Tag Archives: Vienna

make music part of your life series: Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)


Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 [complete] (Organ Solo Mass)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Missa Brevis No. 8 in C major, K. 259, is a mass composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, probably in 1776.[1] It is scored for SATB soloists, SATB choir, violin I and II, 2 oboes, 2 clarini (high trumpets), 3 trombones colla parte, timpani and basso continuo.

Although classed as a missa brevis (brief mass), the inclusion of trumpets in the scoring makes it a missa brevis et solemnis.[1][2] The mass derives its nickname Orgelmesse or Orgelsolomesse (Organ Solo Mass) from the obbligato organ solo entry of the Benedictus.[1][3] This is one of three masses Mozart composed in November and December 1776, all set in C major, including the Credo Mass (K. 257) and the Piccolominimesse (K. 258).[4]

The work consists of six movements. Performances require approximately 10–15 minutes.

  1. “Kyrie” Andante, C major, common time
  2. “Gloria” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  3. “Credo” Allegro, C major, common time
  4. Sanctus” Adagio maestoso, C major, 3/4
    “Pleni sunt coeli et terra…” Allegro, C major, cut common time
  5. “Benedictus” Allegro vivace, G major, 3/4
    “Hosanna in excelsis…” Allegro, C major, 3/4
  6. Agnus Dei” Adagio, C major, common time
    Dona nobis pacem…” Allegro, C major, 3/4

FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki

great compositions/performances: Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa


Mozart Concerto D Minor K466 Freiburger Mozart-Orchester, Michael Erren,Valentina Lisitsa

Filmed live May 20, 2012, Freiburg im Breisgau ,Germany
Cadenzas by Mozart’s favorite student – and billiards pal, Jan Nepomuk Hummel :-)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Neuer Markt in Vienna with Capuchin Church and Haus zur Mehlgrube on the right, painting by Bernardo Bellotto, 1760

The Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, K. 466, was written by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart in 1785. The first performance took place at the Mehlgrube Casino in Vienna on February 11, 1785, with the composer as the soloist.[1]

Movements

The concerto is scored for solo piano, flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. As is typical with concertos, it is in three movements:

  1. Allegro
  2. Romanze
  3. Allegro assai

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great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

(C) Deusche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited , Music Publishing Rights Collecting Society, UMPG Publishing and all their respective owners. There’s no personal work here.

(C) Deutsche Grammophon, ORF/RM Associates Limited et toutes leurs propriétaires respectifs.

The Firebird

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated...

Igor Stravinsky and Pablo Picasso collaborated on Pulcinella in 1920. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This article is about the ballet to Stravinsky’s 1910 music. For other uses of the word, see Firebird.

The Firebird (French: L’oiseau de feu; Russian: «Жар-птица», Zhar-ptitsa) is a ballet and orchestral concert work by the Russian composer Igor Stravinsky. It was written for the 1910 Paris season of Sergei Diaghilev‘s Ballets Russes company, with choreography by Michel Fokine. The ballet is based on Russian folk tales of the magical glowing bird that can be both a blessing and a curse to its owner. When the ballet was first performed on 25 June 1910, it was an instant success with both audience and critics.

Stravinsky was a young, virtually unknown composer when Diaghilev recruited him to create works for the Ballets Russes. The Firebird was his first project. Originally, Diaghilev approached the Russian composer Anatoly Lyadov, but later hired Stravinsky to compose the music.

The ballet has historic significance not only as Stravinsky’s breakthrough piece — “Mark him well”, said Sergei Diaghilev to Tamara Karsavina, who was dancing the title role: “He is a man on the eve of celebrity…” — but also as the beginning of the collaboration between Diaghilev and Stravinsky that would also produce Petrushka and The Rite of Spring.

Genesis and premiere

The ballet was the first of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes productions to have an all-original score composed for it. Alexandre Benois wrote in 1910 that he had two years earlier suggested to Diaghilev the production of a Russian nationalist ballet,[7] an idea all the more attractive given both the newly awakened French passion for Russian dance and also the ruinously expensive costs of staging opera. The inspiration of mixing the mythical Firebird with the unrelated Russian tale of Kaschei the deathless possibly came from a popular child’s verse by Yakov Polonsky, “A Winter’s Journey” (Zimniy put, 1844), which includes the lines:

And in my dreams I see myself on a wolf’s back
Riding along a forest path
To do battle with a sorcerer-tsar [i.e., Kaschei]]
In that land where a princess sits under lock and key,
Pining behind massive walls.
There gardens surround a palace all of glass;
There Firebirds sing by night
And peck at golden fruit.[8]

fabulous musical moments: Schubert / A. Brendel, 1961: Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (Op. 15) – The Wanderer –


Schubert / A. Brendel, 1961: Fantasy in C Major, D. 760 (Op. 15) – The Wanderer - 

Wanderer-Fantasie (German translation would Fantasy Traveller) is the popular name of the Opus 15 (D 760) in C major by Franz Schubert written in November 1822. This is a Fantasy for piano in the classical form of the sonata. There is strong correlation between movements, so this part is interpreted as a process of sonata with significant variations from the classical form.

great compositions/performances: Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000


Stravinsky: The Firebird / Gergiev · Vienna Philarmonic · Salzburg Festival 2000

Great presentation of the Vienna Philharmonic conducted by the russian Maestro Valery Gergiev, in one of the most powerful and greatest presentation of The Firebird (L’Oiseau de feu) of Igor Stravinsky at Salzburg Festival 2000.

Bacchus on make music part of your life series: Composer Joseph Horovitz – Blue Ridge – Societat “Unión Musical” de Crevillent


Bacchus on Blue Ridge (Joseph Horovitz) – Societat “Unión Musical” de Crevillent

Bacchus on Blue Ridge (Joseph Horovitz) - Societat "Unión Musical" de Crevillent

Bacchus on Blue Ridge (Joseph Horovitz) – Societat “Unión Musical” de Crevillent

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
This article is about the British composer and conductor. For the American cultural historian, see Joseph Horowitz.

Joseph Horovitz (born 26 May 1926 in Vienna, Austria) is a British composer and conductor.

Biography

Horovitz’s Jewish family emigrated to England in 1938 to escape the Nazis. He studied music and modern languages at New College, Oxford, and later attended the Royal College of Music in London, studying composition with Gordon Jacob. He then undertook a year of further study with Nadia Boulanger in Paris. His musical career began in 1950, when he became music director at the Bristol Old Vic. He was subsequently active as a conductor of ballet and opera, and toured Europe and the United States.

Horovitz married Anna in 1956, shortly after coaching at the bi-centenary celebration for Mozart and Glyndeborne. They honeymooned in Majorca, staying in Paguera and visiting Valldemossa. He later used these two names for two clarinet pieces, based on Spanish folk-tunes he had heard there.

Horovitz has been Professor of Composition at the Royal College of Music since 1961, and a Council Member of the Composers’ Guild of Great Britain since 1970. Between 1969 and 1996 he belonged to the board of the Performing Rights Society. His works include 16 ballets, including Alice in Wonderland (1953), 2 one-act operas (The Dumb Wife, libretto Peter Shaffer; Gentlemen’s Island, libretto Gordon Snell), and concertos for violin, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, euphonium, tuba and percussion, as well as a popular and often performed jazz concerto for harpsichord or piano.

A large number of his works have been written for wind orchestra and brass band. In 1959, he was awarded the Commonwealth Medal, and since then he has received many other awards for his compositions. His music for television has included Lillie, Rumpole of the Bailey, The Search for the Nile, The Fight Against Slavery, Wessex Tales and Partners in Crime.

Works

Orchestral Works

  • 1948 Concertante for Clarinet and Strings
  • 1963 Trumpet Concerto
  • 1971 Sinfonietta for Light Orchestra
  • 1972 Horizon Overture
  • 1973 Valse
  • 1976 Bassoon Concerto
  • 1977 Jubilee Toy Symphony
  • 1993 Oboe Concerto

Works for Wind Orchestra and Brass Band

  • 1964 Three Pieces From Music Hall Suite for brass band
  • 1970 Sinfonietta for brass band
    • 1. Allegro
    • 2. Lento moderato
    • 3. Con brio
  • 1972 Euphonium Concerto for euphonium and wind orchestra1975 The Dong with a Luminous Nose for brass band
    • 1. Moderato
    • 2. Lento
    • 3. Con moto
  • 1977 Samson for baritone, mixed chorus and brass band
  • 1983 Ballet for Band for brass band
  • 1984 Bacchus on Blue Ridge: Divertimento for wind orchestra
    • 1. Moderato
    • 2. Blues
    • 3. Vivo
  • 1985 Concertino Classico for 2 cornets (or trumpets) and brass band
    • 1. Con brio
    • 2. Larghetto
    • 3. Allegro rustico
  • 1991 Fete Galante for wind orchestra
    • 1. Pavane
    • 2. Menuet
    • 3. Bourée des masques
  • 1992 Dance SuiteAd Astra
    • 1. Allegro
    • 2. Andantino
    • 3. Vivace
  • Commedia Dell’Arte
  • Lillie Theme
  • Theme and Co-Operation for brass band
  • Tuba Concerto for tuba und brass bandWind-Harp
    • 1. Allegro
    • 2. Andante
    • 3. Con Moto

Film scores

Other works

  • 1952 Les Femmes d’Alger: Ballet in one act
  • 1953 The Dumb Wife: Comic opera in one act
  • 1953 Alice in Wonderland: Ballet in two acts
  • 1958 Concerto for Dancers: Ballet in one act
  • 1958 Gentleman’s Island (libretto by Gordon Snell) in English or German for tenor, baritone and chamber orchestra
  • 1961 Horrortorio (words by Alistair Sampson from a scenario by Maurice Richardson) for soloists, chorus and orchestra. It was performed at the Hoffnung Astronautical Musical Festival
  • 1962 Fantasia on a Theme of Couperin for wind nonet
  • 1965 Let’s Make a Ballet: Ballet in one act
  • 1970 Captain Noah and his Floating Zoo: Cantata (text by Michael Flanders) for mixed chorus with piano, double bass and percussion
  • 1970 Lady Macbeth Scena for mezzo-soprano and piano
  • 1975 Summer Sunday: a comical-tragical-ecological Pastoral for mixed choir and piano
  • 1980 Miss Carter Wore Pink: Ballet in one act

Chamber Music

  • 1964 Music Hall Suite for brass quintet1976 Brass Polka for brass quartet
    • 1. Soubrette Song
    • 2. Trick-cyclists
    • 3. Adagio-team
    • 4. Soft shoe shuffle
    • 5. Les Girls
  • 1969 String Quartet No. 5
  • Sonatina, op. 3 for oboe and piano
  • Quartet for oboe and strings, op. 18
  • Ghetto Song for solo guitar
  • 1981 Sonatina For Clarinet and Piano
    • 1. Allegro calmato
    • 2. Lento quasi Andante
    • 3. Con brio

 

make music part of your life series: Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann


Beethoven – Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67 – Thielemann

Ludwig van Beethoven
Symphony No 5 in C minor, Op 67

1 Allegro con brio
2 Andante con moto
3 Allegro
4 Allegro

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

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make music part of your life series: Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379


Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27

in G, K. 379

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at: http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
—————————————-­———————————

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great compositions/performances: F. Schubert – Symphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 (Harnoncourt)


F. SchubertSymphony No. 4 “Tragic” in C minor, D. 417 Conductor – Nikolaus Harnoncourt
Wiener Philharmoniker
Musikvereinssaal Wien

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The symphony has four movements (a performance lasts around 30 minutes.)
  1. Adagio molto – Allegro vivace
  2. Andante in A flat major
  3. Menuetto. Allegro vivace – Trio in E flat major
  4. Allegro

The Symphony No. 4 in C minor, D. 417, commonly called the Tragic (German: Tragische), was composed by Franz Schubert in April 1816.[1] It was completed one year after the Third Symphony, when Schubert was 19 years old. However, the work was premiered only on November 19, 1849, in Leipzig, more than two decades after Schubert’s death.[citation needed]

The title Tragic is Schubert’s own. It was added to the autograph manuscript some time after the work was completed.[1] It is not known exactly why he added the title, but the work is one of only two symphonies (the Unfinished Symphony is the other) which Schubert wrote in a minor key.

The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in B-flat, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in A-flat, C and E-flat, 2 trumpets in C and E-flat, timpani and strings.

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word: felicitate


felicitate 

Definition: (verb) To offer congratulations to.
Synonyms: congratulate
Usage: I felicitate you on your memory, sir. Discuss.
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Historic musical moments: Brahms – Symphony No. 2 – Wiener Philharmoniker – Leonard Bernstein – 1982


Brahms – Symphony No. 2Wiener PhilharmonikerLeonard Bernstein – 1982

Johannes Brahms
Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 73

I. Allegro non troppo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (00:42)
II. Adagio non troppo – L’istesso tempo, ma grazioso . . . (21:53)
III. Allegretto grazioso (quasi andantino) . . . . . . . . . . . . (34:41)
IV. Finale. Allegro con spirito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (40:13)

Wiener Philharmoniker
Leonard Bernstein

Recorded live at the Große Musikvereinssaal
Vienna, 1-6 September 1982

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Franz Anton Mesmer (1734)


Franz Anton Mesmer (1734)

Mesmer was a German physician who experimented with an early form of hypnosis, known as “mesmerism.” He developed a doctrine of “animal magnetism,” believing that harmony could be restored in the human body by inducing “crises”—trance states often ending in delirium or convulsions. He carried out dramatic demonstrations of his ability to “mesmerize” his patients using magnetized objects. Accused by Viennese physicians of fraud, he left Austria for France. What scandal plagued Mesmer’s career? More… Discuss

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Chopin – Variations on “Là ci darem la mano” from Mozart’s Don Giovanni


ChopinVariations on “Là ci darem la mano” from Mozart‘s Don Giovanni

Frédéric Chopin’s Variations on “Là ci darem la mano” for piano and orchestra, Op. 2, was written in 1827, when he was aged only 17. “Là ci darem la mano” is a duet sung by Don Giovanni and Zerlina, from Mozart’s opera Don Giovanni. It was one of the earliest manifestations of Chopin’s incipient genius. It inspired Robert Schumann‘s famous exclamation, Hats off, gentlemen! A genius!

The work was premiered on 11 August 1829 at the Vienna Kärntnertortheater, with Chopin as the soloist. It received very positive audience and critical acclaim.

The work is in B-flat major throughout, except for the Adagio of Variation 5, which is in the minor key.

- Introduction: Largo – Poco piu mosso 0:00
- Thema: Allegretto 5:20
- Variation 1: Brillante 6:53
- Variation 2: Veloce, ma accuratamente 7:52
- Variation 3: Sempre sostenuto 8:54
- Variation 4: Con bravura 10:20
- Variation 5: Alla Polacca 11:24

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Great Compositions/Performances: Chopin, Piano Concerto No. 1 in E minor, Op. 11



Martha Argerich, piano
Wiener KammerOrchester
Dir. Erwin Ortner
Vienna – May 16, 2010

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Happy Mother’s Day! Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube Waltz – Vienna Philharmonic


Happy Mother’s Day! Johann Strauss II – The Blue Danube WaltzVienna Philharmonic

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Great Compositions/Performances: W. A. Mozart – Symphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788)


W. A. MozartSymphony No. 41 “Jupiter” in C major, K. 551 (1788):
1. Allegro vivace, 4/4
2. Andante cantabile, 3/4 in F major
3. Menuetto: Allegretto – Trio, 3/4
4. Molto allegro, 2/2

The Chamber Orchestra of Europe
Conductor – Nicolaus Harnoncourt
Grosser Musikvereinsaal Wien

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart: Overture – ‘Lucio Silla’


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (German: [ˈvɔlfɡaŋ amaˈdeus ˈmoːtsaʁt], English see fn.), name Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart (27 January 1756 — 5 December 1791), was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era. Mozart showed prodigious ability from his earliest childhood. Already competent on keyboard and violin, he composed from the age of five and performed before European royalty. At 17, he was engaged as a court musician in Salzburg, but grew restless and travelled in search of a better position, always composing abundantly. While visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He chose to stay in the capital, where he achieved fame but little financial security. During his final years in Vienna, he composed many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas, and portions of the Requiem, which was largely unfinished at the time of his death. The circumstances of his early death have been much mythologized. He was survived by his wife Constanze and two sons. Mozart learned voraciously from others, and developed a brilliance and maturity of style that encompassed the light and graceful along with the dark and passionate. He composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, and choral music. He is among the most enduringly popular of classical composers, and his influence on subsequent Western art music is profound; Beethoven composed his own early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Haydn wrote that “posterity will not see such a talent again in 100 years…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wolfgang…

Lucio Silla (pronounced /ˈluːtʃoʊ ˈsɪlɒ/, Italian pronunciation: [ˈluːtʃo ˈsiːlla]), K. 135, is an Italian opera in three acts composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The libretto was written by Giovanni de Gamerra. It was first performed on 26 December 1772 at the Teatro Regio Ducal in Milan and was regarded as “a moderate success”. Handel’s opera Silla (1713) covered the same subject…http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucio_Silla


A link to this wonderful artists Website:http://www.classicalarchives.com/moza…

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Resurrection and Ascension of Jesus–Beethoven Oratorio: Christ on the Mount of Olives–Hallelujah



Oratorio, “Christ on the Mount of Olives

Ludwig Van Beethoven
(1770-1827)

Beethoven wrote but one oratorio, “Christus am Oelberge” (“Christ on the Mount of Olives”). It was begun in 1800 and finished during the following year. The text is by Huber, and was written, with Beethoven’s assistance, in fourteen days. The first performance of the work is entirely took place at Vienna, April 5, 1803, at the Theater an der Wien.

The closing number, a chorus of angels (“Hallelujah, God‘s almighty Son”), is introduced with a short but massive symphony leading to a jubilant burst of “Hallelujah,” which finally resolves itself into a glorious fugue. In all sacred music it is difficult to find a choral number which can surpass it in majesty or power.


Lyrics for the Hallelujah

Hallelujah unto God’s Almighty Son Praise the Lord, ye bright angelic choirs
In holy songs of Joy.
Man, proclaim his grace and glory,
Hallelujah unto God’s Almighty Son
Praise the Lord in holy songs of joy.



FROM THE COUNCIL OF TRENT

Resurrection

By the word Resurrection, however, we are not merely to understand that Christ was raised from the dead, which happened to many others, but that He rose by His own power and virtue, a singular prerogative peculiar to Him alone. For it is incompatible with nature and was never given to man to raise himself by his own power, from death to life. This was reserved for the almighty power of God, as we learn from these words of the Apostle: Although he was crucified through weakness, yet he liveth by the power of God. This divine power, having never been separated, either from His body in the grave, or from His soul in hell, there existed a divine force both within the body, by which it could be again united to the soul, and within the soul, by which it could again return to the body. Thus He was able by His own power to return to life and rise from the dead.


Ascension

Filled with the Spirit of God, and contemplating the blessed and glorious Ascension of our Lord, the Prophet David exhorts all to celebrate that splendid triumph with the greatest joy and gladness: Clap your hands, all ye nations: shout unto God with he voice of joy…. God is ascended with jubilee. 

This, then, the faithful must believe without hesitation, that Jesus Christ, having fully accomplished the work of Redemption, ascended as man, body and soul, into heaven; for as God He never forsook heaven, filling as He does all places with His Divinity. 

He ascended by His own power, not being taken up by the power of another, as was Elias, who was carried to heaven in a fiery chariot; or, as the Prophet Habacuc, or Philip, the deacon, who were borne through the air by the divine power, and traversed great distances.

Neither did He ascend into heaven solely by the exercise of His supreme power as God, but also by virtue of the power which He possessed as man. Although human power alone was insufficient to accomplish this, yet the virtue with which the blessed soul of Christ was endowed was capable of moving the body as it pleased, and His body, now glorified, readily obeyed the behest of the soul that moved it. Hence, we believe that Christ ascended into heaven as God and man by His own power.


Please visit our site at:

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals…

http://catholicharboroffaithandmorals…

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Brahms Piano concerto N° 2 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (German: [joˈhanəs ˈbʁaːms]; 7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist.

Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms’s popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the “Three Bs“.

Brahms composed for piano, chamber ensembles, symphony orchestra, and for voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works; he worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinistJoseph Joachim. Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. Brahms, an uncompromising perfectionist, destroyed some of his works and left others unpublished.[1]

Brahms is often considered both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Baroque and Classical masters. He was a master of counterpoint, the complex and highly disciplined art for which Johann Sebastian Bach is famous, and of development, a compositional ethos pioneered by Joseph HaydnWolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and other composers. Brahms aimed to honour the “purity” of these venerable “German” structures and advance them into a Romantic idiom, in the process creating bold new approaches to harmony and melody. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg and Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms’s works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers.

 

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: DINU LIPATTI (1917)


Dinu Lipatti (1917)

Lipatti was a Romanian pianist whose career was tragically cut short by Hodgkin’s lymphoma at age 33. Despite a relatively short playing career and a small recorded legacy, Lipatti is considered among the finest pianists of the 20th century. He was much admired for his pianistic technique, and he is noted for his interpretations of Mozart, Bach, and Chopin. As a teen, Lipatti came in second in the Vienna International Piano Competition. How did his failure to take first place impact his future? More… Discuss

 

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Mozart – Missa Brevis in C, K. 259 (Organ Solo Mass)



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Composed December 1775/1776 in Salzburg.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

 

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Mozart – Violin Sonata No. 27 in G, K. 379



Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791).
Composed April 1781, in Vienna.
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/

Buy “Mozart: 2g. Tema – 2g. Tema” on

Google PlayiTunesAmazon MP3 

Artist
Arthur Grumiaux

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58 (Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy)



***Beethoven-Piano Concerto No. 4 in G Major Op. 58
***Rudolf Serkin: piano-Philadelphia Orchestra-Eugene Ormandy: ***conductor-1962

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58, was composed in 1805–1806, although no autograph copy survives. It is scored for solo piano and an orchestra consisting of a flute, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, timpani, and strings. Like many classical concertos, it has three movements:

  1. Allegro moderato
  2. Andante con moto (in E minor)
  3. Rondo (Vivace)

Premiere and reception

It was premiered in March 1807 at a private concert of the home of Prince Franz Joseph von Lobkowitz. The Coriolan Overture and the Fourth Symphony were premiered in that same concert.[1] However, the public premiere was not until 22 December 1808 in Vienna at the Theater an der Wien. Beethoven again took the stage as soloist. This was part of a marathon concert which saw Beethoven’s last appearance as a soloist with orchestra, as well as the premieres of the Choral Fantasy and the Fifth and Sixth symphonies. Beethoven dedicated the concerto to his friend, student, and patron, the Archduke Rudolph.

A review in the May 1809 edition of the Allgemeine musikalische Zeitung states that “[this concerto] is the most admirable, singular, artistic and complex Beethoven concerto ever”.[2] However, after its first performance, the piece was neglected until 1836, when it was revived by Felix Mendelssohn. Today, the work is widely performed and recorded, and is considered to be one of the central works of the piano concerto literature.

 

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Ludwig van Beethoven: Bagatelle #4 Op 126/4



Two versions of Sviatoslav Richter Playing Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Bagatelle for piano in B minor, Op. 126 No. 4

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Vienna New Year’s Concert 2013 – Johann Strauss II: The Blue Danube, Waltz, op. 314



Make Music Part of Your Life Series:  Vienna New Year’s Concert 2013 – Johann Strauss II: The Blue Danube, Waltz, op. 314

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Dinu Lipatti – Chopin Nocturne Op. 27, No.2 in D flat Major



Dinu Lipatti – Chopin Nocturne No2 op 27 in D flat Major
More information about Dinu Lipatti (and Clara Haskil, another great piano player) you can find on http://www.lipatti-haskil-foundation….

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Ruggiero RICCI – LALO Violin Concerto Op.20 – L.de Froment, 1977



Edouard LALO: Violin Concerto in F major Op.20 (1873)
0:13 / I. Andante – Allegro [13'29'']
13:42 / II. Andantino [4'34'']
18:16 / III. Allegro con fuoco [6'06'']
Ruggiero Ricci, violin – Orchestra of Radio Luxembourg – Louis de Froment, conductor (Recorded: June, July 1977 – VOX)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Horowitz plays : Schubert’s Impromptu in G flat major D899 No.3 (in Vienna)


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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE SERIES: Fritz Kreisler – Miniature Viennese March



Vienna Brahms Trio
Boris Kuschnir (violin), Orfeo Mandozzi (violoncello), Jasminka Stancul (piano)
Tempo di marcia
Palais Ferstl, Vienna, 9th December 2009

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HERZ Henri-CAVATINE DE LA CENERENTOLA – Op.60-plays Milan JELEN.wmv


Henri Herz (Vienna, 6 January 1803 — Paris, 5 January 1888) was a pianist and composer, Austrian by birth, and French by domicile.

Herz was born Heinrich Herz in Vienna. He was Jewish by birth, although he asked the musical journalist Fétis not to mention this in the latter’s musical encyclopaedia,[1] perhaps a reflection of endemic anti-semitism in nineteenth-century French cultural circles.

As a child Herz studied with his father and in Coblenz with the organist Daniel Hünten. In 1816 he entered the Paris Conservatoire, where he studied under Victor Dourlen and Anton Reicha. His brother Jacques Herz (1794-1880) was a fellow-pupil at the Conservatoire, and also became a noted pianist and teacher
A celebrated pianist, Herz traveled worldwide, including tours in Europe, Russia, South America, and in the United States of America in 1846-50, where he concertised all the way to San Francisco, California, where his performances were compared to the more extravagant manner of Leopold de Meyer, concertising in the United States during the same period (1845-47)..[2] He wrote a book about his experiences abroad, Mes voyages en Amérique (Paris: Achille Faure, 1866).[3]
Herz taught at the Conservatoire (1842-74). (Of his pupils, only Marie-Aimée Roger-Miclos (1860-1950) recorded, in the early 1900s, for Dischi Fonotipia.)
In 1842 he built the Salle des Concerts Herz on the rue de la Victoire. This was used for performances by Berlioz and Offenbach.[4] In 1851 he founded his own piano factory in Paris
Herz composed many pieces including eight piano concertos. Among his many musical works, he was involved with the composition of Hexaméron (the fourth variation on Bellini’s theme is his). Many however found his piano style showy and shallow, and Robert Schumann was amongst those who criticized it.

 

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Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664, Op. 120 ( summer of 1819):
Movements
I. Allegro moderato, A major
II. Andante, D major
III. Allegro, A major

Well regarded among pianists, the “Little” A major sonata is so called to distinguish it from the hefty 1828 sonata in the same key. The manuscript, completed in July 1819, was dedicated to Josephine von Koller of Steyr in Upper Austria, whom he considered to be “very pretty” and “a good pianist.” The lyrical, buoyant, in spots typically poignant nature of this sonata fits the image of a young Schubert in love, living in a summery Austrian countryside, which he also considered to be “unimaginably lovely.”[1]

The A major sonata is straightforward, with a dulcet melodic opening. It was the first of Schubert’s piano sonatas where the sonata form as perfected by his idol, Beethoven, does not seem wrestled with; rather, it is a “joyous breakthrough,” a carefree triumph over strict rules of construction.[2]

The manuscript to this “little” sonata has been lost.[3]

Biography

Early life and education

Schubert was born in Himmelpfortgrund (now a part of Alsergrund), Vienna on January 31, 1797. His father, Franz Theodor Schubert, the son of a Moravian peasant, was a parish schoolmaster; his mother, Elisabeth Vietz, was the daughter of a Silesian master locksmith, and had also been a housemaid for a Viennese family prior to her marriage. Of Franz Theodor’s fourteen children (one illegitimate child was born in 1783),[1] nine died in infancy; five survived. Their father was a well-known teacher, and his school in Lichtental, a part of Vienna’s 9th district, was well attended.[2] He was not a musician of fame or with formal training, but he taught his son some elements of music.[3]

 

The house in which Schubert was born, today Nussdorfer Strasse 54, in the 9th district of Vienna.

At the age of five, Schubert began receiving regular instruction from his father and a year later was enrolled at his father’s school. His formal musical education also began around the same time. His father continued to teach him the basics of the violin,[3] and his brother Ignaz gave him piano lessons.[4] At 7, Schubert began receiving lessons from Michael Holzer, the local church organist and choirmaster. Holzer’s lessons seem to have mainly consisted of conversations and expressions of admiration[5] and the boy gained more from his acquaintance with a friendly joiner‘s apprentice who used to take him to a neighboring pianoforte warehouse where he had the opportunity to practice on better instruments.[6] He also played the viola in the family string quartet, with brothers Ferdinand and Ignaz on violin and his father on the cello. Schubert wrote many of his early string quartets for this ensemble.[7]

Schubert first came to the attention of Antonio Salieri, then Vienna’s leading musical authority, in 1804, when his vocal talent was recognized.[7] In October 1808, he became a pupil at the Stadtkonvikt (Imperial seminary) through a choir scholarship. At the Stadtkonvikt, Schubert was introduced to theovertures and symphonies of Mozart.[8] His exposure to these pieces and various lighter compositions, combined with his occasional visits to the opera set the foundation for his greater musical knowledge.[9]One important musical influence came from the songs of Johann Rudolf Zumsteeg, who was an importantLied composer of the time, which, his friend Joseph von Spaun reported, he “wanted to modernize”.[10]Schubert’s friendship with Spaun began at the Stadtkonvikt and endured through his lifetime. In those early days, the more well-to-do Spaun furnished the impoverished Schubert with manuscript paper.[9]

Meanwhile, his genius began to show in his compositions. Schubert was occasionally permitted to lead the Stadtkonvikt’s orchestra, and Salieri decided to begin training him privately in musical composition andtheory in these years.[11] It was the first germ of that amateur orchestra for which, in later years, many of his compositions were written. During the remainder of his stay at the Stadtkonvikt he wrote a good deal of chamber music, several songs, some miscellaneous pieces for the pianoforte and, among his more ambitious efforts, a Kyrie (D. 31) and Salve Regina (D. 27), an octet for wind instruments (D. 72/72a, said to commemorate the 1812 death of his mother),[12] a cantata for guitar and male voices (D. 110, in honor of his father’s birthday in 1813), and his first symphony (D. 82).[13]

Teacher at his father’s school

At the end of 1813, he left the Stadtkonvikt, and returned home for studies at the Normalhauptschule to train as a teacher. In 1814, he entered his father’s school as teacher of the youngest students. For over two years, the young man endured the drudgery of the work, which he performed with very indifferent success.[14] There were, however, other interests to compensate. He continued to receive private lessons in composition from Salieri, who did more for Schubert’s musical training than any of his other teachers. Salieri and Schubert would part ways in 1817.[11]

In 1814, Schubert met a young soprano named Therese Grob, the daughter of a local silk manufacturer. Several of his songs (Salve Regina and Tantum Ergo) were composed for her voice, and she also performed in the premiere of his first Mass (D. 105) in September[15] 1814.[14] Schubert intended to marry Grob, but was hindered by the harsh marriage consent law of 1815,[16] which required the ability to show the means to support a family.[17] In November 1816, after failing to gain a position at Laibach, Schubert sent Grob’s brother Heinrich a collection of songs, which were retained by her family into the 20th century.[18]

Schubert’s most prolific year was probably 1815. He composed over 20,000 bars of music, more than half of which was for orchestra, including nine church works, a symphony, and about 140 Lieder.[19] In that year, he was also introduced to Anselm Hüttenbrenner and Franz von Schober, who would become his lifelong friends. Another friend, Johann Mayrhofer, was introduced to him by Spaun in 1814.[20]

Supported by friends

 

Josef Abel(?) portrait of an anonymous young man with glasses (possibly Schubert)

Significant changes happened in 1816. Schober, a student of good family and some means, invited Schubert to room with him at his mother’s house. The proposal was particularly opportune, for Schubert had just made the unsuccessful application for the post of Kapellmeister at Laibach, and he had also decided not to resume teaching duties at his father’s school. By the end of the year, he became a guest in Schober’s lodgings. For a time, he attempted to increase the household resources by giving music lessons, but they were soon abandoned, and he devoted himself to composition. “I compose every morning, and when one piece is done, I begin another.”[21] During this year, he focused on orchestral and choral works, although he also continued to write Lieder.[22] Much of this work was unpublished, but manuscripts and copies circulated among friends and admirers.[23]

In early 1817, Schober introduced Schubert to Johann Michael Vogl, a prominent baritone twenty years Schubert’s senior. Vogl, for whom Schubert went on to write a great many songs, became one of Schubert’s main proponents in Viennese musical circles. He also met Joseph Hüttenbrenner (brother to Anselm), who also played a role in promoting Schubert’s music.[24] These, and an increasing circle of friends and musicians, became responsible for promoting, collecting, and, after his death, preserving, his work.[25]

In late 1817, Schubert’s father gained a new position at a school in Rossau (not far from Lichtental). Schubert rejoined his father and reluctantly took up teaching duties there. In early 1818, he was rejected for membership in the prestigious Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde, something that might have furthered his musical career.[26] However, he began to gain more notice in the press, and the first public performance of a secular work, an overture performed in February 1818, received praise from the press in Vienna and abroad.[27]

Schubert spent the summer of 1818 as music teacher to the family of Count Johann Karl Esterházy at their château in Zseliz (then in Hungary, now in Slovakia). His duties were relatively light (teaching piano and singing to the two daughters, Marie and Karoline), and the pay relatively good. As a result, he happily continued to compose during this time. It may have been at this time that he wrote one of his now world-famous compositions, the Marche militaire No. 1 in D major. On his return from Zseliz, he took up residence with his friend Mayrhofer.[26] The respite at Zseliz led to a succession of compositions for piano duet.[28]

The tight circle of friends that Schubert surrounded himself with was dealt a blow in early 1820. Schubert and four of his friends were arrested by the Austrian secret police, who were suspicious of any type of student gatherings. One of Schubert’s friends, Johann Senn, was put on trial, imprisoned for over a year, and then permanently banned from Vienna. The other four, including Schubert, were “severely reprimanded”, in part for “inveighing against [officials] with insulting and opprobrious language”.[29] While Schubert never saw Senn again, he did set some of his poems, “Selige Welt” and “Schwanengesang”, to music. The incident may have played a role in a falling-out with Mayrhofer, with whom he was living at the time.[30]

Musical maturity

The compositions of 1819 and 1820 show a marked advance in development and maturity of style[31]. The unfinished oratorio “Lazarus” (D. 689) was begun in February; later followed, amid a number of smaller works, by the 23rd Psalm (D. 706), the Gesang der Geister (D. 705/714), the Quartettsatz in C minor (D. 703), and the “Wanderer Fantasy” for piano (D. 760). Of most notable interest is the staging in 1820 of two of Schubert’s operas: Die Zwillingsbrüder (D. 647) appeared at the Theater am Kärntnertoron June 14, and Die Zauberharfe (D. 644) appeared at the Theater an der Wien on August 21.[32]Hitherto, his larger compositions (apart from his masses) had been restricted to the amateur orchestra at the Gundelhof, a society which grew out of the quartet-parties at his home. Now he began to assume a more prominent position, addressing a wider public.[32] Publishers, however, remained distant, withAnton Diabelli hesitantly agreeing to print some of his works on commission.[33] The first seven opus numbers (all songs) appeared on these terms; then the commission ceased, and he began to receive the meager pittances which were all that the great publishing houses ever accorded to him. The situation improved somewhat in March 1821 when Vogl sang “Der Erlkönig” at a concert that was extremely well received.[34] That month, he composed a variation on a waltz by Anton Diabelli (D. 718), being one of the fifty composers who contributed to Vaterländischer Künstlerverein.

The production of the two operas turned Schubert’s attention more firmly than ever in the direction of the stage, where, for a variety of reasons, he was almost completely unsuccessful. In 1822, Alfonso und Estrella was refused, partly owing to its libretto.[35] Fierrabras (D. 796) was rejected in the fall of 1823, but this was largely due to the popularity of Rossini and the Italian operatic style, and the failure of Carl Maria von Weber‘s Euryanthe.[36] Die Verschworenen (D. 787) was prohibited by the censor (apparently on the grounds of its title),[37] and Rosamunde (D. 797) was withdrawn after two nights, owing to the poor quality of the play for which Schubert had written incidental music. Of these works, the two former are written on a scale which would make their performances exceedingly difficult (Fierrabras, for instance, contains over 1,000 pages of manuscript score), but Die Verschworenen is a bright attractive comedy, and Rosamunde contains some of the most charming music that Schubert ever composed. In 1822, he made the acquaintance of both Weber and Beethoven, but little came of it in either case. Beethoven is said to have acknowledged the younger man’s gifts on a few occasions, but some of this is likely legend and in any case he could not have known the real scope of Schubert’s music – especially not the instrumental works – as so little of it was printed or performed in the composer’s lifetime. On his deathbed, Beethoven is said to have looked into some of the younger man’s works and exclaimed, “Truly, the spark of divine genius resides in this Schubert!”[38] but what would have come of it if he had recovered we can never know.

 

Schubert in 1825 (watercolor by Wilhelm August Rieder)

…read more here

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Elly Ney plays Beethoven Andante favori WoO 57 in F major


Beethoven: Andante favori WoO 57 in F major
Elly Ney playing the historical Graf piano witch Ludwig van Beethoven played during the last years of his life. 
Recorded 1965

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

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Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 - Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 - Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 - Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 - Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 - Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 - Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 - Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 - Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 - Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 - Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 - Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 - Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 - Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 - Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 - Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 - Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 - Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 - Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 - Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Flute Quartet No.2 G major (K.285a.)


Flute: Sharon Bezaly 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Flute Quartet No.2 G major (K.285a.)
Andante & 
Tempo di Menuette

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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 “From The New World” / Karajan · Vienna Philarmonic



Great presentation of the Great Wiener Philharmoniker conducted by Herbert von Karajan, playing the 9th Symphony of Antonin Dvorak “From the new world”. 

Gran presentación de la Filarmónica de Viena conducida por Herbert von Karajan, interpretando la novena sinfonía de Antonin Dvorak “Sinfonía del Nuevo Mundo”.

(C) Telemonde 1992, UMG and all their respective owners. No commercial use of this material.

(0:37) 1st mvt (Adagio, Allegro Molto)
(10:42) 2nd mvt (Largo)
(23:30) 3rd mvt (Scherzo, Molto Vivace)
(32:07) 4rth mvt (Allegro con fuoco)

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Beethoven “12 Contredances”



12 Contredances for small Orchestra WoO 14 
by Ludwig van Beethoven
Chamber Orchestra Berlin
Helmut Koch, conductor
1970

 

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Great Composition/Performances: Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players



Great Composition/Performances:   Beethoven Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 / Roger Norrington The London Classical Players

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 † 1827) 

Work: Symphony No.1 in C major, Op.21 

01. Adagio molto – Allegro con brio
02. Andante cantabile con moto
03. Menuetto – Allegro molto e vivace
04. Adagio – Allegro molto e vivace

Dedication to Baron Gottfried van Swieten
Premiered on April 2, 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

Conductor: Roger Norrington
The London Classical Players

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Ludwig van Beethoven‘s Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21, was dedicated to Baron Gottfried van Swieten, an early patron of the composer. The piece was published in 1801 by Hoffmeister & Kühnel of Leipzig. It is unknown exactly when Beethoven finished writing this work, but sketches of the finale were found from 1795.[1]
Historical background

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, three years after the premiere of his 1st Symphony.

The symphony is clearly indebted to Beethoven’s predecessors, particularly his teacher Joseph Haydn as well as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, but nonetheless has characteristics that mark it uniquely as Beethoven’s work, notably the frequent use of sforzandi and the prominent, more independent use of wind instruments. Sketches for the finale are found among the exercises Beethoven wrote while studying counterpoint underJohann Georg Albrechtsberger in the spring of 1797.

The premiere took place on 2 April 1800 at the K.K. Hoftheater nächst der Burg in Vienna. The concert program also included his Septet and Piano Concerto No. 2, as well as a symphony by Mozart, and an aria and a duet from Haydn’s oratorio The Creation. This concert effectively served to announce Beethoven’s talents to Vienna.[2]

Instrumentation
The symphony is scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in C, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in C and F, 2 trumpets in C, timpani and strings.

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Great Composers/Compositions: Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: Concerto for Cello in A minor No. 1, Wq. 170



Álbum: Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: Cello Concertos
Interpretes del álbum: Tim Hugh & Bournemouth Sinfonietta
Compositor: Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
Año: 2002
Genero: Barroca

 

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Franz Anton Hoffmeister – Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)


Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Cover of Franz Anton Hoffmeister

Franz Anton Hoffmeister 
Work: Piano Concerto in D-major, Op.24 (178/9?)

Mov.I: Allegro brioso 00:00
Mov.II: Adagio 15:07
Mov.III: Allegretto 22:57

Pianist: Wilhelm Neuhaus
Orchestra: Cologne Chamber Orchestra
Conductor: Helmut Müller-Brühl (1933 – 2012)

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Great Composers/Compositions: Igor Bukhvalov – Symphony no. 8 in F-Dur, Op. 93 by Ludwig van Beethoven



Igor Bukhvalov conducts Belarusian National Philharmonic performing Symphony #8 in F-Dur ,Op. 93 By Ludwig van Beethoven:

The Eighth Symphony consists of four movements:

 

  1. Allegro vivace e con brio
  2. Allegretto scherzando
  3. Tempo di Menuetto
  4. Allegro vivace
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 The Symphony No. 8 in F MajorOp. 93 is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1812. Beethoven fondly referred to it as “my little Symphony in F,” distinguishing it from his Sixth Symphony, a longer work also in F.[1]

The Eighth Symphony is generally light-hearted, though not lightweight, and in many places cheerfully loud, with many accented notes. Various passages in the symphony are heard by some listeners to be musical jokes.[2] As with various other Beethoven works such as the Opus 27 piano sonatas, the symphony deviates from Classical tradition in making the last movement the weightiest of the four.
The work was begun in the summer of 1812, immediately after the completion of the Seventh Symphony.[3]At the time Beethoven was 41 years old. As Antony Hopkins has noted, the cheerful mood of the work betrays nothing of the grossly unpleasant events that were taking place in Beethoven’s life at the time, which involved his interference in his brother Johann’s love life.[4] The work took Beethoven only four months to complete,[3] and is, unlike many of his works, without dedication.
The premiere took place on 24 February 1814, at a concert in the RedoutensaalVienna, at which theSeventh Symphony (which had been premiered two months earlier) was also played.[5] Beethoven was growing increasingly deaf at the time, but nevertheless led the premiere. Reportedly, “the orchestra largely ignored his ungainly gestures and followed the principal violinist instead.”[6]

 

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Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47



Alberni String Quartet.
Howard Davis, violin.
Peter Pople, violin.
Roger Best, violin/viola.
David Smith, cello.
Virginia Black, harmonium

Antonín Dvořák – Bagatelles, Op. 47
1. Allegretto scherzando 2’59
2. Tempo di menuetto, grazioso 3’16
3. Allegretto scherzando 2’56
4. Canon, andante con moto 3’27
5. Poco allegro 4’21

 

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RESPIGHI Suite for Organ and Strings In G



RESPIGHI Suite for Organ and Strings
Performed by Ars Nova Chamber Orchestra at Vienna Presbyterian Church on October 27​, 2012.

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schubert Symphony No 6 C major, D 589 Bavarian RSO Maazel



Franz Schubert Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589 
Lorin Maazel conducts Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589,[1] is a symphony by Franz Schubert composed between October 1817 and February 1818.[2] Its first public performance was in Vienna in 1828. It is nicknamed the “Little C major” to distinguish it from his later Ninth Symphony, in the same key, which is known as the “Great C major“.[3]

There are four movements:

  1. Adagio, 3/4 - Allegro, 2/2 7:23
  2. Andante, 2/4 in F major 12:27
  3. ScherzoPresto; Trio: Piu lento (Trio in E major), 3/4 17:12
  4. Allegro moderato, 2/4

 

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Best Classical Music YouTube Collection: Classical Music Mix – Best Classical Pieces Part I (1/2)


Make this the best post of 2014: RATE, LIKE, COMMENT! Above all ENJOY!

Published on Feb 9, 2013: 4,590,957 views!

A mix with some of the best classical pieces in the world.

Compositions name list:

00:01 - Albinoni – Adagio in g minor
10:44 - Pachelbel – Canon in D major
16:55 - Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
22:59 - Carlos GardelPor una cabeza
30:03 - Dmitri Shostakovich – Waltz no 2
33:52 - Eugen Doga – Grammofon
36:20 - Gheorghe Zamfir – The Lonely Shepherd
40:40 - Johann Strauss IIVienna Blood Waltz
47:46 - Johann Strauss II – Voices of Spring Waltz
53:31 - Juventino Rosas – Over the Waves Waltz
59:20 - Mozart – Rondo Alla Turca
1:02:57 - Mozart – Symphony 40 No 1
1:09:16 - Mozart – Lacrimosa
1:12:36 - Nino Rota – Vito’s Waltz
1:15:28 - Nobuo Uematsu – Dance With the Balamb-Fish
1:19:08 - Tchaikovsky – Sleeping Beauty Waltz
1:23:47 - Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake Waltz
1:30:41 - Tchaikovsky – Waltz of the Flowers
1:37:05 - Mozart – Serenade No 13

 

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Schumann, Albumblatt op. 124 Nr. 16 (Schlummerlied), Wolfgang Weller 2012.



Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856)
Albumblätter op. 124 Nr. 16 “Schlummerlied”
Wolfgang Weller

Tempo Giusto

This recording is part of the ongoing Schumann-Project:
ROBERT SCHUMANN / COMPLETE PIANO WORKS / WOLFGANG WELLER

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Sergei Rachmaninov – Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 19



SERGEI RACHMANINOV – Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 19

In this 1994 recording, Michael Grebanier plays the cello while Janet Guggenheim plays the piano. Naxos is the official owner of this recording.

1. Lento/Allegro Moderato (0:00)
Photo #1: Autumn Leaves, by maddox74
http://pixabay.com/en/autumn-leaves-f…
Photo #2: The Nature of Leaves, by gapa66
http://pixabay.com/en/autumn-the-natu…

2. Allegro Scherzando (10:54)
Photo: Deciduous Tree, by Hans
http://pixabay.com/en/beech-fagus-syl…

3. Andante (17:29)
Photo: Weser Uplands, by AnnaER
http://pixabay.com/en/landscape-autum…

4. Allegro mosso (23:43)
Photo #1: Autumn Colors, by giani
http://pixabay.com/en/fall-colors-fal…
Photo #2: Alpine Mountains, by stux
http://pixabay.com/en/hair-dryer-land…

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Vienna New Years Concert 2010, Die Fledermaus Overture, Johann Strauss



From the New Years Day concert 2010 in Vienna. Johann StraussDie Fledermaus Overture. Upscaled to 720p.

Recorded from the BBC on 01 January 2010.

 

Mozart – Quintet for Piano and Winds in E flat, K. 452



The Quintet in E flat major for Piano and Winds, K. 452, was completed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on March 30, 1784 and premiered two days later at the Imperial and Royal National Court Theater in Vienna. Shortly after the premiere, Mozart wrote to his father that “I myself consider it to be the best thing I have written in my life.” It is scored for piano, oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon. There are three movements:
1. Largo – Allegro moderato
2. Larghetto
3. Allegretto
This structure closely resembles that of a typical sonata. The first movement is a sprightly sonata form Allegro, with themes being passed from instrument to instrument, usually with the piano introducing a theme and accompanying while the oboe, clarinet, horn and bassoon play variations on it. The Larghetto movement is typical of the 2nd movement of other Mozart pieces: soft and gentle, yet still engaging. The Allegretto movement is a “sonata-rondo” of the kind Mozart used as the finale of many of the piano concertos he was writing at this period, and contains a written-out cadenza-like section toward the end.
This piece was the inspiration for the Quintet in E flat for Piano and Winds, Op. 16, by Ludwig van Beethoven, who composed this tribute in 1796. Both compositions use the same scoring. 
—————————————-­————————————-
FREE .mp3 and .wav files of all Mozart’s music at: http://www.mozart-archiv.de/
FREE sheet music scores of any Mozart piece at:http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/nma/start…
ALSO check out these cool sites: http://musopen.org/
and http://imslp.org/wiki/
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FABULOUS COMPOSERS/COMPOSITIONS: Beethoven – Missa Solemnis – Philharmonia / Karajan



Ludwig van Beethoven

Missa Solemnis op.123

Kyrie 0:00
Gloria 11:12
Credo 28:33
Sanctus 50:54
Agnus Dei 01:07:59

Elisabeth Schwarzkopf
Christa Ludwig
Nicolai Gedda
Nicola Zaccaria
Singverein des Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde in Wien
Philharmonia Orchestra
Herbert von Karajan

Studio recording (11-15.IX.1958)

 Donald Tovey has connected Beethoven to the earlier tradition in a different way:

Not even Bach or Handel can show a greater sense of space and of sonority. There is no earlier choral writing that comes so near to recovering some of the lost secrets of the style of Palestrina. There is no choral and no orchestral writing, earlier or later, that shows a more thrilling sense of the individual colour of every chord, every position, and every doubled third or discord.
 

In this famous portrait of Beethoven byJoseph Karl Stieler, Beethoven can be seen working on the Missa solemnis in D major.

The Missa solemnis in D major, Op. 123 was composed by Ludwig van Beethoven from 1819 to 1823. It was first performed on 7 April 1824 in St. PetersburgRussia, under the auspices of Beethoven’s patron Prince Nikolai Galitzin; an incomplete performance was given in Vienna on 7 May 1824, when the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei were conducted by the composer.[1] It is generally considered to be one of the composer’s supreme achievements. Together with Bach’s Mass in B minor, it is the most significantMass setting of the common practice period.

Despite critical recognition as one of Beethoven’s great works from the height of his composing career,Missa solemnis has not achieved the same level of popular attention that many of his symphonies and sonatas have enjoyed.[citation needed] Written around the same time as his Ninth Symphony, it is Beethoven’s second setting of the Mass, after his Mass in C, Op. 86.

The Mass is scored for 2 flutes; 2 oboes, 2 clarinets (in A, C, and B♭); 2 bassoonscontrabassoon; 4horns (in D, E♭, B♭ basso, E, and G); 2 trumpets (D, B♭, and C); alto, tenor, and bass trombonetimpani;organ continuo; strings (violins I and II, violascellos, and basses); sopranoaltotenor, and bass soloists; and mixed choir.

Like most Masses, Beethoven’s Missa solemnis is in five movements:

  • Kyrie: Perhaps the most traditional of the Mass movements, the Kyrie is in a traditional ABA’ structure, with stately choral writing in the first movement section and more contrapuntal voice leading in the Christe, which also introduces the four vocal soloists.
  • Gloria: Quickly shifting textures and themes highlight each portion of the Gloria text, in a beginning to the movement that is almost encyclopedic in its exploration of 3/4 time. The movement ends with the first of the work’s two massive fugues, on the text “In gloria Dei patris. Amen”, leading into a recapitulation of the initial Gloria text and music.
  • Credo: One of the most remarkable movements to come from Beethoven’s pen opens with a chord sequence that will be used again in the movement to effect modulations. The Credo, like the Gloria, is an often disorienting, mad rush through the text. The poignant modal harmonies for the “et incarnatus” yield to ever more expressive heights through the “crucifixus”, and into a remarkable, a cappella setting of the “et resurrexit”that is over almost before it has begun. Most notable about the movement, though, is the closing fugue on “et vitam venturi” that includes one of the most difficult passages in the choral repertoire, when the subject returns at doubled tempo for a thrilling conclusion.
    The form of the Credo is divided into four parts: (I) allegro ma non troppo through “descendit de coelis” in B-flat; (II) “Incarnatus est” through”Resurrexit” in D; (III) “Et ascendit” through the Credo recapitulation in F; (IV) Fugue and Coda “et vitam venturi saeculi, amen” in B-flat.
  • Sanctus: Up until the benedictus of the Sanctus, the Missa solemnis is of fairly normal classical proportions. But then, after an orchestral preludio, a solo violin enters in its highest range — representing the Holy Spirit descending to earth — and begins the Missa’s most transcendently beautiful music, in a remarkably long extension of the text.
  • Agnus Dei: A setting of the plea “miserere nobis” (“have mercy on us”) that begins with the men’s voices alone in B minor yields, eventually, to a bright D-major prayer “dona nobis pacem” (“grant us peace”) in a pastoral mode. After some fugal development, it is suddenly and dramatically interrupted by martial sounds (a convention in the 18th century, as in Haydn‘s Missa in tempore belli), but after repeated pleas of “miserere!”,eventually recovers and brings itself to a stately conclusion.