Tag Archives: United States

today’s holiday: Constitution Day and Citizenship Day


Constitution Day and Citizenship Day

English: SIGONELLA, Sicily (July 20, 2010) Can...

English: SIGONELLA, Sicily (July 20, 2010) Candidates for U.S. citizenship recite the oath of citizenship during a naturalization ceremony at Naval Air Station Sigonella. Eleven candidates from eight countries became citizens during the ceremony. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Erica R. Gardner/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The US holidays Constitution Day and “I Am an American” Day have been combined into Citizenship Day, which a number of states and cities celebrate with special exercises on September 17. Schools make a special effort to acquaint their students with the history and importance of the Constitution. Naturalization ceremonies, re-creations of the signing of the Constitution, and parades are other popular ways of celebrating Citizenship Day and bring attention to the rights and obligations of citizenship. More… Discuss

$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola (doctors without borders are needed at….borders without doctors)


$1 Billion Needed to Fight Ebola

With the Ebola outbreak in West Africa still uncontained, the UN is increasing its calls for funding in the fight against the epidemic from $100 million just a month ago to $1 billion today. This health crisis, the World Health Organization’s assistant director-general says, is “unparalleled in modern times,” with thousands infected thus far and the number of cases projected to double every three weeks if containment efforts are not stepped up. According to the president of the medical charity Doctors Without Borders, the response to the outbreak has been insufficient thus far and the window of opportunity to contain the outbreak is closing. More… Discuss

word: impede


impede 

Definition: (verb) Be a hindrance or obstacle to.
Synonyms: hinder
Usage: By questioning every proposal, she is impeding the progress of our project. Discuss.

Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection – ProPublica


Old Debts, Fresh Pain: Weak Laws Offer Debtors Little Protection – ProPublica.

Today In History: What Happened This Day In History


Today In History. What Happened This Day In History

A chronological timetable of historical events that occurred on this

day in history. Historical facts of the day in the areas of military, politics, science, music, sports, arts, entertainment and more. Discover what happened today in history.

September 14
1146   Zangi of the Near East is murdered. The Sultan Nur ad-Din, his son, pursues the conquest of Edessa.
1321   Dante Alighieri dies of malaria just hours after finishing writing Paradiso.
1544   Henry VIII’s forces take Boulogne, France.
1773   Russian forces under Aleksandr Suvorov successfully storm a Turkish fort at Hirsov, Turkey.
1791   Louis XVI swears his allegiance to the French constitution.
1812   Napoleon Bonaparte’s invasion of Russia reaches its climax as his Grande Armee enters Moscow–only to find the enemy capital deserted and burning, set afire by the few Russians who remained.
1814   Francis Scott Key writes the words to the “Star Spangled Banner” as he waits aboard a British launch in the Chesapeake Bay for the outcome of the British assault on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.
1847   U.S. forces under Gen. Winfield Scott capture Mexico City, virtually bringing the two-year Mexican War to a close.
1853   The Allies land at Eupatoria on the west coast of Crimea.
1862   At the battles of South Mountain and Crampton’s Gap, Maryland Union troops smash into the Confederates as they close in on what will become the Antietam battleground.
1901   Vice President Theodore Roosevelt is sworn in as the 26th President of the United States upon the death of William McKinley, who was shot eight days earlier.
1911   Russian Premier Piotr Stolypin is mortally wounded in an assassination attempt at the Kiev opera house.
1943   German troops abandon the Salerno front in Italy..
1960   Iraq, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia form OPEC.
1966   Operation Attleboro, designed as a training exercise for American troops, becomes a month-long struggle against the Viet Cong.
1975   Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church.
1979   Nur Muhammad Taraki, president and former prime minister of Afghanistan, is assassinated in a coup in which prime minister Hafizullah Amin seizes power.
1982   Bachir Gemayel, president-elect of Lebanon, is killed along with 26 others in a bomb blast in Beirut.
1984   Joe Kittinger, a former USAF fighter pilot during the Vietnam War, becomes the first person to pilot a gas balloon solo across the Atlantic Ocean.
1994   Major League Baseball players strike over a salary cap and other proposed changes, forcing the cancellation of the entire postseason and the World Series.
2007   Northern Rock Bank suffers the UK’s first bank run in 150 years.
Born on September 14
1769   Baron Freidrich von Humbolt, German naturalist and explorer who made the first isothermic and isobaric maps.
1849   Ivan Pavlov, Russian physiologist who studied dogs’ responsiveness.
1860   Hamlin Garland, author who wrote about the Midwest in novles such as A Son of the Middle Border and The Book of the American Indian.
1864   Lord Robert Cecil, one of the founders of the League of Nations and its president from 1923 to 1945.
1867   Charles Dana Gibson, illustrator, creator of the ‘Gibson Girl.’
1879   Margaret Sanger, birth-control advocate and founder of Planned Parenthood.
1898   Hal B. Wallis, film producer (The Maltese Falcon, Casablanca).
1921   Constance Baker Motley, first African-American woman to be appointed a federal judge.
1930   Allan Bloom, writer (The Closing of the American Mind).
1934   Kate Millet, feminist writer, author of Sexual Politics.
1936   Ferid Murad, Albanian-American physician and pharmacologist, is co-winner of Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his research on nitroglycerin’s effects the cardiovascular system.
1948   Marc Reisner, author and environmentalist best known for his book Cadillac Desert, a history of water management in the Western portion of the US.
1955   Geraldine Brooks, Australian-American journalist and author; her novel March won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction (2005).
1961   Wendy Thomas (Melinda “Wendy” Thomas Morse), namesake, mascot and spokesperson for the Wendy’s chain of fast-food restaurants.
1983   Amy Winehouse, singer-songwriter; her five Grammy wins (out of six nominations) for her Back to Black album (2006) tied the existing record for most wins by a female artist in a single night; won Brit Award for Best British Female Artist (2007).

 

new widget at euzicasa: Access HISTORYnet.com (Live The History)


http://www.historynet.com/

Today in History: click to Access Here

this pressed: Why Do Democrats Keep Trying to Ban Guns That Look Scary, Not the Guns That Kill the Most People? – ProPublica


Why Do Democrats Keep Trying to Ban Guns That Look Scary, Not the Guns That Kill the Most People? – ProPublica.

today’s birthday: Jesse Owens (1913)


Jesse Owens (1913)

Owens was an African-American track-and-field star famous for his performance at the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games, where he claimed four gold medals in the presence of Adolf Hitler and Nazi leaders, who had hoped the games would promote their idea of racial superiority. Though hailed as a hero, Owens faced segregation upon his return to the US, even suffering the humiliation of having to use a freight elevator to attend a reception in his honor. How did he earn a living after the Olympics? More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)


Two Plus Four Agreement Signed in Moscow (1990)

The Two Plus Four Agreement, also known as the Treaty on the Final Settlement With Respect to Germany, was the final peace treaty negotiated between West Germany and East Germany—the “Two”—and the four powers that occupied Germany at the end of World War II: France, the UK, the US, and the Soviet Union. The treaty paved the way for the German reunification, which took place less than a month later, on October 3. What rights did the four powers renounce under the treaty’s terms? More… Discuss

Popcorn


Popcorn

Popcorn is a type of corn that bursts into irregularly shaped puffs when heated. When heat is applied to a popcorn kernel, pressure builds inside it until the outer hull finally explodes and the gelatinized, starchy interior comes spilling out. This rapidly hardens, becoming the familiar puff. This tasty treat, today a fixture at theater concession stands, is not a modern invention. Evidence suggests humans have been eating it for thousands of years. What are kernels that fail to pop called? More… Discuss

todady’s holiday: Patriot Day


Patriot Day

Patriot Day in the United States commemorates the anniversary of the terrorist attacks that took place on September 11, 2001, in New York City, Washington, DC, and in the skies above Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Each year, the president proclaims a day of national observance in memory of the more than 2,700 people who lost their lives in the attacks. Throughout the nation, flags are flown at half-staff, and a moment of silence is observed at 8:46 AM, Eastern time, the exact moment the first plane flew into the North Tower of the World Trade Center. More… Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: 9/11 Terrorist Attacks (2001)


9/11 Terrorist Attacks (2001)

On September 11, 2001, 19 Al-Qaeda terrorists hijacked four commercial airplanes. They crashed two planes into the World Trade Center’s Twin Towers in New York City and flew a third into the Pentagon building in Virginia. Passengers on the fourth flight attempted to retake control of the aircraft, but it crashed in a Pennsylvania field. The devastating terrorist attacks of 9/11 were responsible for 2,996 deaths and countless more injuries. What were the environmental consequences of 9/11? More… Discuss

quote: There is no sadder sight than a young pessimist, except an old optimist. Mark Twain


There is no sadder sight than a young pessimist, except an old optimist.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

Hawaii is a paradise…of bird extinction http://t.co/jkTaUx6mqq #SOTB14 pic.twitter.com/lYufd32CxM — Smithsonian


Hawaii is a paradise…of bird extinction http://t.co/jkTaUx6mqq #SOTB14 pic.twitter.com/lYufd32CxM

— Smithsonian (@smithsonian) September 10, 2014

quote: The one predominant duty is to find one’s work and do it. Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)


The one predominant duty is to find one’s work and do it.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) Discuss

this day in the yesteryear: First V-2 Rocket Hits London (1944)


First V-2 Rocket Hits London (1944)

Developed by Germany during World War II, the Vergeltungswaffe 2 (V-2) rocket was the world’s first modern ballistic missile and the first known manmade object to enter outer space. Thousands were launched on Allied targets during the last year of the war, causing more than 9,000 deaths. One of the rocket’s first targets was London, which was hit just days after Hitler declared his plans to start V-2 attacks. To what did the British government initially attribute the resulting explosion? More… Discuss

Quotation: She was a woman who, between courses, could be graceful with her elbows on the table. Henry James


She was a woman who, between courses, could be graceful with her elbows on the table.

Henry James (1843-1916) Discuss

today’s birthday: Marquis de Lafayette (1757)


Marquis de Lafayette (1757)

Lafayette was a French aristocrat most famous for his participation in the American and French revolutions. He fought with distinction in the American Revolution, becoming a close friend of George Washington. Upon returning to France, “the Hero of Two Worlds” turned his attentions to his home country, helping draft the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen and pushing for a constitutional monarchy. Lafayette is one of only seven people to have been accorded what honor by the US? More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Ginseng Festival


Ginseng Festival

This festival is a celebration of ginseng in Fusong, a county in the Changbai Mountains of China and the largest ginseng grower in the country. The people of Fusong have traditionally celebrated the ginseng harvest, and, in 1987, the government officially set aside three days for both a festival and a trade fair of ginseng products. The festival features performances of yangko, dragon, and lion dances; story-telling parties with a ginseng theme; art and photo exhibits; and a fireworks display. More… Discuss

today’s holiday: Taiwan Armed Forces Day


Taiwan Armed Forces Day

Founded in 1955, Armed Forces Day in Taiwan honors the country’s military and celebrates their victory over the Japanese in World War II (called the War of Resistance in Taiwan). The day is marked by military parades featuring special units chosen for their precision and outstanding performance. A troop-cheering by the onlookers is part of the celebration, as are educational activities covering the history of the war period and the role of the Taiwanese military in defeating the enemy. The day is also marked by the members of the armed forces having a rare day off from work. More… Discuss

word: antipathy


antipathy 

Definition: (noun) A strong feeling of aversion or repugnance.
Synonyms: aversion, distaste
Usage: He divined the fanatical love of freedom in her, the deep-seated antipathy for restraint of any sort. Discuss.

Jeff Malashock- The Old Sorehead by Julius Fucik: Make music part of your life series


Jeff Malashock- The Old Sorehead by Julius Fucik

today’s holiday: Labor Day


Labor Day

The first Labor Day observance in 1882 was confined to New York City. Oregon, in 1887, was the first state to make it a legal holiday, and, in 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed a bill making it a national holiday. The holiday’s association with trade unions has declined, but it remains important as the end of the summer season for schoolchildren and as an opportunity for friends and families to get together for picnics and sporting events. Labor Day is observed on the first Monday in September throughout the US, in Canada, and in Puerto Rico. More… Discuss

LABOR DAY (from Wikipedia)


LABOR DAY

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Labor Day in the United States is a holiday celebrated on the first Monday in September. It is a celebration of the American labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of their country.

Labor Day was promoted by the Central Labor Union and the Knights of Labor, who organized the first parade in New York City. After the Haymarket Massacre, which occurred in Chicago on May 4, 1886, U.S. President Grover Cleveland feared that commemorating Labor Day on May 1 could become an opportunity to commemorate the affair. Thus, in 1887, it was established as an official holiday in September to support the Labor Day that the Knights favored.[1]

The equivalent holiday in Canada, Labour Day, is also celebrated on the first Monday of September. In many other countries (more than 80 worldwide), “Labour Day” is synonymous with, or linked with, International Workers’ Day, which occurs on May 1.

History

In 1882, Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed the holiday while serving as secretary of the CLU (Central Labor Union) of New York.[2] Others argue that it was first proposed by Peter J. McGuire of the American Federation of Labor in May 1882,[3] after witnessing the annual labour festival held in Toronto, Canada.[4] Oregon was the first state to make it a holiday on February 21, 1887. By the time it became a federal holiday in 1894, thirty states officially celebrated Labor Day.[3]

Following the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the U.S. military and U.S. Marshals during the Pullman Strike, the United States Congress unanimously voted to approve rush legislation that made Labor Day a national holiday; President Grover Cleveland signed it into law a mere six days after the end of the strike.[5] The September date originally chosen by the CLU of New York and observed by many of the nation’s trade unions for the past several years was selected rather than the more widespread International Workers’ Day because Cleveland was concerned that observance of the latter would be associated with the nascent Communist, Syndicalist and Anarchist movements that, though distinct from one another, had rallied to commemorate the Haymarket Affair in International Workers’ Day.[6] All U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and the territories have made it a statutory holiday.

Labor Day
Labor Day New York 1882.jpg

Labor Day Parade, Union Square, New York, 1882
Observed by United States
Type Federal Holiday (federal government, DC and U.S. Territories); and State Holiday (in all 50 U.S. States)
Celebrations Parades, barbecues
Date First Monday in September
2013 date September 2
2014 date September 1
2015 date September 7
2016 date September 5
Frequency annual
Related to Labour Day

this day in the yesteryear: Last Passenger Pigeon Dies in Captivity (1914)


Last Passenger Pigeon Dies in Captivity (1914)

Billions of passenger pigeons inhabited eastern North America in the early 19th century, migrating in enormous flocks that darkened the skies for days at a time. They soon fell victim to habitat loss caused by mass deforestation, along with excessive hunting on an industrial scale. The bird‘s rapid extinction was largely responsible for ending the marketing of game birds and gave major impetus to the conservation movement. Where did the last known passenger pigeon die in 1914? More… Discuss

Practice your scales with the Fred Musical Straws – CNET


Practice your scales with the Fred Musical Straws – CNET.

Experimental Ebola Drug Shows Promise


Experimental Ebola Drug Shows Promise

Some good Ebola news is being reported on the heels of the World Health Organization’s projections that the current outbreak could spread to another 10 countries and infect over 20,000 people before it is contained: the experimental drug ZMapp was 100% effective in monkey studies. All of the Ebola-infected monkeys treated with ZMapp survived, even when they received the treatment five days after infection—considered late stage in the animals and equivalent to about nine to 11 days in humans. Still, these results do not mean the drug will be as effective in humans, and, in fact, two of the seven human Ebola patients treated with the drug have nevertheless died. More… Discuss

today’s birthday: Charlie Parker (1920) (listen to “Summertime”)


Charlie Parker (1920)

Charlie “Bird” Parker was an American saxophonist and composer. Along with trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie, Parker was a leader of the bop movement in jazz. His brilliant improvisations were noted for their power and beauty. Sadly, his heroin addiction was legendary as well. He had a drug-induced nervous breakdown in 1946 and saw his cabaret card—which allowed him to play in New York clubs—revoked by the police in 1951. When he died four years later, at age 34, how old did the coroner think he was? More… Discuss

Charlie Parker – Summertime (Jazz Instrumental)

The Blue Danube, Op 314 Johann Strauss II in HD – unofficial Austrian national anthem! : make music part of your life series


The Blue Danube, Op 314 Johann Strauss II in HD – unofficial Austrian national anthem!

The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (German for By the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II, composed in 1866. Originally performed 15 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men’s Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success however and Strauss is reputed to have said “The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda—I wish that had been a success!”

After the original music was written, the words were added by the Choral Association’s poet, Joseph Weyl. Strauss later added more music, and Weyl needed to change some of the words. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World’s Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion. The Blue Danube premiered in the United States in its instrumental version on 1 July 1867 in New York, and in Great Britain in its choral version on 21 September 1867 in London at the promenade concerts at Covent Garden.

The specifically Viennese sentiments associated with the waltz have made it an unofficial Austrian national anthem. The waltz is traditionally broadcast by all public-law television and radio stations exactly at midnight on New Year’s Eve, and on New Year’s Day it is a customary encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year’s Concert. The first few bars are the interval signal of Österreichischer Rundfunk‘s international programs.

When Strauss’s stepdaughter, Alice von Meyszner-Strauss, asked the composer Johannes Brahms to sign her autograph-fan, he wrote down the first bars of The Blue Danube, but adding “Leider nicht von Johannes Brahms” (Alas! not by Johannes Brahms).

A typical performance lasts around 10 minutes, with the seven-minute main piece, followed by a three-minute coda.
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The text above is taken from Wikipedia, under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Audio source: Youtube Audio Library
Picture by: Ivanhoe
Picture license: CC BY-SA 3.0
Picture source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bud…

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