Daily Archives: April 8, 2013

Quotation: George Eliot on the bad habit of being – staying unhappy


One gets a bad habit of being unhappy.

George Eliot (1819-1880) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: TOM LEHRER (1928) mathematician and song writer


Tom Lehrer (1928)

Despite being a mathematician who led a long career in academia, Lehrer is best known for the few dozen humorous songs he wrote in the 1950s and 60s. He largely tried to dodge the limelight, but his satirical treatment of serious subjects nevertheless gained him a significant cult following and influenced later performers of parody, like “Weird Al” Yankovic. According to an urban legend—one denied by the man himself—Lehrer gave up political satire after the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to whom? More… Discuss

Lyrics and Chords
If you visit American city
You will find it very pretty
Just two things of which you must beware
Don’t drink the water and don’t breathe the air

/ C G / – C / – F / C GC / 

Pollution, pollution
They got smog and sewage and mud
Turn on your tap
And get hot and cold running crud

/ Am G / F E / F C / G C / 

See the halibuts and the sturgeons
Being wiped out by detergeons
Fish gotta swim and birds gotta fly
But they don’t last long if they try

Pollution, pollution
You can use the latest toothpaste
And then rinse your mouth
With industrial waste

Just go out for a breath of air
And you’ll be ready for Medicare
The city streets are really quite a thrill
If the hoods don’t get you, the monoxide will

Pollution, pollution
Wear a gas mask and a veil
Then you can breathe
Long as you don’t inhale

Lots of things there that you can drink
But stay away from the kitchen sink
The breakfast garbage that you throw in to the bay
They drink as lunch in San José

So go to the city
See the crazy people there
Like lambs to the slaughter
They’re drinking the water
And breathing, cough, the air

/ Am G / F E / FEm CAm FEm CAm / FEm CAm / Dm G C – /
Thomas Andrew “Tom” Lehrer (born April 9, 1928) is an American singer-songwriter, satirist, pianist, and mathematician. He has lectured on mathematics and musical theater. Lehrer is best known for the pithy, humorous songs he recorded in the 1950s and 60s.

His work often parodied popular song forms, notably in “The Elements”, where he sets the names of the chemical elements to the tune of the “Major-General’s Song” from Gilbert and Sullivan’s Pirates of Penzance. Lehrer’s earlier work frequently dealt with trivial subject matter, but he also produced a number of songs dealing with the social and political issues of the day, particularly when he went on to write for the US version of the TV show That Was The Week That Was.
Born in 1928 to a Jewish-American family, Tom Lehrer began studying classical piano music at the age of 7. However, Lehrer was more interested in the popular music of the age. Eventually, his mother found him a popular-music piano teacher.[1] At this early age, he began writing his own show tunes that would eventually help him in his future adventures as a satirical composer/writer in his years at Harvard and beyond.[2]

Before attending college, Lehrer graduated from the Loomis Chaffee School in Windsor, Connecticut. As an undergraduate student at Harvard University, studying mathematics, he began to write comic songs to entertain his friends, including “Fight Fiercely, Harvard” (1945). Those songs later became The Physical Revue, a joking reference to a leading scientific journal, The Physical Review.
Early life

Born in 1928 to a Jewish-American family, Tom Lehrer began studying classical piano music at the age of 7. However, Lehrer was more interested in the popular music of the age. Eventually, his mother found him a popular-music piano teacher.[1] At this early age, he began writing his own show tunes that would eventually help him in his future adventures as a satirical composer/writer in his years at Harvard and beyond. 
More videos from Trevor RIDVIDDhttp://www.youtube.com/user/7779trevor

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: PRINCE CHARLES AND CAMILLA PARKER BOWLES WED (2005)


Prince Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles Wed (2005)

The 2005 wedding of Prince Charles to Camilla Parker Bowles capped off a decades-long romance that began in the 1970s, while both were single, and continued through both of their marriages—his to Diana Spencer, hers to Andrew Parker Bowles—as well as their respective divorces. The scandal of their affair tainted public perceptions of the pair and mired their union in controversy. When they finally wed, it was in a civil rather than religious ceremony. Why was the wedding postponed for one day? More… Discuss

BRITAIN MOURNS LOSS OF LADY THATCHER


Britain Mourns Loss of Lady Thatcher

Britain’s first female prime minister, “Iron Lady” Margaret Thatcher, passed away Monday following a stroke. She was highly regarded in the political community, and news of her death elicited tributes from leaders around the globe. Thatcher’s 11 years in office (1979-90) made her the longest continuously serving British prime ministerin the 20th century. During that time, she initiated what became known as the “Thatcher Revolution,” a controversial series of social and economic changes that dismantled many aspects of Britain’s postwar welfare stateMore…Discuss

 

Santa Monica Blvd, West Hollywood


Massachusetts Man Shoots Bear In Own Backyard … Faces Jail For Defending His Life


Make That 14 Oath-Keepers … Mitch McConnell Mans Up


YouViewed/Editorial

Mitch McConnell Joins Senate Gun Filibuster

 

 

 

” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he would join a group of Senate Republicans threatening a filibuster to oppose a cloture vote if Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid moves a gun bill to the floor this week.

Reid has promised to move a gun bill to the Senate floor this week, but it’s unclear which one. It depends on whether Democrats can strike a deal on background checks on gun sales — otherwise, they may settle for a less strict bill that includes some form of background checks, increase penalties for gun trafficking and increase school security. In order to get around the filibuster, Reid has indicated that he would file a cloture motion, which would require a 60-vote margin to move the bill.

“While nobody knows yet what Senator Reid’s plan is for the gun bill, if he chooses…

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La prima foto che hai amato (reloaded)


Pega's photography Blog

Magari non ci hai mai pensato, per molti non è una cosa a livello cosciente, ma per quasi tutti i fotografi esiste una foto che rappresenta un personale punto di riferimento. È quella che in un più o meno remoto passato ha fatto scattare qualcosa e, almeno in parte, è “responsabile” della nascita di un interesse particolare per la Fotografia.
Non è assolutamente detto che si debba trattare dell’opera di qualche fotografo importante, ma nel mio caso l’immagine che ritengo la principale indiziata è una famosa foto di Edward Weston. La vedi qui a fianco: Nude woman, un capolavoro che il grande maestro del bianco e nero realizzò nel 1936. Ne rimasi affascinato da ragazzino e resta a tutt’oggi una delle foto che amo di più in assoluto, per l’insieme di armonia, grazia, rigore, sensualità, talento e grandissimo senso estetico che rappresenta.
E tu ce l’hai una foto che…

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NY Gun Confiscation Begins


YouViewed/Editorial

NY Gun Confiscation Underway – Citizens Told To Turn In Pistol Owner ID & Firearms

 

” Remember all those who denied that firearms confiscation as a result of New York’s new gun laws was too “insane” to even consider?

That it was strictly in the realm of paranoid conspiracy theorists and the “it cant happen here crowd”?

 

There’s just one huge problem it is happening now in New York State!
It seems those that tried desperately to warn of such an insidious plot had hit the bullseye with their warnings after all. News came from multiple NY State based firearms enthusiast websites late Friday that confiscations of Pistol Owner ID Cards, as well as firearms and accessories has commenced in NY under the provisions of the horribly flawed, draconian and blatantly unconstitutional NY SAFE Act.

Those folks having their weapons and FID cards confiscated  have…

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ANd the poor minded!

Wishmaster (1997): Evil a-Djinn


Mikes Film Talk

Unknown

Directed by Robert Kurtzman (Buried Alive, Deadly Impact) Wishmaster is a horror film that has its tongue firmly in its cheek. Starring Andrew Divoff and featuring a cornucopia of horror film alumni, as well as Jack Lemmon‘s son Chris. (Chis Lemmon sounds just like his dad and even has most of his mannerisms)

In the beginning of the film we see the “back story” of the evil Djinn (Divoff in heavy makeup) and we also see how he comes to be defeated by a court sorcerer. The sorcerer traps the Djinn in an opal the size of Texas and that is where he remains until a drunken crane operator smashes the statue that the jewel was hidden in.

This newly released opal is pocketed by a dock worker and it finds its way eventually to an auction house. The owner, Nick Merritt (Lemmon) gives the stone to Alexandra…

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Time For Lunch


That is the cutest photo I saw in a while! 🙂

rabirius

Time For Lunch

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Orion


Si: Rodrigo Y Gabriela: Thank you memyselfandela!

memyselfandela

Lay in silence by my side
hear the beat and the heartbeat
this moment of now and here
for moments come and go
yet none will be like this perfect moment
when Orion shines in your eyes.

—————————————-

memyselfandela, 2013

 

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Egyptian Female Activist: Egypt Was Much Better Under Hosni Mubarak


And so were Christians!

“Illegal We Do Immediately; Unconstitutional Takes a Little Longer”: Kissinger in New Mass WikiLeaks Document Release


I Don’t Want to Walk Alone Through This


Who I am

Alone in the Middle

Al has been dismissed from the hospital and back in the nursing home. There is nothing more anyone can do for him. They upped his nitro to the maximum does in order to try to keep his heart at rest.

Al’s heart is suffering from the tremors. He has CAD, and it is getting tired. On the way back home from the nursing home it hit me what the doctors had said. I started shaking so bad I had to pull off the side of the road and I cried like a baby.

I cried for my selfishness in the thoughts of  losing my brother. I cried for all Parkinson’s patients. I cried because I feel so helpless. The emergency push to get approved for him to come home has been given. The state called me today while I was at the nursing home. Now it has to…

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Four Preludes to Playthings of the Wind Carl Sandburg (1878-1967) Smoke and Steel. 1922.




Four Preludes to Playthings of the Wind

Carl Sandburg (1878-1967)
Smoke and Steel. 1922.

 

1.
The woman named Tomorrow
sits with a hairpin in her teeth
and takes her time
and does her hair the way she wants it
and fastens at last the last braid and coil
and puts the hairpin where it belongs
and turns and drawls: Well, what of it?
My grandmother, Yesterday, is gone.
What of it? Let the dead be dead.

 

2.
The doors were cedar
and the panels strips of gold
and the girls were golden girls
and the panels read and the girls chanted:
We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation:
nothing like us ever was.

 

The doors are twisted on broken hinges.
Sheets of rain swish through on the wind
where the golden girls ran and the panels read:
We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation,
nothing like us ever was.

 

3.
It has happened before.
Strong men put up a city and got
a nation together,
And paid singers to sing and women
to warble: We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation,
nothing like us ever was.

 

And while the singers sang
and the strong men listened
and paid the singers well
and felt good about it all,
there were rats and lizards who listened
… and the only listeners left now
… are … the rats … and the lizards.

 

And there are black crows
crying, “Caw, caw,”
bringing mud and sticks
building a nest
over the words carved
on the doors where the panels were cedar
and the strips on the panels were gold
and the golden girls came singing:

 

We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation:
nothing like us ever was.

 

The only singers now are crows crying, “Caw, caw,”
And the sheets of rain whine in the wind and doorways.
And the only listeners now are … the rats … and the lizards.

 

4.
The feet of the rats
scribble on the door sills;
the hieroglyphs of the rat footprints
chatter the pedigrees of the rats
and babble of the blood
and gabble of the breed
of the grandfathers and the great-grandfathers
of the rats.

 

And the wind shifts
and the dust on a door sill shifts
and even the writing of the rat footprints
tells us nothing, nothing at all
about the greatest city, the greatest nation
where the strong men listened
and the women warbled: Nothing like us ever was.

oke and Steel. 1922.

1.
The woman named Tomorrow
sits with a hairpin in her teeth
and takes her time
and does her hair the way she wants it
and fastens at last the last braid and coil
and puts the hairpin where it belongs
and turns and drawls: Well, what of it?
My grandmother, Yesterday, is gone.
What of it? Let the dead be dead.

2.
The doors were cedar
and the panels strips of gold
and the girls were golden girls
and the panels read and the girls chanted:
We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation:
nothing like us ever was.

The doors are twisted on broken hinges.
Sheets of rain swish through on the wind
where the golden girls ran and the panels read:
We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation,
nothing like us ever was.

3.
It has happened before.
Strong men put up a city and got
a nation together,
And paid singers to sing and women
to warble: We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation,
nothing like us ever was.

And while the singers sang
and the strong men listened
and paid the singers well
and felt good about it all,
there were rats and lizards who listened
… and the only listeners left now
… are … the rats … and the lizards.

And there are black crows
crying, “Caw, caw,”
bringing mud and sticks
building a nest
over the words carved
on the doors where the panels were cedar
and the strips on the panels were gold
and the golden girls came singing:

We are the greatest city,
the greatest nation:
nothing like us ever was.

The only singers now are crows crying, “Caw, caw,”
And the sheets of rain whine in the wind and doorways.
And the only listeners now are … the rats … and the lizards.

4.
The feet of the rats
scribble on the door sills;
the hieroglyphs of the rat footprints
chatter the pedigrees of the rats
and babble of the blood
and gabble of the breed
of the grandfathers and the great-grandfathers
of the rats.

And the wind shifts
and the dust on a door sill shifts
and even the writing of the rat footprints
tells us nothing, nothing at all
about the greatest city, the greatest nation
where the strong men listened
and the women warbled: Nothing like us ever was.

About the video:

Published on Dec 26, 2012

 

Carl Sandburg (January 6, 1878 — July 22, 1967) was an American writer and editor, best known for his poetry. He was the recipient of three Pulitzer Prizes: two for his poetry and another for his biography of Abraham Lincoln. H. L. Mencken called Sandburg “indubitably an American in every pulse-beat”.

Sandburg was born in Galesburg, Illinois, to parents of Swedish ancestry. At the age of thirteen he left school and began driving a milk wagon. From the age of about fourteen until he was seventeen or eighteen, he worked as a porter at the Union Hotel barbershop in Galesburg. After that he was on the milk route again for 18 months. He then became a bricklayer and a farm laborer on the wheat plains of Kansas. After an interval spent at Lombard College in Galesburg, he became a hotel servant in Denver, then a coal-heaver in Omaha. He began his writing career as a journalist for the Chicago Daily News. Later he wrote poetry, history, biographies, novels, children’s literature, and film reviews. Sandburg also collected and edited books of ballads and folklore. He spent most of his life in the Midwest before moving to North Carolina.

Sandburg volunteered to go to the military and was stationed in Puerto Rico with the 6th Illinois Infantry during the Spanish–American War, disembarking at Guánica, Puerto Rico on July 25, 1898. Sandburg was never actually called to battle. He attended West Point for just two weeks, before failing a mathematics and grammar exam. Sandburg returned to Galesburg and entered Lombard College, but left without a degree in 1903.

 

Margaret Thatcher and misapplied death etiquette (from TheGuardian)


Margaret Thatcher and misapplied death etiquette (from TheGuardian)

Margaret Thatcher and misapplied death etiquette (from The Guardian)

 

 

“Pardonne, mais n’oublie JAMAIS.”(Paul Eluard)


Forget the past, why? The past is what the future may not be able to provide….

Understanding the WordPress Dashboard


Understand it before you commit to blogging

WordPress.tv

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ATF Uses Brain-Damaged Man To Set Up Gun and Drug Deals Then Shuts Down Operation And Charges Brain-Damaged Man


JUst like in movies!

JONATHAN TURLEY

599px-US-AlcoholTobaccoFirearmsAndExplosives-Seal.svgThe ATF continues to struggle in the aftermath of its moronic Fast and Furious operation where they allowed powerful weapons to walk into the hands of gangs. One of those guns led to the killing of a U.S. Border Patrol agent. However, in true lunacy, a more recent operation would seem to demand similar ridicule. In Milwaukee, ATF agents ran an operation using Chauncey Wright, a brain-damaged 28-year-old man with a low IQ in the 50s to set up gun and drug deals. They then shutdown the operation and, you guessed it, they arrested Wright.

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Margaret Thatcher dies


Dear Kitty. Some blog

This video, about a song, not exactly pro-Thatcher, says about itself:

Elvis Costello: Tramp the Dirt Down.

Interview and solo performance, British TV, 1989.

Today, the ex-Prime Minister of Britain, Margaret Thatcher, died.

About the prospect of Margaret Thatcher dying, Owen Jones wrote last year in daily The Independent in Britain:

Sunday 16 September 2012

Not all socialists want to dance on Margaret Thatcher’s grave. I want her to go on and on

Despite the manifest failures of Thatcherism, talk of celebrating her death is futile. Concentrate on building an economy that works for working people

Few things drive the right-wing press into self-righteous apoplexy more than Thatcher-hate. It was on display at the TUC conference last week, where T-shirts pledged that trade unionists would “dance on her grave”. On Saturday, it was reported that some Liverpool fans – finally vindicated over the sickening travesty of…

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Axa Courier Express ~ www.commercialmotor.com