Daily Archives: August 28, 2013

Delamaide: Holder’s threat to banks is too late


 

Delamaide: Holder’s threat to banks is too late.

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New York Times website still down and out


 

New York Times website still down and out.

Syrian crisis could lift price of crude oil, gas


 

Syrian crisis could lift price of crude oil, gas.

Obama’s Trade Policy – NYTimes.com


 

Obama’s Trade Policy – NYTimes.com.

Israel in partial army reserve call-up over Syria – FRANCE 24


 

Israel in partial army reserve call-up over Syria – FRANCE 24.

Pascal Rogé Erik Satie “Nocturne No.4”


Erik Satie – Gnossienne No.1



Alfred Eric Leslie Satie (Honfleur, 17 May 1866 — Paris, 1 July 1925) was a French composer and pianist. Starting with his first composition in 1884, he signed his name as Erik Satie.

Satie was introduced as a “gymnopedist” in 1887, shortly before writing his most famous compositions, the Gymnopédies. Later, he also referred to himself as a “phonometrograph” or “phonometrician” (meaning “someone who measures (and writes down) sounds”) preferring this designation to that of “musician,” after having been called “a clumsy but subtle technician” in a book on contemporary French composers published in 1911.

In addition to his body of music, Satie also left a remarkable set of writings, having contributed work for a range of publications, from the dadaist 391 to the American Vanity Fair. Although in later life he prided himself on always publishing his work under his own name, in the late nineteenth century he appears to have used pseudonyms such as Virginie Lebeau and François de Paule in some of his published writings.

Satie was a colourful figure in the early 20th century Parisian avant-garde. He was a precursor to later artistic movements such as minimalism, repetitive music and the Theatre of the Absurd.

“Gnossienne” is the name given to several piano pieces by French composer Erik Satie in the late 19th century.
Satie’s coining of the word “gnossienne” was one of the rare occasions when a composer used a new term to indicate a new “type” of composition. Satie had and would use many novel names for his compositions; for example, “ogive” had been the name of an architectural element until Satie used it as the name for a composition, the Ogives Similarly with “vexations”, “croquis et agaceries” and so on—but “gnossienne” was a word that did not exist before Satie used it to indicate a composition. “Gnossienne” appears to be derived from the word gnosis; Satie was involved in gnostic sects and movements at the time that he began to compose the Gnossiennes. However, some published versions claim that the word derives from Cretan “knossos” or “gnossus” and link the Gnossiennes to Theseus, Ariadne and the Minotaur myth.

The Gnossiennes were composed by Satie in the decade following the composition of the Trois Sarabandes (1887) and the Trois Gymnopédies (1888). Like these Sarabandes and Gymnopédies, the Gnossiennes are often considered dances. It is not certain that this qualification comes from Satie himself—the sarabande and the Gymnopaedia were at least historically known as dances. Continue reading

Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)



Klára Würtz, piano.
Franz Schubert – Piano Sonata in A major, D 664 (Op. 120)
I. Allegro moderato
II. Andante
III. Allegro

Paul Dukas : The Sorcerer’s Apprentice



Paul Dukas : The Sorcerer’s Apprentice
Yutaka Sado Conducts 
World Philharmonic Orchestra
( Live recording )

Mendelssohn / Frank Pelleg, 1954: Quartet in B minor for Piano and Strings, Op. 3 – Complete



Frank Pelleg (1910-1968) is joined by Peter Rybar (1913-2002, violin), Heinz Wigand (viola), and Antonio Tusa (cello) — all members of the Winterthur String Quartet — in this 1954 recording of the first movement of the Mendelssohn piano quartet in B minor, Op. 3. I created this video from the LP depicted above, issued on the Concert Hall Society label, serial number E4KP 1420, Concert Hall release H-5.

Movement 1: Allegro molto
Movement 2: Andante
Movement 3: Allegro molto
Movement 4: Finale – Allegro vivace

 

Quotation: E. M. Forster


She might yet be able to help him to the building of the rainbow bridge that should connect the prose in us with the passion. Without it we are meaningless fragments, half monks, half beasts, unconnected arches that have never joined into a man.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970) Discuss

Today’s Birthday: VLADIMIR SHUKHOV (1853)


Vladimir Shukhov (1853)

Though less widely known than his contemporaries Thomas Edison and Gustave Eiffel, Russian engineer, scientist, and architect Vladimir Shukhov has drawn comparisons to both of them. His innovations in the petroleum refining process and the means of transporting petroleum products revolutionized the oil industry, while his architectural works were of a sort never seen before. He pioneered the construction of thin-shell and tensile structures as well as what innovative type of curved structure? More… Discuss

This Day in the Yesteryear: LYNCHING OF 14-YEAR-OLD BOY HELPS INSPIRE US CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT (1955)


Lynching of 14-Year-Old Boy Helps Inspire US Civil Rights Movement (1955)

At age 14, African-American Emmett Till was murdered in Mississippi after reportedly whistling at a white woman, Carolyn Bryant, in a grocery store. Her husband and his half-brother beat Till, shot him in the head, and dumped his body in the Tallahatchie River, weighing it down by tying a metal fan around his neck with barbed wire. Till’s body was pulled from the river three days later. What decision made by Till’s mother about her son’s funeral helped bring attention to his brutal murder? More… Discuss

 

THIS IS YOUR BRAIN ON DRUGS


This Is Your Brain on Drugs

Using cocaine just once may change a person’s brain structure, making him or her more likely to seek out or crave the drug again. Within hours of being exposed to cocaine, the brain cells of mice displayed increased development of protrusions called dendritic spines, believed to be involved in memory formation. Those mice whose brains were most changed by the cocaine exposure seemed to develop the greatest preference for the drug, suggesting that this is part of the process of learning addictionMore… Discuss

 

EXTREMOPHILES


Extremophiles

Extremophiles are microorganisms that thrive in environments with extreme conditions, such as high or low temperatures or pH levels, high salt concentration, or high pressure. Found in hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor, they produce the vivid colors of some hot springs. Due to extremophiles’ ability to thrive in conditions detrimental to most life on Earth, some scientists theorize that they may reflect what life may be like on other planets. How are extremophiles used industrially? More… Discuss