Tag Archives: Tempo

Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Edvard Grieg – Norwegian Dances, Op. 35 – III. Allegro moderato alla marcia



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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26


Make Music Part of Your Life Series: 
Enescu – Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in F minor, Op. 26 (1898)

[1] Allegro molto moderato
[2] Allegretto scherzando 14:30
[3] Molto andante 22:09
[4] Presto 34:16

Andrei Csaba (cello)
Dan Grigore (piano)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5, No. 1 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)



Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5, No. 1 (Paul Tortelier & Eric Heidsieck)

00:00 - Adagio sostenuto – Allegro
17:59 - Rondo. Allegro vivace

Paul Tortelier, cello
Eric Heidsieck, piano

recorded: 1972

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Make Music PArt of Your Life: Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence



The String Sextet in D minor “Souvenir de Florence“, Op. 70, is a string sextet scored for 2 violins, 2 violas, and 2 cellos composed in the European summer of 1890 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky dedicated the work to the St. Petersburg Chamber Music Society in response to his becoming an Honorary Member. The work, in the traditional four-movement form, was titled “Souvenir de Florence” because the composer sketched one of the work’s principal themes while visiting Florence, Italy, where he composed The Queen of Spades. The work was revised between December 1891 and January 1892, before being premiered in 1892.

1. Allegro con spirito (00:00)
2. Adagio cantabile e con moto (10:16)
3. Allegretto moderato (19:56)
4. Allegro con brio e vivace (26:11)

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59 [Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano]



Ingryd Thorson & Julian Thurber, piano

Antonín Dvořák – Legends, Op. 59

1. Allegretto non troppo, quasi andantino [D minor] 3’03
2. Molto moderato [G major] 4’08
3. Allegro giusto [G minor] 4’11
4. Molto maestoso [C major] 5’30
5. Allegro giusto [A flat major] 4’16
6. Allegro con moto [C sharp minor] 4’21
7. Allegretto grazioso [A major] 2’14
8. Un poco allegretto e grazioso, quasi andantino [F major] 3’16
9. Andante con moto [D major] 2’27
10. Andante [B flat minor] 3’14

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3


Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3

Frank Pelleg (1910-1968) is joined by Peter Rybar (1913-2002, violin), Heinz Wigand (viola), and Antonio Tusa (cello) — all members of the Winterthur String Quartet — in this 1954 recording of the first movement of the Mendelssohn piano quartet in B minor, Op. 3. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued on the Concert Hall Society label, serial number E4KP 1420, Concert Hall release H-5.

Movement 1: Allegro molto
Movement 2: Andante
Movement 3: Allegro molto
Movement 4: Finale – Allegro vivace

(Note: Late last year I had uploaded this performance in four separate segments.)

—————————————-­————-
More from Mendelssohn:

Arthur Grumiaux, 1974: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Complete - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LURD7h…

Mendelssohn / Igor Oistrakh: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 – Movement 1, early 1950s: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Igqdql…
—————————————-­————-

Details about this LP are available at the Library of Congress website here: http://lccn.loc.gov/r54000657

More information about Pelleg here: http://www.doremi.com/pelleg.html

Rybar’s obituary is available for review here:http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/2002/o…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Saint-Saëns – Concerto no 1 pour piano et orchestre – Jeanne-Marie Darré



Camille Saint-Saëns

Concerto pour piano et orchestre no 1
en ré majeur – opus 17

Jeanne-Marie Darré 

Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion Française
Louis Fourestier 

Enregistré en 1956

I- Andante – Allegro assai 00:00

II- Andante sostenuto quasi adagio 10:19

III- Allegro con fuoco 17:52

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Most Beautiful Music: Dvořák Symphony No 9 “New World” Celibidache, Münchner Philharmoniker, 1991



Dvořák – Symohony No. 9 in E minor op. 95 “From The New World”
Münchner Philharmoniker conducted by Sergiu Celibidache
Recorded 1991
1. Adagio – Allegro molto
2. Largo
3. Scherzo. Molto vivace
4. Allegro con fuoco

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Beethoven: Symphony No.8 – Jarvi, DKB



Beethoven: Symphony No.8 in F, Op.93
Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen
Paavo Jarvi, dir.

0:01 I. Allegro vivace e con brio
9:05 II. Allegro scherzando
12:57 III. Tempo di Menuetto
17:36 IV. Allegro vivace

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DAVORIN DOLINŠEK and POPV perform LEROY ANDERSON: PIANO CONCERTO IN C (Slovenian premiere!)



Concert of POPV – Symphonic Wind Orchestra of Premogovnik Velenje, 8.12.2012
Conductor: Matjaž Emeršič
Soloist: Davorin Dolinšek

Leroy Anderson: Concert for Piano and Orchestra in C major
Allegro Moderato [Cadenza I: at 7'39'']
Andante-Allegretto (starts at 8’35”)
Allegro Vivo (starts at 14’16”) [Cadenza II: at 18'40'']

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Great Compositions/Performances: Bernstein – Academic Festival Overture (Brahms)



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Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini: Cello Concerto No.3 in D major, (G.476)



Álbum: Boccherini: Cello Concertos Complete
Interprete del álbum: Enrico Bronzi & Accademia I Filarmonici Di Verona
Compositor: Luigi Rodolfo Boccherini
Año: 2005
Genero: Clásico Italiano
Movimientos: Allegro-Adagio-Allegro

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Carl Maria von Weber – Symphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50



John Georgiadis. Queensland Orchestra
Carl Maria von WeberSymphony No. 1 in C major, J. 50
I. Allegro con Fuoco 00:07:56
II. Andante 00:06:20
III. Scherzo and Trio 00:04:06
IV. Finale: Presto 00:06:47

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde”



Brandis Quartet, Thomas Brandis, violin. Peter Brem, violin. Wilfried Strehle, viola. Wolfgang Boettcher, cello. 
Franz Schubert – String Quartet, in A minor, D 804 “Rosamunde
I. Allegro ma non troppo
II. Andante
III. Menuetto, allegro
IV. Allegro moderato

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Franz Schubert – Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)



Picture: Carlo Bossoli – A Bustling Market on the Piazza Navona in Rome

Franz Schubert 

Work: Symphony No.1 in D-major, D.82 (1813)

Mov.I: Adagio – Allegro vivace 00:00
Mov.II: Andante 11:47
Mov.III: Menuetto: Allegretto 19:17
Mov.IV: Allegro vivace 23:30

Orchestra: Failoni Orchestra

Conductor: Michael Halász

The symphony is scored for 1 flute, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in D, 2 trumpets in D, timpani and strings. 

The orchestration, which is balanced between strings and winds, lends itself to small chamber orchestras, as well as larger ensembles. The trumpets are scored particularly high, as in many of Schubert’s early works. Trumpet players will find, in general, the tessitura sitting between a concert D to Concert A for most of the 1st and 4th movements. In the 4th movement, Schubert pushes them up to a high D, in a repeated fashion. 

Some careful planning is needed to balance the multiple doublings between horns and trumpets.

 

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Lipatti & Ansermet – Schumann Concerto in A minor Op. 54



1. Allegro affettuoso
2. Intermezzo: Andantino grazioso (15:32)
3. Allegro vivace (20:26)

Dinu Lipatti, piano
Ernest Ansermet conducting the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande
live – Geneva, February 22, 1950

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: JOHN FIELD: Piano Concerto no. 2 – Paolo Restani, piano



I Allegro moderato
II Poco adagio
III Moderato innocente
Paolo Restani, piano
Orchestre Philharmonique de Nice
Marco Guidarini, conductor

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite I. Complete



Great Compositions/Performances:  
Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite I. 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa Conducting

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven – Violin Sonata No. 3 in Eb, op. 12 no. 3



I. Allegro con spirito [0:00]
II. Adagio con molta espressione [8:52]
III. Rondo: Allegro molto [14:19]

Hiro Kurosaki, violin
Linda Nicholson, fortepiano

performed on period instruments

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann – Alexis Weissenberg (1967) Davidsbündlertänze, Op 6



The first edition is preceded by the following epigraph:

Alter Spruch:

In all und jeder Zeit
Verknüpft sich Lust und Leid:
Bleibt fromm in Lust und seid
Dem Leid mit Mut bereit

(Old saying:

In each and every age
joy and sorrow are mingled:
Remain pious in joy,
and be ready for sorrow with courage.)

The individual pieces, unnamed, have the following tempo markings, keys and ascriptions: Lebhaft (Vivace), G major, Florestan and Eusebius; Innig (Con intimo sentimento), B minor, Eusebius; Etwas hahnbüchen (Un poco impetuoso) (1st edition), Mit Humor (Con umore) (2nd edition), G major, Florestan (Hahnbüchen, now usually hahnebüchen (also hanebüchen or hagebüchen), is an untranslatable colloquialism roughly meaning “coarse” or “clumsy.” Apparently, it originally meant “made of hornbeam wood.” (See the article “Hanebüchen” in the German version of Wikipedia.) Ernest Hutcheson translated it as “cockeyed” in his book The Literature of the Piano.); Ungeduldig (Con impazienza), B minor, Florestan; Einfach (Semplice), D major, Eusebius; Sehr rasch und in sich hinein (Molto vivo, con intimo fervore) (1st edition), Sehr rasch (Molto vivo) (2nd edition), D minor, Florestan; Nicht schnell mit äußerst starker Empfindung (Non presto profondamente espressivo) (1st edition), Nicht schnell (Non presto) (2nd edition), G minor, Eusebius; Frisch (Con freschezza), C minor, Florestan; No tempo indication (metronome mark of 1 crotchet = 126) (1st edition), Lebhaft (Vivace) (2nd edition), C major, Florestan; Balladenmäßig sehr rasch (Alla ballata molto vivo) (1st edition), (“Sehr” and “Molto” capitalized in 2nd edition), D minor (ends major), Florestan; Einfach (Semplice), B minor-D major, Eusebius; Mit Humor (Con umore), B minor-E minor and major, Florestan; Wild und lustig (Selvaggio e gaio), B minor and major, Florestan and Eusebius; Zart und singend (Dolce e cantando), E♭ major, Eusebius; Frisch (Con freschezza), B♭ major – Etwas bewegter (poco piu mosso), E♭ major (return to opening section is optional), Florestan and Eusebius; Mit gutem Humor (Con buon umore) (in 2nd edition, “Con umore”), G major – Etwas langsamer (Un poco più lento), B minor; leading without a break into Wie aus der Ferne (Come da lontano), B major and minor (including a full reprise of No. 2), Florestan and Eusebius; and Nicht schnell (Non presto), C major, Eusebius.

 

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Pietro A. Locatelli Concerto Grosso Op.1 No.7 in F major


Published on Mar 10, 2014
Pietro A. Locatelli Concerto Grosso Op.1 No.7 in F major

Capella Istropolitana
Jaroslav Krecek Conductor

Painting: Mario Nuzzi, La Primave 

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE: Gabriel Fauré – Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15


Published on Jan 21, 2013

Gabriel Fauré – Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15

Antoine Tamestit, viola / Trio Wanderer:
Raphaël Pidoux, violoncello
Vincent Coq, piano
Jean-Marc Phillips-Varjabédian, violin 

1. Allegro molto moderato 
2. Scherzo. Allegro vivo 
3. Adagio 
4. Finale. Allegro molto

Gabriel Fauré’s Piano Quartet No. 1, in C minor, Op. 15 is one of two chamber works written by him for the conventional piano quartet combination of piano, violin, viola and cello. Despite being in a minor key it is predominantly positive in tone, though with some hints in the slow movement of the emotional turmoil of Fauré’s life at the time of the composition.

In 1877, after wooing her for five years, Fauré had finally become engaged to Marieanne Viardot, daughter of the well-known singer Pauline Viardot. The engagement lasted for less than four months, and Marieanne broke it off, to Fauré’s considerable distress. It was in the later stages of their relationship that he began work on the quartet, in the summer of 1876. He completed it in 1879, and revised it in 1883, completely rewriting the finale. The first performance of the original version was given on 14 February 1880. In a study dated 2008, Kathryn Koscho notes that the original finale has not survived, and is believed to have been destroyed by Fauré in his last day

Fauré in 1875

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mendelssohn Cello Sonata no.2 Natalia Gutman & Viacheslav Poprugin



Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy sonata for cello and piano op.58 in D major
1.Allegro assai vivace 0:02
2.Allegretto scherzando 8:48
3.Adagio 13:42
4.Molto allegro e vivace 18:15

Natalia Gutman cello
Viacheslav Poprugin piano

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Johannes Brahms: Piano Concerto NO. 2 in B flat Op. 83 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Bramhs (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

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Z.Francescatti – R.Casadesus: BEETHOVEN Sonata No.8 Op.30,3 (1961)



Ludwig van BEETHOVEN – The Sonatas for Violin & Piano
Violin Sonata No.8 in G major, Op.30/3
0:05 / I. Allegro assai [5'48'']
5:56 / II. Tempo di minuetto, molto moderato e grazioso [6'53'']
12:54 / III. Allegro vivace [3'22'']
Zino FRANCESCATTI, violin – Robert CASADESUS, piano 
(Rec. 1961 – vinyl CBS77426 (p) 1982)
audio restoring / vinyl remaster: Emilio Pessina, 2013
________________________________________­__________
10 Violin Sonatashttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Joshua Bell – Tchaikovsky – Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35



Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Violin Concerto in D major, Op 35

1 Allegro moderato
2 Canzonetta: Andante
3 Finale. Allegro vivacissimo

Joshua Bell, violin

National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America
Valery Gergiev, conductor

Live recording. London, Proms 2013

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonín Dvořák – Czech Suite in D major, B. 93, Op. 39 – II. Polka



Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra (Katowice), Antoni Wit. Paint, A Village In Winter by Adrianus Eversen

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Johannes Brahms – Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857)



Johannes Brahms

Work: Serenade No.1 in D-major, Op.11 (1857) for orchestra

Mov.I: Allegro molto 00:00
Mov.II: Scherzo: Allegro non troppo 10:27
Mov.III: Adagio non troppo 17:55
Mov.IV: Menuetto I & II 33:35
Mov.V: Scherzo: Allegro 37:13
Mov.VI: Rondo: Allegro 39:47

Orchestra: Capella Agustina

Conductor: Andreas Spering

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: P. I. Tchaikovsky – Symphony No. 3 in D major, Op. 29 (Fedoseyev)



Pyotr Ilyich TchaikovskySymphony No. 3 ["Polish"] in D major, Op. 29 (1875)
1. Introduzione e Allegro
2. Alla tedesca. Allegro moderato e semplice
3. Andante elegiaco
4. Scherzo. Allegro vivo
5. Finale. Allegro con fuoco

Moskow Radio Symphony Orchestra
Conductor – Vladimir Fedoseyev
Recorded live at the Alte Oper Frankfurt, 1991

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Make Music Part of Your Life series: Schumann – Symphony No. 2 in C Op.61 – Leonard Bernstein (live recording)



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) – Symphony n°2 in C major opus 61

I. Sostenuto assai (00:00) – Allegro ma non troppo (03:41)
II. Scherzo. Allegro vivace (12:26)
III. Adagio espressivo (19:20)
IV. Allegro molto vivace (32:46)

Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks), dir Leonard Bernstein
(live recording 1983)
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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

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Make Music Part of your Life: W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 40 in G minor (Harnoncourt)



Make Music Part of your Life:  W. A. MozartSymphony No. 40 in G minor (Harnoncourt)

Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550 (1788):
1. Molto allegro
2. Andante
3. Menuetto. Allegretto — Trio
4. Finale. Allegro assai

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13'29'']
13:42 / II. Andantino [4'34'']
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6'06'']
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Arrau Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54



Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

1.- Allegro Affettuoso
2.- Intermezzo: Andantino Grazioso
3.- Allegro Vivace

Film footage recorded in 1963

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Claudio Arrau (1903-1991)

 

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Fritz Kreisler – Miniature Viennese March



Vienna Brahms Trio
Boris Kuschnir (violin), Orfeo Mandozzi (violoncello), Jasminka Stancul (piano)
Tempo di marcia
Palais Ferstl, Vienna, 9th December 2009

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467 (Elvira Madigan) Pollini/Muti



Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala
Maurizio Pollini, piano
Riccardo Muti, conductor
(2004)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 21 in C majorK. 467, was completed on March 9, 1785 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, four weeks after the completion of the previous D minor concerto, K. 466.[1][2]

The concerto has three movements:

 

  1. Allegro maestoso; in common time. The tempo marking is in Mozart’s catalog of his own works, but not in the autograph manuscript.[3]
  2. Andante in F major. In both the autograph score and in his personal catalog, Mozart notated the meter as Alla breve[4]
  3. Allegro vivace assai

Recordings:  This work has been recorded numerous times by many famous pianists including Géza AndaPiotr Anderszewski,Vladimir AshkenazyDaniel BarenboimMalcolm BilsonAlfred BrendelRobert CasadesusIvan DrenikovAnnie FischerWalter GiesekingFriedrich GuldaStephen HoughKeith JarrettWilhelm KempffWalter KlienAlicia de LarrochaGiorgi LatsabidzeRosina LhevinneDinu LipattiRadu LupuMurray PerahiaMaria João Pires,Maurizio PolliniArthur RubinsteinFazil SayAndrás SchiffArtur SchnabelRudolf SerkinHoward Shelley,Mitsuko Uchida, and Christian Zacharias.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak: Humoresque #7 in Gb Op 101/7: Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman


Humoresques (Czech: Humoresky), Op. 101 (B. 187), is a piano cycle by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, written during the summer of 1894. One writer says “the seventh Humoresque is probably the most famous small piano work ever written after Beethoven‘s Für Elise[1]

History
During his stay in America, when Dvořák was director of the Conservatory in New York from 1892 to 1895, the composer collected many interesting musical themes in his sketchbooks. He used some of these ideas in other compositions, notably the “From the New World” Symphony, the “American” String Quartet, the Quintet in E Flat Major, and the Sonatina for Violin, but some remained unused.

In 1894 Dvořák spent the summer with his family in Bohemia, at Vysoká u Příbrami. During this “vacation”, Dvořák began to use the collected material and to compose a new cycle of short piano pieces. On 19 July 1894 Dvořák sketched the first Humoresque in B major, today number 6 in the cycle. However, the composer soon started to create scores for the pieces that were intended to be published. The score was completed on 27 August 1894.
The cycle was entitled Humoresques shortly before Dvořák sent the score to his German publisher F. Simrock. The composition was published by Simrock in Autumn, 1894.
The publisher took advantage of the great popularity of the seventh Humoresque to produce arrangements for many instruments and ensembles. The piece was later also published as a song with various lyrics. It has also been arranged for choir.[2] The melody was also used as the theme of Slappy Squirrel in the popular animated television show Animaniacs. In 2004 the vocal group Beethoven’s Wig used Humoresque as the basis for a song entitled Dvořák the Czechoslovak.
Structure
The cycle consists of eight pieces:

  1. Vivace (E♭ minor)
  2. Poco andante (B major)
  3. Poco andante e molto cantabile (A♭ major)
  4. Poco andante (F major)
  5. Vivace (A minor)
  6. Poco allegretto (B major)
  7. Poco lento e grazioso (G♭ major)
  8. Poco andante—Vivace–Meno mosso, quasi Tempo I (B minor)

The main theme of the first Humoresque was sketched in New York on New Year’s Eve 1892, with the inscription “Marche funèbre” (sic).[3] The minor theme was accompanied with the inscription “people singing in the street”. The opening theme of the fourth piece was also sketched in New York, among ideas intended for the unrealized opera Hiawatha. The “American” style is also apparent in other themes of the Humoresques.[4]

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart / Divertimento in B-flat major, K. 137



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)

Divertimento in B-flat major for string quartet, K. 137/125b (1772)
00:00 - Andante
07:52 - Allegro di molto
11:17 - Allegro assai
(Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields Chamber Ensemble (1986))

“Three early Mozart pieces, K. 137, 137 and 138, are labeled divertimentos on the manuscripts and are so listed in Grove. However, few Mozart scholars accept that tag as an accurate description of the works, and most doubt that the title came from Mozart. For one thing, a divertimento should have two minuets, and these three have none. At first glance they seem to be straightforward string quartets–yet many experts contend that they don’t sound at all like string quartets. 

So what are they? Mozart scholar Alfred Einstein fancies them as small symphonies for strings, to which the composer was prepared to add extra parts for winds; they are sometimes known as the ‘Salzburg symphonies.’ Musicologist Hans Keller has given them the curious designation of ‘orchestral quartets.’ Others insist that they are indeed string quartets even if they lack the serious temper of that rarefied form. Yet (to complete the confusion) they are universally referred to as divertimentos–the one thing everyone agrees they are not.

Whatever they’re called, they are fine examples of Mozart’s early essays in chamber music…Mozart composed them in 1772, when he was 16, not long before leaving Salzburg on his third (and, as it turned out, his last) trip to Italy. He was going to Milan to produce the opera ‘Lucio Silla‘ on a commission from Count Firmian, governor-general of that city. He probably expected, from previous experience, to need music to entertain the count’s court while he was at work on the opera. So it seems likely that these three works were composed to meet that need. Mozart may have planned to present them with a small orchestra, as Einstein surmises, but here they are played by the four instruments of a string quartet.

The Divertimento in B flat, K. 137…differs from [K. 136 & K. 138] by starting with a slow movement. This affecting ‘Andante’ is led by the first violin and is punctuated by dramatic responses from the accompanying strings. A spirited ‘Allegro di molto’ movement follows, leading to a delicate finale marked ‘Allegro assai’. This section, while not actually a minuet, has a courtly air that suggests a roomful of dancers bowing and curtsying under brilliant chandeliers.” – Harvey B. Loomis

Painting: Still Life (Morning Glories, Toad, & Insects), Otto Marseus van Schrieck

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Edvard Grieg – Symphonic Dances / Dances Symphoniques (Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra Neeme Järvi)



Great Compositions/Performances:  Edvard GriegSymphonic Dances / Dances Symphoniques

Edvard Grieg (1843-1907), Norge

- Symphonic Dances on Norwegian motifs, Op. 64
- Danses symphoniques sur des motifs norvégiens, op. 64

I. Allegro moderato e marcato
II. Allegro grazioso
III. Allegro giocoso
IV. Andante – Allegro molto e risoluto

Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
Neeme Järvi

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life – Series: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141


Antonín DvořákSymphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio-F major 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace poco meno mosso 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49
****The work, at approximately 40 minutes in length, is scored for an orchestra of 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A and B♭, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in D and F, 2 trumpets in C, D, and F, 3 trombonestimpani and strings***

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Title page of the score of Dvořák’s seventh symphony, with portrait of Hans von Bülow

Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141, by Antonín Dvořák (published as No. 2) was first performed in London on April 22, 1885 shortly after the piece was completed on March 17, 1885.

Composition history

Dvořák’s work on the symphony began on December 13, 1884. Dvořák heard and admired Brahms‘s new 3rd Symphony, and this prompted him to think of writing of a new symphony himself. So it was fortuitous that in that same year the Philharmonic Society of London invited him to write a new symphony and elected him as an honorary member. A month later, after his daily walk to the railway station in Prague, he said “the first subject of my new symphony flashed in to my mind on the arrival of the festive train bringing our countrymen from Pest”. The Czechs were in fact coming to the National Theatre in Prague, where there was to be a musical evening to support the political struggles of the Czech nation. He resolved that his new symphony would reflect this struggle. In doing so the symphony would also reveal something of his personal struggle in reconciling his simple and peaceful countryman’s feelings with his intense patriotism and his wish to see the Czech nation flourish.

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Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Minor D845, Op.42


The Piano Sonata in A minor, D. 845 (Op. 42) by Franz Schubert is a sonata for solo piano, composed in May 1825.

Piano Sonata in A Minor D845: 

I. Moderato, A minor 00:00

II. Andante poco moto, C major. (4 measures missing after measure 43) 8:06

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace – Trio: Un poco più lento, A minor 17:13

IV. Rondo: Allegro vivace, A minor 23:58

The first movement is in sonata form though with ambiguity over the material in the development and the beginning of the recapitulation.[1]

The second movement is in variation form. Noted performers of the work in the 19th century included Hans von Bülow, who played the sonata in both Europe and the USA.[2]

Daniel Coren has discussed the nature of the recapitulation in the first movement of this sonata.[3]

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schubert – Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990))



Franz Schubert (1797-1828):
Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D. 759 “Unfinished” (1822)
1. Allegro moderato00:00 
2. Andante con moto - 13:32
Performed by Charles Mackerras and the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (1990).
Painting: Wanderer in the Storm, Karl Julius von Leypold

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Great Compositions/Performances: Saint-Saëns – Violin Sonata No. 1 – Heifetz, Smith



Camille Saint-Saëns, Violin Sonata No. 1, Op. 75 (1885)

I. Allegro agitato
II. Adagio (6:45)
III. Allegro moderato (12:33)
IV. Allegro molto (16:13)

Jascha Heifetz, Brooks Smith

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550 Karl Bohm Wiener Philarmoniker



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No 40 G minor K 550Karl Bhom conducts Wiener Philarmoniker:

 

 

 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

 

Molto allegro 0:40
Andante 9:42
Menuetto, allegretto 17:25
Finale, allegro assai 22:05

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart wrote his Symphony No. 40 in G minor, KV. 550, in 1788. It is sometimes referred to as the “Great G minor symphony,” to distinguish it from the “Little G minor symphony,” No. 25. The two are the only extant minor key symphonies Mozart wrote.[1]

 

 

 

 

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Great Compositions/Performance: Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky”, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky


A. Dvořák, Trio in E minor Op.90 “Dumky“, Oistrakh, Oborin, Knushevitsky

1. Lento maestoso
2. Andante – Vivace non troppo
3. Andante moderato
4. Allegro
5. Lento maestoso – Vivace

David Oistrakh Violin
Lev Oborin Piano
Sviatoslav Knushevitsky Violoncello

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261


Leonid Kogan – Mozart – Adagio in E major, K 261

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:
Adagio in E major for violin and orchestra, K 261
Leonid Kogan, violin
Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra
Pavel Kogan, conductor
(Live recording, May 1981)

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  • Artist
    Leonid Kogan, Moscow Philharmonic Orchestra, Pavel Kogan

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G



Great Compositions/Performances: Leonard Bernstein interprets Maurice Ravel‘s Piano Concerto in G

 

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Antoine de Lhoyer: Concerto for guitar & strings, Op. 16 (1799) – Part II / Ensemble Matheus



ANTOINE DE LHOYER [1768-1852]

Concerto pour la guitare avec accompagnement de 2 violons, alto et basse, Opus 16

date: 1799 (Hamburg, Boehme, 1802)

II. Adagio (arranged by Philippe Spinosi) - 0:05

Philippe Spinosi (R. Lacote, 1824 guitar)
Violin I
Laurence Paugam (J. Knit, 1770 c.)
Emmanuel Curial (N.-A. Chappuy, 1750 c.)
Marc-Antoine Raffy (Ch. Jacquot, Early XIX Century)
Cécile Mille (Fresbrunner, 1750 c.)
Violin II
Françoise Paugam (Italy, Early XVIII Century)
Anne-Violaine Caillaux (A. Meyer, Metz, XVIII Century)
Tami Troman (A. Castagneri, Paris, 1738)
Viola
Malik Haudidier (J. L. Blivet, 1998 after A. Testore, Milan, 1747)
Marie-Aude Guyon (Maucotel et Deschamp, 1906)
Pauline Warnier (Austrian anonymous, XVIII Century violoncello)
Thierry Runarvot (1700 c., Naples double bass)

Ensemble Matheus / Jean-Christophe Spinosi (conductor)

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Great Compositions/Performances: Symphony No 8 in F major Op 93 Christian Thielemann


Buy “Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: IV. Allegro vivace” on

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Artist
Christian Thielemann

 

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