Monthly Archives: February 2012

02/28/2012 MEDIA WATCH France


MediaWatch French Edition is our take on the stories big and bizarre in newspapers, on news websites, blogs and on social media. We also look at stories about how the media functions and how it’s evolving in today’s society. Tune in at 9.45pm Paris time for a look at the French media

Tango dance Scent of a women (An encore, encore); “no mistakes in tango, you make one, you tango it along”



Gabrielle Anwar and Al Pacino in “Scent of Woman”

Burn Notice: A funny moment



Excerpts from the Wikipedia article:

“The William Tell Overture is the instrumental introduction to the opera Guillaume Tell (in EnglishWilliam Tell) by Gioachino Rossini. William Tell premiered in 1829 and was the last of Rossini’s 39 operas, after which he went into semi-retirement, although he continued to compose cantatas, sacred music and secular vocal music. The overture is in four parts, each following the next without pause. There has been repeated use (and sometimes parody) of parts of this overture in both classical music and popular media, most famously as the theme music for the Lone Ranger radio and television shows. Franz Liszt prepared a piano transcription of the overture in 1838 (S.552) which became a staple of his concert repertoire. There are also transcriptions by other composers, including versions by Louis Gottschalk for two and four pianos and a duet for piano and violin.”
(To find out more about this very beatiful, well known, always liked overture, access: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tell_Overture)

The art of French bashing (from France 24 International)


The art of French bashing (from France 24 International)

The art of French bashing (from France 24 International) (click here to access the story: Laugh if you like!)

 

MEDIAWATCH
MediaWatch is our take on the stories big and bizarre in newspapers, on news websites, blogs and on social media. We also look at stories about how the media functions and how it’s evolving in today’s society. Presented by James Creedon, tune in at 8.45pm Paris time for a look at the French media and 10.22pm for the international media.
 
 
 


A post full of spirituality, kindness to nature, kindness to self. Looking at this photo reminded me of the classic movie “bless the beast and children and the song with the same name, interpreted by The Carpenters (Karen, Richard and their band). So I reblog with the sense of urgency toward a more humane human society, the way we really were intended to be! Thanks Ann!

Ann Novek( Luure)--With the Sky as the Ceiling and the Heart Outdoors

Why should man expect his prayer for mercy to be heard by What is above him when he shows no mercy to what is under him? ~Pierre Troubetzkoy”   ( From Cruelty Free Eating)Photo: Ann Novek

View original post

Quotation of the Day: George Eliot (1819-1880) – On Consequences


Consequences are unpitying. Our deeds carry their terrible consequences, quite apart from any fluctuations that went before—consequences that are hardly ever confined to ourselves.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

JAMES “JIMMY” DORSEY (1904) – – – Clarinet Polka Jimmy Dorsey and his Orchestra


James “Jimmy” Dorsey (1904)

Dorsey was a prominent jazz musician and big band leader. He began performing as a youth, first learning the trumpet before 

taking up his signature instruments, the clarinet and alto saxophone. He formed several bands with his brother, and the duo became so popular that they later starred in a fictionalized film biography, The Fabulous Dorseys. After they parted ways in 1935, the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra had several number-one hits. What was the name of his first post-split hit recordMore… Discuss


 

“Keep Right!” – Pacific Coast Hwy Bike Lanes (my sports photography)


"Keep Right!" - Pacific Coast Hwy Bike Lanes (my fitness photography)

"Keep Right!" - Pacific Coast Hwy Bike Lanes (my fitness photography)

The Buoy – Huntington Beach Pier December 2011 171 – View toward Newport Beach Pier (Landscape Photography)


Huntington Beach Pier December 2011 171-View toward Newport Beach Pier

Huntington Beach Pier December 2011 171-View toward Newport Beach Pier

Escargot, is what’s for dinner (my life photography)


Escargot, is what's for dinner: Bolsa Chica-Huntington Beach

Escargot, is what's for dinner: Bolsa Chica-Huntington Beach

Kids Not Active Enough Even with “Active” Video Games


Kids Not Active Enough Even with “Active” Video Games

In recent decades, people have become increasingly sedentary, trading sports and other activities for TV, video games, and computers. When so-called active video games systems, like Nintendo’s Wii, entered the market several years ago, it was hoped they would encourage kids to get more exercise. However, a new study finds that kids who play Wii games are just as sedentary as those who play inactive video games. While researchers admit that the Wii may still provide some health benefit over totally sedentary screen time, experts maintain that these sorts of games are no replacement for active, outdoor play. More… Discuss

Quotation of the Day: John Quincy Adams (1767-1848)


 

Their zeal might sometimes be too ardent, but it was always sincere.

John Quincy Adams (1767-1848) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: Linus Carl Pauling (1901)


Linus Carl Pauling (1901)

An American chemist, Pauling was the first person to win two unshared Nobel Prizes: one for chemistry in 1954 and one for peace in 1962. He was one of the first to study molecular structure using quantum mechanics, and he made discoveries in biochemistry and medicine. In the 1950s, he became concerned about nuclear weapons testing and radioactive fallout and wrote an appeal—signed by thousands of scientists—to halt such tests. What publication called his peace prize “A Weird Insult from Norway“? More… Discuss

Surfing – twist and splash Huntington Beach (my life photography)


Surfing - twist and splash Huntington Beach (my life photography)

Surfing - twist and splash Huntington Beach (my life photography)

Ocean Pacific – of sailboats and birds (my life photography)


Ocean Pacific - of sailboats and birds (my life photography)

Ocean Pacific - of sailboats and birds (my life photography)

Duck’s Elegant Flight (my nature photography)


Duck's Elegant flight (my nature photography)

Duck's Elegant flight (my nature photography)

A Sepia Day (my nature photography)


A Sepia Day

A Sepia Day

San Gabriel River Bike Road will be resurfaced (about 7.5 miles)


San Gabriel River Bike Road will be resurfaced (about 7.5 miles)

San Gabriel River Bike Road will be resurfaced (about 7.5 miles)

Thirty birds on three wires (my graphic art collection)


Thirty birds on three wires (my graphic art collection)

Thirty birds on three wires (my graphic art collection)

Respighi – Three Botticelli Pictures Triptych


A definition of depilated Beauty: The Birth of...

A word from billystewart4: “The first piece in Ottorino Respighi‘s amazing triptych entitled “Three Botticelli Paintings”:

The first  piece was inspired by Botticelli’s painting “Primavera” (Spring).
The 2nd of 3 pieces, the triptych known as “Three Botticelli Paintings” by the far too underappreciated Italian turn-of-the-century composer Ottorino Respighi.

The 3 pieces are all based on paintings by the Renassaince painter Sandro Botticelli. My personal favorite piece of Respighi’s from this composition is “The Birth of Venus“. But all are outstanding and display Respighi’s gift for combining the sounds of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, which he studied endlessly.

Performed by the Philharmonia of London and conducted by Geoffrey Simon

Primavera by Sandro Botticelli-1482

File:Botticelli 085A.jpg

 

A definition of depilated Beauty: The Birth of...

Image via Wikipedia

Respighi – Gli Uccelli (“The Birds”)


Ottorino Respighi in the 1920s in the company ...

Image via Wikipedia

 

Word from billystewart4: “Yet another of Respighi‘s wonderful works that receives little attention on YouTube
Respighi’s love of music from the 17th and 18th Centuries often inspired his work; Ancient Airs and Dances would be the most significant example of this mimicry.

Gli Uccelli” (The Birds) was heavily influenced by compositions of the past; pieces which were composed as ‘bird-pieces’. In 1927 Respighi composed a 5 piece Suite based upon compositions which were inspired by birds; the work was first performed the same year in Brazil (where Respighi conducted and, incidentally, during his visit, was inspired to write “Brazillian Impressions; please, see my other video posts for those three amazing toen poems).

The first movement, a Prelude, is based on a harpsichord piece by Bernardo Pasquini (1637-1710), and it gives a preview of the themes that will return in later movements.

The second movement, La colomba (The Dove), is based on a lute piece by Jacques de Gallot (1625-1695). The Oboe (my personal favorite of the woodwinds) sings the doves song.

The third movement, La Gallina (The Hen), is derived from a harpsichord piece by Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764), the hen clucking noisily and rushing about.

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra performs under Louis Lane.

Enjoy!”

“San Gabriel River Bikeway, on a sunny day – November 2010” (a movie I made)


I had to change the soundtrack (used to be “Never going back again”, but the choice I made, The Trout with the golden Quintet, Jacqueline du Pres, is totally out of this world…I love it!


@ Tracie Louise Photo Gallery: The Timelessness of Snapshot photography!

Smetana – From My Life – string quartet


string quartet by B. Smetana – From My Life
15th December 2009
Beirut, Lebanon
Nabih Bulos – violin
Ondin Brezeanu – violin
Magdalena Sokola – cello
Catalina Rupa – viola

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Bad Moon Rising


Creedence Clearwater Revival – Have You Ever Seen The Rain?


creedence clearwater revival,the best of vol1,

Have You Ever Seen the Rain?” is a song written by John Fogerty and released in 1970 on the album Pendulum by roots rock group Creedence Clearwater Revival. The song charted highest in Canada, reaching number one on the RPM 100 national album chart in March 1971.[1] In the U.S., it peaked at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the same year. On Cash Box pop chart, it peaked at number three. Billboard co-listed the b-side “Hey Tonight”. In the UK, it reached number 36. It was the group’s eighth gold-selling single.[2]

Some have speculated that the song’s lyrics are referencing the Vietnam War, with the ‘rain’ being a metaphor for bombs falling from the sky.[3] In his review of the song for Allmusic website, Mark Deming suggests that the song is about the idealism of the 1960s fading in the wake of events such as the Altamont Free Concert and the Kent State shootings and that Fogerty is saying that the same issues of the ’60s still existed in the 1970s but that people were no longer fighting for them.[4] However, Fogerty himself has said in interviews and prior to playing the song in concert that the song is about rising tension within CCR and the imminent departure of his brother Tom from the band.[5]

John Fogerty released a live version of the song on his The Long Road Home – In Concert DVD which was recorded at the Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles, California on September 15, 2005.

Lobo – Me and you…and : (Come on you know who!)


ravens – flight or flight (my life photography)


ravens -  flight or fight

ravens - flight or fight

“Nutty” the ground squirrel playing nice for peanuts (my life photography)


"Nutty" the ground squirrel playing nice for peanuts

"Nutty" the ground squirrel playing nice for peanuts

The Lennon Sisters & Joni James “On The Boardwalk” (In Atlantic City)


(Voice Heard) – Mono The Lawrence Welk Show
(First Song) – Mono The Lennon Sisters
(Last Song) – Stereo Joni James

Atlantic City History:

Atlantic City is a city on Absecond Island on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean in New Jersey. It is the central location of the Boardwalk Empire book and the HBO series Boardwalk Empire, and is occasionally alluded to in the series as The Emerald City

The original inhabitants were the Lenni-Lenape Indians. They would travel for 5 miles over marshland on the Old Indian Trail (where Florida Ave. is today) from the Mainland to spend their summer months hunting and fishing on the island. 

The first recorded owner of Absecond Island from the late 1670’s was an Englishman by the name of Thomas Budd. He was given the island against a claim he had against the holders of the royal grant. His beach front land was valued at a mere $0.04 an acre. That same property today would be worth millions of dollars per acre. For the next one hundred years, the island would be visited by hunters and white settlers. 

The first white man to build a permanent structure on the island was Jeremiah Leeds in 1785 (at what is now Arctic and Arkansas Ave). He and his family grew corn and rye and raised cattle on the Leeds Plantation. After his death in 1838, Leeds second wife got a license to operate a tavern called Aunt Millie’s Boarding House. Atlantic City’s first business was born. 

 In 1850 a prominent physician on the island, Dr. Jonathan Pitney, had the idea of turning the island into a health retreat. He recruited the services of a civil engineer named Richard Osborne to help him bring the railroad to the island. Osborne is credited with naming the city, while Dr. Pitney thought of the names and placement for the city streets (streets running parallel to the ocean would be named after the great ocean bodies of the world and streets which ran east to west would be named after the States). 
On July 5th, 1854, the first train arrived from Camden after an arduous 21/2 hour journey. The invasion of tourists to the island began. It didn’t take long for real estate developers to recognize the island’s potential as a resort destination. Lavish hotels and fancy restaurants sprang up, many of them featured in the show, such as Babette’s Supper Club. Within twenty years there were nearly 500,000 passengers a year arriving by rail. And all these people were tracking mounds and mounds of sand into the hotel and restaurant lobbies. Something had to be done about it. 

Alexander Boardman, a conductor for the Atlantic City-Camden Railroad, proposed building a boardwalk. City Hall accepted the proposal in 1870 and using half the cities annual tax revenue, built an 8 foot wide wood structure from the beach to the town. It was not only functional,  it was totally unique and the tourists loved it. The boardwalk was so popular it reached a length of 7 miles long (before the 1944 hurricane) and it fueled the cities explosive growth, with the cities first road from the mainland finishing construction in 1870 and two additional rail lines being added in 1878. Atlantic City was formally opened on Wednesday, June 16th, 1880. 

Official logo of Atlantic City

Image via Wikipedia

Pelicans flying in formation (my life photography)


Pelicans flying in formation (my life photography)

Pelicans flying in formation (my life photography)

I’m “M”, photogenic, and Live in Huntington Beach ( my life photopgraphy)


I'm "M" and photogenic!

I'm "M" and photogenic!


Change your words, change your world! So inspiring! Thanks

Work The Dream

This needs no words. It says it all.

[youtube-http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Hzgzim5m7oU]

video by purplecontent

View original post

Another Passion Flower (my nature photography)


Passion Flower

Passion Flower

Liberty Park Fountain (my nature photography)


Liberty Park Fountain

Liberty Park Fountain

Seal Beach Sand Project (my motivational movies on you-tube)


Holly Forever (1990 – 2012) on Pacific Coast Hwy (my life photography)


Holly's Shine(my life photography)

Holly's Shine(my life photography)

Oh, the wind is blowing! (my life photography)


Oh, the wind is blowing! (my life photography)

Oh, the wind is blowing! (my life photography)

“Nutty” – the Ground skirrel (my nature photography)


Nutty (my nature photography)

Nutty (my nature photography)

Dizzying Speed (my life photography)


Dizzying Speed (my life photography)

Dizzying Speed (my life photography)

San Gabriel River – The Tide Is Rising


San Gabriel River - The Tide Is Rising (my nature photography)

San Gabriel River - The Tide Is Rising (my nature photography)

Awakening Spring ( my nature photography)


awakening spring

awakening spring

Flower Liberty Park Cerritos (my nature photography)


Flower Liberty Park Cerritos

Flower Liberty Park Cerritos

New Passion Flower February 25, 2012 (Liberty Park – Cerritos) (my nature photography)


New Passion Flower February 25, 2012 (liberty Park Cerritos) (my nature photography)

New Passion Flower February 25, 2012 (liberty Park Cerritos) (my nature photography)

Mini-Sahara (at Bolsa Chica State Beach): (my nature photography)


Mini-Sahara (at Bolsa Chica State Beach)

Mini-Sahara (at Bolsa Chica State Beach)

Today it was windy, a cold wind, blowing from the ocean, and building dunes, only to blow them all around. I remember seeing a documentary about northern Sahara, with some very eroded mountains looking quite like this. That’s why I call it Mini-Sahara. 

Celibidache conducts Enescu’s Romanian Rhapsody No.1 in A


Sergiu Celibidache conducding the BucharestGeorge EnescuPhilharmonic Orchestra in his homeland, 1978″

Excerpts from Wikipedia Article in translation: “Symphonic miniatures are based on folklore (mainly urban) and type present a medley of songs grouping with sequences developer. Their exotic nature, dynamic, melodic beauty, spectacular orchestration have made these songs come quickly repertory orchestras and be interpreted in concert or in records discrografice by most major conductors of the world.” 

Bucharest, Romania: Ateneu Român

Image via Wikipedia

Dvořák: Humoresque Op. 101 No. 7, Yo Yo Ma, Itzhak Perlman, Ozawa


Excerpts from Wikipedia: Humoresques (Czech: Humoresky), Op. 101 (B. 187) is a piano cycle by the Czech composer Antonín Dvořák, written during the summer of 1894. One writer says “the seventh Humoresque is probably the most famous small piano work ever written after Beethoven’s Für Elise.
During his stay in America, when Dvořák was director of the Conservatory in New York from 1892 to 1895, the composer collected many interesting musical themes in his sketchbooks. He used some of these ideas in other compositions, notably the “From the New World” Symphony, the “American” String Quartet, the Quintet in E Flat Major, and the Sonatina for Violin), but some remained unused.

In 1894, Dvořák spent the summer with his family in Bohemia, at Vysoká u Příbrami. During this “vacation”, Dvořák began to use the collected material and to compose a new cycle of short piano pieces. On 19 July 1894 Dvořák sketched the first Humoresque in B major, today number 6 in the cycle. However, the composer soon started to create scores for the pieces that were intended to be published. The score was completed on 27 August 1894.

The cycle was entitled Humoresques shortly before Dvořák sent the score to his German publisher F. Simrock. The composition was published by Simrock in Autumn, 1894.

The publisher took advantage of the great popularity of the seventh Humoresque to produce arrangements for many instruments and ensembles. The piece was later also published as a song with various lyrics. It has also been arranged for choir.”

(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humoresques_(Dvo%C5%99%C3%A1k

 

Dvorak Slavonic Dance No.1 – Wiener Philharmoniker -S. Ozawa


 Dvorak’s Slavonic Dance No.1 In c. (Live Performance with Vienna Philharmonic conducted by Seiji Ozawa)

The Mission – Gabriel’s Oboe ( “Music the universal language before words existed”)


Movie – The Mission
Music – Gabriel’s Oboe
Actor – Jeremy Irons (Father Gabriel)
Soundtrack – Ennio Morricone