J.Haydn – Cello Concerto No.1 in C major – M. Rostropovich and Academy of Saint Martin in the Fields

 

 


Mstislav Leopoldovich Rostropovich, KBE (Russian: Мстисла́в Леопо́льдович Ростропо́вич, Mstislav Leopol’dovič Rostropovič, pronounced [rəstrɐˈpɔvʲɪtɕ]; March 27, 1927 – April 27, 2007), known to close friends as Slava, was a Soviet and Russian cellist and conductor. He was married to the soprano Galina Vishnevskaya. He is widely considered to have been the greatest cellist of the second half of the 20th century, and one of the greatest of all time. In addition to his outstanding interpretations and technique, he was well-known for his commissions of new works which enlarged the cello repertoire more than any cellist before or since. He gave the premieres of over 100 pieces.[1]

Rostropovich was internationally recognized as a staunch advocate of human rights, and was awarded the 1974 Award of the International League of Human Rights.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mstislav_Rostropovich

The Cello Concerto No. 1 in C Major, Hob. VIIb/1, by Joseph Haydn was composed around 17611765 for longtime friend Joseph Franz Weigl, then the principal cellist of Prince Nicolaus‘s Esterházy Orchestra.

The work was presumed lost until 1961, when musicologist Oldřich Pulkert discovered a copy of the score at the Prague National Museum. Though some doubts have been raised about the authenticity of the work, most experts believe that Haydn did compose this concerto.
(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cello_Concerto_No._1_in_C_(Haydn)

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One response to “J.Haydn – Cello Concerto No.1 in C major – M. Rostropovich and Academy of Saint Martin in the Fields

  1. Pingback: “Kyrie” from Lord Nelson Mass — Franz Joseph Haydn & “Daemon Irrepit Callidus” — György Orbán « HI-FI Lives

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