Daily Archives: June 15, 2012

Spain: the beginning of the end


From BBC NEWS-Europe : “Greek election is euro versus drachma, Samaras says”


From BBC NEWS-Europe _ Greek election is euro versus drachma, Samaras says

From BBC NEWS-Europe _ Greek election is euro versus drachma, Samaras says

Greek bailout: Where the parties stand

Party Stance on bailout Share of vote May
Pro-bailout parties
New Democracy logo New Democracy Keep bailout but more time for restructuring and EU help to stimulate growth 19%
Pasok logo Socialist (Pasok) Keep bailout but subject it to a “structured and courageous revision”; implement fiscal adjustment over three years, not two 13%

Anti-bailout parties

Syriza logo Syriza Cancel bailout, nationalise banks and freeze privatisations, but stay inside eurozone 17%
Independent Greeks logo Independent Greeks Reject bailout but remain in eurozone 11%
Democratic Left logo Democratic Left Gradually disengage from bailout but stay in eurozone 6%
KKE logo Communist (KKE) Unilaterally cancel debt, leave the EU and restore Greece‘s own currency 9%
Golden dawn logo Golden Dawn Tear up the bailout but not necessarily abandon the euro 7%

The Genius of Mutual Indebtedness – Nigel Farage ) (I’ll call this ” the ship that hit the fan”)


 Donate to UKIP: http://www.ukip.org/donations | http://www.ukipmeps.org |http://twitter.com/#!/Nigel_Farage
European Parliament, Strasbourg, 13 June 2012

• Speaker: Nigel Farage MEP, Leader of the UK Independence Party (UKIP), Co-President of the ‘Europe of Freedom and Democracy‘ (EFD) Group in the European Parliament – http://nigelfaragemep.co.uk

• Joint debate: European Council meeting – Multiannual financial framework and own resources

A. Preparation for the European Council meeting (28-29 June 2012)
Council and Commission statements
[2011/2920(RSP)]

B. Multiannual financial framework and own resources
Council and Commission statements
[2012/2678(RSP)]

Transcript: 

“Another one bites the dust. Country number four, Spain, gets bailed out and we all of course know that it won’t be the last. Though I wondered over the weekend whether perhaps I was missing something, because when the Spanish prime minister Mr Rajoy got up, he said that this bailout shows what a success the eurozone has been. 

And I thought, well, having listened to him over the previous couple of weeks telling us that there would not be a bailout, I got the feeling after all his twists and turns he’s just about the most incompetent leader in the whole of Europe, and that’s saying something, because there is pretty stiff competition.

Indeed, every single prediction of yours, Mr Barroso, has been wrong, and dear old Herman Van Rompuy, well he’s done a runner hasn’t he. Because the last time he was here, he told us we had turned the corner, that the euro crisis was over and he hasn’t bothered to come back and see us.

I remember being here ten years ago, hearing the launch of the Lisbon Agenda. We were told that with the euro, by 2010 we would have full employment and indeed that Europe would be the competitive and dynamic powerhouse of the world. By any objective criteria the Euro has failed, and in fact there is a looming, impending disaster.

You know, this deal makes things worse not better. A hundred billion [euro] is put up for the Spanish banking system, and 20 per cent of that money has to come from Italy. And under the deal the Italians have to lend to the Spanish banks at 3 per cent but to get that money they have to borrow on the markets at 7 per cent. It’s genius isn’t it. It really is brilliant.

So what we are doing with this package is we are actually driving countries like Italy towards needing to be bailed out themselves. 

In addition to that, we put a further 10 per cent on Spanish national debt and I tell you, any banking analyst will tell you, 100 billion does not solve the Spanish banking problem, it would need to be more like 400 billion.

And with Greece teetering on the edge of Euro withdrawal, the real elephant in the room is that once Greece leaves, the ECB, the European Central Bank is bust. It’s gone.

It has 444 billion euros worth of exposure to the bailed-out countries and to rectify that you’ll need to have a cash call from Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Greece and Italy. You couldn’t make it up could you! It is total and utter failure. This ship, the euro Titanic has now hit the iceberg and sadly there simply aren’t enough life boats.”

…………………………….
• Video: EbS (European Parliament)
• End music: Velvet Choker – Corner Stone Cues
…………………………….

EU Member States:
Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom

Barenboim & Lupu live in Prague 2011: Mozart – Concerto No. 10 for two pianos –






Barenboim & Lupu live in Prague 2011: Mozart – Concerto No. 10 in E-flat major for two pianos, K. 365 – 1st movement. Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor Lawrence Foster. Dvorak Hall of Rudolfinum, Prague, October 23rd 2011.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The Concerto No. 10 in E-flat major for Two Pianos, K. 365/316a, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was written in 1779. Mozart wrote it to play with his sister Maria Anna (“Nannerl”). He was 23 years old and on the verge of leaving Salzburg for Vienna.

The concerto is scored for the two pianos together with two oboes, two bassoons; two horns; and strings. The piece is in three movements:

  1. Allegro common time
  2. Andante B-flat major 3/4
  3. Rondo: Allegro 2/4

The concerto departs from the usual solo piano concerto with the dialogue between the two pianos as they exchange musical ideas. Mozart divides up the more striking passages quite evenly between the two pianos. Also, the orchestra is rather more quiet than in Mozart’s other piano concertos, leaving much of the music to the soloists.

The first movement is lyrical and “wonderfully spacious, as if Mozart is thoroughly enjoying himself and letting his ideas flow freely,” as Ledbetter has noted.[1] The middle movement is slow and refined; the orchestra stays in the background behind the pair of playful pianists. The finale is a rondo filled with rhythmic drive and, after passages of lyrical grace, there is an exuberant return to the main rondo theme.

 

Nice birds


Nice birds (don't know name)

Nice birds (don’t know name)

Kelp Gull and Stingray (Never refuse a free meal?) (my photography collection)


Seagull and stingray (Never refuse a free meal?)

Seagull and stingray (Never refuse a free meal?)

Identify a bird at: http://identify.whatbird.com/obj/1036/overview/Kelp_Gull.aspx

Gustav Klimt:


Gustav Klimt At Googleartproject

Gustav Klimt At Googleartproject (click to take the virtual tour)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: 

Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862– February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Secession movement. His major works include paintingsmuralssketches, and other art objects. Klimt’s primary subject was the female body,[1]and his works are marked by a frank eroticism—nowhere is this more apparent than in his numerous drawings in pencil (see Mulher sentada, below).[2]

Leonard Cohen – Light as the Breeze



From his album “The Future” (1992).
All paintings by Gustav Klimt.

Light As The Breeze (Leonard Cohen)

She stands before you naked 
you can see it, you can taste it, 
and she comes to you light as the breeze. 
Now you can drink it or you can nurse it, 
it don’t matter how you worship 
as long as you’re 
down on your knees. 
So I knelt there at the delta, 
at the alpha and the omega, 
at the cradle of the river and the seas. 
And like a blessing come from heaven 
for something like a second 
I was healed and my heart 
was at ease. O baby I waited 
so long for your kiss 
for something to happen, 
oh something like this. And you’re weak and you’re harmless 
and you’re sleeping in your harness 
and the wind going wild 
in the trees, 
and it ain’t exactly prison 
but you’ll never be forgiven 
for whatever you’ve done 
with the keys. 

O baby I waited … 

It’s dark now and it’s snowing 
O my love I must be going, 
The river has started to freeze. 
And I’m sick of pretending 
I’m broken from bending 
I’ve lived too long on my knees. 

Then she dances so graceful 
and your heart’s hard and hateful 
and she’s naked 
but that’s just a tease. 
And you turn in disgust 
from your hatred and from your love 
and comes to you 
light as the breeze. 

O baby I waited … 

There’s blood on every bracelet 
you can see it, you can taste it, 
and it’s Please baby 
please baby please. 
And she says, Drink deeply, pilgrim 
but don’t forget there’s still a woman 
beneath this 
resplendent chemise. 

So I knelt there at the delta, 
at the alpha and the omega, 
I knelt there like one who believes. 
And the blessings come from heaven 
and for something like a second 
I’m cured and my heart 
is at ease.

Gustav Klimt (July 14, 1862– February 6, 1918) was an Austrian Symbolist painter and one of the most prominent members of the Vienna Secession movement. His major works include paintings, muralssketches, and other art objects. Klimt’s primary subject was the female body,[1]and his works are marked by a frank eroticism—nowhere is this more apparent than in his numerous drawings in pencil.

 http://www.googleartproject.com/artist/gustav-klimt/4127340/

Our Lady of Solitude – Leonard Cohen



Our Lady of Solitude by Leonard Cohen

All summer long she touched me.
She gathered in my soul
from many a thorn, from many thickets,
Her fingers, like a weaver’s –
quick and cool.

And the light came from her body,
and the night went through her grace.
All summer long she touched me;
and I knew her, I knew her,
face to face.

And her dress was blue and silver,
and her words were few and small,
She is the vessel of the whole wide world;
Mistress, oh mistress, of us all.

I thank you with my heart
for keeping me so close to thee
while so many, oh so many, stood apart.

And the light came from her body,
and the night went through her grace.
All summer long she touched me;
I knew her, I knew her,
face to face…

All lyrics and audio are posted purely for education and are the SOLE PROPERTY of their owners and authors.
For albums and purchase information, please see the official Sony Leonard Cohen site at http://www.leonardcohen.com
Lyrics Source Address: http://www.leonardcohenfiles.com/album7.html#53 

Leonard Cohen – You Know Who I Am


You know who I am (Leonard Cohen)

I cannot follow you, my love, 
you cannot follow me. 
I am the distance you put between 
all of the moments that we will be. 
You know who I am, 
you’ve stared at the sun, 
well I am the one who loves 
changing from nothing to one. 

Sometimes I need you naked, 
sometimes I need you wild, 
I need you to carry my children in 
and I need you to kill a child. 

You know who I am… 

If you should ever track me down 
I will surrender there 
and I will leave with you one broken man 
whom I will teach you to repair. 

You know who I am… 

I cannot follow you, my love, 
you cannot follow me. 
I am the distance you put between 
all of the moments that we will be. 

You know who I am…

 

Leonard Cohen: “The Letters” (The music of words, the words in sounds: listen to it , unveil its mystery)!


“The Letters” (Leonard Cohen)

You never liked to get
The letters that I sent.
But now you’ve got the gist
Of what my letters meant.
You’re reading them again,
The ones you didn’t burn.
You press them to your lips,
My pages of concern.
I said there’d been a flood.
I said there’s nothing left.
I hoped that you would come.
I gave you my address.
Your story was so long,
The plot was so intense,
It took you years to cross
The lines of self-defense.
The wounded forms appear:
The loss, the full extent;
And simple kindness here,
The solitude of strength.
You walk into my room.
You stand there at my desk,
Begin your letter to
The one who’s coming next.

The Long Goodbye Theatrical Trailer: Raymond Chandler (Let the moment Fly)


The Long Goodbye (Robert Altman 1973). Music by John Williams. Lyrics by Johnny Mercer


Have a wonderful weekend Frizztext, this post is fabulous, great music Welcome to Bermuda! 🙂

Flickr Comments

I like Berlin and so I composed a slide show with my Berlin photos (background-music: me on guitar and very talented friends with some more instruments). But then my daughter (she lives in Berlin) sent me a link to a youtube video featuring Lail Arad with her song “Everyone is Moving to Berlin” – wow I can’t wait to drive again to Berlin – not any chance for Bermuda or Bahamas, Barbados or Bali!

related:

View original post


I was very touched by this authenticity of this post, its truthfulness and sincerity, among people who live in real time, which happend to be my very thoughts, as I watch the orange star of my notification tool, lit, while I’m still working on my last post (like a boor bell, without a bell, but still noticeable). May be this is a form of democracy? If yes, go to the post and read it Thanks Frizztext!

Flickr Comments

It’s a great chance, that bloggers and photographers are able to have dialogues in these modern times so quickly: Some decades ago it was not so easy to find each other. So Claudio Mufarrege from Argentina discovered my autobiography at http://flickrcomments.wordpress.com/2011/04/06/german-biography/ and kindly wrote: “I really admire the strength and the determination that have led you to be yourself, my friend. I really admire you, Dietmar…” [June 14, 2012 at 8:46 pm] P.S.: I like the essays of the philosopher Hannah Arendt (Die Banalität des Bösen) about the trial vs. Adolf Eichmann in Israel; the man who adopted me, was a kind of Adolf Eichmann

The Long Goodbye (tribute to Raymond Chandler)
title=”The Long Goodbye” (tribute to Raymond Chandler) photo-composition by Claudio.Ar, click on the image to enter his galleries on Flickr

my reply to him: “Life is sooo long, dear Claudio! And so many things are happening in a lifetime. And I can’t…

View original post 96 more words

Scavenging (or falling on hard times) At Seal Beach (my photography)


Scavenging (or falling on hard times) At Seal Beach (my photography)

Scavenging (or falling on hard times) At Seal Beach (my photography)

Quotation of the Day: Aristotle – Democracy = the power of the poor over the rich


In a democracy the poor will have more power than the rich, because there are more of them, and the will of the majority is supreme.

Aristotle (384 BC322 BCDiscuss

  1. Was there ever a democracy since his time? 
  2. Was there a democracy during his lifetime? 
  3. Will there ever be a democracy based on the need of the majority over the power of the few?

Today’s Birthday: HUGO PRATT (1927)


Hugo Pratt (1927)

Italian comic book author Hugo Pratt spent his early childhood in Venice and moved with his parents to Ethiopia when he was 10. Following WWII, he returned to Italy, but he did not remain there for long. Pratt traveled widely, and his wanderlust is mirrored in his best-known character, Corto Maltese, a roving sea captain and adventurer. A meticulous researcher, Pratt often incorporated actual historic figures and events into Maltese’s fictional adventures. Where was Pratt imprisoned as a child? More… Discuss

This Day in History: CHARLES GOODYEAR GRANTED PATENT FOR VULCANIZATION (1844)


Charles Goodyear Granted Patent for Vulcanization (1844)

Goodyear was the inventor of vulcanization, a process that makes rubber harder, less soluble, and more durable. Previously, rubber products were sticky and volatile, often melting in heat or hardening in cold. He obtained a patent for vulcanization in 1844 but was still badly in debt at the time of his death. Goodyear had no official connection to the famed Goodyear Tire Company, which was founded decades later and named in his honor. Why was he in prison when he began experimenting with rubber? More… Discuss

BULGARIAN MUSEUM TO DISPLAY “VAMPIRE” SKELETON


Bulgarian Museum to Display “Vampire” Skeleton

Bulgaria’s national history museum plans to display a new item in its collection next week: a vampire. The so-called vampire is in fact the 700-year-old skeleton of a man who was pierced through the chest with an iron rod—after death—in a pagan ritual intended to prevent him from turning into a bloodsucking immortal. Archaeologists excavating a monastery near the Bulgarian city of Sozopol recently discovered the remains, which date to a time when superstitions about vampires were widespread in the region. The director of the museum said excavations have unearthed more than 100 “vampire” burial sites throughout the country, mostly of noblemen who were pierced with wooden or iron stakes. More… Discuss