Daily Archives: July 8, 2011

Warning about Brown Widow Spiders In SoCal-Orange County – via KTLA


Warning about Brown Widow Spiders In SoCal-Orange County

Warning about Brown Widow Spiders In SoCal-Orange County

The spider Latrodectus geometricus, commonly known as the brown widow, grey widow, or geometric button spider, is one of the widow spiders in the genus Latrodectus. As such, it is a “cousin” to the more famous Latrodectus mactans. The brown widow is found in parts of the southeastern, southern and southwestern United States (including Florida, Alabama, California, Oklahoma, Nevada, Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas); as well as in parts of Australia, Afghanistan, South Africa and Cyprus.[citation needed] The origin of this species is uncertain, as specimens were independently discovered in both Africa and the Americas. They are usually found around buildings in tropical areas.
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latrodectus_geometricus)

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Atlantis The Last: What's Next? Historic Memories

Atlantis The Last: What's Next? Historic Memories

On Human Society, and Change


You can never have a revolution in order to establish a democracy. You must have a democracy in order to have a revolution.

Gilbert Chesterton (1874-1936) Discuss

Chesterton, G. K. (Gilbert Keith Chesterton), 1874–1936, English author. Conservative, even reactionary, in his thinking, Chesterton was a convert (1922) to Roman Catholicism and its champion. He has been called the “prince of paradox” because his dogma is often hidden beneath a light, energetic, and whimsical style. A prolific writer, Chesterton wrote studies of Browning (1903) and Dickens (1906); several novels including The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904) and The Man Who Was Thursday (1908); a noted series of crime stories featuring Father Brown as detective; many poems, collected in 1927; and his famous essays, collected in Tremendous Trifles (1909), Come to Think of It (1930), and other volumes. He was the editor of G. K.’s Weekly, an organ of the Distributist League, which advocated the small-holding system. An amusing artist, he illustrated books by Hilaire Belloc Belloc, Hilaire (Joseph Hilaire Pierre Belloc) , 1870–1953, English author, b. France. He became a British subject in 1902, and from 1906 to 1910 was a Liberal member of Parliament for South Salford.
(….. Click the link for more information. , his friend and collaborator.)
Source: http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Chesterton%2c+G.+K.

My Take on this subject:  Democracy is the privilege, that most people don’t have an opportunity to understand, or to experience and therefore to recognize…It’s the rara avis that everybody talks about, but only few ever took a glimpse at and those were sworn to secrecy.  

Today’s Birthday: Alfred Binet (1857)


Alfred Binet (1857)

A major figure in the development of experimental psychology in France, Binet founded L’Année Psychologique, the first French journal on psychology, in 1895. He is also known for his research and innovations in measuring reasoning ability. Between 1905 and 1911, he and Théodore Simon developed influential scales for the measurement of the intelligence of children, which, with revisions, came into wide use in schools, industries, and the army. How did the scales work? More… Discuss

Today in History: Vasco da Gama Sets Sail on First Direct European Voyage to India (1497)


Vasco da Gama Sets Sail on First Direct European Voyage to India (1497)

In 1497, da Gama began his epochal voyage to India, becoming the first European to journey there directly by sea. With four vessels, he rounded the Cape of Good Hope, passed the easternmost point reached by Bartolomeu Dias in 1488, continued up the coast of Africa to Malindi, and sailed across the Indian Ocean to Calicut. His voyage opened up a way for Europe to reach the Indies, and marked the beginning of the Portuguese Empire. For what brutal methods was da Gama known during his travels? More… Discuss