Daily Archives: November 10, 2013

Far-de noima, gand poetic de George-B


Far-de noima, gand poetic de George-B

Am visat un vis far-de noima
natura moarta, omorata far-de noima
nenaturalul ridicat pe pedestal far-de noima…

Apoi  m-am ridicat far-de noima
doar ca sa deslusesc far-de noima
ca visul s-a trezit si el far-de noima…

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Robert Schumann, Blumenstück – Sviatoslav Richter



Robert Schumann
Blumenstück op.19 (1839)
Sviatoslav Richter

 

Schumann, Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52



Robert SCHUMANN
Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op.52

1. Overture – 00.05
2. Scherzo – 07.13
3. Finale – 11.30

Sinfonietta Sofia Orchestra conducted by Christo Pavlov

New Concert Hall, 01 Oct 2011
Sofia, Bulgaria

 

Ottorino Respighi – Adagio con variazioni



Title of Composition: Adagio con variazioni
Composer: Ottorino Respighi
Created in: 1920
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Cello: Raphael Wallfisch
Orchestra: Bournemouth Sinfonietta
Conductor: Tamas Vasary
Recorded in: 1990
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If you are interested in purchasing the CD/MP3, you can find it at either Arkivmusic:
http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/D…

Or at Amazon:
http://www.amazon.com/Respighi-Birds-…

The CD/MP3 also includes The Birds and Three Bo

 

Ottorino Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances Suite III


 

Franz Schubert: Rondo for Violin & Orchestra in A D 438



Austrian composer Franz Schubert (1797-1828) was one of the great composers of the classical era in music that is associated with Vienna, the others being Mozart, Haydn, and Beethoven
Schubert, who was born in a suburb of Vienna, was the fourth son of a schoolmaster. At age 5, he learned the violin from his father and the piano from an older brother. Because of Schubert’s excellent voice, at age 11 he became one of the Vienna Choir Boys at the Imperial Chapel. By the age of 16, Schubert wrote an opera, a series of quartets, and his Symphony No. 1

Shortly afterward, he left Vienna’s Imperial Chapel and began teacher training to become a schoolmaster. However, Schubert’s genius lay in musical creativity, and between 1813 and 1818 he had a surge of creativity where he wrote five symphonies, six operas, and 300 “Lieder” songs, a term which is usually used to describe songs composed to a German poem. 

While in the midst of all this creative composing, Schubert found teaching in a classroom to be too boring and in 1816 at age 19 he gave up teaching at the schoolhouse of his father and moved to Vienna where he devoted himself to composition, focusing on orchestral and choral works. During this creative activity, Schubert’s health deteriorated. He died at the age of thirty-one after a brief unconfirmed illness. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was written in June 1828, and may well have been intended to form a two-movement sonata along the lines of Beethoven’s E minor Sonata

It is lovingly modeled on the lyrical finale of Beethoven’s sonata: his theme follows a similar harmonic pattern, and even the keyboard layout of its opening bars, with the melody’s initial phrase followed by a more assertive answer in octaves, echoes Beethoven’s. 

Schubert mirrors Beethoven’s procedure, too, by transferring the final reprise of the Rondo theme to the sonorous tenor register, with a continuous pattern of semiquavers unfolding above it. 

But Schubert’s composition is far from a slavish imitation, and it can more than hold its own against Beethoven’s. Particularly beautiful is the manner in which one of the important subsidiary themes returns towards the end, surmounted by a shimmering pianissimo accompaniment in repeated chords from the primo player. 

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings was published in December 1828, less than a month after Schubert died.

Rondo in A for Violin and Strings
Performed by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra
Pinchas Zukerman, Conductor

 

Quotstion: William Makepeace Thackeray about a good word


Never lose a chance of saying a kind word.

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811-1863) Discuss

 

CHARLES THE BOLD, DUKE OF BURGUNDY (1433)


Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy (1433)

Charles the Bold was the last of the great dukes of Burgundy. An opponent of Louis XI of France, Charles sought independence for Burgundy and had great success casting off French rule, extending Burgundy’s possessions and building a centralized government until he was defeated and killed in battle against the Swiss. Prior to his death, he arranged for his daughter to marry the son of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III. How did this pairing affect the course of European history?More… Discuss

 

This Day in the Yesteryear: MARY ANDERSON PATENTS THE WINDSHIELD WIPER (1903)


Mary Anderson Patents the Windshield Wiper (1903)

Today we take for granted the fact that we are able to flip a switch and clear our windshields of precipitation or debris, but this was not always the case. Early drivers were forced to manually clear their windshields of snow, rain, dirt, and the like, that is, until Mary Anderson invented the first effective windshield wiper system. It was not long before windshield wipers were standard equipment on American cars. What inspired Anderson to invent a windshield-clearing device? More… Discuss

 

SCIENTISTS WEIGH IN ON STEROIDS CONTROVERSY


Scientists Weigh in on Steroids Controversy

A new study on mice shows that brief exposure to testosterone helps them rebuild muscle later in life, suggesting that athletes who “juice” maintain an unnatural advantage even years after they stop and that the penalty for steroid use in professional athletics should therefore be a lifetime ban. It has long been believed that the benefits of steroid use disappear once their use is discontinued, but this study seems to contradict that, as do recent studies on humans. More… Discuss

 

Word: INEXPUGNABLE


inexpugnable 

Definition: (adjective) Incapable of being overcome, challenged, or refuted.
Synonyms: impregnable
Usage: I felt the inexpugnable strength of common sense being insidiously menaced by this gruesome, by this insane, delusion. Discuss.

 

Article: SAN SERRIFFE


San Serriffe

On April Fools’ Day 1977, Britain’s The Guardiannewspaper reported on the curious—but fictional—island nation of San Serriffe. The article described two islands—Upper Caisse and Lower Caisse—inhabited by colonists known as “colons” and “semi-colons,” who celebrate events such as the Festival of the Well-Made Play. Since the article predated personal computers, typography was not widely known, and plays on words like “sans serif” eluded many readers. What is San Serriffe’s national bird?More… Discuss

Today at euzicasa: Happy Anniversary EuZicAsa – 3 Years at WordPress.com


Happy Anniversary (3 Years)

Happy Anniversary EuZicAsa:  3 Years at WordPress.com