Daily Archives: July 15, 2011

Japan nuclear reactor halted over pressure drop_via_France24 International


Japan nuclear reactor halted over pressure drop_via_France24 International

Japan nuclear reactor halted over pressure drop_via_France24 International (click here to read the story at France24 International)

The Best in Classical Music: Jane Jones on Classic FM


The best in Classical Music

The best in Classical Music Classic FM (click, yada, yada...)

I like Jane Jones musical  choices – Now the theme is “Summer:” Thank You Jane!

Order Pizza at a Space Station Near You – via France24 International


Obama dials for pizza, gets space station

Obama dials for pizza, gets space station (click on picture to read the entire story via France24 International)

Pizza: Never A Dull Meal! or Come Home, Come Home It’s Suppertime!

This Week’s Top MuckReads: CIA Secret Sites, Costly Stadiums, and Legislators Grabbing Subsidies-via ProPublica


This Week Top MuckReads - ProPublica

This Week Top MuckReads - ProPublica (click to read the article @ ProPublica)

This Day in History: Fire Ravages Rome’s Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls (1823)


Fire Ravages Rome’s Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls (1823)

In 1823, a worker repairing the roof of Rome’s Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls accidentally started a fire that resulted in its almost total destruction. The church, built under Emperor Constantine in the 4th century, had retained its original character for nearly 1,500 years. Reconstruction work began almost immediately with the aim of recreating the original structure. The viceroy of Egypt contributed alabaster pillars to the rebuilding effort, while the Russian emperor sent what? More… Discuss

Today’s Quotation: George Eliot – On Truth and Lie


Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

The above quote comes from “Adam Bede“–Book Two–Chapter XVII–1859. The quote is in the fifth paragraph.

Read the book at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/507/507-h/507-h.htm#2HCH0017

Find Out more about George Eliot a
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Eliot

 

Table Salt – Sodium Chloride – In Foods


Salt-Balance

Salt-Balance

High Sodium, Low Potassium Diet Danger

It is widely believed that eating too much salt can increase one’s risk of hypertension and death from heart disease or stroke, though recent studies investigating this assertion have had mixed results. The latest study from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found a link between high sodium consumption and increased risk of heart attack related death but also noted that potassium rich foods could help defend against salt’s ill effects. The 15-year study followed more than 12,000 people and showed that those who had both a high salt intake and a low potassium intake had the highest risk of dying from any cause. More… Discuss

Those who worked in industry like ceramic tiles or ice cream,  know that adding salt (Sodium Chloride) to a liquid increases its viscosity and rheology properties. In the human body, blood viscosity is also controlled by the amount of salt: When too much salt is in the system the blood becomes more viscous which results in the increase in the blood pressure. As a counteraction we become thirsty, and require more water than needed in order to dilute the blood and bring the viscosity down. Now we have two negative health effects: water retention and high blood pressure.
The salt balance, a mixture of Sodium and Potassium Chlorides, add an extra taste to food, due to its Potassium Chloride. There are different concentrations available, al the way to Sodium Chloride substitute table salt (only Potassium Chloride).


While one can buy all these food supplements from any market, it is important to consult with a medical professional, before committing to a low Sodium Diet, use of water pill, of other medication prescribed to reduce the blood pressure.

Related articles

Sumptuary Laws – the Antipode of “Ab Aspera Ad Astra”, Yet More Realistic!


Sumptuary Laws

Sumptuary laws are laws directed against overindulgence or extravagance in diet, drink, and dress based on social, religious, or moral grounds. Historically, these statutes often varied according to rank and were mainly used to mark class distinctions and prevent people from assuming the appearance of a superior class. They were also used to stigmatize disfavored groups, who could be required to wear identifying apparel. How rich did one need to be to wear a belt in the Massachusetts Bay Colony? More… Discuss