Daily Archives: July 13, 2011

Dimitre Peev – Anon – Spanish Romance


“Romance Anónimo” (Anonymous Romance) is a piece for guitar, also known as “Estudio en Mi de Rubira” (Study in E by Rubira), “Spanish Romance”, “Romance de España”, “Romance of the Guitar”, “Romanza” and “Romance d’Amour” among other names.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(song)

Its origins and authorship are currently in question. It is suspected of originally being a solo instrumental guitar work, from the 19th century. It has variously been attributed to Antonio Rubira, David del Castillo[1], Francisco Tárrega, Fernando Sor, Daniel Fortea, Miguel Llobet, Antonio Cano, Vicente Gómez and Narciso Yepes. The Anónimo (anonymous) part of its name has been incorporated over the years due to this uncertainty. The question of authorship has probably been propagated by three main reasons: the lack of claim by its true author, the desire to avoid paying copyright fees, and the desire of publishing companies to claim the lucrative copyright of this world-famous song.[2]

The style of the piece is that of the Parlour music of the late 19th century in Spain or South America, having a closed three-part form: the first in the minor key and the second being in the major key, with the third being a restatement of the first.

Antonín Dvořák – Serenade for Strings in E major, op.22 (Highlights)



Composition and premiere

1875 was a fruitful year for Dvořák‘s composing. This was the same year that he wrote his Symphony No. 5, String Quintet No. 2, Piano Trio No. 1, the opera Vanda, and the Moravian Duets. These were happy times in his life. His marriage was young, and his first son had been born. For the first time in his life, he was starting to be recognized as a composer, and was able to live stably without fear of poverty. He received a generous stipend from a commission in Vienna, which allowed him to compose his Fifth Symphony and several chamber works as well as the Serenade.

Allegedly, Dvořák wrote the Serenade in just 12 days, from 3–14 May. The piece was premiered in Prague on 10 December 1876 by Adolf Čech and the combined orchestras of the Czech and German theatres. It was published in 1877 in the composer’s piano duet arrangement by Emanuel Starý in Prague. The score was printed two years later by Bote and Bock, Berlin.
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Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serenade_for_Strings_(Dvo%C5%99%C3%A1k)

William Byrd – Justorum animae. Worcester Cathedral choir



William Byrd (1540 or late 1539 – 4 July 1623) was an English composer of the Renaissance. He wrote in many of the forms current in England at the time, including various types of sacred and secular polyphony, keyboard (the so-called Virginian school) and consort music.

Our knowledge of Byrd’s biography has expanded in recent years, thanks largely to the research of John Harley (Harley, 1997). Following the discovery of a document dated 2 October 1598 in which Byrd’s age is given as ’58 years or there about’s it now appears that he was born in 1540. The older dating 1542–3 is derived from Byrd’s will (endorsed on 22 November 1622) which describes him as ‘in the 80th year of my age’. It now becomes clear that it must have been drafted about three years earlier than the date of endorsement. Byrd was born in London, the son of a Thomas Byrd (not Thomas Byrd of the Chapel Royal) about whom little is known. Byrd had two brothers, Symon’d and John, and four sisters. It is clear from a reference in the prefatory material in the Tallis/Byrd Cantiones of 1575 that Byrd was a pupil of Thomas Tallis, then the leading composing member of the Chapel Royal Choir. Byrd also worked in collaboration with two other Chapel Royal singing-men, John Sheppard and William Mundy, on one of his earliest compositions, a contribution to a joint setting of the alternatim psalm In exitu Israel composed for the procession to the font at the Paschal Vigil. As an item for the Sarum liturgy this was presumably composed near the end of the reign of Mary Tudor (1553–1558), whose Catholic beliefs impelled her to revive Sarum liturgical practices during her brief reign. In view of these contacts it is reasonable to speculate that Byrd was a Chapel Royal choirboy, though the surviving records do not name the choristers individually.
(Source:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Byrd)

Related Online Reference

Hildegard Von Bingen (1098-1179) – O viridissima virga, Ave


ANALYSIS _ Insurers Bait and Switch _ via IWatch: All Well on the “Insurance_For_Profiting” Front!


 
ANALYSIS _ Insurers bait and switch _ via IWatch
ANALYSIS _ Insurers bait and switch _ via I Watch (click to read more about this issue)

 

 

 


Phone-hacking scandal: live coverage (click to read Article)

This Day in History: New York Draft Riots (1863)


New York Draft Riots (1863)

The New York Draft Riots, in which more than 100 civilians were killed, were the largest civil insurrection in US history after the Civil War. The rioters were mainly working-class men who were angry because, for a $300 fee, the wealthy could buy their way out of the Civil War draft. The rioters burned draft headquarters and other buildings. Mobs also attacked African Americans, whom they blamed for the war. The riots are portrayed in an alternate-history novel co-written by what politician? More… Discuss

Tuday’s Quotation: Virginia Woolf (1882-1941): How Well Can One Know Anybody?


It is no use trying to sum people up. One must follow hints, not exactly what is said, nor yet entirely what is done. (The quotation is from Woolf’s novel, Jacob’s Room)

 Read more about the novel at:(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob%27s_Room),

 

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Julius Caesar (100 BCE)


Julius Caesar (100 BCE)

Caesar was a Roman general and statesman who formed the First Triumvirate with Pompey and Marcus Licinius Crassus and later precipitated the Roman Civil War, defeating Pompey and becoming dictator for life. His dictatorial powers, however, inspired great resentment. He was in the midst of launching a series of political and social reforms when he was assassinated on the Ides of March by conspirators led by Cassius and Brutus. Caesar’s commentaries on what wars are considered classic military documents? More… Discuss

Cancer Death Risk Greater for Men


Cancer Death Risk Greater for Men

US researchers say men diagnosed with cancer are more likely to die from the disease than women. They attribute the discrepancy in part to the fact that men are at greater risk of developing cancer than women, perhaps as a result of differences in exposure to carcinogens or hormonal or metabolic differences. According to the American Cancer Society, men have about a 1 in 2 chance of developing cancer, while women have just a 1 in 3 chance. In addition, men are more likely than women to have advanced disease by the time their cancer is detected. More… Discuss

Villa of the Papyri


Villa of the Papyri

The Villa of the Papyri, as it is now known, was a private home owned by Julius Caesar’s father-in-law in the ancient Roman city of Herculaneum. In 79 CE, the eruption of Vesuvius covered the entire city with volcanic ash, including the villa, which was situated halfway up the volcano‘s slope. Its remains were excavated in the 18th century, and therein was found a library containing 1,785 carbonized papyrus scrolls, many of them expounding the ideas of what school of philosophy? More… Discuss