Sam Cooke – Unchained Melody

Oh, my love, my darling
I’ve hungered for your touch
A long, lonely time
And time goes by so slowly
And time can do so much
Are you still mine?
I need you love, I need your love
God speed your love to me
Lonely rivers flows to the sea, to the sea
To the open arms of the sea
Lonely rivers sigh, wait for me, wait for me
I’ll be coming home, wait for me

Oh, my love, my darling
I’ve hungered for your touch
A long, lonely time
And time goes by so slowly
And time can do so much
Are you still mine?

I need you love, I need your love
God speed your love to me

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
 
Unchained Melody
Single by The Righteous Brothers
from the album Just Once in My Life
A-side Hung on You
Released July 17, 1965
Format 7″
Genre Blue-eyed soul
Length 3:15
Label Philles
Writer(s) Music: Alex North
Lyrics: Hy Zaret
Producer Phil Spector
The Righteous Brothers singles chronology
Just Once in My Life
(1964)
“Hung On You/Unchained Melody”
(1965)
Ebb Tide
(1965)
“Unchained Melody”
Single by LeAnn Rimes
from the album Blue and Unchained Melody: The Early Years
A-side Put a Little Holiday in Your Heart(Target Exclusive CD single)
One Way Ticket (Because I Can)
Released December 24, 1996
Format CD single
Genre Country
Length 3:51
Label Curb
Writer(s) Music: Alex North
Lyrics: Hy Zaret
Producer Wilbur C. Rimes
LeAnn Rimes singles chronology
One Way Ticket (Because I Can)
(1996)
“Hung On You/Unchained Melody”
(1996)
The Light in Your Eyes
(1996)

“Unchained Melody” is a 1955 song with music by Alex North and lyrics by Hy Zaret. It has become one of the most recorded songs of the 20th century, by some estimates having spawned over 500 versions in hundreds of different languages.[1]

In 1955, Alex North used the music as a theme for the prison film Unchained, hence the name. Todd Duncan sang the vocals for the film soundtrack.[2] Les Baxter (Capitol Records catalog number 3055), released an instrumental version which reached #2. Then song recordings were released by Al Hibbler (Decca Records #29441) reaching #3 on the Billboard charts, Jimmy Young which hit #1 in the United Kingdom, and Roy Hamilton (Epic Records no. 9102) reaching #1 on the R&B Best Sellers list and #6 on the pop chart.[3] Hundreds of other recordings followed.

It was the July 1965 version by The Righteous Brothers that became a jukebox standard for the late 20th century, regaining massive popularity when used in the 1990 blockbuster film Ghost. On December of 1996, country pop recording artist, LeAnn Rimes would release her rendition of the song as a single.

 

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