Daily Archives: August 26, 2011

Today’s Birthday: Theodore Dreiser (1871)


Theodore Dreiser (1871)

Dreiser was a novelist and pioneer of naturalism in American literature. After working as a journalist, magazine editor, and publisher, he published his first novel, Sister Carrie, which was denounced as scandalous. In 1915, the withdrawal of his autobiographical novel, The Genius, from distribution on moral grounds ignited a national anticensorship campaign supported by most of the leading literary figures of the day. Whose murder inspired his An American Tragedy? More… Discuss

Advertisements

Zamfira A Plecat (Sa-si Caute Barbat) – IOAN LUCHIAN MIHALEA


Maurice Ravel: Bolero


Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel (1875–1937). Originally composed as a ballet commissioned by Russian ballerina Ida Rubinstein, the piece, which premiered in 1928, is Ravel’s most famous musical composition.[2] Before Boléro, Ravel had composed large scale ballets (such as Daphnis et Chloé, composed for the Ballets Russes 1909–1912), suites for the ballet (such as the second orchestral version of Ma Mère l’Oye, 1912), and one-movement dance pieces (such as La Valse, 1906–1920). Apart from such compositions intended for a staged dance performance, Ravel had demonstrated an interest in composing re-styled dances, from his earliest successes (the 1895 Menuet and the 1899 Pavane) to his more mature works like Le tombeau de Couperin (which takes the format of a dance suite).

Boléro epitomises Ravel’s preoccupation with restyling and reinventing dance movements. It was also one of the last pieces he composed before illness forced him into retirement: the two piano concertos and the Don Quichotte à Dulcinée song cycle were the only compositions that followed Boléro.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bol%C3%A9ro)

Gustavo Dudamel – Danzon n°2


Gustavo Adolfo Dudamel Ramírez (born January 26, 1981) is a Venezuelan conductor and violinist. He is currently the principal conductor of the Gothenburg Symphony in Gothenburg, Sweden, and music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic in Los Angeles, California.[1] Dudamel is also the artistic director of the Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venezuela.
(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustavo_Dudamel)

Never on Sunday – Melina Mercouri


Never on Sunday (Greek: Ποτέ Την Κυριακή, translit. Pote Tin Kyriaki) is a 1960 Greek black-and-white film which tells the story of Ilya, a prostitute who lives in the port of Piraeus in Greece, and Homer, an American tourist from Middletown, Connecticut — a classical scholar enamored with all things Greek. Ilya is a character close to the “hooker with a heart of gold” cliché.[citation needed] Homer feels Ilya’s life style typifies the degradation of Greek classical culture and attempts to steer her onto the path of morality. It constitutes a variation of the Pygmalion story.

The film stars Melina Mercouri and Jules Dassin, and it gently submerges the viewer into Greek culture, including dance, music, and language (through the use of subtitles). The signature song and the bouzouki theme of the movie became hits of the 1960s and brought the composer, Manos Hadjidakis, an Academy Award.

It won the Academy Award for Best Song (Manos Hadjidakis for “Never on Sunday“). It was nominated for the Academy Awards for, respectively, Best Actress in a Leading Role (Melina Mercouri), Best Costume Design, Black-and-White, Best Director (Jules Dassin) and Best Writing, Story and Screenplay as Written Directly for the Screen (Dassin). Mercouri won the award for Best Actress at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival.
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Never_on_Sunday)

Democracy Now: Laws made by some people for other people, only, are FEUDAL


Democracy Now - Laws made by some people, for other people, Only, are FEUDAL

Democracy Now - Laws made by some people, for other people, Only, are FEUDAL

Los Angeles River Tries On New Role, as Waterway – The New York Times


Los Angeles River Tries On New Role, as Waterway _ The New York Times

Los Angeles River Tries On New Role, as Waterway _ The New York Times

From WebMD – Vitamins and Supplements Lifestyle Guide –


Vitamins and Supplements Lifestyle Guide - WebMD

Vitamins and Supplements Lifestyle Guide - WebMD

Say no to High Fructose Corn Syrop: Our bodies are affected by it.


Fructose Facts for People with Diabetes

Fructose Facts for People with Diabetes

Quotation: George Eliot – Complexity Derived Exception


In so complex a thing as human nature, we must consider, it is hard to find rules without exception.

(The quotation is from Ch. XXXIII of Austen’s first novel, Adam Bede.)

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

I think that: We owe everything to  complexity as it is trully the harmony of matter.

Today’s Birthday: Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford (1676)


Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford (1676)

Walpole was an English statesman. Elected to the House of Commons in 1701, he later served as secretary of war. With the accession of George I, he rose rapidly to become first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the exchequer. With his consolidation of power, he effectively became the first British prime minister. He avoided foreign entanglement and kept England neutral until 1739, when he was forced into the War of Jenkins’ Ear against Spain. How did the conflict get its name? More… Discuss

This day in History: National Assembly of Quebec Adopts the Charter of the French Language (1977)


National Assembly of Quebec Adopts the Charter of the French Language (1977)

In 1976, the Parti Québécois, a party of French-Canadian nationalists formed in 1970, won control of the provincial parliament. Among its first acts was the passage of La charte de la langue française—the Charter of the French Language. Also known as Bill 101, the controversial legislation made French the official language of Quebec and prohibited the use of English on signs and in most commercial transactions. What effect did the charter have on businesses in Quebec? More… Discuss