Tag Archives: Russia

this pressed-for the record: Flash – Ukraine president replaces Donetsk governor with hardline general – France 24


AFP

A woman walks past grafitti reading

A woman walks past grafitti reading “Donetsk will be free”, and bearing a Russian flag in Donetsk on October 10, 2014

A woman walks past grafitti reading “Donetsk will be free”, and bearing a Russian flag in Donetsk on October 10, 2014

Ukraine’s president on Friday fired a millionaire businessman who failed to stop the advance of pro-Russian rebels while governor of war-torn Donetsk and replaced him with a hardline nationalist general.

via Flash – Ukraine president replaces Donetsk governor with hardline general – France 24.

this day in the yesteryear: Boris Yeltsin Orders Tanks to Storm Russian Parliament (1993)


Boris Yeltsin Orders Tanks to Storm Russian Parliament (1993)

As president of an independent Russia, Boris Yeltsin sought to end state control of the economy but clashed with parliament, which was controlled by former Communists. When Yeltsin suspended the parliament, it retaliated by naming Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi as acting president, and anti-Yeltsin forces barricaded themselves inside the parliament building. The military interceded on Yeltsin’s side and, after a bloody battle, troops recaptured the parliament building. What was the death toll? More… Discuss

Svetlanov conducts Tchaikovsky – Capriccio italien, Op. 45: great compositions/performances


Svetlanov conducts Tchaikovsky – Capriccio italien, Op. 45

today’s birthday: Ivan Pavlov (1849) Russian physiologist and Nobel laureate Ivan Pavlov is chiefly known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex, a reflex developed gradually by training in association with a specific repeated external stimulus. In the 1890s, he was investigating the gastric function of dogs when he noticed that the animals began salivating at the mere sound of the bell that preceded their feedings. He made this phenomenon the focus of his research. What other experimental subjects did he use in his research? More… Discuss


Ivan Pavlov (1849)

Russian physiologist and Nobel laureate Ivan Pavlov is chiefly known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex, a reflex developed gradually by training in association with a specific repeated external stimulus. In the 1890s, he was investigating the gastric function of dogs when he noticed that the animals began salivating at the mere sound of the bell that preceded their feedings. He made this phenomenon the focus of his research. What other experimental subjects did he use in his research? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Treaty of Fredrikshamn Signed (1809)


Treaty of Fredrikshamn Signed (1809)

In the 17th century, Sweden was a major European power and controlled most of the Baltic coast. However, its expansion in the Baltic Sea coastlands antagonized Russia, Denmark-Norway, and Saxony-Poland, which formed an anti-Swedish coalition. The resultant Great Northern War cost Sweden much of its territory and marked the emergence of Russia as a major power. After Russia and Sweden clashed again in the 19th century, the 1809 Treaty of Fredrikshamn forced Sweden to cede all of what country? More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov (1745)


Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov (1745)

Kutuzov was a Russian field marshal who commanded the Russian army during major engagements with Napoleon between 1805 and 1812, including the battles of Austerlitz and Borodino. Though his forces suffered great losses in both of these engagements, Kutuzov nevertheless managed to rout the French, forcing them to leave along the path they had devastated when they entered the country. For Napoleon, this was the beginning of the end. In what epic novel does Kutuzov appear as a major character? More… Discuss

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this

day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

September 14
1146   Zangi of the Near East is murdered. The Sultan Nur ad-Din, his son, pursues the conquest of Edessa.
1321   Dante Alighieri dies of malaria just hours after finishing writing Paradiso.
1544   Henry VIII’s forces take Boulogne, France.
1773   Russian forces under Aleksandr Suvorov successfully storm a Turkish fort at Hirsov, Turkey.
1791   Louis XVI swears his allegiance to the French constitution.
1812   Napoleon Bonaparte’s invasion of Russia reaches its climax as his Grande Armee enters Moscow–only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained.
1814   Francis Scott Key writes the words to the “Star Spangled Banner” as he waits aboard a British launch in the Chesapeake Bay for the outcome of the British assault on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
1847   U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott capture Mexico City, virtually bringing the two-year Mexican War to a close.
1853   The Allies land at Eupatoria on the west coast of Crimea.
1862   At the battles of South Mountain and Crampton’s Gap, Maryland Union troops smash into the Confederates as they close in on what will become the Antietam battleground.
1901   Vice President Theodore Roosevelt is sworn in as the 26th President of the United States upon the death of William McKinley, who was shot eight days earlier.
1911   Russian Premier Piotr Stolypin is mortally wounded in an assassination attempt at the Kiev opera house.
1943   German troops abandon the Salerno front in Italy..
1960   Iraq, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia form OPEC.
1966   Operation Attleboro, designed as a training exercise for American troops, becomes a month-long struggle against the Viet Cong.
1975   Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church.
1979   Nur Muhammad Taraki, president and former prime minister of Afghanistan, is assassinated in a coup in which prime minister Hafizullah Amin seizes power.
1982   Bachir Gemayel, president-elect of Lebanon, is killed along with 26 others in a bomb blast in Beirut.
1984   Joe Kittinger, a former USAF fighter pilot during the Vietnam War, becomes the first person to pilot a gas balloon solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
1994   Major League Baseball players strike over a salary cap and other proposed changes, forcing the cancellation of the entire postseason and the World Series.
2007   Northern Rock Bank suffers the UK’s first bank run in 150 years.
Born on September 14
1769   Baron Freidrich von Humbolt, German naturalist and explorer who made the first isothermic and isobaric maps.
1849   Ivan Pavlov, Russian physiologist who studied dogs’ responsiveness.
1860   Hamlin Garland, author who wrote about the Midwest in novles such as A Son of the Middle Border and The Book of the American Indian.
1864   Lord Robert Cecil, one of the founders of the League of Nations and its president from 1923 to 1945.
1867   Charles Dana Gibson, illustrator, creator of the ‘Gibson Girl.’
1879   Margaret Sanger, birth-control advocate and founder of Planned Parenthood.
1898   Hal B. Wallis, film producer (The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca).
1921   Constance Baker Motley, first African-American woman to be appointed a federal judge.
1930   Allan Bloom, writer (The Closing of the American Mind).
1934   Kate Millet, feminist writer, author of Sexual Politics.
1936   Ferid Murad, Albanian-American physician and pharmacologist, is co-winner of Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on nitroglycerin’s effects the cardiovascular system.
1948   Marc Reisner, author and environmentalist best known for his book Cadillac Desert, a history of water management in the Western portion of the US.
1955   Geraldine Brooks, Australian-American journalist and author; her novel March won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2005).
1961   Wendy Thomas (Melinda “Wendy” Thomas Morse), namesake, mascot and spokesperson for the Wendy’s chain of fast-food restaurants.
1983   Amy Winehouse, singer-songwriter; her five Grammy wins (out of six nominations) for her Back to Black album (2006) tied the existing record for most wins by a female artist in a single night; won Brit Award for Best British Female Artist (2007).

 

this pressed: Moscow will review its military strategy in face of NATO plan for rapid-reaction force – The Washington Post


Moscow will review its military strategy in face of NATO plan for rapid-reaction force –

The Washington Post.

this pressed: Ukraine: Nato hält Niederlage für Kiew für sicher – SPIEGEL ONLINE (Analysis of the military situation: NATO sees Ukraine as already loser)



Ukraine: Prorussische Separatisten auf dem Vormarsch

Ukraine: Nato hält Niederlage für Kiew für sicher – SPIEGEL ONLINE.

(Analysis of the military situation: NATO sees Ukraine as already loser)

Excerpts from article:  “Kiev / Moscow - NATO has changed its military assessment of the situation in eastern Ukraine fundamentally. A week ago, the strategists of the Alliance assumed that Russia has strengthened the separatists with covert troops only because the pro-Russian rebels had to retreat under pressure of the Ukrainian army.

When the generals of the alliance but then late last week to a crisis meeting on the situation of the army of the Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko came together, they painted a grim picture. Militarily, the conflict for Kiev is already lost,” stated a senior NATO general. Poroshenko, the judgment, were really only talks to withdraw his men alive from the pliers of the Russians“.

The location descriptions behind closed doors were far more dramatic than the few images that NATO published mid-week. On large maps were marked with thick arrows Russian units, which now from the north, the west and the south on the border of eastern Ukraine are at least 20 Battalions  with a minimum of 500 men and heavy guns are the scouts of NATO.”
(translation from German to English with the aid of Google Translate online service)

quotation: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, “One can know a man from his laugh…”


One can know a man from his laugh, and if you like a man’s laugh before you know anything of him, you may confidently say that he is a good man.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss


NATO Says Russian Troops in Ukraine

NATO says more than 1,000 Russian troops are now operating inside Ukraine and released satellite images purporting to show Russian combat forces and heavy weapons engaging in military activity within Ukraine to support its claims. It also asserts that Russia has transferred large quantities of advanced weapons, including air defense systems, artillery, tanks, and armored personnel carriers to Ukrainian separatists in the east of the country. The Kremlin, meanwhile, denies these accusations. The UN Security Council convened an emergency meeting to discuss the ongoing crisis. More… Discuss

this pressed watch video here: Ukraine detains Russian paratroopers; U.S. ambassador warns of ‘counteroffensive’ – The Washington Post (“davai ceas, davai palton”…) the never ending story


Ukraine detains Russian paratroopers; U.S. ambassador warns of ‘counteroffensive’ – The Washington Post.

this pressed from CNet: Edward Snowden a ‘uniquely postmodern breed of whistle-blower’ – CNET


Edward Snowden a ‘uniquely postmodern breed of whistle-blower’ – CNET.

More Mystery Holes Appear in Siberia


More Mystery Holes Appear in Siberia

Two more mysterious craters have cropped up—or, perhaps more accurately, down—in an isolated region of Siberia north of the Arctic Circle. Earlier this month, the first such crater, nicknamed the “Yamal black hole” for its location on the Yamal peninsula, was discovered in the region. The area is rich in natural gas, leading to speculation that the holes are the result of underground gas explosions. However, this is not the only theory. Meteorites, stray missiles, and even aliens have all been cited as potential causes for the mysterious craters. More… Discuss

It’s hot in LA…what can I say: GLAZUNOV: The Seasons – ‘Summer’ – Philharmonia Orchestra – Yevgeny Svetlanov: great compositions/performances


GLAZUNOV: The Seasons – ‘Summer’ – Philharmonia Orchestra – Yevgeny Svetlanov

Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov (1865-1936 : Russia)

The Seasons (Ballet, Op.67)

Scene III. Summer

Scene Three depicts the height of summer in a wheatfield.
The Spirit of Corn (Kschessinska’s role) dances in the heat of
the day. Naiads carrying blue veils symbolize the coolness of
streams. Satyrs invade the field and attempt to carry off the
spirit of Corn who is protected by Zephyr and the flowers.
From booklet notes

I: Waltz 00:06
II: Barcarole 02:18
III: Variation 05:15
IV: Coda 06:38

Philharmonia Orchestra
Yevgeny Svetlanov, conductor

CDC-7 47847 2
1986 © Angel Records
ADD

Links:
Alexander Konstantinovich Glazunov
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexande…
Yevgeny Svetlanov
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yevgeny_…
Philharmonia Orchestra
http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/
Philharmonia Orchestra Facebook
https://www.facebook.com/philharmonia…
Philharmonia Orchestra YouTube
http://www.youtube.com/user/Philharmo…

Mikhail Baryshnikov


Mikhail Baryshnikov

 

Mikhail Baryshnikov in New York, 1984.

Mikhail Baryshnikov in New York, 1984. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Baryshnikov is a world renowned Russian-American dancer and choreographer. He began studying dance in Riga, Latvia, where he was raised, and soon earned himself a coveted spot with the Kirov Ballet, one of the foremost ballet companies in Russia. In 1974, while on tour with the company, he defected to the West and joined the American Ballet Theatre, where he later served as artistic director. He has also tried his hand at acting and has appeared in a number of films and TV shows, such as what? More… Discuss

make music part of your life series: Sergei Rachmaninoff – Études-Tableaux, Op. 39


Sergei RachmaninoffÉtudes-Tableaux, Op. 39

N. Lugansky, piano

Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the U...

Rachmaninoff, in his later years, toured the United States extensively, and became an American citizen shortly before his death. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

No. 1, in C minor
No. 2, in A minor
No. 3, in F sharp minor
No. 4, in B minor
No. 5, in E flat minor
No. 6, in A minor
No. 7, in C minor
No. 8, in D minor
No. 9, in D major

 

 

US Moving to Join Landmine Convention


US Moving to Join Landmine Convention

The Ottawa Convention, a UN treaty banning landmines, currently has 161 signatories, but noticeably absent are several world powers, including the US, Russia, and China. Though the number of people killed or maimed each year by landmines has fallen considerably since the convention came into force in 1999, thousands—the vast majority of whom are civilians—still fall victim to these weapons each year. Now, the US has announced its intention to eventually join the treaty, and it is taking steps toward this by committing to end production and purchasing of anti-personnel landmines, allowing existing stockpiles to dwindle as they expire. More… Discuss

Rasputin


Rasputin

Rasputin was a notorious figure in the court of Czar Nicholas II due to his magnetic personality and relative success in treating the czarevitch’s hemophilia. His appointees filled high positions, and those who opposed him were dismissed. A semiliterate peasant, Rasputin gained a reputation as a holy man, preaching a doctrine of salvation that mixed religious fervor with sexual indulgence. In 1916, a group of right-wing patriots plotted to kill him. What happened when they tried to poison him? More… Discuss

today’s holidady: Ysyakh


Ysyakh

This is a celebration of the midnight sun, observed in the Yakut region in the northeastern part of Russia on and around the Summer Solstice. In 1992 the Yakut Autonomous Soviet Republic became the Republic of Sakha (the Yakut people‘s name for themselves) within the Russian Federation. The festivities during Ysyakh include foot races, horse races, and often sled dog and reindeer races. Folk dancing and feasting—primarily on boiled beef and kumiss, or fermented mare’s milk—complete the celebration, which often goes on all night. More… Discuss

quotation: The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half. Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881)


The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss

this day in history: Boris Yeltsin Elected President of Russia (1991)


Boris Yeltsin Elected President of Russia (1991)

Yeltsin served as Russia’s first democratically elected president. He directed the Russian Federation‘s secession from the USSR and the formation of a new, decentralized confederation, the Commonwealth of Independent States, with himself as its leader. As president, Yeltsin instituted a radical reform program that consisted of the mass privatization of state-run enterprises, after which the country experienced inflation, heavy taxes, and a protracted economic depression. Who succeeded Yeltsin? More… Discuss

this pressed: BBC News – Ukraine crisis: Russia must engage with Kiev, says G7


BBC News – Ukraine crisis: Russia must engage with Kiev, says G7.

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press this: UPDATE 2-Russia will respond to increased NATO activity near border – top general | Reuters


 

UPDATE 2-Russia will respond to increased NATO activity near border – top general | Reuters.

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From Wikipedia: 2014 Russian military intervention in Ukraine


Ukrainian crisis
Part of the 2014 Crimean crisis
Crimea crisis map.PNG
Crimea (black), Ukraine (light green) and Russia (light red) in Europe
  Crimea
(disputed by Ukraine and the Russian Federation)
  Russia
Date 27 February 2014 (de facto)[1] – present
(2 months, 1 week and 1 day)
Location Crimea and Sevastopol
Southern Kherson Oblast, Ukraine[2]
Allegedly, Eastern Ukraine[3]
Status Ongoing

Belligerents
Russia Russia

Ukraine Ukraine[15]
Commanders and leaders
Pres. Vladimir Putin
Gen. Sergey Shoygu
Gen. Valery Gerasimov
Lt.Gen. Igor Sergun
V.Adm. Aleksandr Vitko
Sergey Aksyonov
Pres. (acting) Oleksandr Turchynov
Adm. Ihor Tenyukh
Lt.Gen. Mykhailo Kutsyn
R.Adm. Serhiy Hayduk (P.O.W.)
R.Adm. Denis Berezovsky
(defected)
Units involved
Medium emblem of the Вооружённые Силы Российской Федерации.svg Russian Armed Forces:[16][17]
Russian 76th Airborne Division patch.svg 76th Airborne Division
Russian 31st Airborne Brigade patch.svg 31st Airborne Brigade
18th Mechanized Brigade

Sleeve Insignia of the Russian Baltic Fleet.svg Baltic Fleet[18]
Sleeve Insignia of the Russian Northern Fleet.svg Northern Fleet
Sleeve Insignia of the Russian Black Sea Fleet.svg Black Sea Fleet:

FSB.svg FSB Operators

Generalstaff central dep.svg GRU Operators

Emblem of the Ukrainian Armed Forces.svg Armed Forces of Ukraine:
Emblem of the Ukrainian Navy.svg Ukrainian Navy

  • 36th Coastal Defense Brigade[23]  Surrendered

Gerb of State Border Guard Service of Ukraine.gif Ukrainian Sea Guard
MVS of Ukraine.gif Ukrainian police
Герб Внутрішніх Військ.png Internal Troops
NGU command.jpg National Guard of Ukraine
Security Service of Ukraine.gif SBU

  • Spetcnaz “Alpha”
Strength
Crimean Force: 25,000–30,000[24][25]

  • Black Sea Fleet: 11,000 (including Marines)4 Squadrons of fighter aircraft (18 planes each)

Reinforcements:Between 16,000[23][26][27][28] and 42,000[29] troops

Crimean garrison:
~ 14,500[30] – 18,800[31] troops
10 warships
Casualties and losses
15 Pro-Russian militants killed[22][32][33][34][35] 3 Ukrainian soldiers killed[36][37][38]
1 Ukrainian SBU officer killed
3 militants killed (Russian claim)
1 civilian activist abducted and killed[39]
1 Ukrainian MP abducted and killed
1 Ukrainian civilian killed
8+ wounded[15][40]
50+ captured[40][41][42]
1 Mil Mi-8 helicopter
1 An-2 transport aircraft
12 ships captured (some damaged)
Overall deaths: 25

Following the events of the 2014 Ukrainian Revolution, a secession crisis began on Ukraine‘s Crimean Peninsula. In late February 2014, unmarked armed forces began to take over the Crimean Peninsula in Ukraine. Experts identified the gunmen to be Russian Special Forces[43] and other paramilitaries. Russia at the time insisted that the forces did not include Russian troops stationed in the area,[44] but only local self-defense forces.[45][46] The local population and the media referred to them as “martians” or “little green men“.[47][48] On 17 April, Russian president Vladimir Putin admitted that Russian troops were in fact active in Crimea during the referendum, claiming this facilitated self-determination for the region.[49][50]

Russia rejected the legitimacy of the interim Ukrainian government in favor of ousted-President Viktor Yanukovych,[a] whose request for intervention has also been cited.[52][53] Russia has accused the United States and the EU of funding and directing the Ukrainian revolution.[54][55][56][57] The Ukrainian military reaction has included a mobilization of Ukraine’s armed forces and reserves. Western media reported that as of 3 March, Russia had stated that its troops would stay until the political situation was “normalised”[58][59] however Russia consistently denied that its troops were involved in the conflict at the time.[60][61][62][63]

Geopolitics of the Crimean autonomous Republic, March 2014.

Read more

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: NUCLEAR REACTOR AT CHERNOBYL PLANT EXPLODES (1986)


Nuclear Reactor at Chernobyl Plant Explodes (1986)

The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant is regarded as the worst nuclear accident in history. Radioactive debris from the disaster drifted across parts of the western Soviet Union and Europe. Large areas of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia were badly contaminated, resulting in the resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people and a disputed number of deaths. The incident set off an international outcry over the dangers posed by radioactive emissions. What caused the accident? More… Discuss

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Regina Spektor – “Samson” [OFFICIAL VIDEO]



Regina Spektor “Samson” Directed by Peter Sluszka

Regina’s new album ‘What We Saw from the Cheap Seats‘ is available now:
http://smarturl.it/whatwesawitunesyt

For more Regina:
http://Facebook.com/ReginaSpektor 
http://ReginaSpektor.com
http://myspace.com/ReginaSpektor

 Related articles

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Just a thought: Imagine going to sleep in your sovereign country, and waking up in as annexed to the neighboring one: Such is the fate of Ukrainian Citizen….What a shame!


click on image to access the report at CNN

click on image to access the report at CNN

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Visit at your own risk! I personally expressed my wish not to be associated in any way with this instigating website listed on my discussion settings!


http://usconstitutionalfreepress.wordpress.com/

click to access this site (at your own risk) AKA john galt keeps rebblogging my copyrighted posts even after my expressed wish that he abstain!

Visit at your own risk! I personally expressed my wish not to be associated in any way with this instigating website listed on my discussion settings!

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TODAY’S HOLIDAY: COSMONAUTS DAY


Cosmonauts Day

On April 12, 1961, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first man to travel in outer space. April 12 was declared Cosmonauts Day in Gagarin’s honor. Official ceremonies on this day begin in the Moscow suburb of Korolyov, well known as the center of Russian rocket production, where officials and former cosmonauts lay flowers at a statue of Gagarin. The general public celebrates the day in a less formal manner: some place flowers at statues of Gagarin in various cities, while others attend space-themed art and film exhibitions. More… Discuss

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“O Joyful Day,” Anonymous Slavic 17th century motet trans. Mark Bailey



American Baroque Orchestra
Mark Bailey, artistic director

From a live 2013 performance entitled, “Music across the Nations,” this Slavic part-song or kant is arranged for two instrumental groupings that trade musical lines, and then play as a united ensemble for the final time. These part songs reveal the first significant wave of western music to influence regions such as Ukraine and Russia. They were sung para-liturgically, i.e. based on sacred themes but not designed in the church service per se. Because they were strophic and tuneful, part songs were very popular for many decades. They lend themselves quite well to instrumental ensembles and likely were played that way as well.

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NEWS: CONTROVERSIAL CRIMEA REFERENDUM DRAWS SANCTIONS


Controversial Crimea Referendum Draws Sanctions

Despite opposition from Kiev and the West, Crimeamoved forward with a referendum in which voters overwhelmingly backed seceding from Ukraine and joining Russia. Given the buildup of Russian troops in the region and the hurried nature of the referendum, many question the legitimacy of the vote. Nevertheless, Crimean officials—whose authority is also contested—lost little time in formally applying to join Russia. The US and EU responses were swift, though not as far-reaching as some had hoped; sanctions were imposed on a number of individuals in Russia and Crimea who pushed for or helped carry out the referendum. More… Discuss

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: ALEXANDER III OF RUSSIA (1845)


Alexander III of Russia (1845)

Alexander III was tsar of Russia from 1881 until his death in 1894. As ruler, he sought to counteract what he considered the excessive liberalism of his father’s reign and pursued a reactionary policy that promoted Russification and the persecution of religious minorities. Still, economic policy during Alexander’s rule enabled rapid industrial development and allowed Russia to begin building the Trans-Siberian Railroad. To which of Alexander’s relatives was his wife, Dagmar, originally engaged? More…Discuss

 

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THIS DAY IN THE YESTERYEAR: FIRST ROCK FESTIVAL HELD IN THE SOVIET UNION (1980)


First Rock Festival Held in the Soviet Union (1980)

Dubbed the “Soviet Woodstock,” the 1980 Tbilisi rock festival is widely considered the turning point in the history of Russian rock music. Held in Tbilisi—capital of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic—the event was the USSR‘s first official rock festival. However, unlike Woodstock, the high point of youth counterculture in the US, freedom of expression at Tbilisi-80 was limited, and the jury stormed out after one performer’s provocative moves. Which bands performed at the event? More…Discuss

 

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History of Ukraine (excerpts from Wikipedia) <<<>>



Tetyana Ivanytska “Have Mercy On Me, Oh Lord” (Ukrainian classical music)
Artists: “Khreschatyk” Academic Chamber Choir, a conductor — Pavlo Struts
Kyiv, 2008

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Part of a series on the
History of Ukraine
Coat of arms of Ukraine
Portal icon Ukraine portal
 

The territory of Ukraine has been inhabited for at least forty four thousand years.[1] It is where the horse was first domesticated[2] and a candidate site of the origins of the Proto-Indo-European language family.[3][4]

According to a popular and well established theory, the medieval state of Kievan Rus was established by the Varangians in the 9th century as the first historically recorded East Slavic state. It emerged as a powerful nation in the Middle Ages but disintegrated in the 12th century. By the middle of the 14th century, present Ukrainian territories were under the rule of three external powers: the Golden Horde, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, and the Kingdom of Poland, during the 15th century these lands came under the rule of the Crown of the Kingdom of PolandPolish Lithuanian Commonwealth (since 1569), and Crimean Khanate.[5] In 1653 the greater portion of the population rebelled against dominantly Polish Catholic rule and in January 1654 an assembly of the people (rada) voted at Pereyaslav to turn to Moscow, effectively joining the southeastern portion of the Polish-Lithuanian empire east of the Dnieper River to Russia.[6] After the Partitions of Poland (1772–1795) and conquest of Crimean Khanate, Ukraine was divided between Russia and Austria, thus the largest part of Ukraine was integrated into theRussian Empire, with the rest under Austrian (known as Austro-Hungarian since 1849) control.

chaotic period of warfare ensued after the Russian Revolution, with internationally recognized establishment of an independent Ukrainian People’s Republic. Independent Ukraine emerged from its own civil war. The Ukrainian–Soviet Warfollowed, which resulted in the Soviet Army establishing control in late 1919[7]Soviet victory. The conquerors created theUkrainian Soviet Socialist Republic, which on 30 December 1922 became one of the founding republics of the Soviet Union. The Soviet government was hostile to Ukrainian language and Ukrainian culture; there were mass repressions of Ukrainian poets, historians and linguists. Then there was a genocide of Ukrainians: millions of people starved to death in 1932 and 1933 in the Holodomor. After the 1939 invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany and Soviet Union, the Ukrainian SSR’s territory was enlarged westward. During World War II the Ukrainian Insurgent Army tried to reestablish Ukrainian independence and fought against both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. But in 1941 Ukraine was occupied by Nazi Germany, being liberated in 1944. In 1945, the Ukrainian SSR became one of the founding members of the United Nations.[8] In 1954, it expanded to the south with the transfer of the Crimea.

Ukraine became independent again when the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991. This dissolution started a period of transition to amarket economy, in which Ukraine suffered an eight-year recession.[9] Since then, however, the economy has experienced a high increase in GDP growthUkraine was caught up in the worldwide economic crisis in 2008 and the economy plunged. GDP fell 20% from spring 2008 to spring 2009, then leveled off as analysts compared the magnitude of the downturn to the worst years of economic depression during the early 1990s.[10]

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: SVETLANA ALLILUYEVA (1926)


Svetlana Alliluyeva (1926)

The youngest child of Joseph Stalin, and his only daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva caused a furor when she defected to the West in the 1960s, leaving behind her two grown children in the process. After becoming a naturalized US citizen, she published two successful memoirs, married, took the name Lana Peters, had a daughter, and divorced. In 1984, she returned to the USSR and renounced her defection, but her resolve soon wavered. How long was it before she left again for the West? More… Discuss

 

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Corigliano: Suite from “The Red Violin” / Rachlevsky • Chamber Orchestra Kremlin



Corigliano: Suite from “The Red Violin” / Misha Rachlevsky • Chamber Orchestra Kremlin

Recorded at the Chamber Hall of the Moscow International House of Music, with Mr. Corigliano in the audience, March 2003. Russian premiere. With author’s permission, Misha Rachlevsky amended the Suite with other episodes from the film’s score, giving every violinist of the orchestra a chance to shine.

Our website: http://KremlinOnTour.com/

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life -Series: Nikolaj Rimski-Korsakov – Symphony No.1 in E minor, Op. 1


Nikolaj Rimski-KorsakovSymphony No.1 in E minor, Op. 1

Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra

 

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Leaked U.S. phone call about Ukraine draws anger from Russia, EU | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour | PBS


Victoria Nuland’s alleged explicit comments about the EU’s involvement in Ukraine has caused controversy. Photo by Greece’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Flickr  A taped and leaked telephone conversation between two U.S. politicians about the future of Ukrainian politics — which included an explicit comment about the European Union — has caused a diplomatic flap, exacerbating tensions between the United States and Russia.

Victoria Nuland’s alleged explicit comments about the EU’s involvement in Ukraine has caused controversy. Photo by Greece’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Flickr
A taped and leaked telephone conversation between two U.S. politicians about the future of Ukrainian politics — which included an explicit comment about the European Union — has caused a diplomatic flap, exacerbating tensions between the United States and Russia.

Leaked U.S. phone call about Ukraine draws anger from Russia, EU | The Rundown | PBS NewsHour | PBS.

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NEWS: VODKA HASTENING DEATH IN RUSSIAN MEN


Vodka Hastening Death in Russian Men

One in four Russian men dies before the age of 55, compared to just one in 10 in the US and seven in 100 in the UK, and researchers say vodka is largely to blame for the extremely high premature death rate in Russian males. Men who reported smoking and drinking three or more half-liter bottles of vodka a week were found in a recent study to have a much greater risk of premature death than those who smoked but consumed less than one bottle of vodka a week. Alcohol poisoning, accidents, violence, suicide, and diseases like throat and liver cancer, pancreatitis, and liver disease were among the most frequent causes of death in heavy drinkersMore… Discuss

 

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SÀMI NATIONAL HOLIDAY


Sàmi National Holiday

The Sàmi people are indigenous to the arctic area of theNordic countries. February 6 is recognized as Sàmi National Holiday in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. This day is full of activities that celebrate the Sàmi culture. First celebrated in 1993, it has become a popular event and a time for the indigenous Sàmi people to celebrate their cultural identityMore…Discuss

 

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Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908) – “Dubinuschka”, op. 62.



Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908) – “Dubinuschka”, op. 62.

L’Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
Ernest Ansermet

 

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‘It took a Hundred years to grow and just 10 minutes to cut me down!’ (greenpeace)


‘It took a Hundred years to grow and just 10 minutes to cut me down!’ (greenpeace)

 

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Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video


Fukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Celsium-137 in salmon stockFukushima fallout in US: fishermen detect Cesium-137 in salmon stock – News – World – The Voice of Russia: News, Breaking news, Politics, Economics, Business, Russia, International current events, Expert opinion, podcasts, Video.

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GREAT COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: N. Rimsky-Korsakov – The Tale of Tsar Saltan: Suite: Part I



The Tale of Tsar Saltan: Suite from the Opera
by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844-1908)
I. Tsar’s Departure and Farewell

  • Buy “Rimsky-Korsakov: The Tale of Tsar Saltan – Suite, Op.57 – 1. The Tsar’s departure and Farewell” on

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
NARK.jpg

File:Swan princess.jpgThe lengthy full title of both the opera and the poem is The Tale of Tsar Saltan, of his Son the Renowned and Mighty Bogatyr Prince Gvidon Saltanovich and of the Beautiful Princess-Swan.

Note: The name “Saltan” is often erroneously rendered “Sultan”. Likewise, another mistranslation of the Russian title found in English makes this a “legend” rather than simply a “tale” or “fairytale”.

Head of a man with dark greying hair, glasses and a long beardNikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov 

(Russian: Николай Андреевич Римский-Корсаков; Russian pronunciation: [nʲɪkəˌlaj ˌrʲim.skʲɪj ˈkorsəkəf]; 18 March [O.S. 6 March] 1844[a 1] – 21 June [O.S. 8 June] 1908) was a Russian composer, and a member of the group of composers known as The Five.[a 2] He was a master of orchestration. His best-known orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the symphonic suite Scheherazade—are staples of the classical music repertoire, along with suites and excerpts from some of his 15 operas.Scheherazade is an example of his frequent use of fairy tale and folk subjects.

 

Rimsky-Korsakov believed, as did fellow composer Mily Balakirev and critic Vladimir Stasov, in developing a nationalistic style of classical music. This style employed Russian folk song and lore along with exotic harmonic, melodic and rhythmic elements in a practice known as musical orientalism, and eschewed traditional Western compositional methods. However, Rimsky-Korsakov appreciated Western musical techniques after he became a professor of musical composition, harmony and orchestration at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory in 1871. He undertook a rigorous three-year program of self-education and became a master of Western methods, incorporating them alongside the influences of Mikhail Glinka and fellow members of The Five. His techniques of composition and orchestration were further enriched by his exposure to the works of Richard Wagner.

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Russian lawyer says Snowden in danger after hostile remarks | Reuters


The Reichstag building, seat of the German lower house of parliament Bundestag, is pictured though a flag depicting fugitive former U.S. National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, during a demonstration in Berlin November 18, 2013. REUTERS/Tobias SchwarzRussian lawyer says Snowden in danger after hostile remarks | Reuters.

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Fabulous Compositions/Great Performances: Weber Invitation to the Dance



April 2003- Weber, Invitation to the Dance

Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel returns to St. Petersburg, Russia to once again conduct the St. Petersburg Philharmonic for the 100th anniversary of the legendary Yevgeni Mravinsky. 

“He is, simply put, a master… There is an authority and authenticity in Maestro Tchivzhel’s music making that is indisputably commanding and communicative.”– Yo Yo Ma 

http://www.maximaltd.com/edvardtchivz…
ttp://www.greenvillesymphony.org/

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Edvard Grieg. Symphonic Dances No.1



Youth Symphony Orchestra Mussorgsky College of St. Petersburg
Conductor Lev Dunaev
Молодёжный симфонический оркестр музыкального колледжа им.М.П.Мусоргского (Санкт-Петербург)
Дирижёр Лев Дунаев
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