Monthly Archives: August 2013

Dacă am plecat Ardealule


 

Hymn to the Theotokos at Sinaia Monastery in Romania



Pilgrims singing in Sinaia monastery church in Romania

 

Romanian Anthem



Republic of Romania National Anthem
Lyrics:

Wake up, Romanian, from your deadly sleep
Into which you’ve been sunk by the barbaric tyrants
Now, or never, your fate renew,
To which your enemies will bow to.

Now or never let’s give proof to the world
That in these veins still flows a Roman blood,
That in our chests we still maintain our pride in a name
The victor in his battles, the name of Trajan!

Watch on, shadows of highnesses, Mihai, Stefan, Corvine,
The Romanian Nation, your great grandchildren,
With weapons in their arms, with your fire in their veins,
“Life in freedom or death!” shout all.

Priests, lead with your crucifixes! Because our army is Christian,
The motto is Liberty and its goal is holy,
Better to die in battle, in full glory!
Than to once again be slaves upon our ancient ground!

Trumped!


JONATHAN TURLEY

Submitted By: Mike Spindell, Guest Blogger

495px-Donald_Trump_by_Gage_SkidmoreMost readers of Jonathan Turley’s blog are concerned with the direction that this country has taken of late. In truth the problems we see are merely the manifestations of a long term trend that has resulted in a lack of respect for our republican form of government as defined by our Constitution. One merely has to go through the range of stories covered only in this past week’s Jonathan Turley blogs, to understand that we are at a critical juncture in our nation’s history. The issue to me is whether our country goes fully down the road towards empire. The phenomenon of a nation with overwhelming military superiority becoming imperial is a drama played out over and again over eons on the world’s stage. With empire perforce comes the trappings of an imperial state and with it the creation of an elite class defined…

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Hebrides Overture (Fingal’s Cave’) Op. 26



Hebrides Overture (Fingal’s Cave‘) Op. 26

Felix Mendelssohn

Mendelssohn wrote the magnificent Hebrides Overture when he was only 21 (though revisions were made a few years later). It was upon a visit to Scotland (the Romantic view of which was much in vogue at the time) and more specifically, the Hebridean Islands off the Scottish west coast, that the first mysterious theme came to his head, which he quickly wrote down. He was also inspired by a visit to Fingal’s Cave, a natural structure of pillars of basalt, hence the subtitle for the composition.

The waters around the Hebrides are famously rough and stormy, and navigation can be difficult even today, let alone in Mendelssohn’s time. Throughout the overture, Mendelssohn evokes the sense of the great, mysterious power surrounding the islands, as well as the tumbling ocean (bass activity at around 00:19 – 00:35, for example) and lonely cries of seabirds (3:54?)

The Hebrides Overture is not meant to be a narrative – it is more of a scene/mood setter. Nevertheless, it is perhaps the earliest example of what could be described as a tone poem, and is a fascinating, riveting work written with great maturity by a man barely out of his teens.

 

Sergei Rachmaninoff – Scherzo in D minor



V. Polyansky – Russian State SO

 

MOSZKOWSKI Moritz – Caprice espagnol Op. 37


Beethoven String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) – American String Quartet



Beethoven String Quartet No. 13 in B-flat Major, Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) performed by the American String Quartet (live). Filmed live in The Jerome L. Greene Performance Space in New York for WQXR‘s Beethoven String Quartet Marathon on November 18, 2012.

 

Quotation: Charles Dickens


Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There’s no better rule.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Discuss

 

Today’s Birthday: RAMON MAGSAYSAY (1907)


Ramon Magsaysay (1907)

A Philippine guerrilla leader during World War II, Magsaysay helped combat the Japanese occupation and clear the way for US forces to liberate the island nation. He then entered politics and, as secretary of defense, spearheaded one of the most successful antiguerrilla campaigns in modern history by currying favor with the peasantry—thereby depriving the Hukbalahap rebels of popular support. By 1953, the Huks were no longer a threat, and Magsaysay was elected president. How did he die? More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: THE GLEIWITZ INCIDENT (1939)


The Gleiwitz Incident (1939)

In 1939, Nazi forces staged an attack on a German radio station. They shot a well-known Polish sympathizer and planted his body at the scene, reporting the attack as the work of Polish saboteurs. The attack was part of a Nazi propaganda campaign called Operation Himmler, which involved a series of staged incidents intended to create the appearance of Polish aggression against Germany and provide a basis for the invasion of Poland. What did the Nazis broadcast from the radio station? More… Discuss

 

GRAND-ER CANYON DISCOVERED UNDER GREENLAND ICE SHEET


Grand-er Canyon Discovered Under Greenland Ice Sheet

Hidden beneath the ice sheet that covers much ofGreenland is a vast canyon half a mile (800 m) deep and 470 miles (750 km) in length. By comparison, the Grand Canyon, though deeper, is just 217 miles (349 km) long. The hidden gorge, which has never been seen by human eyes, was discovered by chance as scientists researching climate change mapped Greenland’s bedrock. Now covered by an ice sheet that is 2 miles (3 km) thick at points and is so heavy it causes the entire island of Greenland to sag in the middle, the canyon was likely carved millions of years ago by an ancient river. More… Discuss

 

THE CRYPT OF CIVILIZATION


The Crypt of Civilization

Sealed in a chamber on the grounds of Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, Georgia, is an elaborate time capsule called the Crypt of Civilization. Inspired by the lack of information about ancient civilizations, university President Thornwell Jacobs devised the crypt in 1935 and spent the next five years deciding what to put in it. Likely the world’s first time capsule, it was sealed in 1940 and is slated be reopened in the year 8113. What items were selected to be stored in the crypt? More… Discuss

 

‘Joggers Ahead’ – Oil Painting (my art collection)


'Joggers Ahead' - Oil Painting (my art collection)

‘Joggers Ahead’ – Oil Painting (my art collection)

Soggy Bottom Boys- I Am A Man Of Constant Sorrow


Soggy Bottom Boys- I Am A Man Of Constant Sorrow

 

Bob Dylan -_- ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~I’ll be Your Baby Tonight~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Bob Dylan

I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight ” *Lyric

Close your eyes, close your door
You don’t have to worry any more
I’ll be your baby tonight.

Shut the light, shut the shade
You don’t have to be afraid
I’ll be your baby tonight.

Well, that mockingbird’s gonna sail away
We’re gonna forget it
That big, fat moon is gonna shine like a spoon
But we’re gonna let it
You won’t regret it.

Kick your shoes off, do not fear
Bring that bottle over here
I’ll be your baby tonight.

 

Bob Dylan – Man Of Constant Sorrow



Bob Dylan’s first TV appearance in 1963.

History of this traditional American folk song. It was first recorded by Dick Burnett, a partially blind fiddler from Kentucky. “Man of Constant Sorrow” is a traditional American folk song first recorded by Dick Burnett, a partially blind fiddler from Kentucky. Although he song was originally recorded by Burnett as “Farewell Song” printed in a Richard Burnett songbook, c. 1913. An early version was recorded by Emry Arthur in 1928 (Vocalion Vo 5208).

On October 13, 2009 on the Diane Rehm Show, Dr. Ralph Stanley of the Stanley Brothers, born in 1927, discussed the song, its origin, and his effort to revive it: “Man of Constant Sorrow” is probably two or three hundred years old. But the first time I heard it when I was y’know, like a small boy, my daddy — my father — he had some of the words to it, and I heard him sing it, and we — my brother and me — we put a few more words to it, and brought it back in existence. I guess if it hadn’t been for that it’d have been gone forever. I’m proud to be the one that brought that song back, because I think it’s wonderful.”
There is some uncertainty whether Dick Burnett himself wrote the song. One claim is that it was sung by the Mackin clan in 1888 in Ireland and that Cameron O’Mackin emigrated to Tennessee, brought the song with him, and performed it. In an interview he gave toward the end of his life, Burnett himself indicated that he could not remember:

Charles Wolfe: “What about this “Farewell Song” — ‘I am a man of constant sorrow’ — did you write it?”
Richard Burnett: “No, I think I got the ballad from somebody — I dunno. It may be my song…”

If Burnett wrote the song, the date of its composition, or at least of the editing of certain lyrics by Burnett, can be fixed at about 1913. Since it is known that Burnett was born in 1883, married in 1905, and blinded in 1907, the dating of two of these texts can be made on the basis of internal evidence. The second stanza of “Farewell Song” mentions that the singer has been blind six years, which put the date at 1913. According to the Country Music Annual, Burnett “probably tailored a pre-existing song to fit his blindness” and may have adapted a hymn. Charles Wolfe argues that “Burnett probably based his melody on an old Baptist hymn called “Wandering Boy”.

Stanley’s autobiography is titled Man of Constant Sorrow

“I am a man of constant sorrow
I’ve seen trouble all my days
I’ll say goodbye to Colorado
Where I was born and partly raised.

Your mother says I’m a stranger
My face you’ll never see no more
But there’s one promise, darling
I’ll see you on God’s golden shore.

Through this open world I’m about to ramble
Through ice and snow, sleet and rain
I’m about to ride that morning railroad
Perhaps I’ll die on that train.

I’m going back to Colorado
The place that I started from
If I knowed how bad you’d treat me
Honey, I never would have come.”

Bob Dylan stated, “Roscoe Holcomb has a certain untamed sense of control, which makes him one of the best.” Eric Clapton called Holcomb “my favorite [country] musician.” Holcomb’s white-knuckle performances reflect a time before radio told musicians how to play, and these recordings make other music seem watered-down in comparison. His high, tense voice inspired the term “high lonesome sound.” Self-accompanied on banjo, fiddle, guitar, or harmonica, these songs express the hard life he lived and the tradition in which he was raised. Includes his vintage 1961 “Man of Constant Sorrow.”

 

Bob Dylan – Hurricane (original) and yes: LYRICS!


BOB DYLAN LYRICS

“Hurricane”

Pistols shots ring out in the barroom night
Enter Patty Valentine from the upper hall
She sees the bartender in a pool of blood
Cries out “My God they killed them all”
Here comes the story of the Hurricane
The man the authorities came to blame
For something that he never done
Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

Three bodies lying there does Patty see
And another man named Bello moving around mysteriously
“I didn’t do it” he says and he throws up his hands
“I was only robbing the register I hope you understand
I saw them leaving” he says and he stops
“One of us had better call up the cops”
And so Patty calls the cops
And they arrive on the scene with their red lights flashing
In the hot New Jersey night.

Meanwhile far away in another part of town
Rubin Carter and a couple of friends are driving around
Number one contender for the middleweight crown
Had no idea what kinda shit was about to go down
When a cop pulled him over to the side of the road
Just like the time before and the time before that
In Patterson that’s just the way things go
If you’re black you might as well not shown up on the street
‘Less you wanna draw the heat.

Alfred Bello had a partner and he had a rap for the corps
Him and Arthur Dexter Bradley were just out prowling around
He said “I saw two men running out they looked like middleweights
They jumped into a white car with out-of-state plates”
And Miss Patty Valentine just nodded her head
Cop said “Wait a minute boys this one’s not dead”
So they took him to the infirmary
And though this man could hardly see
They told him that he could identify the guilty men.

Four in the morning and they haul Rubin in
Take him to the hospital and they bring him upstairs
The wounded man looks up through his one dying eye
Says “Wha’d you bring him in here for ? He ain’t the guy !”
Yes here comes the story of the Hurricane
The man the authorities came to blame
For something that he never done
Put in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

Four months later the ghettos are in flame
Rubin’s in South America fighting for his name
While Arthur Dexter Bradley’s still in the robbery game
And the cops are putting the screws to him looking for somebody to blame
“Remember that murder that happened in a bar ?”
“Remember you said you saw the getaway car?”
“You think you’d like to play ball with the law ?”
“Think it might-a been that fighter you saw running that night ?”
“Don’t forget that you are white”.

Arthur Dexter Bradley said “I’m really not sure”
Cops said “A boy like you could use a break
We got you for the motel job and we’re talking to your friend Bello
Now you don’t wanta have to go back to jail be a nice fellow
You’ll be doing society a favor
That sonofabitch is brave and getting braver
We want to put his ass in stir
We want to pin this triple murder on him
He ain’t no Gentleman Jim”.

Rubin could take a man out with just one punch
But he never did like to talk about it all that much
It’s my work he’d say and I do it for pay
And when it’s over I’d just as soon go on my way
Up to some paradise
Where the trout streams flow and the air is nice
And ride a horse along a trail
But then they took him to the jailhouse
Where they try to turn a man into a mouse.

All of Rubin’s cards were marked in advance
The trial was a pig-circus he never had a chance
The judge made Rubin’s witnesses drunkards from the slums
To the white folks who watched he was a revolutionary bum
And to the black folks he was just a crazy nigger
No one doubted that he pulled the trigger
And though they could not produce the gun
The DA said he was the one who did the deed
And the all-white jury agreed.

Rubin Carter was falsely tried
The crime was murder ‘one’ guess who testified
Bello and Bradley and they both baldly lied
And the newspapers they all went along for the ride
How can the life of such a man
Be in the palm of some fool’s hand ? 
To see him obviously framed
Couldn’t help but make me feel ashamed to live in a land 
Where justice is a game.

Now all the criminals in their coats and their ties
Are free to drink martinis and watch the sun rise
While Rubin sits like Buddha in a ten-foot cell
An innocent man in a living hell
That’s the story of the Hurricane
But it won’t be over till they clear his name
And give him back the time he’s done
Put him in a prison cell but one time he could-a been
The champion of the world.

 

 

Bob Dylan- With God On Our Side (Lyrics In Description) Listen and learn! don’t listen and err!



Oh my name it is nothin’
My age it means less
The country I come from
Is called the Midwest
I’s taught and brought up there
The laws to abide
And the land that I live in
Has God on its side.

Oh the history books tell it
They tell it so well
The cavalries charged
The Indians fell
The cavalries charged
The Indians died
Oh the country was young
With God on its side.

The Spanish-American
War had its day
And the Civil War too
Was soon laid away
And the names of the heroes
I’s made to memorize
With guns on their hands
And God on their side.

The First World War, boys
It came and it went
The reason for fighting
I never did get
But I learned to accept it
Accept it with pride
For you don’t count the dead
When God’s on your side.

When the Second World War
Came to an end
We forgave the Germans
And then we were friends
Though they murdered six million
In the ovens they fried
The Germans now too
Have God on their side.

I’ve learned to hate Russians
All through my whole life
If another war comes
It’s them we must fight
To hate them and fear them
To run and to hide
And accept it all bravely
With God on my side.

But now we got weapons
Of the chemical dust
If fire them we’re forced to
Then fire them we must
One push of the button
And a shot the world wide
And you never ask questions
When God’s on your side.

In a many dark hour
I’ve been thinkin’ about this
That Jesus Christ
Was betrayed by a kiss
But I can’t think for you
You’ll have to decide
Whether Judas Iscariot
Had God on his side.

So now as I’m leavin’
I’m weary as Hell
The confusion I’m feelin’
Ain’t no tongue can tell
The words fill my head
And fall to the floor
If God’s on our side
He’ll stop the next war.

 

Bob Dylan – Shelter From the Storm (Original studio version, from Blood on the Tracks) WOW!



BOB DYLAN LYRICS

“Shelter From The Storm”

I was in another lifetime one of toil and blood
When blackness was a virtue and the road was full of mud
I came in from the wilderness a creature void of form
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

And if I pass this way again you can rest assured
I’ll always do my best for her on that I give my word
In a world of steel-eyed death and men who are fighting to be warm
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Not a word was spoke between us there was little risk involved
Everything up to that point had been left unresolved
Try imagining a place where it’s always safe and warm
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

I was burned out from exhaustion buried in the hail
Poisoned in the bushes and blown out on the trail
Hunted like a crocodile ravaged in the corn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Suddenly I turned around and she was standing there
With silver bracelets on her wrists and flowers in her hair
She walked up to me so gracefully and took my crown of thorns
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Now there’s a wall between us something there’s been lost
I took too much for granted got my signals crossed
Just to think that it all began on a long-forgotten morn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Well the deputy walks on hard nails and the preacher rides a mount
But nothing really matters much it’s doom alone that counts
And the one-eyed undertaker he blows a futile horn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.
I’ve heard newborn babies wailing like a mourning dove
And old men with broken teeth stranded without love
Do I understand your question man is it hopeless and forlorn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

In a little hilltop village they gambled for my clothes
I bargained for salvation and they gave me a lethal dose
I offered up my innocence and got repaid with scorn
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

Well I’m living in a foreign country but I’m bound to cross the line
Beauty walks a razor’s edge someday I’ll make it mine
If I could only turn back the clock to when God and her were born
“Come in” she said
“I’ll give you shelter from the storm”.

 

New Impressions from the trail, under the general theme “the heat is on” (my photo collection)


The Elegance of Pachelbel-Serenade~~~~~~~TGIF FRIENDS!~~~~~~~


Borodin – In the Steppes of Central Asia (1880), played on period instruments



In the Steppes of Central Asia (1880)

A “musical tableau” for orchestra by Russian composer and chemist Alexander Borodin (1833-1887), a member of the group of composers known as The Five, or the Mighty Handful. The work was originally intended to celebrate the silver anniversary of the reign of Czar Alexander II, who had expanded the domain of Imperial Russia eastward into Central Asia. The celebration never came to fruition due to the assassination of the Czar; instead the piece was premiered in a concert in 1880 by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and the orchestra of the Russian Opera. Borodin dedicated it to Franz Liszt.

This recording was made by conductor Jos van Immerseel and the Anima Eterna Orchestra, which plays on period instruments.

More about this Blog: “You published your 8196th post on this blog” (big-grin smiley here)


You published your 8196th post on this blog

You published your 8196th post on this blog

Dvorak – Piano Quintet No.2 in A, Op.81



[Verbier 2013]
Yuri Bashmet
Vilde Frang
Daniil Trifonov
Renaud Capuçon
Gautier Capuçon

 
 Antonín Dvořák‘s Piano Quintet No. 2 in A major, Op. 81, B. 155, is a quintet for piano, 2 violinsviola, and cello. It was composed between August 18 and October 8 of 1887, and was premiered in Prague on January 6, 1888. The quintet is acknowledged as one of the masterpieces in the form, along with those of Schubert,SchumannBrahms and Shostakovich.[1]

The music has four movements:

  1. Allegro, ma non tanto
  2. DumkaAndante con moto
  3. Scherzo (Furiant): molto vivace
  4. Finale: Allegro.

 

 

Dvorak Sinfonia nº7 em ré menor Op. 70



Antonín Dvořák

1. Allegro maestoso 0:00
2. Poco adagio 11:35
3. Scherzo: Vivace 22:00
4. Allegro 29:20

Ludwig van Beethoven — Piano Trio in B flat major, Op. 97 BEETHOVEN, Trio in B flat major for Piano, Violin, Violoncello Op.97 “Erzherzog – Trio”


[youtube.com/watch?v=hQhyByyotJY]

Piano: Stefan Mendl 
Violin: Wolfgang Redik 
Violoncello: Marcus Trefny

Quotation: Ralph Waldo Emerson on revolution


Every revolution was first a thought in one man’s mind, and when the same thought occurs to another man, it is the key to that era.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Discus

Today’s Birthday: JACQUES-LOUIS DAVID (1748)


Jacques-Louis David (1748)

The unchallenged painter of the French Revolution, and later the official portraitist to Napoleon, David was the virtual art dictator of France for a generation. His pervasive influence on European art extended beyond painting to determine the course of fashion, interior decoration, and even the development of moral philosophy. Although he was a talented portraitist, David is best known for his paintings of classical, historical, and mythological themes. What are some of his most famous works?More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE DISAPPEARED OBSERVED BY UN FOR FIRST TIME (2011)


International Day of the Disappeared Observed by UN for First Time (2011)

The International Day of the Disappeared on August 30 is an annual commemoration day to draw attention to the fate of individuals imprisoned at places unknown to their relatives and without legal process. The impulse for the day came from the Latin American Federation of Associations for Relatives of Detained-Disappeared, a non-governmental organization founded in 1981 in Costa Rica. When did the United Nations adopt the Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Enforced DisappearanceMore… Discuss

 

RESEARCHER FORCES COLLEAGUE’S HAND, LITERALLY


Researcher Forces Colleague’s Hand, Literally

Researchers at the University of Washington have achieved what is believed to be the first human brain-to-brain communication, with one researcher using his brain to send a signal to the other’s that caused him to involuntarily move his right index finger. This was achieved by having the “sender” imagine moving his right hand while wearing a device that could read his brain signals. These signals were then sent, via the Internet, to a brain-stimulating device worn by the “receiver.” More…Discuss

 

Word of the Day: PRESUMPTUOUS


presumptuous 

Definition: (adjective) Excessively forward.
Synonyms: assumptive
Usage: You might think it presumptuous of me to offer you relationship advice when we barely even know each other, but please hear me out. Discuss.
Gallery

New Impressions from the Trail: Slalom to the top (where the canvas changes daily) (My photo Collection)

This gallery contains 16 photos.


Whittier Water – digital oil painting (my Art Collection)


Whittier Water - digital oil painting (my Art Collection)

Whittier Water – digital oil painting (my Art Collection)

Gallery

Impressions from the trail: August 28, 2013 (My Photo Collection)

This gallery contains 41 photos.


TCHAIKOVSKY_Meditation Op. 72 No. 5



P.I.Tchaikovsky – Meditation Op.72 No.5, Piano – Tomona Miyazakihttp://tomona.jp



1. The wounded heart
2. Last Spring

Willem Mengelberg
Born: March 28, 1871 – Utrecht,
Holland Died: March 21, 1951 – Chur, Switzerland Grieg(1843-1907)

In the late 1860s Grieg married his cousin, Nina Hagerup, and settled in Christiania (now much less charmingly named Oslo). Life couldn’t have been easy, eking out a living from teaching and conducting, particularly as his over-zealous studies in Leipzig had permanently damaged his health. Then, in 1874, still aged only 31, came a stroke of good fortune: he was awarded a life annuity from the Norwegian government (nice work if you can get it!). Maybe he isn’t exactly a “front rank” composer, but his music is equally capable of charming the simple soul (like me) as it is the not so simple (like Liszt).  Continue reading

Arrau – Bernstein Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 4



Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58.

“The Amnesty International Concert”

Conductor: Leonard Bernstein
Piano Soloist: Claudio Arrau
Orchestra: Bavarian Broadcast Symphony Orchestra
Venue: Munich, Germany
Date: 17/10/1976

I. Allegro moderato
II. Andante con moto
III. Rondo. Vivace

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 – 1827)
Claudio Arrau (1903 – 1991)
Leonard Bernstein (1919 – 1990)

 

Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence


Pyotr Tchaikovsky – Souvenir de Florence

The String Sextet in D minor “Souvenir de Florence”, Op. 70, is a string sextet scored for 2 violins, 2 violas, and 2 cellos composed in the European summer of 1890 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Tchaikovsky dedicated the work to the St. Petersburg Chamber Music Society in response to his becoming an Honorary Member. The work, in the traditional four-movement form, was titled “Souvenir de Florence” because the composer sketched one of the work’s principal themes while visiting Florence, Italy, where he composed The Queen of Spades. The work was revised between December 1891 and January 1892, before being premiered in 1892.

1. Allegro con spirito (00:00)
2. Adagio cantabile e con moto (10:16)
3. Allegretto moderato (19:56)
4. Allegro con brio e vivace (26:11)

 

Martha Argerich plays Franz Liszt – The Piano Sonata in B-Minor S.178


Quotation: Eleanor H. Porter


People radiate what is in their minds and in their hearts. If a man feels kindly and obliging, his neighbors will feel that way, too, before long. But if he scolds and scowls and criticizes—his neighbors will return scowl for scowl, and add interest!

Eleanor H. Porter (1868-1920) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: VIVIEN THEODORE THOMAS (1910)


Vivien Theodore Thomas (1910)

When the Great Depression hit, Thomas was forced to set aside his dreams of becoming a doctor and instead found work as a laboratory assistant to American surgeon Alfred Blalock. He spent the next 34 years working with Blalock and was instrumental in developing a pioneering surgical treatment for tetralogy of Fallot, a congenital heart malformation. Despite his groundbreaking work, he went unrecognized for many years due to racial prejudices. What honorary degree was conferred upon him in 1976? More… Discuss

 

Thid Day in the Yesteryear: BRAZILIAN RUNNER ATTACKED BY SPECTATOR DURING OLYMPIC MARATHON (2004)


Brazilian Runner Attacked by Spectator during Olympic Marathon (2004)

At the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, Vanderlei de Lima was on track to become the first Brazilian to win an Olympic gold medal in the marathon, leading the pack in the last miles of the race, when he was pushed into the crowd by a spectator named Cornelius Horan, a defrocked Irish priest. De Lima lost about 10 seconds in the incident and finished third. Brazil appealed for de Lima to be awarded a gold medal but was denied. What other sporting event had Horan previously disrupted?More… Discuss

 

“CANCER” IMPACTS PATIENTS’ TREATMENT PREFERENCES


“Cancer” Impacts Patients’ Treatment Preferences

The terminology a doctor uses when breaking the news of a diagnosis to a patient could affect which course of treatment the patient opts for. Women are more likely to choose surgery to treat ductal carcinoma in situ, a non-invasive type of breast lesion, when the word cancer is used in its description. When it is presented to them as “a breast lesion” or “abnormal cells,” as opposed to “non-invasive breast cancer,” they are more open to alternative treatment options like drugs and watchful waitingMore… Discuss

 

NO MAN’S LAND


No Man’s Land

No man’s land is territory whose ownership is unclear or under dispute and is often unoccupied. The term—then spelled “nonesmanneslond”—was likely first used in medieval Europe to describe a contested territory or refuse dumping ground between fiefdoms. During WWI, it was used to refer to the land between enemy trenches too dangerous to occupy, and during the Cold War, it became associated with territories near the Iron Curtain. What stretch of no man’s land is known as the “Cactus Curtain“? More… Discuss

 

Delamaide: Holder’s threat to banks is too late


 

Delamaide: Holder’s threat to banks is too late.

New York Times website still down and out


 

New York Times website still down and out.

Syrian crisis could lift price of crude oil, gas


 

Syrian crisis could lift price of crude oil, gas.

Obama’s Trade Policy – NYTimes.com


 

Obama’s Trade Policy – NYTimes.com.

Israel in partial army reserve call-up over Syria – FRANCE 24


 

Israel in partial army reserve call-up over Syria – FRANCE 24.