Tag Archives: World Literature

quotation: Mark Twain (on friendship)


The proper office of a friend is to side with you when you are in the wrong. Nearly anybody will side with you when you are in the right.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

quotation: The value of a dollar is social, as it is created by society. Ralph Waldo Emerson


quotation:  The value of a dollar is social, as it is created by society.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

word: graybeard


graybeard 

Definition: (noun) A man who is very old.
Synonyms: old man, Methuselah
Usage: “So, fellow-pilgrims,” said he, “here we are, seven wise men, and one fair damsel—who, doubtless, is as wise as any graybeard of the company.” Discuss.

quotation: Henry Fielding


LOVE: A word properly applied to our delight in particular kinds of food; sometimes metaphorically spoken of the favorite objects of all our appetites.

Henry Fielding (1707-1754) Discuss

Prokofiev – Romeo & Juliet – Leningrad / Mravinsky


Prokofiev – Romeo & Juliet – Leningrad / Mravinsky

Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet

Prokofiev – Romeo and Juliet

quotation: The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half. Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881)


The second half of a man’s life is made up of nothing but the habits he has acquired during the first half.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss

quotation: “Death is not the end. There remains the litigation over the estate.” Ambrose Bierce


Death is not the end. There remains the litigation over the estate.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

quotation: Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian. Herman Melville


Better sleep with a sober cannibal than a drunken Christian.

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

quotation: “The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.” William Shakespeare


The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: James Fenimore Cooper – A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it.


A refined simplicity is the characteristic of all high bred deportment, in every country, and a considerate humanity should be the aim of all beneath it.

James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: William Shakespeare – “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”


The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Washington Irving


A sharp tongue is the only edge tool that grows keener with constant use.

Washington Irving (1783-1859) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Robert Louis Stevenson


I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

ARTICLE: JOHN DONNE


John Donne

The greatest of the metaphysical poets, Donne wrote original, witty, erudite, and often obscure verse characterized by a brilliant use of paradox, hyperbole, and imagery and distinguished by a remarkable blend of passion and reason. Neglected for some 200 years, he was rediscovered by 20th-century critics. Author of the famous phrase “for whom the bell tolls,” a reference to the tolling of church bells upon someone’s death, Donne commissioned what macabre painting shortly before his own passing? More… Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Herman Melville


Death is only a launching into the region of the strange Untried; it is but the first salutation to the possibilities of the immense Remote, the Wild, the Watery, the Unshored…

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Sleep that knits up the ravelled sleeve of care The death of each day’s life, sore labour’s bath Balm of hurt minds, great nature’s second course, Chief nourisher in life’s feast.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: George Eliot


Animals are such agreeable friends – they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: William Shakespeare


Friendship is constant in all other things Save in the office and affairs of love.

William Shakespeare (1564-1616) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce


Academy: A modern school where football is taught.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


Books, not which afford us a cowering enjoyment, but in which each thought is of unusual daring; such as an idle man cannot read, and a timid one would not be entertained by, which even make us dangerous to existing institution–such call I good books.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Mark Twain


Life should begin with age and its privileges and accumulations, and end with youth and its capacity to splendidly enjoy such advantages.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: “One must be poor to know the luxury of giving.” (George Eliot)


One must be poor to know the luxury of giving.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

NEW AT EUZICASA: WIDGET <<>>


SHAKESPEARE NAVIGATOR A MUST HAVE WIDGET!

SHAKESPEARE NAVIGATOR A MUST HAVE WIDGET! (YOU ARE ONE CLICK AWAY!)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: E. M. Forster


Lord I disbelieve — help thou my unbelief.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Francis Bacon


Revenge triumphs over death; love slights it; honor aspireth to it; grief flieth to it; fear preoccupateth it.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: George Eliot ABOUT A TYRANT


If a man means to be hard, let him keep in his saddle and speak from that height, above the level of pleading eyes, and with the command of a distant horizon.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


I am as desirous of being a good neighbor as I am of being a bad subject.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Lucy Maud Montgomery about interest


One can’t stay sad very long in such an interesting world, can one?

Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: George Eliot about conceited people


I’ve never any pity for conceited people, because I think they carry their comfort about with them.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Booker T. Washington ABOUT WORK


Nothing ever comes to me, that is worth having, except as the result of hard work.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce


The desire to know whether or not a woman is cursed with curiosity is one of the most active and insatiable passions of the masculine soul.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce ABOUT NOSES AND THEIR FAVORITE RETREAT!


It has been observed that one’s nose is never so happy as when thrust into the affairs of others, from which some physiologists have drawn the inference that the nose is devoid of the sense of smell.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau


I heartily accept the motto, “That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Ambrose Bierce


A word which some lexicographer has marked obsolete is ever thereafter an object of dread and loathing to the fool writer, but if it is a good word and has no exact modern equivalent equally good, it is good enough for the good writer.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: George Eliot (1819-1880)


It is well known to all experienced minds that our firmest convictions are often dependent on subtle impressions for which words are quite too coarse a medium.

George Eliot (1819-1880)

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: Henry David Thoreau ABOUT EVIL


There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

QUOTATION: George Eliot ON SAFETY


A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

George Eliot


What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult to each other?

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

 

Quotation: Henry David Thoreau about undue respect for a law


A common and natural result of an undue respect for the law is, that you may see a file of soldiers … marching in admirable order over hill and dale to the wars, against their wills, ay, against their common sense and consciences.

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Discuss

QUOTATION: Ralph Waldo Emerson


Man postpones or remembers; he does not live in the present, but with reverted eye laments the past, or, heedless of the riches that surround him, stands on tiptoe to foresee the future.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discuss

 

Quotation: Booker T. Washington – about nations and slavery


I pity from the bottom of my heart any nation or body of people that is so unfortunate as to get entangled in the net of slavery.

Booker T. Washington (1856-1915) Discuss

 

Quotation: Francis Bacon on being born and dying


It is as natural to die, as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful, as the other.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

Quotstion: William Makepeace Thackeray about a good word


Never lose a chance of saying a kind word.

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

 

Word: INEXPUGNABLE


inexpugnable 

Definition: (adjective) Incapable of being overcome, challenged, or refuted.
Synonyms: impregnable
Usage: I felt the inexpugnable strength of common sense being insidiously menaced by this gruesome, by this insane, delusion. Discuss.

 

Quotation: Herman Melville


Why did the old Persians hold the sea holy? Why did the Greeks give it a separate deity … ? Surely all this is not without meaning … But that same image, we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans. It is the image of the ungraspable phantom of life; and this is the key to it all.

Herman Melville (1819-1891) Discuss

 

Quotation: Francis Bacon (good old times…)


There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame, as to be found false and perfidious.

Francis Bacon (1561-1626) Discuss

 

Quotation: Fyodor Dostoyevsky on expressing truth vs. flattery


Nothing in the world is harder than speaking the truth and nothing easier than flattery.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) Discuss

 

Quotation: Mark Twain on patriotism vs. institutionalism


My kind of loyalty was loyalty to one’s country, not to its institutions or its office-holders. The country is the real thing, the substantial thing, the eternal thing; it is the thing to watch over, and care for, and be loyal to; institutions are extraneous, they are its mere clothing, and clothing can wear out.

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Discuss

 

Quotation: George Eliot


Men’s lives are as thoroughly blended with each other as the air they breathe: evil spreads as necessarily as disease.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss