Tag Archives: wikipedia

QUOTATION: Gustave Flaubert


Nothing is more humiliating than to see idiots succeed in enterprises we have failed in.

Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) Discuss

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: ROBERT SCHUMANN – Overture, Scherzo und Finale, Op.52



Make Music Part of Your Life Series: ROBERT SCHUMANN – Overture, Scherzo und Finale, Op.52:

GILBERTO SEREMBE, conductor
O.R.T. – Orchestra Regionale Toscana
Firenze, Teatro della Compagnia, 9 June 1995
http://www.italianconductingacademy.com

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Great Compositions/Performances: Kempff plays Schubert Piano Sonata in A Major D664



Franz Schubert:
Piano Sonata in A Major D664:
Mvt.I: Allegro moderato 00:00
Mvt.II: Andante 10:41
Mvt.III: Allegro 15:14

Wilhelm Kempff: piano

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included BachMozartChopinSchumannLiszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert, by both of whom he recorded complete sets of their piano sonatas[1] [2]. He is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century.[3]

Early life

 

Kempff was born in JüterbogBrandenburg, in 1895.[1] He grew up in nearby Potsdam where his father was a royal music director and organist at St. Nicolai Church. His grandfather was also an organist and his brother Georg became director of church music at the University of Erlangen. Kempff studied music at first at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik at the age of nine after receiving lessons from his father at a younger age. Whilst there he studied composition with Robert Kahn and piano with Karl Heinrich Barth[1] (with whom Arthur Rubinstein also studied). In 1914 Kempff moved on to study at the Viktoria gymnasium in Potsdam before returning to Berlin to finish his training.[1]

 

As a pianist

 

In 1917, Kempff made his first major recital, consisting of predominantly major works, including Beethoven’s Hammerklavier Sonata and Brahms Variations on a theme of Paganini.[1] Kempff toured very widely in Europe and much of the rest of the world. Between 1936 and 1979 he performed ten times in Japan (a small Japanese island was named Kenpu-san in his honor)[citation needed]. Kempff made his first London appearance in 1951 and his first in New York in 1964. He gave his last public performance in Paris in 1981, and then retired for health reasons (Parkinson’s Disease). He died in PositanoItaly at the age of 95, five years after his wife, whom he had married in 1926. They were survived by five children.[1]

 

Wilhelm Kempff recorded over a period of some sixty years. His recorded legacy includes works of SchumannBrahmsSchubertMozartBachLisztChopin and particularly, of Beethoven.[1]

 

He was among the first to record the complete sonatas of Franz Schubert, long before these works became popular. He also recorded two sets of the complete Beethoven sonatas (and one early, almost complete set on shellac 1926-1945), one in mono (1951–1956) and the other in stereo (1964–1965). He recorded the complete Beethoven piano concertos twice as well, both with the Berlin Philharmonic; the first from the early 1950s in mono with Paul van Kempen, and the later in stereo from the early 1960s with Ferdinand Leitner. Kempff also recorded chamber music with Yehudi MenuhinPierre FournierWolfgang SchneiderhanPaul Grummer, and Henryk Szeryng, among others.

 

The pianist Alfred Brendel has written that Kempff “played on impulse… it depended on whether the right breeze, as with an aeolian harp, was blowing. You then would take something home that you never heard elsewhere.” (in Brendel’s book, The Veil of Order). He regards Kempff as the “most rhythmical” of his colleagues. Brendel helped choose the selections for Phillip’s “Great Pianists of the 20th Century” issue of Kempff recordings, and wrote in the notes that Kempff “achieves things that are beyond him” in his “unsurpassable” recording of Liszt’s first Legende, “St. Francis Preaching to the Birds.”

 

Kempff (right) with Ernest Ansermet (left) in 1965

 

When pianist Artur Schnabel undertook his pioneering complete recording of the Beethoven sonatas in the 1930s, he told EMI that if he didn’t complete the cycle, they should have Kempff complete the remainder – even though the two pianists took noticeably different approaches to the composer (for example, Schnabel preferred extremely fast or slow tempos, while Kempff preferred moderate ones). Later, when Kempff was in Finland, the composer Jean Sibelius asked him to play the slow movement of Beethoven’s 29th Sonata, the Hammerklavier; after Kempff finished, Sibelius told him, “You did not play that as a pianist but rather as a human being.”[4]

 

Technique

 

As a performer he stressed lyricism and spontaneity in music, particularly effective in intimate pieces or passages. He always strove for a singing, lyrical quality. He avoided extreme tempos and display for its own sake. He left recordings of most of his repertory, including the complete sonatas of Beethoven and Schubert. He performed to an advanced age, concertizing past his eightieth birthday. His association with the Berlin Philharmonic spanned over sixty years.

 

As a teacher

 

From 1924 to 1929, Kempff took over the direction of the Stuttgart College of Music as a successor of Max Pauer. In 1931, he was co-founder of the summer courses at Marmorpalais Potsdam. In 1957, Kempff founded Fondazione Orfeo (today: Kempff Kulturstiftung) in the south-Italian city Positano and held his first Beethoven interpretation masterclass at Casa Orfeo, which Kempff had built especially for this reason. He continued teaching there once a year until 1982. After his death in 1991,Gerhard Oppitz taught the courses from 1992-1994 until John O’Conor took over. Oppitz and O’Conor had both been outstanding participants of Kempff’s masterclasses and were personally closely connected with Wilhelm Kempff.

 

Other noted pianists to have studied with Kempff include Jörg DemusNorman ShetlerMitsuko UchidaPeter SchmalfussIdil Biret and Carmen Piazzini.

 

Composition

 

A lesser-known activity of Kempff was composing. He composed for almost every genre and used his own cadenzas for Beethoven’s Piano Concertos 1-4. His student Idil Biret has recorded a CD of his piano works. His second symphony premiered in 1929 at the Leipzig Gewandhaus by Wilhelm Furtwängler. He also prepared a number of Bach transcriptions, including the Siciliano from the Flute Sonata in E-flat major, that have been recorded by Kempff and others.

 

Recordings

 

Among many others:

 

  • Beethoven: Piano Sonatas Nos. 1, 12, 19, and 20 (DG LP 138 935; released 1965; recipient of Grand Prix du Disque)
  • Schubert: The Piano Sonatas (complete), (DG 463 766-2 (seven compact disks)) recordings made in 1965, ’67, ’68, ’70.

 

Autobiogra

 

  • Kempff, Wilhelm. Unter dem Zimbelstern: Jugenderinnerungen eines Pianisten ["Under the Cymbal Star: The Development of a Musician" (1951)]. Laaber: Laaber Verlag, 1978.

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QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

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ARTICLE: LENT


LENT
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Its institutional purpose is heightened in the annual commemoration of Holy Week, marking the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus, which recalls the tradition and events of the New Testament beginning on Friday of Sorrows, further climaxing on Jesus’crucifixion on Good Friday, which ultimately culminates in the joyful celebration on Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. During Lent, many of the faithful commit to fasting or giving up certain types of luxuries as a form of penitence. Many Christians also add a Lenten spiritual discipline, such as reading a daily devotional, to draw themselves near to God.[6] TheStations of the Cross, a devotional commemoration of Christ’s carrying the Cross and of his execution, are often observed. Many Roman Catholic and some Protestant churches remove flowers from their altars, while crucifixes, religious statues, and other elaborate religious symbols are often veiled in violet fabrics in solemn observance of the event. Throughout Christendom, some adherents mark the season with the traditional abstention from the consumption of meat, most notably among Roman Catholics.[7]

Lent is traditionally described as lasting for forty days, in commemoration of the forty days which, according to the Gospels ofMatthewMark and Luke, Jesus spent fasting in the desert before the beginning of his public ministry, where he endured temptation by the Devil.[8][9] However, different Christian denominations calculate the forty days of Lent differently. Historically, the season of Lent lasts from Ash Wednesday to Holy Saturday and includes the Paschal Triduum.[10][11] This duration has been maintained by most Western Christian denominations, including the Anglican Church,[12] Lutheran Church,[13] Methodist Church,[14] and Western Rite Orthodox Church.[15] However, after the liturgical abbreviations of the Second Vatican Council in the Roman Catholic Church, Lent, in that denomination alone, is now taken to end on Maundy Thursday rather than Easter Eve, and hence lasts 38 days excluding Sundays, or 44 days in total.[10]


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GREAT COMPOSITIONS/PERFORMANCES: Brahms Piano concerto N° 2 (Barenboim – Celibidache)



Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897)
Pianokonzer Nr. 2
Piano concerto N° 2

München Philharmoniker
Dirigent: Sergiu Celibidache
Piano: Daniel Barenboim

1st mov 00:30
2nd mov 20:00
3rd mov 29:55
4th mov 42:26

 

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms (German: [joˈhanəs ˈbʁaːms]; 7 May 1833 – 3 April 1897) was a German composer and pianist.

Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms’s popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the “Three Bs“.

Brahms composed for piano, chamber ensembles, symphony orchestra, and for voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works; he worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinistJoseph Joachim. Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. Brahms, an uncompromising perfectionist, destroyed some of his works and left others unpublished.[1]

Brahms is often considered both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Baroque and Classical masters. He was a master of counterpoint, the complex and highly disciplined art for which Johann Sebastian Bach is famous, and of development, a compositional ethos pioneered by Joseph HaydnWolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and other composers. Brahms aimed to honour the “purity” of these venerable “German” structures and advance them into a Romantic idiom, in the process creating bold new approaches to harmony and melody. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg and Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms’s works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers.

 

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QUOTATION: Thomas Hardy


A resolution to avoid an evil is seldom framed till the evil is so far advanced as to make avoidance impossible.

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) Discuss

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Schumann – Alexis Weissenberg (1967) Davidsbündlertänze, Op 6



The first edition is preceded by the following epigraph:

Alter Spruch:

In all und jeder Zeit
Verknüpft sich Lust und Leid:
Bleibt fromm in Lust und seid
Dem Leid mit Mut bereit

(Old saying:

In each and every age
joy and sorrow are mingled:
Remain pious in joy,
and be ready for sorrow with courage.)

The individual pieces, unnamed, have the following tempo markings, keys and ascriptions: Lebhaft (Vivace), G major, Florestan and Eusebius; Innig (Con intimo sentimento), B minor, Eusebius; Etwas hahnbüchen (Un poco impetuoso) (1st edition), Mit Humor (Con umore) (2nd edition), G major, Florestan (Hahnbüchen, now usually hahnebüchen (also hanebüchen or hagebüchen), is an untranslatable colloquialism roughly meaning “coarse” or “clumsy.” Apparently, it originally meant “made of hornbeam wood.” (See the article “Hanebüchen” in the German version of Wikipedia.) Ernest Hutcheson translated it as “cockeyed” in his book The Literature of the Piano.); Ungeduldig (Con impazienza), B minor, Florestan; Einfach (Semplice), D major, Eusebius; Sehr rasch und in sich hinein (Molto vivo, con intimo fervore) (1st edition), Sehr rasch (Molto vivo) (2nd edition), D minor, Florestan; Nicht schnell mit äußerst starker Empfindung (Non presto profondamente espressivo) (1st edition), Nicht schnell (Non presto) (2nd edition), G minor, Eusebius; Frisch (Con freschezza), C minor, Florestan; No tempo indication (metronome mark of 1 crotchet = 126) (1st edition), Lebhaft (Vivace) (2nd edition), C major, Florestan; Balladenmäßig sehr rasch (Alla ballata molto vivo) (1st edition), (“Sehr” and “Molto” capitalized in 2nd edition), D minor (ends major), Florestan; Einfach (Semplice), B minor-D major, Eusebius; Mit Humor (Con umore), B minor-E minor and major, Florestan; Wild und lustig (Selvaggio e gaio), B minor and major, Florestan and Eusebius; Zart und singend (Dolce e cantando), E♭ major, Eusebius; Frisch (Con freschezza), B♭ major – Etwas bewegter (poco piu mosso), E♭ major (return to opening section is optional), Florestan and Eusebius; Mit gutem Humor (Con buon umore) (in 2nd edition, “Con umore”), G major – Etwas langsamer (Un poco più lento), B minor; leading without a break into Wie aus der Ferne (Come da lontano), B major and minor (including a full reprise of No. 2), Florestan and Eusebius; and Nicht schnell (Non presto), C major, Eusebius.

 

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MAKE MUSIC PART OF YOUR LIFE: Gabriel Fauré – Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15


Published on Jan 21, 2013

Gabriel Fauré – Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15

Antoine Tamestit, viola / Trio Wanderer:
Raphaël Pidoux, violoncello
Vincent Coq, piano
Jean-Marc Phillips-Varjabédian, violin 

1. Allegro molto moderato 
2. Scherzo. Allegro vivo 
3. Adagio 
4. Finale. Allegro molto

Gabriel Fauré’s Piano Quartet No. 1, in C minor, Op. 15 is one of two chamber works written by him for the conventional piano quartet combination of piano, violin, viola and cello. Despite being in a minor key it is predominantly positive in tone, though with some hints in the slow movement of the emotional turmoil of Fauré’s life at the time of the composition.

In 1877, after wooing her for five years, Fauré had finally become engaged to Marieanne Viardot, daughter of the well-known singer Pauline Viardot. The engagement lasted for less than four months, and Marieanne broke it off, to Fauré’s considerable distress. It was in the later stages of their relationship that he began work on the quartet, in the summer of 1876. He completed it in 1879, and revised it in 1883, completely rewriting the finale. The first performance of the original version was given on 14 February 1880. In a study dated 2008, Kathryn Koscho notes that the original finale has not survived, and is believed to have been destroyed by Fauré in his last day

Fauré in 1875

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TODAY’S BIRTHDAY: Samuel Barber : Souvenirs Op.28 – 1 Waltz


From Wikipedia,

Samuel Barber : Souvenirs Op.28 – 1 Waltz:
Duo Frösche
Primo : Mika Nishizawa
Secondo : Kenichi Nishizawa
official site
http://www.kenichinishizawa.net/

バーバー「スーヴェニール」I : ワルツ
デュオ・フレッシェ(西澤健一&美歌)


the free encyclopedia

Samuel Osmond Barber II (March 9, 1910 – January 23, 1981) was an American composer of orchestraloperachoral, andpiano music. He is one of the most celebrated composers of the 20th century: music critic Donal Henahan stated that “Probably no other American composer has ever enjoyed such early, such persistent and such long-lasting acclaim.”[1] His Adagio for Strings (1936) has earned a permanent place in the concert repertory of orchestras. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music twice: for his opera Vanessa (1956–57) and for the Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1962). Also widely performed is hisKnoxville: Summer of 1915 (1947), a setting for soprano and orchestra of a prose text by James Agee. At the time of his death, nearly all of his compositions had been recorded.[1]

Samuel Barber, photographed by 
Carl Van Vechten, 1944

 

 

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Edvard Grieg – Humoresque op 6 no 1



Tempo di Valse. From Edvard Grieg – Anniversary Collection recorded by Norwegian Pianist Knut Erik Jensen

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Vincent D’indy Symphony on a French mountain air for piano and orchestra



Pnina Salzman and the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra/ Mendi Rodan, conductor. See also her Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pnina-…

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
For the asteroid named after the composer, see 11530 d’Indy.

Vincent d’Indy, ca. 1895

Vincent d’Indy (French pronunciation: ​[vɛ̃ˈsɑ̃ dɛ̃ˈdi]) (27 March 1851 – 2 December 1931) was a French composer and teacher.

Life

Paul Marie Théodore Vincent d’Indy was born in Paris into an aristocratic family of royalist and Catholic persuasion. He had piano lessons from an early age from his paternal grandmother, who passed him on to Antoine François Marmontel and Louis Diémer.[1] From the age of 14 he studied harmony with Albert Lavignac. At age 19, during the Franco-Prussian War, he enlisted in the National Guard, but returned to musical life as soon as the hostilities were over. The first of his works he heard performed was a Symphonie italienne, at an orchestral rehearsal under Jules Pasdeloup; the work was admired by Georges Bizet and Jules Massenet, with whom he had already become acquainted.[1] On the advice of Henri Duparc, he became a devoted student of César Franck at the Conservatoire de Paris. As a follower of Franck, d’Indy came to admire what he considered the standards of German symphonism.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Pnina Salzman (Hebrew: פנינה זלצמן) (February 24, 1922, Tel AvivMandate Palestine – December 16, 2006, Tel Aviv, Israel) was an Israeli classical pianist and piano pedagogue.

Salzman showed an early aptitude for the piano, and gave her first recital at the age of eight. The French pianist and teacher, Alfred Cortot, heard her play in 1932 while she was a student at Shulamit Conservatory and invited her to Paris to study. She graduated at the Ecole Normale de Musique then became a pupil of Magda Tagliaferroat the Conservatoire de Paris, where she was to win the Premier Prix de Piano in 1938, aged 16.

It was through the violinist Bronislaw Huberman that she first developed a lifelong association with the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, which Huberman had founded.

In 1963 she became the first Israeli to be invited to play in the USSR and in 1994, the first Israeli pianist invited to play in China. Besides performing as a soloist, she was a member of the Israel Piano Quartet.

She was a Professor and the head of the piano department at Tel Aviv University and served on the jury of many piano competitions, including the Arthur Rubinstein,Vladimir Horowitz and Marguerite Long competitions. She taught piano to many students, including Dror ElimelechNimrod David PfefferElisha AbasIddo Bar-Shai andYossi Reshef.

Buy “Symphony on a French Mountain Air for Piano and Orchestra in G Major, Op. 25: II. Assez modéré, mais sans lenteur” on

Google PlayAmazonMP3iTuneseMusic

  • Artist
    Pnina Salzman

 

 

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EAT YOUR SAUERKRAUT (YOGURT, KEFIR, AND BORSCH)



Around 5000 people made it downtown Des Moines, Iowa for the 9th annual Oktoberfest. Lots of bier, food, and great polka music.

Please visit
 http://healthyeatingrocks.com/2013/01/29/antibiotics-fermented-foods-and-your-health/comment-page-1/#comment-1642
for a great post on health benefits deriving from the consumption of sauerkraut and other probiotics

From Wikipedia:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Choucroute garnie, a traditional dish of Alsace (France), where sauerkraut is garnished with sausages and other pork products

Sauerkraut (/ˈsaʊərkrt/German pronunciation: [ˈzaʊ.ɐˌkʁaʊt] ( listen)), directly translated: “sour cabbage”, is finely cutcabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria, including LeuconostocLactobacillus, and Pediococcus.[1][2] It has a long shelf-life and a distinctive sour flavor, both of which result from the lactic acid that forms when the bacteria ferment the sugars in the cabbage. Sauerkraut is also used as a condiment upon various foods, such as meat dishes and hot dogs.[3][4][[6]

History

Fermented foods have a long history in many cultures. Today, two of the most well-known instances of traditional fermented cabbage side dishes are sauerkraut and Korean kimchi.[7] The Roman writers Cato (in his De Agri Cultura) and Columella (in his De re Rustica) mentioned preserving cabbages and turnips with salt. It is believed to have been introduced to Europe in its present form 1,000 years later by Genghis Khan after invading China.[8][9] The Tartars took it in their saddlebags to Europe. There it took root mostly in Eastern European and Germanic cuisines, but also in other countries including France, where the name became choucroute.[10]

Before frozen foods, refrigeration, and cheap transport from warmer areas became readily available in northern and central Europe, sauerkraut, like other preserved foods, provided a source of nutrients during the winter. James Cook always took a store of sauerkraut on his sea voyages, since experience had taught him it preventedscurvy.[11][12]

Geographic distribution

In Germany, sauerkraut is often flavored with juniper berries. Traditionally it is served with pork, Strasbourg sausage or frankfurters, bacon, smoked pork or smoked Morteau or Montbéliard sausages, accompanied typically by roasted or steamed potatoes or dumplings.[13]

Sauerkraut is the main ingredient of the Alsatian meal choucroute garnie (French for dressed sauerkraut), sauerkraut with sausages and other salted meats and charcuterie, and often potatoes.

Sauerkraut is the most important ingredient in the shchi, a traditional soup of Russia where it has been known as far back as the 9th century, the time of the import of cabbage from Byzantium.

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life: Arrau Schumann Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54



Piano Concerto in A minor, Op. 54

1.- Allegro Affettuoso
2.- Intermezzo: Andantino Grazioso
3.- Allegro Vivace

Film footage recorded in 1963

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)
Claudio Arrau (1903-1991)

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Claudio Arrau plays Debussy Estampes, no.2, “La soirée dans Grenade”


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaEstampes (Prints), L.100, is a composition for solo piano by Claude Debussy. It was finished in 1903.

Estampes contains three movements:

  1. Pagodes (Pagodas) – approx. 6 minutes.
  2. La soirée dans Grenade (The Evening in Granada) – approx. 5½ minutes.
  3. Jardins sous la pluie (Gardens in the Rain) – approx. 3½ minutes.[1]

II. La soirée dans Grenade

La soirée dans Grenade uses the Arabic scale and mimics guitar strumming to evoke images of GranadaSpain. At the time of its writing, Debussy’s only personal experience with the country was a few hours spent in San Sebastián.[2] Despite this, the Spanish composer Manuel de Falla said of Soirée, “There is not even one measure of this music borrowed from the Spanish folklore, and yet the entire composition in its most minute details, conveys admirably Spain“.[3]

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Make music Part of Your Life Series: Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467 (Elvira Madigan) Pollini/Muti



Mozart:Piano Concerto No. 21 in C major, K. 467

Orchestra Filarmonica della Scala
Maurizio Pollini, piano
Riccardo Muti, conductor
(2004)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Piano Concerto No. 21 in C majorK. 467, was completed on March 9, 1785 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, four weeks after the completion of the previous D minor concerto, K. 466.[1][2]

The concerto has three movements:

 

  1. Allegro maestoso; in common time. The tempo marking is in Mozart’s catalog of his own works, but not in the autograph manuscript.[3]
  2. Andante in F major. In both the autograph score and in his personal catalog, Mozart notated the meter as Alla breve[4]
  3. Allegro vivace assai

Recordings:  This work has been recorded numerous times by many famous pianists including Géza AndaPiotr Anderszewski,Vladimir AshkenazyDaniel BarenboimMalcolm BilsonAlfred BrendelRobert CasadesusIvan DrenikovAnnie FischerWalter GiesekingFriedrich GuldaStephen HoughKeith JarrettWilhelm KempffWalter KlienAlicia de LarrochaGiorgi LatsabidzeRosina LhevinneDinu LipattiRadu LupuMurray PerahiaMaria João Pires,Maurizio PolliniArthur RubinsteinFazil SayAndrás SchiffArtur SchnabelRudolf SerkinHoward Shelley,Mitsuko Uchida, and Christian Zacharias.

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Make Music Part of Your Life Series: Antonin Dvorak: Humoresque #7 in Gb Op 101/7: Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman


Humoresques (Czech: Humoresky), Op. 101 (B. 187), is a piano cycle by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, written during the summer of 1894. One writer says “the seventh Humoresque is probably the most famous small piano work ever written after Beethoven‘s Für Elise[1]

History
During his stay in America, when Dvořák was director of the Conservatory in New York from 1892 to 1895, the composer collected many interesting musical themes in his sketchbooks. He used some of these ideas in other compositions, notably the “From the New World” Symphony, the “American” String Quartet, the Quintet in E Flat Major, and the Sonatina for Violin, but some remained unused.

In 1894 Dvořák spent the summer with his family in Bohemia, at Vysoká u Příbrami. During this “vacation”, Dvořák began to use the collected material and to compose a new cycle of short piano pieces. On 19 July 1894 Dvořák sketched the first Humoresque in B major, today number 6 in the cycle. However, the composer soon started to create scores for the pieces that were intended to be published. The score was completed on 27 August 1894.
The cycle was entitled Humoresques shortly before Dvořák sent the score to his German publisher F. Simrock. The composition was published by Simrock in Autumn, 1894.
The publisher took advantage of the great popularity of the seventh Humoresque to produce arrangements for many instruments and ensembles. The piece was later also published as a song with various lyrics. It has also been arranged for choir.[2] The melody was also used as the theme of Slappy Squirrel in the popular animated television show Animaniacs. In 2004 the vocal group Beethoven’s Wig used Humoresque as the basis for a song entitled Dvořák the Czechoslovak.
Structure
The cycle consists of eight pieces:

  1. Vivace (E♭ minor)
  2. Poco andante (B major)
  3. Poco andante e molto cantabile (A♭ major)
  4. Poco andante (F major)
  5. Vivace (A minor)
  6. Poco allegretto (B major)
  7. Poco lento e grazioso (G♭ major)
  8. Poco andante—Vivace–Meno mosso, quasi Tempo I (B minor)

The main theme of the first Humoresque was sketched in New York on New Year’s Eve 1892, with the inscription “Marche funèbre” (sic).[3] The minor theme was accompanied with the inscription “people singing in the street”. The opening theme of the fourth piece was also sketched in New York, among ideas intended for the unrealized opera Hiawatha. The “American” style is also apparent in other themes of the Humoresques.[4]

Buy “Humoresque No. 7 in G-flat Major, Op. 101″ on

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Wikipedia invites you (Yes You!) to this week topic to pick on_Impossible Object (view – talk – edit) What are you waiting for: go there!


Wikipedia invite_Impossible Object (view - talk - edit)

Wikipedia invite_Impossible Object (view – talk – edit) (One click away…same old drill boys and girls)

Image representing Wikipedia as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase

 

 

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Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring


Great compositions/Performances: Bach: Cantata, BWV 147, Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring is the most common English title of the 10th and last movement of the cantata Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben, BWV 147 (“Heart and Mouth and Deed and Life”), composed by Johann Sebastian Bach in 1716 and 1723. Written during his first year in Leipzig, Germany, this chorale movement is one of Bach’s most enduring works.

Jesu, joy of man’s desiring,

Holy wisdom, love most bright;

Drawn by Thee, our souls aspiring

Soar to uncreated light.

Word of God, our flesh that fashioned,

With the fire of life impassioned,

Striving still to truth unknown,

Soaring, dying round Thy throne.

Through the way where hope is guiding,

Hark, what peaceful music rings;

Where the flock, in Thee confiding,

Drink of joy from deathless springs.

Theirs is beauty’s fairest pleasure;

Theirs is wisdom’s holiest treasure.

Thou dost ever lead Thine own

In the love of joys unknown.

Enjoy, It’s all good!

 

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Make Music Part of Your Life – Series: Antonín Dvořák – Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141


Antonín DvořákSymphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141
1. Allegro maestoso 12’42
2. Poco adagio-F major 10’21
3. Scherzo, vivace poco meno mosso 7’49
4. Finale, allegro 9’49
****The work, at approximately 40 minutes in length, is scored for an orchestra of 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 clarinets in A and B♭, 2 bassoons, 4 horns in D and F, 2 trumpets in C, D, and F, 3 trombonestimpani and strings***

Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 

Title page of the score of Dvořák’s seventh symphony, with portrait of Hans von Bülow

Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, B. 141, by Antonín Dvořák (published as No. 2) was first performed in London on April 22, 1885 shortly after the piece was completed on March 17, 1885.

Composition history

Dvořák’s work on the symphony began on December 13, 1884. Dvořák heard and admired Brahms‘s new 3rd Symphony, and this prompted him to think of writing of a new symphony himself. So it was fortuitous that in that same year the Philharmonic Society of London invited him to write a new symphony and elected him as an honorary member. A month later, after his daily walk to the railway station in Prague, he said “the first subject of my new symphony flashed in to my mind on the arrival of the festive train bringing our countrymen from Pest”. The Czechs were in fact coming to the National Theatre in Prague, where there was to be a musical evening to support the political struggles of the Czech nation. He resolved that his new symphony would reflect this struggle. In doing so the symphony would also reveal something of his personal struggle in reconciling his simple and peaceful countryman’s feelings with his intense patriotism and his wish to see the Czech nation flourish.

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The Blue Lagoon (R), (1980)


 
The Blue Lagoon
Blue lagoon 1980 movie poster.jpg

Promotional film poster
Directed by Randal Kleiser
Produced by Randal Kleiser
Screenplay by Douglas Day Stewart
Story by Henry De Vere Stacpoole
Based on The Blue Lagoon
Starring Brooke Shields
Christopher Atkins
Leo McKern
William Daniels
Music by Basil Poledouris
Cinematography Néstor Almendros
Editing by Robert Gordon
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release dates
  • June 20, 1980
Running time 104 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $4.5 million
Box office $58,853,106 (U.S. and Canada only)

The Blue Lagoon is a 1980 American romantic adventure film directed by Randal Kleiser. The screenplay by Douglas Day Stewart was based on the novel The Blue Lagoon by Henry De Vere Stacpoole. The film stars Brooke Shields andChristopher Atkins. The original music score was composed by Basil Poledouris and the cinematography was by Néstor Almendros.

The film tells the story of two young children marooned on a tropical island paradise in the South Pacific. With neither the guidance nor the restrictions of society, emotional feelings and physical changes arise as they reach puberty and fall in love.

Shields was 14 years old at the time of filming and later testified before a U.S. Congressional inquiry that older body doubles were used in some of her nude scenes. Also, throughout the film in frontal shots her breasts were always covered by her long hair or in other ways. It was also stated that Shields’s hair was glued to her breasts during many of her topless scenes.[1] The film received a MPAA rating of R.

 .

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36 – Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Christian Thielemann, conductor


Beethoven – Symphony No 2 in D major, Op 36

Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Christian Thielemann, conductor

This symphony consists of four movements:

  1. Adagio molto, 3/4 – Allegro con brio, 4/4
  2. Larghetto, 3/8 in A major
  3. Scherzo: Allegro, 3/4
  4. Allegro molto, 2/2

A typical performance runs 33 to 36 minutes.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Portrait of Beethoven in 1803, a year after the premiere of his Second Symphony.

The Symphony No. 2 in D major (Op. 36) is a symphony in four movements written by Ludwig van Beethoven between 1801 and 1802. The work is dedicated to Karl Alois, Prince Lichnowsky.

 

Background

 

Beethoven’s Second Symphony was mostly written during Beethoven’s stay at Heiligenstadt in 1802, at which time his deafness was becoming more apparent and he began to realize that it might be incurable. The work was premiered in the Theater an der Wien in Vienna on 5 April 1803, and was conducted by the composer. During that same concert, the Third Piano Concerto and the oratorio Christ on the Mount of Olives were also debuted.[1] It is one of the last works of Beethoven’s so-called “early period”.

 

Beethoven wrote the Second Symphony without a standard minuet; instead, a scherzo took its place, giving the composition even greater scope and energy. The scherzo and the finale are filled with vulgar Beethovenian musical jokes, which shocked the sensibilities of many contemporary critics. One Viennese critic for the Zeitung fuer die elegante Welt (Newspaper for the Elegant World) famously wrote of the Symphony that it was “a hideously writhing, wounded dragon that refuses to die, but writhing in its last agonies and, in the fourth movement, bleeding to death.”[2]

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Erik Satie : Je te veux


 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

Je te veux” (French for I want you) is a song composed by Erik Satie to a text by Henry Pacory. A sentimental waltz, it was written for Paulette Darty, whose accompanist Satie had been for a period of time. The text consists of two verses and a repeated chorus.

The song was registered with SACEM on 20 November 1902, but Roland-Manuel argued it had actually been composed in 1897. Satie composed various versions of theJe te veux waltz: for piano and voice, for an orchestra of brass instruments and for full orchestra (including a Trio). The piano and voice version was first published in 1903.[1]

The melody was performed to the public in 1903 at La Scala. In 1925 the song was recorded with Yvonne George as singer. Je te veux was also recorded by Mathé Altéry,Régine CrespinGigliola NegriNicolaï Gedda and Davide Bassino, and later by sopranos Jessye NormanMarie Devellereau and Angela Gheorghiu. Other notable renditions include the ones by Japanese group ALI PROJECT[2] and Japanese chip musician SAITONE.

John Cage instructs the performer to do the piano and voice version as part of his “Sonnekus²”.[1]

 

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‘Henry and June’ – Soundtrack and PLaylist (Lucienne Boyer – Parlez-Moi D’Amour [1930] and other 17 wonderful songs!)


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
This article is about the book by Anaïs Nin. For other uses, see Henry and June (disambiguation).
Henry and June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin
Henryandjune cover.jpg

Front Cover
Author Anaïs Nin
Language English
Genre MemoirDiary
Publisher Harcourt Brace Jovanovich
Publication date
1986
Media type Print (Hardcover andPaperback)
ISBN 978-0-15-140003-4
OCLC 13333571
Dewey Decimal 818/.5203 B 19
LC Class PS3527.I865 Z4642 1986

Henry and June: From the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (full title Henry and June: From A Journal of Love: the Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (1931–1932)) is a 1986 book that is based upon material excerpted from the unpublished diaries of Anaïs Nin. It corresponds temporally to the first volume of Nin’s published diaries, written between October 1931 and October 1932, yet is radically different, in that that book begins with a description of the landscape of and around her home and never mentions her husband, whereas “Henry and June” begins with discussion of Nin’s sex life and is full of her struggles and passionate relationship with husband Hugo, and then, as the novel/memoir progresses, other lovers.

This, the first of currently four volumes of unexpurgated diaries, concentrates on her passionate involvement with the writer Henry Miller and his wife June Miller.

It is noteworthy that Nin’s source material —her diaries —was able to spawn two dramatically different narratives about the same time period, both widely read and praised. The expurgated diary reveals Nin the philosopher and amateur but astute psychologist. The unexpurgated diary reveals a woman breaking out into wild sexual discovery. It is introduced by her second—coterminous—husband.

A film based on the book was released in 1990.

 

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Let’s learn from Voni: http://foodbabe.com/subway/ Azodicarbonamide: banned in the rest of the world…striving in our food…Question: WHY?


Visit:  http://foodbabe.com/subway/
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Azodicarbonamide
Identifiers
CAS number 123-77-3 Yes
PubChem 31269
ChemSpider 4575589 Yes
UNII 56Z28B9C8O Yes
EC-number 204-650-8
ChEMBL CHEMBL28517 Yes
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C2H4N4O2
Molar mass 116.08 g mol−1
Appearance Yellow to orange/red crystalline powder
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
EU classification Harmful (XN)
R-phrases R42 R44
S-phrases S22 S24 S37
NFPA 704
NFPA 704.svg
1
2
2
 
 Yes (verify) (what is: Yes/?)
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Azodicarbonamide, or azobisformamide, is a chemical compound with the molecular formula C2H4O2N4.[1] It is a yellow to orange red, odorless, crystalline powder. As a food additive, it is known by the E number E927.

Use as a food additive

Azodicarbonamide is used as a food additive, a flour bleaching agent and improving agent. It reacts with moist flour as an oxidizing agent.[2] The main reaction product is biurea,[3] a derivative of urea, which is stable during baking. Secondary reaction products include semicarbazide[4] and ethyl carbamate.[5] The United States permits the use of azodicarbonamide at levels up to 45 ppm.[6] In Australia[citation needed] the use of azodicarbonamide as a food additive is banned. In Singapore, use is punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a fine of $450,000[citation needed].

Other uses

The principal use of azodicarbonamide is in the production of foamed plastics as an additive. The thermal decomposition of azodicarbonamide results in the evolution of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and ammonia gases, which are trapped in the polymer as bubbles to form a foamed article.

Azodicarbonamide as used in plastics, synthetic leather and other uses can be pure or modified. This is important because modification affects the reaction temperatures. Pure azodicarbonamide generally reacts around 200 °C, but there are some products that the reaction temperature must be lower, depending on the application. In the plastic, leather and other industries, modified azodicarbonamide (average decomposition temperature 170 °C) contains additives that accelerate the reaction or react at lower temperatures.

Azodicarbonamide as a blowing agent in plastics has been banned in Europe since August 2005 for the manufacture of plastic articles that are intended to come into direct contact with food.[7]

Safety

In the United States, azodicarbonamide has generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status and is allowed to be added to flour at levels up to 45 ppm.[8]

In the UK, the Health and Safety Executive has identified azodicarbonamide as a respiratory sensitizer (a possible cause of asthma) and determined that products should be labeled with “May cause sensitisation by inhalation.”[9] TheWorld Health Organization has linked azodicarbonamide to “respiratory issues, allergies and asthma.” Britain, Europe, and Australia now ban its use in food.[10]

Toxicological studies of the reactions of azodicarbonamide show that it is rapidly converted in dough to biurea, which is a stable compound not decomposed upon cooking.[11]

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: George Enescu – Romanian Rhapsody n° 2 in D major, Op. 11 (Orchestre de Montbéliard, Paul Staïcu)



The first Romanian Rhapsody composed at 19 years (together with a second one, both bearing the opus number 11) gained a worldwide fame for its lovely folk tunes (in fact, all Enescu’s works are imbued with such folk lightmotifs) and vivid Romanian rhythms, becoming definitely the best known of all his compositions. Here the Rhapsody No.2 is performed with an infectious empathy by the Romanian conductor Paul Staïcu along with his outstanding musicians of Montbéliard Philharmonic Orchestra.  The performance reveals a mighty symphonist with a keen sense of colours and orchestral textures, a rigorous and honest one devoted to principles and truth, extracting the sap of his composition from folk melodies of his people.  The reputed conductor Paul Staïcu has signed a series of recordings devoted to the complete orchestral oeuvres of his fellow compatriot.  The celebrated Romanian Rhapsody in D major op.11 , more reflexive than its pair no.1, the second Romanian Rhapsody is also a youthful work (written in 1900, when the composer was 19) with persistent folk aromas and picturesque suggestions, aiming at fructifying the popular Romanian musical treasure and meditative side of its sentimentality. The rhapsodic character compounds its appeal and favours its reception by audiences. It is a composition putting grave questions and depicting outrageous realities, filtered through a sensitive conscience. It conveys the sufferance of a moral man facing the immorality of a corrupt and pointless world, reflecting on duties and faiths, on life’s sense and destiny. The torturing mood is magisterially recreated by the inspired baton of Paul Staïcu, the main themes flow unceasingly with a desolating vigour and reach finally a concluding climax affirming an undefeated hope in the majesty of mankind.

  

The Romanian Athenaeum, at about the time of the Rhapsodies’ premiere there in 1903

The two Romanian Rhapsodies, Op. 11, for orchestra, are George Enescu‘s best-known compositions. They were both written in 1901, and first performed together in 1903. The two rhapsodies, and particularly the first, have long held a permanent place in the repertory of every major orchestra. They employ elements of lăutărească music, vivid Romanian rhythms, and an air of spontaneity. They exhibit exotic modal coloring, with some scales having ‘mobile’ thirds, sixths or sevenths, creating a shifting major/minor atmosphere, one of the characteristics of Romanian lăutărească music.[1][not in citation given] They also incorporate some material found in the later drafts of his Poème roumaine, Op. 1.[2]

File:Ateneul Român stage.jpg

The stage of the Athenaeum in Bucharest

The two Romanian Rhapsodies were composed in Paris, and premiered together in a concert at the Romanian Athenaeumin Bucharest which also included the world premiere of Enescu’s First Suite for Orchestra, Op. 9 (1903). The composer conducted all three of his own works, which were preceded on the programme by Berlioz’s Overture to Les francs-jugesand Schumann’s Symphony No. 1, both conducted by Eduard Wachmann. The concert took place on 23 February 1903[3](according to the Julian calendar in use in Romania at that time; 8 March 1903 Gregorian).[4] The Second Rhapsody was played first, and Enescu maintained this order of performance throughout his life.[5]

Rhapsody No. 2 in D major

The Second Rhapsody, like the first, was completed in 1901,[14][7] but is more inward and reflective. Its essential character is not dance, but song.[15][5] It is based on the popular 19th-century ballad “Pe o stîncă neagră, într-un vechi castel” (“On a dark rock, in an old castle”) which, like the opening melody of the First Rhapsody Enescu may have learned from the lăutar Chioru,[1] though again there is some doubt whether Enescu actually remembered it from Chioru.[10] After a development culminating in a canonic presentation, this theme is joined by a dance tune, “Sîrba lui Pompieru” (“Sîrba of the Fireman”), followed shortly afterward by the second half of a folksong, “Văleu, lupu mă mănîncă” (“Aiee, I’m being devoured by a wolf!”), which is treated in canon.[16] Toward the end there is a brief moment of animation, bringing to mind the spirit of country lăutari, but the work ends quietly.[17]

Unlike the First Rhapsody, there is no controversy at all about the scoring of the Second, which is given in the published score as: 3 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets in A, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets in C, 3 trombones, 2 timpani, cymbal, 2 harps, first violins, second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.[18]

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Symphony No 8 in F major Op 93 Christian Thielemann


Buy “Symphony No. 8 in F Major, Op. 93: IV. Allegro vivace” on

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Artist
Christian Thielemann

 

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Eddie Vedder – No More (video)


EDDIE VEDDER LYRICS

“No More”

I speak for a man who gave for this land
Took a bullet in the back for his pay
Spilled his blood in the dirt and the dust
He’s back to say:What he has seen is hard to believe
And it does no good to just pray
He asks of us to stand
And we must end this war todayWith his mind, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his heart, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his life he’s saying, “No more war!”With his eyes, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his body, he’s saying, “No more!”
With his voice, he’s saying, “No more war!”

Yeah, nothing’s too good for a veteran
Yeah, this is what they say
So nothing is what they will get
In this new American way

The lies we were told to get us to go
Were criminal … let us be straight
Let’s get to the point where our voices get heard
And I know what I’ll say

With our minds, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our hearts, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our lives, we’re saying, “No more war!”

With our eyes, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our voices, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our bodies, we’re saying, “No more war!”

No more innocents dying
No more terrorizing
No more eulogizing
No more
No more evangelizing
No more
No more presidents lying
No more war

With our minds, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our hearts, we’re saying, “No more!”
With our lives, we’re saying, “No more war!”

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eddie Vedder (born Edward Louis Severson; December 23, 1964) is an American musician andsinger-songwriter[2] who is best known for being the lead vocalist and one of three guitarists of thealternative rock band Pearl Jam. Known for his powerful vocals, he has been ranked at #7 on a list of “Best Lead Singers of All Time”, compiled by Rolling Stone.[3] He is also involved in soundtrack work and contributes to albums by other artists. In 2007, Vedder released his first solo album as asoundtrack for the film Into the Wild (2007). His second album, Ukulele Songs, along with a live DVD titled Water on the Road, was released on 31 May 2011.[4]

Eddie Vedder
EddieVedder.jpg

Vedder on October 22, 2006
Background information
Birth name Edward Louis Severson III
Also known as Edward Mueller, Jerome Turner, Wes C. Addle
Born December 23, 1964 (age 49)
Evanston, Illinois, United States
Genres Alternative rockfolk rock,grungehard rock
Occupations Musiciansongwriter
Instruments Main: Vocals Occasional: guitar,harmonicatambourineOther: mandolinmandola,ukulelekeyboardsaccordion,bass guitardrums
Years active 1979–present
Labels Universal Republic Records
Republic Records,MonkeywrenchJ Records
Associated acts Pearl JamGlen HansardBad RadioTemple of the Dog,Hovercraft7 Worlds Collide, C Average, Jimmy FallonNeil Young
Notable instruments
Fender Telecaster
Schecter PT Model
Gibson SG
Gibson SG Jr.
Martin 0–18
Earnest Instruments Tululele, Custom Ukulele[1]

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Anna Amalia of Prussia Flute Sonata en F


Anna Amalia, Abbess of Quedlinburg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Anna Amalia
Antoine Pesne hofdame ; Prinzessin Amalia von Preussen als Amazone.jpg
Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg
Reign 1756-1787
Predecessor Maria Elisabeth
Successor Sophia Albertina
 
Spouse Friedrich von der Trenck
House House of Hohenzollern
Father Frederick William I of Prussia
Mother Sophia Dorothea of Hanover
Born 9 November 1723
BerlinPrussia
Died 30 March 1787 (aged 63)
Religion Lutheranism
Prussian Royalty
House of Hohenzollern
Wappen Deutsches Reich - Königreich Preussen (Grosses).png
Frederick William I
Children
   Frederick Louis, Prince of Orange
   Wilhelmine, Margravine of Bayreuth
   Friedrich William, Prince of Orange
   Princess Charlotte Albertine
   Frederick II
   Friederike Luise, Margravine of Ansbach
   Philippine Charlotte, Duchess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel
   Prince Ludwig Karl Wilhelm
   Sophia Dorothea, Margravine of Schwedt
   Louisa Ulrika, Queen of Sweden
   Prince Augustus William
   Anna Amalie, Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg
   Prince Henry
   Prince Augustus Ferdinand

Princess Anna Amalia of Prussia (9 November 1723 – 30 March 1787) was Princess-Abbess of Quedlinburg. She was one of ten surviving children of King Frederick William I of Prussia and Sophia Dorothea of Hanover.

 

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Great Compositions/Performances: Sviatoslav Richter Plays Edvard Grieg’s Lyric Pieces Op.65 – 6 “Wedding day at Troldhaugen”


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
“Wedding Day at Troldhaugen” (Norwegian: Bryllupsdag på Troldhaugen) is a musical piece composed by Edvard Grieg.[n 1][1] It is the sixth piano piece in the eighth book of his Lyric Pieces, bearing the opus number 65. There has been some discussion about the quality and proportion of this composition in relation to the whole book.[2]

Description

Originally called “Gratulanterne kommer” (The well-wishers are coming),[3][4] it was written in 1896 as a memorial of the 25th wedding anniversary of Grieg and his wife Nina.[5] The anniversary celebration had been held in the Fossli Hotel near the Vøringsfossen waterfall in June 1892. Grieg and his wife celebrated their wedding anniversary with Borre and Nancy Giertsen. Nancy was the sister of Marie Beyer, then married to Frants Beyer, Grieg’s best friend. She belonged to their closest circle of friends at Troldhaugen. During the occasion a guest book was ready to take contributions from all the guests.

Grieg gave the work its final title in 1897 when he compiled Book VIII, Op. 65, of his Lyric Pieces. The work’s festive first section describes congratulations and best wishes that are given by the guests to the newlyweds; the second section is reflective and subdued.
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Sonata II in A minor by Francesco Venturini performed by La Cetra conducted by David Plantier.



Sonata II in A minor by Francesco Venturini performed by La Cetra conducted by David Plantier.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Villa Medici with the Medici lions; etching by Venturini 1691.

Giovanni Francesco Venturini (1650–1710) was an Italian painter of the Baroque period.

He was born in Rome. From the style of his engraving, it is probable that he was a pupil of Giovanni Battista Galestruzzi. He etched several plates from the works of Italian masters, among them the following :

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Great Compositions/Performances: Claudio Arrau Liszt Transcendental Etudes No. 11 Harmonies du soir



Claudio Arrau Liszt Transcendental Etudes No. 11 Harmonies du soir
In D-flat

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 
 

Franz Liszt

Cover of Franz Liszt

The first three bars of the Transcendental Étude No. 11

Transcendental Étude No. 11 in D-flat, “Harmonies du Soir” is the eleventhétude of the set of twelve Transcendental Études by Franz Liszt. This étude is a study in harmonies, broken chords played in quick succession, full octave jumps,chromatic harmonies, chord variations, interlocking hands, bravura, massive chords, especially proper pedaling, and performance as a whole.

This piece is considered one of the most artistic of the études, along with No. 12 “Chasse-neige”.

Origin

“Harmonies du Soir” was rooted from the seventh of the Études in Twelve Exercises, which was a study in alternating hands. However, the similarities in melody are apparent.

Content

 

Franz Liszt

Franz Liszt (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The piece begins with an introduction containing slow broken octaves in the left hand and chords in the right hand. After a group of arpeggios, the main theme is introduced in the left hand, a beautiful descent followed by a chromatic ascent with harmonies changing with each note. It is accompanied in the right hand by bass notes (crossing over) and octaves which seem to “sing along” with the left hand. Eventually, after a build up with large chords in the right hand and octaves deep in the bass in the left hand, this theme is played again this time with harp like arpeggios in both hands. The piece continues in this manner for a while until the second theme, a chordal section marked Poco piu mosso is introduced. It begins pianississimo but then grows to an appassionato climax. The music then seems to fade out, followed by an entire new section of the piece, marked Piu lento con intimo sentimento. This section’s song like melody is accompanied by arpeggiation in both hands (bringing out the main melody is a surprising technical feat, due to the wide spacing of the arpeggios in each hand). After a recitative passage, the music goes somewhere unexpected. The second theme is brought back, this time fortissimo and marked triomfante with chords in both hands. The most technically difficult part of the entire piece consists of multiple pages of chordal jumps and repetition, requiring a large amount of stamina. The music eventually dies down, and after an arpeggiated variation of the first theme, the music dies out
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Great Compositions/Performances: Ruggiero RICCI plays WIENIAWSKI Scherzo-Tarantelle Op.16 – 1980


Henryk Wieniawski ( July 10, 1835 Lublin, Cong...

Henryk Wieniawski ( July 10, 1835 Lublin, Congress Poland, Russian Empire – March 31, 1880 Moscow) was a Polish composer and violinist. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Henryk WIENIAWSKI: Scherzo-Tarantelle, in G minor Op.16 (1855)
Ruggiero RICCI, violin – Joanna Gruenberg, piano (rec: 1980)
________________________________________­__________
full CDhttp://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

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Great Compositions/Performances: Corul Madrigal Pe carare sub un brad D.G.Kiriac) “…ca dragostea n-are leac decat ochii care-ti plac!…)


Great Compositions/Performances:  Corul Madrigal Pe carare sub un brad D.G.Kiriac) “…ca dragostea n-are leac decat ochii care-ti plac!…)

 

English: the eyes Français : les yeux Deutsch:...

English: the eyes Français : les yeux Deutsch: die Augen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

http://www.bestmusic.ro
http://www.electrecord.ro

Buy this song on http://www.triplu.ro

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 

Dumitru Georgescu Kiriac (18 March 1866 – 8 January 1928) was a Romanian composer, conductor, and ethnomusicologist.[1] He was particularly known for his sacred choral works and art songs which were based on the Romanian Orthodox tradition and Romanian folklore.[2]

Kiriac was born in Bucharest and began his musical studies at the Bucharest Conservatory (now the National University of Music) with Gheorghe Brătianu (1847 – 1905) and Eduard Wachmann (1836 – 1908). From 1892 to 1899 he studied in Paris with Vincent d’Indy at the Schola Cantorum de Paris and with Charles-Marie Widor and Gabriel Fauré at the Paris Conservatory. It was during this time that he began collecting Romanian children’s folk songs. On his return to Bucharest in 1900 he became a professor at the Bucharest Conservatory. The following year he founded the Romanian choral society, Carmen.[2][3]

Kiriac died in his native city at the age of 61. He was considered one of the founders of modern Romanian music.[4] Festivalul Internaţional de Muzică Corală “D.G. Kiriac”, an international festival of sacred choral music held annually in the city of Pitești, is named in his honour as is the city’s male voice choir.[5]

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Great Comopositions/Performances: Alessandro Marcello Concerto en re minore (D minor), SF 935 – Op.1. Maurice André



Alessandro Marcello 

Concerto en re minore (D minor), SF 935 – Op.1.

I. Andante 
II. Adagio
III. Presto
Maurice André,  1993

 

Alessandro Marcello

Cover of Alessandro Marcello

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

 

Alessandro Ignazio Marcello (1st February 1673[1] in Venice – 19 June 1747 in Venice) was an Italian nobleman, poet, philosopher, mathematician and musician.

 

Biography

 

A contemporary of Tomaso Albinoni, Marcello was the son of a senator in Venice. As such, he enjoyed a comfortable life that gave him the scope to pursue his interest in music. He held concerts in his hometown and also composed and published several sets of concertos, including six concertos under the title of La Cetra (The Lyre), as well as cantatasariascanzonets, and violin sonatas. Marcello, being a slightly older contemporary of Antonio Vivaldi, often composed under the pseudonym Eterio Stinfalico, his name as a member of the celebrated Arcadian Academy (Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi). He died in Padua in 1747.

 

Alessandro’s brother was Benedetto Marcello, also a composer, who illegally married his singing student Rosanna Scalfi in 1728. After his death she was unable to inherit his estate, and in 1742 she filed suit against Alessandro Marcello, seeking financial support.[2]

 

Works

 

Although his works are infrequently performed today, Marcello is regarded as a very competent composer. His La Cetra concertos are “unusual for their wind solo parts, concision and use of counterpoint within a broadly Vivaldian style,” according to Grove, “placing them as a last outpost of the classic Venetian Baroque concerto.”

 

concerto op 1. Marcello wrote in D minor for oboestrings and basso continuo is perhaps his best-known work. Its worth was affirmed by Johann Sebastian Bach who transcribed it for harpsichord (BWV 974). A number of editions have been published of the famous Oboe Concerto in D minor. The edition in C minor is credited to Benedetto Marcello.

 

 

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UNFORGETTABLE COMPOSITIONS: Antonín Dvořák – Water Goblin, Op. 107 Dedicated to all my friends writing for the best among us – children of the world: be inspired!


Antonín Dvořák – Water Goblin,
Op. 107

The Water Goblin (CzechVodník; initially published by N. Simrock with the English title The Water-Fay) is a symphonic poemOp. 107 (B. 195), written by Antonín Dvořák in 1896.

The source of inspiration for The Water Goblin was a poem found in a collection published by Karel Jaromír Erben under the title Kytice. Four of the six symphonic poems that Dvořák composed were inspired by works of poetry found in that collection.

Poem

Vodník tells a story in four parts of a mischievous water goblin who traps drowning souls in upturned teacups.[1][2]

  • A water goblin is sitting on a poplar by the lake, singing to the moon and sewing a green coat and red boots for his wedding soon to come.
  • A mother tells her daughter of a dream she had about clothing her daughter in white robes swirling like foaming water and with pearls of tears hiding deep distress around her neck. She feels this dream was a presentiment and warns her daughter not to go to the lake. Despite the mother’s warnings, the daughter is drawn to the lake as if possessed and leaves for the lake to do her laundry. The moment she hands down her first garment into the water, the bridge on which she was sitting collapses. As the water engulfs her she is abducted by the malevolent water goblin who lives there.
  • He takes her to his underwater castle and marries her with black crayfish for the groomsmen and fishes for her bridesmaids. After the birth of their first child, the abducted wife sings it a lullaby, which enrages the water goblin. She tries to calm him down and pleads to be allowed ashore to visit her mother once. He gives in on three conditions: She is not to embrace a single soul, not even her mother; she has to leave the baby behind as a hostage; and she will return by the bells of the evening vespers.
  • The reunion of mother and daughter is very sad but full of love. When evening falls the distraught mother keeps her daughter and forbids her to go even when the bells are ringing. The water goblin becomes angry, forsakes his lair in the lake and thumps on the door ordering the girl to go with him because his dinner has to be made. When the mother tells him to go away and eat whatever he has for dinner in his lair, he knocks again, saying his bed needs to be made. Again the mother tells him to leave them alone, after which the goblin says their child is hungry and crying. To this plea the mother tells him to bring the child to them. In a furious rage the goblin returns to the lake and through the shrieking storm screams that pierce the soul are heard. The storm ends with a loud crash that stirs up the mother and her daughter. When opening the door the mother finds a tiny head without a body and a tiny body without a head lying in their blood on the doorstep of her hut.

Composition

Dvořák’s symphonic piece, which is written in the form of a rondo,[3] follows Erben’s written verses remarkably closely; in many places the text fits literary to Dvořák’s music.[4] This may well be a result of the fact that Dvořák derived his themes from putting Erben’s words to music. This way Dvořák produced 7 themes, mostly four bars long for this symphonic poem.

First the water goblin is introduced with a four bar theme starting three repeated notes. These three repeats prove to be vital for the whole composition: Most other themes start with three repeats, the timpani gives a three beat rhythm to the section where the girl wants to go to the lake, the church bells ring three times each at eight o’clock, the water goblin knocks three times on the door.

Second the daughter is introduced with a lovely innocent theme, where the triangle gives her a sparkling twinkle in her eyes. However nice this theme may sound the basis is the same three repeat that formed the basis for the goblin theme. The great difference is in the way they are played: the goblin is in a staccato form presented, where all three notes are short and distinctive of sound, and the girl has a legato played theme, where the three notes are played long, and almost glide over in each other.

The third theme introduces the mother with a suspense theme in b minor which makes the mood even more sad. Again her theme starts with three notes, though the rhythm of the notes is turned around. The suspense is formed by the chromatism in the secondary theme. Later on Dvořák uses these two themes the other way around, as if the secondary theme becomes the primary, and primary the secondary.[5]

The next section Dvořák changes from the minor to the B major key to indicate the persistent state of mind of the daughter when she heads off to the lake. In this section an important role has been given to the timpani, who play a solo, even though its to be played less loud then the rest of the orchestra.[6] They again play the three note repeats, but Dvořák makes a variation on it as well. He changes from three 8th notes to five 16th notes and back and forth and so on. He might have wanted to show the spell the daughter is under, but for sure it makes the coming apocalypse more vivid then if he had only used the original 3 beats. This section ends with a ritardando (slow down), so the listener is prepared for a sudden fast and short swirl in the violins when the bridge cracks.

The next section starts with a sudden E-C-G chord, as the girl hits the water. Dvořák changes key back to b minor for the water goblin theme, and he speeds up the tempo to a lively allegro vivo, which depicts the swirling waters engulfing the girl, for which Dvořák uses as well the Russian device of a descending whole tone scale[7][8] and the diabolic delight of the water goblin.[9]

The Water Goblin is scored for piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, cor anglais, 2 clarinets, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons, 4 horns, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, 2 tubas, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, bells and strings.

The work had its full public premiere in London on 14 November 1896. It had received a semi-public performance on 1 June 1896 at the Prague Conservatory under Antonín Bennewitz.[10]

Letter to Hirschfeld

For the Austrian première in Vienna by the Vienna Philharmonic under Hans Richter on 22 November 1896, Dr. Robert Hirschfeld was asked to write the program notes. For this occasion Dvořák composed a letter stating his intentions and musical solutions for the translation of Erbens poem into music.[11]

  • Allegro vivace : The water goblin (flutes) alone.
  • Andante sostenuto : The girl (clarinet) and her mother (violins), who tells the girl of a bad dream and warns her not to go near the lake.
  • Allegro vivo : The girl ignores the warning (violins and oboes) and falls into the lake, and into the hands of the watergoblin.
  • Andante mesto come prima : The misery of the underwater world.
  • Un poco più lento e molto tranquillo : the girl sings a lullaby for her baby (flute and oboe).
  • Andante : The water goblin tells her to stop singing in a fury and they have a quarrel, which ends that the girl is permitted to go visit her mother, but has to be back before the bells of the vespers.
  • Lento assai : The girl goes home to her mother (cellos and trombones), where they have a sad reunion.
  • Allegro vivace : The storm on the lake, the church bells are heard after which knocking on the door and eventually a loud bang when the goblin throws the dead child against the door.
  • Andante sostenuto : croaking frogs (piccolo and flutes), the mother’s moaning about that Friday, which was an unlucky day (cor anglais and bass clarinet), the mother’s terrible distress (oboes, cellos and basses). The water goblin’s mysterious disappearance into the depth of the lake.

 

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Fringe Theme: Composer J. J. Abrams


Fringe (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
This is a good article. Click here for more information.
Fringe
Fringe intertitle.png

The blue title card, representing the prime universe and the original timeline, is used in seasons 1–2 and frequently in season 3.
Genre
Created by
Starring
Theme music composer J. J. Abrams
Composer(s)
Country of origin United States
Originallanguage(s) English
No. of seasons 5
No. of episodes 100 (List of episodes)
Production
Executiveproducer(s)
Location(s)
Running time
  • 81 minutes (“Pilot”)
  • 50 minutes (season 1)
  • 43 minutes (seasons 2–5)
Productioncompany(s)
Distributor Warner Bros. Television Distribution
Broadcast
Original channel Fox
Picture format 720p (HDTV)
Audio format Dolby Digital 5.1
Original run September 9, 2008 – January 18, 2013

Fringe is an American science fiction television series created by J. J. AbramsAlex Kurtzman, andRoberto Orci. It premiered on the Fox Broadcasting network on September 9, 2008, and concluded on January 18, 2013, after five seasons and 100 episodes. The series follows Olivia Dunham (Anna Torv), Peter Bishop (Joshua Jackson), and Walter Bishop (John Noble), members of a Federal Bureau of Investigation “Fringe Division” team based in BostonMassachusetts, under the supervision of Homeland Security. The team uses “fringe” science and FBI investigative techniques to investigate a series of unexplained, often ghastly occurrences, which are related to mysteries surrounding a parallel universe. The series has been described as a hybrid of The X-FilesAltered States, and The Twilight Zone.

The series format combines elements from procedural dramas as well as those found in serials. The series began as a more traditional “mystery of the week” series, and became more serialized in later seasons. A majority of episodes contain a standalone plot, with several episodes also exploring the series’ overarching mythology.

Early critical reception of the first season was lukewarm but became more favorable in subsequent seasons, when the series began to explore its mythology, including parallel universes and alternate timelines. The show, as well as the cast and crew, has been nominated for many major awards. Despite its move to the “Friday night death slot” and low ratings, the series has received a cult following. It has also spawned two six-part comic book series and an alternate reality game.

 

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Debussy: Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune (1890-1905)



Claude Debussy 
(1862 – 1918) 
Complete music for piano solo (in chronological order) 
Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune (1890-1905)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

An excerpt from “Clair de lune,” the third movement of the Suite bergamasque.

The Suite bergamasque (French pronunciation: ​[bɛʁɡamask]) is one of the most famous pianosuites by Claude Debussy. Debussy commenced the suite in 1890 at age 28, but he did not finish or publish it until 1905.[1]

The Suite bergamasque was first composed by Debussy around 1890, but was significantly revised just before its publication in 1905. It seems that by the time a publisher came to Debussy in order to cash in on his fame and have these pieces published, Debussy loathed the earlier piano style in which these pieces were written.[1] While it is not known how much of the Suite was written in 1890 and how much was written in 1905, it is clear that Debussy changed the names of at least two of the pieces. “Passepied” was called “Pavane”, and “Clair de lune” was originally titled “Promenade Sentimentale.” These names also come fromPaul Verlaine‘s poems.[1]

Movements

The Suite bergamasque consists of four movements:

  1. “Prélude”
  2. “Menuet”
  3. “Clair de lune”
  4. “Passepied”

The suite has been orchestrated by many composers, including André CapletLeopold Stokowski, and Lucien CaillietDimitri Tiomkin arranged “Clair de lune” for organ for his musical score for Warner Brothers’ 1956 film Giant.

 

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Great Composers/Performances: Nathaniel Mayfield plays Michael Haydn’s, Concerto in D for Baroque Trumpet



Michael Haydn‘s Concerto in D Major for Baroque Trumpet. Performed live in Concert by Nathaniel Mayfield in Montreal, Canada on Feb. 18, 2009
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Michael Haydn

Johann Michael Haydn (German: [ˈhaɪdən] ( listen); 14 September 1737 – 10 August 1806) was an Austriancomposer of the Classical period, the younger brother of Joseph Haydn.

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Great Performances: Carl. Maria von. Weber – Concerto No.1, in F minor, Op.73 (Sabine Meyer)



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Carl Maria von Weber wrote his Clarinet Concerto No. 1 in F minor, Op. 73 (J. 114) for the clarinettist Heinrich Bärmann in 1811. The piece is considered a gem in the instrument’s repertoire. It is written for clarinet in B♭. The work consists of three movements in the form of fast, slow, fast.

Structure

  1. Allegro in F minor modulating into A-flat major and later returning to F minor with a meter of 3/4
  2. Adagio ma non troppo in C major transforming into C minor and E flat major and afterward reverting to C major with a meter of 4/4
  3. RondoAllegretto in F major with a meter of 2/4

Instrumentation

Scored for 2 flutes, 2 oboes, 2 bassoons, 3 horns, 2 trumpetstimpanistrings, and solo clarinet

Carl Maria von Weber

Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber (18 or 19 November 1786 – 5 June 1826[1]) was a Germancomposerconductorpianistguitarist[2] and critic, one of the first significant composers of the Romanticschool.

Weber’s operas Der FreischützEuryanthe and Oberon greatly influenced the development of the Romantic opera in Germany. Der Freischütz came to be regarded as the first German “nationalist” opera,Euryanthe developed the Leitmotif technique to a hitherto-unprecedented degree, while Oberon may have influenced Mendelssohn‘s music for A Midsummer Night’s Dream and, at the same time, revealed Weber’s lifelong interest in the music of non-Western cultures. This interest was first manifested in Weber’sincidental music for Schiller‘s translation of Gozzi‘s Turandot, for which he used a Chinese melody, making him the first Western composer to use an Asian tune that was not of the pseudo-Turkish kind popularized by Mozart and others.

A brilliant pianist himself, Weber composed four sonatas, two concertos and the Konzertstück (Concert Piece) in F minor, which influenced composers such as ChopinLiszt and Mendelssohn. The Konzertstückprovided a new model for the one-movement concerto in several contrasting sections (such as Liszt’s, who often played the work), and was acknowledged by Stravinsky as the model for his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra. Weber’s shorter piano pieces, such as the Invitation to the Dance, were later orchestrated byBerlioz, while his Polacca Brillante was later set for piano and orchestra by Liszt.

Weber compositions for woodwind instruments occupy an important place in the musical repertoire. His compositions for the clarinet, which include two concertos, a concertino, a quintet, a duo concertante, and variations on a theme (posthumously), are regularly performed today. His Concertino for Horn and Orchestra requires the performer to simultaneously produce two notes by humming while playing—a technique known as “multiphonics“. His bassoon concerto and the Andante e Rondo ungarese (a reworking of a piece originally for viola and orchestra) are also popular with bassoonists.

Weber’s contribution to vocal and choral music is also significant. His body of Catholic religious music was highly popular in 19th-century Germany, and he composed one of the earliest song cycles, Die Temperamente beim Verluste der Geliebten ([Four] Temperaments on the Loss of a Lover). Weber was also notable as one of the first conductors to conduct without a piano or violin.

Weber’s orchestration has also been highly praised and emulated by later generations of composers – Berlioz referred to him several times in hisTreatise on Instrumentation while Debussy remarked that the sound of the Weber orchestra was obtained through the scrutiny of the soul of each instrument.

His operas influenced the work of later opera composers, especially in Germany, such as MarschnerMeyerbeer and Wagner, as well as several nationalist 19th-century composers such as Glinka. Homage has been paid to Weber by 20th-century composers such as Debussy, Stravinsky,Mahler (who completed Weber’s unfinished comic opera Die drei Pintos and made revisions of Euryanthe and Oberon) and Hindemith (composer of the popular Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by Carl Maria von Weber).

Weber also wrote music journalism and was interested in folksong, and learned lithography to engrave his own works.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich



Robert Schumann Symphony No 3 E flat major Rhenish Rheinische Sinfonie David Zinman Tonhalle Zurich

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 3 “Rhenish” in E flat major, Op. 97 is the last of Robert Schumann‘s (1810-1856) symphonies to be composed, although not the last published. It was composed from November 2 to December 9, 1850, and comprises five movements:

  1. Lebhaft (Lively)
  2. Scherzo: Sehr mäßig (Scherzo) (in C major)
  3. Nicht schnell (not fast) (in A-flat major)
  4. Feierlich (Solemn) (in E-flat minor)
  5. Lebhaft (Lively)

The Third Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets in B♭, two bassoons, four french horns in E♭, two trumpets in E♭, threetrombonestimpani and strings. Its premiere on February 6, 1851 in Düsseldorf, conducted by Schumann himself,[1] was received with mixed reviews, “ranging from praise without qualification to bewilderment”. However according to Peter A. Brown, members of the audience applauded between every movement, and especially at the end of the work when the orchestra joined them in congratulating Schumann by shouting “hurrah!”.[2]

Biographical context

Throughout his life, Schumann explored a diversity of musical genres, including chambervocal, and symphonic music. Although Schumann wrote an incomplete G minor symphony as early as 1832-33 (of which the first movement was performed on two occasions to an unenthusiastic reception),[3]he only began seriously composing for the symphonic genre after receiving his wife’s encouragement in 1839.[4] Schumann gained quick success as a symphonic composer following his orchestral debut with his warmly-received First Symphony, which was composed in 1841 and premiered in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting. By the end of his career Schumann had composed a total of four symphonies. Also in 1841 he finished the work which was later to be published as his Fourth Symphony. In 1845 he composed his C major Symphony, which was published in 1846 asNo. 2, and, in 1850, his Third Symphony. Therefore, the published numbering of the symphonies is not chronological. The reasoning for the “incorrect” numerical sequencing of the symphonies is because his Fourth Symphony was originally completed in 1841, but it was not well received at its Leipzig premiere. The lukewarm reception caused Schumann to withdraw the score and revise it ten years later in Düsseldorf. This final version was published in 1851 after the “Rhenish” Symphony was published

Genesis

The same year that Schumann composed his Third Symphony, he completed his Cello Concerto op. 129 which was published four years later. Schumann was inspired to write this symphony after a trip to the Rhineland with his wife. This journey was a happy and peaceful trip with Clara which felt to them as if they were on a pilgrimage.[5] As a result of this trip, he incorporated elements of his journey and portrayed other experiences from his life in the music. The key of the symphony has been connected to Bach’s idea of E flat major and the Holy Trinity.[6]

 

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Igor Bukhvalov – Symphony no. 8 in F-Dur, Op. 93 by Ludwig van Beethoven



Igor Bukhvalov conducts Belarusian National Philharmonic performing Symphony #8 in F-Dur ,Op. 93 By Ludwig van Beethoven:

The Eighth Symphony consists of four movements:

 

  1. Allegro vivace e con brio
  2. Allegretto scherzando
  3. Tempo di Menuetto
  4. Allegro vivace
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 The Symphony No. 8 in F MajorOp. 93 is a symphony in four movements composed by Ludwig van Beethoven in 1812. Beethoven fondly referred to it as “my little Symphony in F,” distinguishing it from his Sixth Symphony, a longer work also in F.[1]

The Eighth Symphony is generally light-hearted, though not lightweight, and in many places cheerfully loud, with many accented notes. Various passages in the symphony are heard by some listeners to be musical jokes.[2] As with various other Beethoven works such as the Opus 27 piano sonatas, the symphony deviates from Classical tradition in making the last movement the weightiest of the four.
The work was begun in the summer of 1812, immediately after the completion of the Seventh Symphony.[3]At the time Beethoven was 41 years old. As Antony Hopkins has noted, the cheerful mood of the work betrays nothing of the grossly unpleasant events that were taking place in Beethoven’s life at the time, which involved his interference in his brother Johann’s love life.[4] The work took Beethoven only four months to complete,[3] and is, unlike many of his works, without dedication.
The premiere took place on 24 February 1814, at a concert in the RedoutensaalVienna, at which theSeventh Symphony (which had been premiered two months earlier) was also played.[5] Beethoven was growing increasingly deaf at the time, but nevertheless led the premiere. Reportedly, “the orchestra largely ignored his ungainly gestures and followed the principal violinist instead.”[6]

 

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NON MATCHING: Galalith and Old Buttons


Galalith

 
 

White galalith RAAF pre-1953 buttons. (Top left button shows crazing resulting from button having been heated during washing.)

Galalith (Erinoid in the United Kingdom), is a synthetic plastic material manufactured by the interaction of casein and formaldehyde. Given a commercial name derived from the Greek words gala (milk) and lithos (stone), it is odourlessinsoluble in water, biodegradable,antiallergenicantistatic and virtually nonflammable.

Discovery

In 1897, the HanoverGermany mass printing press owner Wilhelm Krische was commissioned to develop an alternative to blackboards.[1] The resultant horn-like plastic made from the milk protein casein was developed in cooperation with the Austrian chemist(Friedrich) Adolph Spitteler (1846–1940). The final result was unsuitable for the original purpose.[1] In 1893, French chemist Auguste Trillat discovered the means to insolubilize casein by immersion in formaldehyde.

Production and usage

Although it could not be moulded once set, and was hence produced in sheets, it was inexpensive to produce due to its simple manufacture. Galalith could be cut, drilled, embossed and dyed without difficulty, and its structure manipulated to create a series of effects. No other plastic at the time could compete on price, and with ivory, horn and bone products becoming far more expensive, it found a natural home in the fashion industry.[1]

This new plastic was presented at Paris Universal Exhibition in 1900. In France, Galalith was distributed by the Compagnie Française de Galalithelocated near Paris in Levallois-Perret. As a result, the Jura area became the first one to use the material.

Marketed in the form of boards, pipes and rods, in 1913 thirty million litres (eight million US gallons) of milk were used to produce Galalith in Germany alone.[1] In 1914, Syrolit Ltd gained the license for manufacture in the United Kingdom. Renaming itself Erinoid Ltd, it started manufacture in the Lightpill former woollen mill in DudbridgeStroud, Gloucestershire.[2]

Galalith could produce gemstone imitations that looked strikingly real. In 1926 Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel published a picture of a short, simple black dress in Vogue. It was calf-length, straight, and decorated only by a few diagonal lines. Vogue called it “Chanel’s Ford,” as like the Model T, the little black dress was simple and accessible for women of all social classes. To accessorize the little black dress, Chanel revamped her designs, thus facilitating the breakthrough and mass popularity of costume jewelry.[1] Galalith was used for striking Art Deco jewelry designs by artists such as Jacob Bengel and Auguste Bonaz, as well as for hair combs and accessories. By the 1930s, Galalith was also used for pens, umbrella handles, white piano keys (replacing natural ivory), and electrical goods,[3] with world production at that time reaching 10,000 tons.

Today

Although Galalith was historically cheap, the fact it could not be moulded led to its demise by commercial end users. Production slowed as the restrictions of World War II led to a need for milk as a food, and niched due to new oil-derived wartime plastic developments. Production continued inBrazil until the 1960s.

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Respighi: Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3



Ottorino Respighi (1879 – 1936)
Ancient Airs and Dances / Antiche arie e danze per liuto
Suite No. 3 (1932)

I. Italiana (0:00)
II. Arie di corte (1:55)
III. Siciliana (8:39)
IV. Passacaglia (12:18)

Sir Neville Marriner
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra
1976
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ancient Airs and Dances (Italian: Antiche arie e danze) is a set of three orchestral suites by Italian composer Ottorino Respighi. In addition to being a renowned composer and conductor, Respighi was also a notable musicologist. His interest in Italian music of the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries led him to compose works inspired by the music of these periods.

Suite No. 3 was composed in 1932. It differs from the previous two suites in that it is arranged for strings only and somewhat melancholy in overall mood. It is based on lute songs by Besard, a piece for baroque guitar by Ludovico Roncalli, and lute pieces by Santino Garsi da Parma and additional anonymous composers.

  1. Italiana (Anonymous: Italiana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  2. Arie di corte (Jean-Baptiste Besard: Arie di corte (Sec.XVI) – Andante cantabile – Allegretto – Vivace – Slow with great expression – Allegro vivace – Vivacissimo – Andante cantabile)
  3. Siciliana (Anonymous: Siciliana (Fine sec.XVI) – Andantino)
  4. Passacaglia (Lodovico Roncalli: Passacaglia (1692) – Maestoso – Vivace)

 

 

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Great Composers/Compositions: Vivaldi Violin Concerto in C major, ‘Il piacere’ Op.8 No.6, RV180



Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (1678 † 1741)
Concerts for the Prince of Poland
Work: Violin Concerto in C major, ‘Il piacere’ Op.8 No.6, RV180

01. Allegro
02. Largo e cantabile
03. Allegro

Andrew Manze, violin & director
Academy of Ancient Music

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  

“Vivaldi” redirects here. For other uses, see Vivaldi (disambiguation).

Antonio Vivaldi in 1725

Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (Italian: [anˈtɔːnjo ˈluːtʃo viˈvaldi]; 4 March 1678 – 28 July 1741), nicknamed il Prete Rosso (“The Red Priest”) because of his red hair, was an Italian Baroque composer, Catholic priest, andvirtuoso violinist, born in Venice. Recognized as one of the greatest Baroque composers, his influence during his lifetime was widespread over Europe. Vivaldi is known mainly for composing instrumental concertos, especially for the violin, as well as sacred choral works and over forty operas. His best known work is a series of violin concertos known as The Four Seasons.

Many of his compositions were written for the female music ensemble of the Ospedale della Pietà, a home for abandoned children where Vivaldi had been employed from 1703 to 1715 and from 1723 to 1740. Vivaldi also had some success with stagings of his operas in VeniceMantua and Vienna. After meeting the Emperor Charles VI, Vivaldi moved to Vienna, hoping for preferment. However, the Emperor died soon after Vivaldi’s arrival and Vivaldi himself died less than a year later.

Though Vivaldi’s music was well received during his lifetime, it later declined in popularity until its vigorous revival in the first half of the 20th century. Today, Vivaldi ranks among the most popular and widely recorded of Baroque composers, second only to Johann Sebastian Bach.[1]

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Schubert Symphony No 6 C major, D 589 Bavarian RSO Maazel



Franz Schubert Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589 
Lorin Maazel conducts Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Symphony No. 6 in C major, D. 589,[1] is a symphony by Franz Schubert composed between October 1817 and February 1818.[2] Its first public performance was in Vienna in 1828. It is nicknamed the “Little C major” to distinguish it from his later Ninth Symphony, in the same key, which is known as the “Great C major“.[3]

There are four movements:

  1. Adagio, 3/4 - Allegro, 2/2 7:23
  2. Andante, 2/4 in F major 12:27
  3. ScherzoPresto; Trio: Piu lento (Trio in E major), 3/4 17:12
  4. Allegro moderato, 2/4

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: GEORG FRIEDRICH HÄNDEL- Berenice , Minuet


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
George Frideric Handel
George Frideric Handel by Balthasar Denner.jpg

Berenice (HWV 38) is an opera in three acts by George Frideric Handel to an Italian libretto, written in Italy in 1709 and originally entitled Berenice, regina d’Egitto (Berenice, Queen of Egypt), byAntonio Salvi.

It was first performed at the Covent Garden Theatre in London on 18 May 1737. It was not successful and only given four times.

It is based upon the life of Cleopatra Berenice, daughter of Ptolemy IX (the main character in Handel’s opera Tolomeo) and is set in around 81 BC.

 

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Fabulous Composers/Compositions: Felix Mendelssohn, Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12, I. Adagio – Allegro moderato



Felix Mendelssohn
Romain Descharmes, Tianwa Yang, Descharmes, Romain, Gallois, Patrick, Sinfonia Finlandia Jyvaskyla, Yang, Tianwa
Violin Sonata in F Minor, Op. 4, MWV Q12
Mendelssohn: Violin Concertos – Violin Sonata in F minor
8.572662
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalog…
http://www.naxoslicensing.com/

 

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Great Performances: Barenboim plays Mendelssohn Songs Without Words Op.30 no.6 in F sharp Minor – Venetian Gondellied


Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas

Mendelssohn aged 12 (1821) by Carl Joseph Begas (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

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GREAT PERFORMANCES: Wilhelm Kempff PlaysBeethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 16 Op. 31 in G major



Piano: Wilhelm Kempff

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 16 in G major, Op. 31 No. 1, was composed between 1801 and 1802.
The sonata consists of three movements. A typical performance lasts about 20 minutes.

  1. Allegro vivace
  2. Adagio grazioso
  3. Rondo, allegretto – presto

Although it was numbered as the first piece in the trio of piano sonatas which were published as Opus 31 in 1803, Beethoven actually finished it after the Op. 31 No. 2, the Tempest Sonata. [From Wikipedia]

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