned away from setting Heine’s writings. Schumann was at ease with Rückert’s words as they were slightly easier to set to music than those of the other poet. In “Widmung”, Schumann confessed all of the things Wieck was to him; his peace, angel, repose, rapture, heart, soul, grave for sorrows, better self and his heaven. In this carefully balanced arrangement of text and music, he revealed the depth of his engagement as a poet-musician. This spirited song contains a few devices which reappeared in his later works, including sweeping keyboard passages and the haunting enharmonic progression (A flat major to E flat major) to the central section. He altered the text by repeating the final verse, and these last measures contain a thoughtful instrumental effect, which eclipses the text and introduces a new motif. The work contains the tempo marking “Innig, Lebhaft 3/2,” and is often sung too slowly. The pattern of the accompaniment, rising and falling, reappeared in “Helft mir, ihr Schwestern Op. 42/5″ and the melody was paraphrased in the heroine’s song of “Die Löwenbraut Op. 31/1″. “Widmung” was performed on several occasions throughout Schumann’s life, once with his “Das Paradies und die Peri Op. 50″ and another time with his Symphony in B flat major, at a benefit concert on March 31, 1841. The depth of the song had a widespread acceptance and effect, and in France, in 1849, Franz Liszt paved the way for Schumann’s influence, with a publication of “Widmung”, for solo piano. Only 40 of Schumann’s 150 solo songs are still commonly heard in recital halls; popular among vocalists at all levels, “Widmung” is included in that first number, as one of the 

 

Schubert: Rondo el la mayor para violin y cuerdas D 438



Federico Agostini, violin 
Orquesta de Camara Abril. Concierto de Clausura.
0:11
3:43

Robert Schumann: Cello Concerto op.129 – Mario Brunello



Mario Brunello plays the Schumann‘s Cello Concerto op.129
Umberto Benedetti Michelangeli conducts the Rai National Symphony Orchestra (Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della Rai)
Turin, 1996

 

Robert Schumann, Blumenstück – Sviatoslav Richter



Robert Schumann
Blumenstück op.19 (1839)
Sviatoslav Richter

 

Schumann, Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52



Robert SCHUMANN
Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52

1. Overture – 00.05
2. Scherzo – 07.13
3. Finale – 11.30

Sinfonietta Sofia Orchestra conducted by Christo Pavlov

New Concert Hall, 01 Oct 2011
Sofia, Bulgaria

 

Leonid Kogan – Schumann – Fantasie in C major, Op 131 (Live recording, 1953)



Robert Schumann
Fantasie in C major, Op 131
(arranged for violin and piano)

Leonid Kogan, violin
Andrei Mytnik, piano

Live recording, 1953

Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor, K. 550



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only minor key symphonies Mozart wrote. The 40th Symphony was completed on 25 July 1788. The composition occupied an exceptionally productive period of just a few weeks in 1788, during which time he also completed the 39th and 41st symphonies (26 June and 10 August, respectively). The symphony is scored (in its revised version) for flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons, 2 horns, and strings. Notably missing are trumpets and timpani.
The work is in four movements, in the usual arrangement (fast movement, slow movement, minuet, fast movement) for a classical-style symphony:
1. Molto allegro, 2/2
2. Andante, 6/8
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio, 3/4
4. Finale. Allegro assai, 2/2.
Every movement but the third is in sonata form; the minuet and trio are in the usual ternary form. This work has elicited varying interpretations from critics. Robert Schumann regarded it as possessing “Grecian lightness and grace”. Donald Francis Tovey saw in it the character of opera buffa. Almost certainly, however, the most common perception today is that the symphony is tragic in tone and intensely emotional; for example, Charles Rosen (in The Classical Style) has called the symphony “a work of passion, violence, and grief.”
Although interpretations differ, the symphony is unquestionably one of Mozart’s most greatly admired works, and it is frequently performed and recorded. Ludwig van Beethoven knew the symphony well, copying out 29 measures from the score in one of his sketchbooks. It is thought that the opening theme of the last movement may have inspired Beethoven in composing the third movement of his Fifth Symphony
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FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

Emil Gilels – Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Emil Gilels, piano

 

Schumann: Pianotrio in g kl.t., op.110



Inon Barnatan, piano
Julian Rachlin, viool
Torleif Thedéen, cello

Schumann: Piano Trio in g minor, op.110

27 december 2010, Internationaal Kamermuziekfestival Utrecht, Vredenburg

 

Sviatoslav Richter plays Schumann – Symphonic Etudes, Op 13



Robert Schumann
Symphonic Etudes, Op 13

Sviatoslav Richter, piano

Recorded live, October 1968

 

Franco GULLI @ SCHUMANN-BRAHMS-DIETRICH Sonata FAE (complete) E.Cavallo,1990



F.A.E. – Violin Sonata (1853) – “In Erwartung der Ankfunt des verehrten und geliebten Freundes JOSEPH JOACHIM, schrieben diese Sonate – Robert SCHUMANN, Johannes BRAHMS, Albert DIETRICH”
0:10 / DIETRICH (1829-1908) – I. Allegro, in A minor [13'40'']
13:37 / SCHUMANN (1810-1856) – II. Intermezzo (Bewegt, doch nicht zu Schnell) WoO 22 [2'26'']
16:16 / BRAHMS (1833-1897) – III. Scherzo (Allegro) in C minor WoO 2 [5'36'']
21:53 / SCHUMANN (1810-1856) – IV. Finale (Markirtes, ziemlich lebhaftes tempo) WoO 22 [6'58'']
Franco GULLI, violin – Enrica Cavallo, piano 
(rec: June 1990, Dynamic Studio, Genova)
________________________________________­__________
Duo Gulli-Cavallo – STRAUSS: http://youtu.be/l8H081NCP7c

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff plays Schumann “Carnaval” Op. 9



Robert Schumann, Carnaval Op. 9
Part I
1. Préambule
2. Pierrot
3. Arlequin
4. Valse noble
5. Eusebius
6. Florestan
7. Coquette
8. Réplique
- Sphinxes
9. Papillons

 

Emil Gilels spielt Robert Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18



Ort: Moskauer Konservatorium 1977

 

Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa



Schumann Kinderszenen Op 15 – Valentina Lisitsa Haskil Argerich Horowitz Bosendorfer:

no.1 Of Foreign Lands and Peoples

1:32 no.2 Curious Story

2:37 no.3 Blindman’s Bluff

3:09 no.4 Entreating Child

3:54 no.5 Perfect Happiness

4:33 no.6 Important Event

5:22 no.7 Dreaming

7:55 no.8 Near The Fire Side

I love no.7 (Traumerei)

Robert Schumann Symphonic Studies (Etudes Symphoniques) op.13 (complete) Mehmet Okonsar,piano



Robert Schumann Symphonic Studies (Etudes Symphoniques) op.13 (complete) Mehmet Okonsar,piano

 

Emil Gilels spielt Robert Schumann: Arabeske Op. 18



Ort: Moskauer Konservatorium 1977

 

Robert SCHUMANN Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52 – Sinfonietta Sofia Orchestra conducted by Christo Pavlov



Robert SCHUMANN
Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52

1. Overture – 00.05
2. Scherzo - 07.13
3. Finale – 11.30

Sinfonietta Sofia Orchestra conducted by Christo Pavlov

New Concert Hall, 01 Oct 2011
Sofia, Bulgaria

 

Robert Schumann – Piano Quintet opus 44 – Ensemble Syntonia



NEWS : Nouvelle vidéo de Syntonia sur Arte Live Web !http://liveweb.arte.tv/fr/video/Salon…

Robert Schumann – Quintette avec piano en mi b Majeur opus 44
1. Allegro Brillante
2. In modo d’una marcia. Un poco largamente
3. Scherzo : Molto vivace
4. Finale : Allegro ma non troppo

Ensemble Syntonia
Pascal Oddon, Mathieu Godefroy, violons
Anne-Aurore Anstett, alto
Patrick Langot, violoncelle
Romain David, piano

Enregistré en 2001 à La Roque d’Anthéron, lors du Festival International de Piano.

http://www.ensemblesyntonia.com

Pour acheter le disque : 
http://www.abeillemusique.com/CD/Clas…

 

Robert Schumann: Toccata in C major, Op. 7



Robert Schumann: Toccata in C major, Op. 7
Piano: Mauro Bertoli
Venue: Piano Festival 2009

Schumann: Symphony No.2 – Gardiner/RCO



Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Symphony No.2 in C major, op.61
John Eliot Gardiner
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, 7 3/2010